6-K 1 d151564d6k.htm FORM 6-K FORM 6-K

 

 

UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 6-K

REPORT OF FOREIGN PRIVATE ISSUER

PURSUANT TO RULE 13a-16 OR 15d-16 OF THE

SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the month of May 2021

Commission File Number 001-34919

SUMITOMO MITSUI FINANCIAL GROUP, INC.

(Translation of registrant’s name into English)

1-2, Marunouchi 1-chome, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-0005, Japan

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant files or will file annual reports under cover of Form 20-F or Form 40-F:

   Form 20-F ☒    Form 40-F ☐

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is submitting the Form 6-K in paper as permitted by Regulation S-T Rule 101(b)(1):

     

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is submitting the Form 6-K in paper as permitted by Regulation S-T Rule 101(b)(7):

     

Indicate by check mark whether by furnishing the information contained in this Form, the registrant is also thereby furnishing the information to the Commission pursuant to Rule 12g3-2(b) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

   Yes  ☐    No ☒

*If “Yes” is marked, indicate below the file number assigned to the registrant in connection with Rule 12g3-2(b):

   82-                 

THIS REPORT ON FORM 6-K SHALL BE DEEMED TO BE INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE INTO THE PROSPECTUS FORMING A PART OF SUMITOMO MITSUI FINANCIAL GROUP, INC.’S REGISTRATION STATEMENT ON FORM F-3 (FILE NO. 333-228913) AND TO BE A PART OF SUCH PROSPECTUS FROM THE DATE ON WHICH THIS REPORT IS FURNISHED, TO THE EXTENT NOT SUPERSEDED BY DOCUMENTS OR REPORTS SUBSEQUENTLY FILED OR FURNISHED.


SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

  Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group, Inc.
  By:  

  /s/ Jun Okahashi

    Name:   Jun Okahashi
    Title:   General Manager, Financial Accounting Dept.

Date:    May 31, 2021


This document has been translated from a Japanese original for reference purposes only. In the event of any discrepancy between this translated document and the Japanese original, the original shall prevail. Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group, Inc. assumes no responsibility for this translation or for direct, indirect or any other forms of damages arising from the translation.

Matters Disclosed on the Internet Website in Relation to

the Convocation of the Ordinary General Meeting of Shareholders

Matters regarding Stock Acquisition Rights

System to Ensure Appropriate Conduct of Operations

Matters regarding Specified Wholly Owned Subsidiary

Others

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

Certified Copy of the Accounting Auditor’s Report of

Consolidated Financial Statements

Notes to Non-Consolidated Financial Statements

(From April 1, 2020 to March 31, 2021)

 

With regard to the information stated above, in accordance with laws, regulations and Article 25 of the Articles of Incorporation, it is disclosed by posting on the company’s website on the Internet (https://www.smfg.co.jp/english/).

 

Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group, Inc.


Matters regarding Stock Acquisition Rights

The following is the outline of the stock acquisition rights issued in accordance with the provisions of Article 238 and Article 240 of the Companies Act to Directors (excluding Outside Directors), Corporate Auditors (excluding Outside Corporate Auditors) and Executive Officers of Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group, Inc. (hereinafter, “the Company”) and its subsidiary Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation (hereinafter, “SMBC”), in consideration of their execution of duties.

 

    

Allotment

    date of stock     
acquisition

rights

 

    Number of      
stock

  acquisition   
rights

 

 

Type and

number of

   shares subject    

to stock
acquisition

rights

 

 

Issue price

(per stock
    acquisition    
right)

 

     Exercise      
price

 (per share)  

      Exercise    
period

 

First series stock acquisition rights

 

 

August 13,

2010

 

 

1,026

 

 

Common stock

 

102,600 shares

 

 

221,500 yen

 

 

1 yen

 

 

August 13, 2010 to August 12, 2040

 

 

Second series stock acquisition rights

 

 

August 16,

2011

 

 

2,682

 

 

Common stock

 

268,200 shares

 

 

187,200 yen

 

 

1 yen

 

 

August 16, 2011 to August 15, 2041

 

 

Third series stock acquisition rights

 

 

August 15,

2012

 

 

2,805

 

 

Common stock

 

280,500 shares

 

 

204,200 yen

 

 

1 yen

 

 

August 15, 2012 to August 14, 2042

 

 

Fourth series stock acquisition rights

 

 

August 14,

2013

 

 

1,157

 

 

Common stock

 

115,700 shares

 

 

415,900 yen

 

 

1 yen

 

 

August 14, 2013 to August 13, 2043

 

 

Fifth series stock acquisition rights

 

 

August 15,

2014

 

 

1,219

 

 

Common stock

 

121,900 shares

 

 

366,100 yen

 

 

1 yen

 

 

August 15, 2014 to August 14, 2044

 

 

Sixth series stock acquisition rights

 

 

August 18,

2015

 

 

1,324

 

 

Common stock

 

132,400 shares

 

 

490,400 yen

 

 

1 yen

 

 

August 18, 2015 to August 17, 2045

 

 

Seventh series stock acquisition rights

 

 

August 15,

2016

 

 

2,012

 

 

Common stock

 

201,200 shares

 

 

281,100 yen

 

 

1 yen

 

 

August 15, 2016 to August 14, 2046

 

 

1


(1)

Stock acquisition rights, etc. of the Company held by the Company’s Directors and Executive Officers at the end of the fiscal year

 

    

      Number of      

stock

acquisition

rights

 

Type and

number of

   shares subject   

to stock

acquisition

rights

 

 

Directors (excluding

Outside Directors) and

Corporate Executive

Officers

 

       
        Number of      
holders
 

      Number of      

stock

acquisition

rights

 

       
           

First series

stock acquisition rights

  8  

Common stock

 

800 shares

 

  1   8    
           

Second series

stock acquisition rights

  8  

Common stock

 

800 shares

 

  1   8    
           

Third series

stock acquisition rights

  7  

Common stock

 

700 shares

 

  1   7    
           

Fourth series

stock acquisition rights

  8  

Common stock

 

800 shares

 

  2   8    
           

Fifth series

stock acquisition rights

  12  

Common stock

 

1,200 shares

 

  3   12    
           

Sixth series

stock acquisition rights

  57  

Common stock

 

5,700 shares

 

  4   57    
           

Seventh series

stock acquisition rights

  33  

Common stock

 

3,300 shares

 

  5   33    

(Note) These stock acquisition rights shall not be allotted to Outside Directors.

 

(2)

Stock acquisition rights, etc. of the Company granted to employees, etc. during the fiscal year

Not applicable.

 

2


System to Ensure Appropriate Conduct of Operations

The Company resolved at the Board of Directors to adopt systems to ensure appropriate conduct of operations of the Company, and operations of the Company and its subsidiaries (hereinafter, “the Group”), and has operated the systems. The outline is as follows:

 

 

System for the storage and management of information related
to the execution of duties by
corporate executive officers

  

 

(Detail of the resolution)

The Company shall appropriately store and manage information related to the execution of duties by corporate executive officers in accordance with “Policies for Managing Information” and “Rules for Managing Information.”

  

 

(Operational status)

The Company appropriately stored and managed minutes of the Management Committee meetings and approval documents by corporate executive officers as well as information related to the execution of duties by corporate executive officers in accordance with “Policies for Managing Information” and “Rules for Managing Information.”

 

System for policies concerning the management of risk of loss of the Group and others

  

 

(Detail of the resolution)

1.  The Company shall establish “Policies on Comprehensive Risk Management” that sets forth fundamental matters on the risk management of the Group, and the department in charge of risk management shall cooperate with the department in charge of corporate planning to comprehensively and systematically manage each type of risk.

2.  The basic policy on the risk management of the Group shall be determined by the resolution of the Management Committee and approved by the Board of Directors.

3.  The Management Committee, the executive officer and the department in charge of risk management shall manage risks in accordance with the basic policy on the risk management of the Group approved in the preceding paragraph.

  

 

(Operational status)

The Company has established “Policies on Comprehensive Risk Management,” and under these policies, the department in charge of risk management cooperated with the department in charge of corporate planning to comprehensively and systematically manage risks. In addition, in accordance with the “Policy for Risk Management Committee,” the Risk Committee was called four times, and the risks considered to have particularly material impact on the Company’s management and improvement in the effectiveness and revision of the risk appetite framework (*) were deliberated. The results were reported to the Board of Directors four times.

 

3


 

System for ensuring the efficient
execution of duties by corporate
executive officers

  

 

(Detail of the resolution)

1.  The Company shall formulate business plans to ensure the efficient execution of duties by corporate executive officers, and corporate executive officers shall execute business operations and manage operating results in accordance with the plans.

2.  Each corporate executive officer shall appropriately allocate duties and delegate authority to executive officers and employees in accordance with “Regulations on Organization,” “Rules for Managing Group Companies” and other internal rules and regulations.

  

 

(Operational status)

•  The Board of Directors formulated and resolved the business plan for fiscal 2021.

•  Based on the business plan formulated and resolved by the Board of Directors, each corporate executive officer executed their respective duties appropriately, and at the same time, executive officers and employees, who had authority delegated in accordance with “Regulations on Organization” and other internal rules and regulations, executed business operations. The status was reported to the Board of Directors four times.

 

  *   A management framework that clarifies the types and levels of risk a company is willing to take to grow profit (risk appetite) and appropriately incorporates the risk appetite in business operations.

 

 

System for ensuring that the executive officers and employees of the Group execute their duties in accordance with laws and regulations, and the Articles of Incorporation

  

 

(Detail of the resolution)

1.  The Company shall develop “Basic Policy on Compliance and Risk” and “Policies on Compliance Management” to ensure that the executive officers and employees of the Group execute their duties in accordance with laws and regulations, and the Articles of Incorporation.

2.  The Company shall formulate an annual plan for compliance with specific measures, including establishing and revising policies, regulations and training programs for the effective functioning of the Group’s compliance system, which shall be approved by the Board of Directors.

3.  The Company shall formulate “Regulations on Assessment of Internal Control Over Financial Reporting” with specific measures to establish and operate internal control over financial reporting, and assess its effectiveness to ensure the appropriateness of accounting treatment and reliability of financial reporting of the Group.

4.  The Company shall establish a whistleblowing system to discover and correct violations of laws and regulations by the Group and its executive officers and employees at an early stage and ensure the appropriateness of its operations.

5.  The Company shall establish a system for appropriately managing the Group’s basic policy on dealing with antisocial forces, including, “the Group has nothing whatsoever to do with antisocial forces,” “the Group rejects any unreasonable request or claim from antisocial forces, does not engage in any under-the-table dealings with or finance those entities and, takes appropriate legal responses as necessary,” and “the Group deals with antisocial forces systemically, in association with outside experts.”

 

4


                                                    

 

6.  The Company shall formulate “Management Policy Concerning Conflicts of Interest” for the Group to prevent and manage conflict of interest with customers within the Group.

7.  The Company shall formulate “SMFG Group Policies for Internal Regulations for Preventing Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing” for the Group to prevent money laundering and terrorist financing, and operate and manage businesses in accordance with the policies.

8.  In order to verify the status of implementation of the matters in the preceding paragraphs, the department in charge of internal audits, which is independent from other departments, shall conduct internal audits and, as a department under the direct supervision of the Audit Committee, report the results to the Audit Committee as well as the Management Committee and other relevant bodies.

    

 

(Operational status)

•  The Company formulated a compliance program under the Board of Directors as a practical implementation plan to achieve compliance within the Company. Based on the program, the Company made efforts to foster compliance awareness throughout the Group and enhance the system for countermeasures against money laundering and financing to terrorists. Regarding progress of the program, the Compliance Committee including outside experts deliberated the program four times and the results were reported to the Board of Directors.

•  In accordance with the rules including “Regulations on Assessment of Internal Control Over Financial Reporting,” the Company assessed its effectiveness, and reported it to the Board of Directors.

•  Based on the Whistle-Blowing Guidelines for SMBC Group, the “SMBC Group Alarm Line” has been established and managed properly as a whistleblowing system for the entire Group.

•  The COI Controlling Office has properly managed conflicts of interest to prevent from unfairly impairing customers’ interests based on the “Management Policy Concerning Conflicts of Interest.” In addition, COI Controlling Office conducts monitoring every six months and reports the results to Group CCO. There were no noteworthy events in the current fiscal year.

•  The department in charge of internal audits conducted internal audits on departments of the Company as well as the Group in accordance with the “Group Internal Audit Charter” and the annual audit plan resolved by the Audit Committee and the Board of Directors, and verified the appropriateness and effectiveness of the internal management system. The audit results were reported to the Audit Committee four times, and then reported to the Board of Directors through the Audit Committee in accordance with the “Policy for Audit Committee.”

 

5


 

System for ensuring the
appropriateness of business
operations of the Group
  

 

(Detail of the resolution)

1.  The Company shall establish the Management Committee under the Board of Directors as the highest decision-making body over the Group’s business execution and management. The Management Committee shall deliberate on important business execution matters before they are executed in accordance with the basic policies adopted by the Board of Directors.

2.  The Company shall formulate “Rules for Managing Group Companies” and “Rules for Managing Group Companies Concerning Compliance” to maintain the Group’s integrated compliance system and ensure the appropriateness of management in accordance with these policies and rules.

3.  The Company shall formulate “Rules on Managing Intra-Group Transactions” to ensure the fairness and appropriateness of transactions, and shall operate and manage businesses based on the rules. Further, transactions that may materially impact the management of the Group shall be approved by the Management Committee and reported to the Audit Committee.

4.  The Company shall formulate rules and regulations on basic matters on managing companies of the Group, as well as include them in the policies for managing companies of the Group, to determine the status of the execution of the duties of the Group’s directors and ensure that they execute their duties efficiently. The Company shall operate and manage the Group in accordance with these policies, rules and regulations.

  

(Operational status)

•  Based on the basic policies adopted by the Board of Directors, the important matters on business execution for the Group was executed based on the Management Committee’s deliberation and vote.

•  Regarding transactions between companies of the Group, the Company has formulated “Rules on Managing Intra-Group Transactions” and operations and management are conducted based on these rules. In addition, transactions that may materially impact on the management of the Group shall be approved by the Management Committee and the Board of Directors. However, there is no transaction applicable for the end of the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021.

 

System for employees to assist the
Audit Committee, including
ensuring their independence from
corporate executive officers and
the effectiveness of instructions
given to them

  

 

(Detail of the resolution)

1.  The Company shall establish Audit Committee Office to assist the Audit Committee to execute their duties.

2.  The approval by the Audit Committee shall be required for matters regarding the employees of the Audit Committee Office, including performance review and transfers, to ensure their independence from the corporate executive officers.

3.  Employees at the Audit Committee Office shall solely assist the Audit Committee in performing its duties, according to instructions from the Audit Committee.

4.  The Company may assign General Managers, Senior Staff to Audit Committee to assist the Audit Committee to execute their duties. In this case, the approval of the Audit Committee shall be required for matters regarding the General Manager, Senior Staff to Audit Committee, including performance review and transfers.

5.  General Managers, Senior Staff to Audit Committee shall audit major subsidiaries of the Group in a way deemed necessary, such as by taking office as corporate auditor of a subsidiary, and shall support the Audit Committee in performing their duties.

 

6


    

 

(Operational status)

•  The Company has established Audit Committee Office to assist the Audit Committee to execute its audit duties. The employees at Audit Committee Office solely assist the Audit Committee in performing its duties, according to instructions from the Audit Committee. Personnel evaluation and transfer of employees were conducted with the consent of the Audit Committee.

•  The Company has assigned General Managers, Senior Staff to Audit Committee to assist the Audit Committee to execute its duties. The General Managers, Senior Staff to Audit Committee audited major companies of the Group in a way deemed necessary, such as by taking office as Corporate Auditor at such companies, and also assisted the duties of the Audit Committee. Personnel evaluation and transfer of the General Managers were conducted with the consent of the Audit Committee.

 

System for executive officers and employees of the Group to report to the Audit Committee, and system to ensure that they shall not be treated unfairly for their actions

  

 

(Detail of the resolution)

1.  Executive officers and employees of the Group shall report any discovery of any fact that may materially harm the Group, any wrongdoing, any material violation of laws, regulations, or the Articles of Incorporation (hereinafter referred to as “the whistleblower”) to the Audit Committee. Further, in the case when the Audit Committee requests an explanation about a discovery, the whistleblower shall promptly respond to the request.

2.  The whistleblower may report any discovery of the above to the Company internal/external contact office for whistleblowing rather than to the Audit Committee. The Company’s department in charge of compliance shall periodically report to the Audit Committee on the status of reception and handling of whistleblowing allegations. Further, the department shall immediately report any allegation requiring reporting to the Audit Committee based on its impact on business, or when requested to do so by the Audit Committee.

3.  The Group’s whistleblowing guidelines shall have provisions prohibiting the unfair treatment of whistleblowers to ensure that they shall not be treated unfairly because of whistleblowing.

    

 

(Operational status)

•  The department in charge of compliance made periodical reports to the Audit Committee on the status of reception and handling of whistleblowing allegations.

•  The Company has stipulated the provision prohibiting the unfair treatment of whistleblowers in the Group’s whistleblowing guideline, and established the system that whistleblowers shall not be treated unfairly because of the use of the whistleblowing system.

 

7


 

System for ensuring effective
auditing by the Audit Committee
  

(Detail of the resolution)

 

1.  The department in charge of internal audits shall report the results of internal audits to the Audit Committee as a department reporting directly to the Audit Committee.

2.  The basic policy and plan for internal audits shall be approved by the Audit Committee and the Board of Directors.

3.  The Audit Committee shall instruct the department in charge of internal audits as the need arises, and the department shall conduct internal audits according to the instructions.

4.  The representative executive officers shall endeavor to improve the efficiency of the audit function carried out by the Audit Committee by ensuring opportunities for the regular exchange of opinions with the Audit Committee and through other measures.

 

  

(Operational status)

•  The department in charge of internal audits reported the results of internal audits to the Audit Committee on a regular basis.

•  The basic policies and basic plan on internal audits were approved by the Audit Committee and the Board of Directors.

•  The Audit Committee gave specific instructions to the department in charge of internal audits as necessary.

•  The Representative Executive Officers exchanged opinions with Audit Committee Members four times, and endeavored to improve the efficiency of the Audit Committee’s auditing function.

 

Bearing of expenses for the
execution of duties by Audit
Committee Members

  

 

(Detail of the resolution)

Every fiscal year, the Company shall set aside a budget to cover necessary expenses for Audit Committee Members to execute their duties based on the budget request of the Audit Committee. If an additional budget is requested by the Audit Committee due to a possible budget overrun, the Company shall set aside additional budget, except when the additional budget is obviously not necessary for executing their duties.

  

 

(Operational status)

The Company set aside expense budget needed for executing their duties including on-site audits.

 

8


Matters regarding Specified Wholly Owned Subsidiary

 

Company Name       Address          

    Total book value         

 (millions of yen)      

 

   Total assets of the        
 Company       

 (millions of yen)      

     
Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation  

1-2, Marunouchi    

1-chome, Chiyoda-ku,      

Tokyo, Japan    

  4,613,790         15,025,382      
  (Note)

Amounts less than one million yen have been rounded down.

Others

Policy Regarding the Exercise of Authority Given to the Board of Directors under the Articles of Incorporation pursuant to paragraph 1, Article 459 of the Companies Act

The Company stipulated in Article 8 of its Articles of Incorporation that except as otherwise provided by applicable law, the Company may, by resolution of its Board of Directors, acquire for value its own shares with agreement of shareholders pursuant to Item 1, paragraph 1 of Article 459 of the Companies Act. For acquisition of its own shares, the Company will appropriately act after comprehensively assessing the status of its capital, investment opportunities for future growth and other factors.

 

9


Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

< Significant Accounting Policies for Preparing Consolidated Financial Statements >

The definitions for subsidiaries and affiliate companies are pursuant to Article 2 paragraph 8 of the Banking Act and Article 4-2 of the Order for Enforcement of the Banking Act.

Amounts less than one million yen have been rounded down.

1. Scope of consolidation

  (1)

Consolidated subsidiaries        177 companies

Principal companies:

SMBC

SMBC Trust Bank Ltd.

SMBC Nikko Securities Inc.

Sumitomo Mitsui Card Company, Limited

SMBC Finance Service Co., Ltd.

SMBC Consumer Finance Co., Ltd.

The Japan Research Institute, Limited

Sumitomo Mitsui DS Asset Management Company, Limited

SMBC Bank International plc

Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation (China) Limited

PT Bank BTPN Tbk

SMBC Americas Holdings, Inc.

SMBC Guarantee Co., Ltd.

Changes in the consolidated subsidiaries in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021 are as follows:

Alternative Investment Capital Limited and 12 other companies were newly included in the scope of consolidation as a result of acquisition of shares and for other reasons.

SMBC Finance Service Co., Ltd. was excluded from the scope of consolidation following its merger with the Company’s consolidated subsidiary Cedyna Financial Corporation. 9 other companies were also excluded from the scope of consolidation, as they ceased to be subsidiaries due to liquidation and for other reasons.

Cedyna Financial Corporation changed its name to SMBC Finance Service Co., Ltd., and Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation Europe Limited changed its name to SMBC Bank International plc.

 

  (2)

Unconsolidated subsidiaries

Principal company: SBCS Co., Ltd.

7 of the unconsolidated subsidiaries are investment partnerships, and neither their assets nor profit/loss are substantially attributable to subsidiaries, and thus are excluded from the scope of consolidation pursuant to Article 63, Paragraph 1, Item 2 of Regulation on Corporate Accounting.

Other unconsolidated subsidiaries are excluded from the scope of consolidation because their total amounts in terms of total assets, ordinary income, net income and retained earnings are immaterial, as such, they do not hinder a rational judgment of financial position and results of operations of the Company and its consolidated subsidiaries when excluded from the scope of consolidation.

2. Application of the equity method

  (1)

Unconsolidated subsidiaries accounted for by the equity method        5 companies

Principal company: SBCS Co., Ltd.

  (2)

Equity method affiliates:        93 companies

Principal companies:

Sumitomo Mitsui Finance and Leasing Company, Limited

Sumitomo Mitsui Auto Service Company, Limited

Changes in the equity method affiliates in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021 are as follows:

24 companies became equity method affiliates due to new establishment and for other reasons.

Kansai Mirai Financial Group, Inc. (“KMFG”) and 26 other companies have been excluded from the scope of equity method affiliates as they ceased to be affiliates due to sale of KMFG’s stocks which SMBC had contributed to employee retirement benefit trusts.

 

  (3)

Unconsolidated subsidiaries that are not accounted for by the equity method

7 unconsolidated subsidiaries that are not accounted for by the equity method are investment partnerships, and neither their assets nor profit/loss are substantially attributable to subsidiaries, and thus are excluded from the scope of equity method pursuant to Article 69, Paragraph 1, Item 2 of Regulation on Corporate Accounting.

 

  (4)

Affiliates that are not accounted for by the equity method

Principal company: Park Square Capital/SMBC Loan Programme S.à r.l.

Affiliates that are not accounted for by the equity method are also excluded from the scope of equity method because their total amounts in terms of net income and retained earnings are immaterial, and as such, they do not hinder a rational judgment of the Group’s financial position and results of operations when excluded from the scope of equity method.

 

10


3. Accounting policies

  (1)

Standards for recognition and measurement of trading assets/liabilities and trading profits/losses

Transactions for trading purposes (seeking gains arising from short-term changes in interest rates, currency exchange rates, or market prices of securities and other market related indices or from variation among markets) are included in “Trading assets” or “Trading liabilities” on the consolidated balance sheet on a trade date basis. Profits and losses on trading-purpose transactions are recognized on a trade date basis, and recorded as “Trading income” and “Trading losses” on the consolidated statement of income.

Securities and monetary claims purchased for trading purposes are stated at the fiscal year-end market value, and financial derivatives such as swaps, futures and options are stated at amounts that would be settled if the transactions were terminated at the consolidated balance sheet date.

“Trading income” and “Trading losses” include interest received or paid during the fiscal year. The year-on-year valuation differences of securities and monetary claims are also recorded in the above-mentioned accounts. As for the derivatives, assuming that the settlement will be made in cash, the year-on-year valuation differences are also recorded in the above-mentioned accounts.

In terms of the evaluation of specific market risks and credit risks for derivative transactions, the net assets or liabilities after offsetting financial assets and liabilities are established as a basis of fair value calculation for the group of such financial assets and liabilities.

  (2)

Standards for recognition and measurement of securities

  1)

Debt securities that consolidated subsidiaries have the positive intent and ability to hold to maturity are classified as held-to-maturity securities and are carried at amortized cost (straight-line method) using the moving-average method. Investments in affiliates that are not accounted for by the equity method are carried at cost using the moving-average method. Securities other than trading purpose securities, held-to-maturity securities and investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries and affiliates are classified as “other securities” (available-for-sale securities). Other securities are carried at fair value (cost of securities sold is calculated using primarily the moving-average method). Stocks with no market prices are carried at cost using the moving-average method.

Net unrealized gains (losses) on other securities, net of income taxes, are included in “Net assets” except for the amount reflected on the gains or losses by applying fair value hedge accounting.

  2)

Securities included in money held in trust are carried in the same method as in (1) and (2), 1) above.

  (3)

Standards for recognition and measurement of derivative transactions

Derivative transactions, excluding those classified as trading derivatives, are carried at fair value.

In terms of the evaluation of specific market risks and credit risks for derivative transactions, the net assets or liabilities after offsetting financial assets and liabilities are established as a basis of fair value calculation for the group of such financial assets and liabilities.

  (4)

Depreciation

  1)

Tangible fixed assets (excluding assets for rent and lease assets)

Buildings owned by the Company and SMBC, which is a consolidated subsidiary of the Company, are depreciated using the straight-line method. Others are depreciated using the declining-balance method. The estimated useful lives of major items are as follows:

 

Buildings:

  7 to 50 years    

                         

 

                                 

 

Others:

  2 to 20 years      

Other consolidated subsidiaries depreciate tangible fixed assets primarily using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the respective assets.

  2)

Intangible fixed assets

Intangible fixed assets are depreciated using the straight-line method. Capitalized software for internal use owned by the Company and its consolidated domestic subsidiaries is depreciated over its estimated useful life (5 to 10 years).

  3)

Assets for rent

Assets for rent are depreciated using the straight-line method, assuming that lease terms are, in principle, their depreciation period and the salvage is estimated disposal value when the lease period expires.

  4)

Lease assets

Lease assets with respect to non-transfer ownership finance leases, which are recorded in “Tangible fixed assets,” are depreciated using the straight-line method, assuming that lease terms are their expected lifetime and salvage values are zero.

 

11


  (5)

Reserve for possible loan losses

The reserve for possible loan losses of major consolidated subsidiaries is provided as detailed below in accordance with the internal standards for write-offs and provisions.

For claims on borrowers that have entered into bankruptcy, special liquidation proceedings or similar legal proceedings (“Bankrupt borrowers”) or borrowers that are not legally or formally insolvent but are regarded as substantially in the same situation (“Effectively bankrupt borrowers”), a reserve is provided based on the amount of claims, after the write-off stated below, net of the expected amount of disposal value of collateral and recoveries from guarantees. For claims on borrowers that are not currently bankrupt but are perceived to have a high risk of falling into bankruptcy (“Potentially bankrupt borrowers”), a reserve is provided in the amount deemed necessary based on an overall solvency assessment of the claims, net of the expected amount of disposal value of collateral recoveries from guarantees.

Discounted Cash Flows (“DCF”) method is used for claims on Bankrupt borrowers, Effectively bankrupt borrowers and Potentially bankrupt borrowers whose cash flows from collection of principals and interest can be rationally estimated, and SMBC, which is a consolidated subsidiary of the Company, applies it to claims on large potentially bankrupt borrowers and claims on large borrowers requiring close monitoring that have been classified as “Past due loans (3 months or more)” or “Restructured loans,” whose total loans from SMBC exceed a certain amount. SMBC establishes a reserve for possible loan losses using the DCF method for such claims in the amount of the difference between the present value of principal and interest (calculated using the rationally estimated cash flows discounted at the initial contractual interest rate) and the book value.

For other claims, a reserve is primarily provided by setting the potential losses in the next one year or three years. The potential losses are calculated by determining the loss ratio based on the historical loan-loss ratio in the past one year or three years or actual loan losses on the basis of actual bankruptcies or averages of probability of bankruptcies in a certain period in the past, and by making necessary adjustments including future estimations.

In addition, in light of the latest economic situation and risk factors, for potential losses for specific portfolios that are based on the future prospects with high probability, but cannot be reflected in actual loan losses in the past and in any individual borrower category, a reserve is provided in the amount deemed necessary based on an overall assessment.

For claims originated in specific overseas countries, an additional reserve is provided in the amount deemed necessary based on the assessment of political and economic conditions.

Branches and credit supervision departments assess all claims in accordance with the self-assessment procedures, and the Credit Review Department, independent from these operating sections, audits their assessment.

The reserve for possible loan losses of the Company and other consolidated subsidiaries for general claims is provided in the amount deemed necessary based on the historical loan-loss ratios, and for doubtful claims in the amount deemed uncollectible based on assessment of each claim.

For collateralized or guaranteed claims on bankrupt borrowers and effectively bankrupt borrowers, the amount exceeding the estimated value of collateral and guarantees is deemed to be uncollectible and written off against the total outstanding amount of the claims. The amount of write-off was 163,185 million yen.

  (6)

Reserve for employee bonuses

The reserve for employee bonuses is provided for payment of bonuses to employees, in the amount of estimated bonuses, which are attributable to the fiscal year.

  (7)

Reserve for executive bonuses

The reserve for executive bonuses is provided for payment of bonuses to executives, in the amount of estimated bonuses, which are attributable to the fiscal year.

  (8)

Reserve for executive retirement benefits

The reserve for executive retirement benefits is provided for payment of retirement benefits to directors, corporate auditors and other corporate executive officers, in the amount deemed accrued at the end of the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021 based on our internal regulations.

  (9)

Reserve for point service program

The reserve for point service program is provided for the potential future redemption of points awarded to customers under the “SMBC Point Pack,” credit card points programs, and other customer points award programs. The amount is calculated by converting the outstanding points into a monetary amount, and rationally estimating and recognizing the amount that will be redeemed in the future.

 

12


  (10)

Reserve for reimbursement of deposits

The reserve for reimbursement of deposits which were derecognized as liabilities under certain conditions is provided for the possible losses on the future claims of withdrawal based on the historical reimbursements.

  (11)

Reserve for losses on interest repayment

The reserve for losses on interest repayment is provided for the possible losses on future claims of repayment of interest based on historical interest repayment experience.

  (12)

Reserve under the special laws

The reserve under the special laws is a reserve for contingent liabilities and provided for compensation for losses from securities related transactions or derivative transactions, pursuant to Article 46-5 of the Financial Instruments and Exchange Act.

  (13)

Employee retirement benefits

In calculating the projected benefit obligation, mainly the benefit formula basis is used to attribute the expected benefit attributable to end of the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021.

Unrecognized prior service cost is amortized on a straight-line basis, primarily over 9 years within the employees’ average remaining service period at incurrence.

Unrecognized net actuarial gain (loss) is amortized on a straight-line basis, primarily over 9 years within the employees’ average remaining service period, commencing from the next fiscal year of incurrence.

  (14)

Translation of foreign currency assets and liabilities

Assets and liabilities of the Company and SMBC, which is a consolidated subsidiary of the Company, denominated in foreign currencies and accounts of SMBC overseas branches are translated into Japanese yen mainly at the exchange rate prevailing at the consolidated balance sheet date, with the exception of stocks of subsidiaries and affiliates translated at rates prevailing at the time of acquisition.

Other consolidated subsidiaries’ assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are translated into Japanese yen at the exchange rate prevailing at their respective balance sheet dates.

  (15)

Lease transactions

  1)

Recognition of income on finance leases

Interest income is allocated to each period.

  2)

Recognition of income on operating leases

Primarily, lease-related income is recognized on a straight-line basis over the full term of the lease, based on the contractual amount of lease fees per month.

  (16)

Hedge accounting

  1)

Hedging against interest rate changes

As for the hedge accounting method applied to hedging transactions for interest rate risk arising from financial assets and liabilities, SMBC, which is a consolidated subsidiary of the Company, applies deferred hedge accounting.

SMBC applies deferred hedge accounting stipulated in “Treatment for Accounting and Auditing of Application of Accounting Standard for Financial Instruments in Banking Industry” (JICPA Industry Committee Practical Guidance No. 24, October 8, 2020) to portfolio hedges on groups of large-volume, small-value monetary claims and debts.

As for the portfolio hedges to offset market fluctuation, SMBC assesses the effectiveness of such hedges by classifying the hedged items (such as deposits and loans) and the hedging instruments (such as interest rate swaps) by their maturity. As for the portfolio hedges to fix cash flows, SMBC assesses the effectiveness of such hedges by verifying the correlation between the hedged items and the hedging instruments.

As for the individual hedges, SMBC also assesses the effectiveness of such individual hedges.

 

13


  2)

Hedging against currency fluctuations

SMBC, which is a consolidated subsidiary of the Company, applies deferred hedge accounting stipulated in “Treatment of Accounting and Auditing Concerning Accounting for Foreign Currency Transactions in Banking Industry” (JICPA Industry Committee Practical Guidance No. 25, October 8, 2020) to currency swap and foreign exchange swap transactions executed for the purpose of lending or borrowing funds in different currencies.

Pursuant to JICPA Industry Committee Practical Guidance No. 25, SMBC assesses the effectiveness of currency swap and foreign exchange swap transactions executed for the purpose of offsetting the risk of changes in currency exchange rates by verifying that there are foreign-currency monetary claims and debts corresponding to the foreign-currency positions.

In order to hedge risk arising from volatility of exchange rates for stocks of subsidiaries and affiliates and other securities (excluding bonds) denominated in foreign currencies, SMBC applies deferred hedge accounting or fair value hedge accounting, on the conditions that the hedged securities are designated in advance and that sufficient on-balance (actual) or off-balance (forward) liability exposure exists to cover the cost of the hedged securities denominated in the same foreign currencies.

  3)

Hedging against share price fluctuations

SMBC, which is a consolidated subsidiary of the Company, applies fair value hedge accounting to individual hedges offsetting the price fluctuation of the shares that are classified under other securities, and accordingly evaluates the effectiveness of such individual hedges.

  4)

Transactions between consolidated subsidiaries

As for derivative transactions between consolidated subsidiaries or internal transactions between trading accounts and other accounts (or among internal sections), SMBC manages the interest rate swaps and currency swaps that are designated as hedging instruments in accordance with the non-arbitrary and strict criteria for external transactions stipulated in JICPA Industry Committee Practical Guidance No. 24 and No. 25. Therefore, SMBC accounts for the gains or losses that arise from interest rate swaps and currency swaps in its earnings or defers them, rather than eliminating them.

Certain other consolidated subsidiaries apply the deferred hedge accounting, fair value hedge accounting or the special treatment for interest rate swaps.

  (17)

Amortization of goodwill

Goodwill is amortized using the straight-line method over a period in which its benefit is expected to be realized, not to exceed 20 years. Immaterial goodwill is charged or credited to income directly when incurred.

  (18)

Consumption taxes

National and local consumption taxes of the Company and its consolidated domestic subsidiaries are accounted for using the tax-excluded method.

  (19)

Adoption of the consolidated corporate-tax system

The Company and certain consolidated domestic subsidiaries apply the consolidated corporate-tax system.

<Notes to the Changes in Accounting Policies>

  1.

Accounting Standard etc. for Fair Value Measurement (Changes in accounting policies due to application of new or revised accounting standards)

The Company has applied “Accounting Standard for Fair Value Measurement” (ASBJ Statement No.30, July 4, 2019) and “Implementation Guidance on Accounting Standard for Fair Value Measurement” (ASBJ Guidance No.31, July 4, 2019) from the beginning of the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021.

Due to this application, the measurement of the fair value of stocks with market price (including foreign stocks, hereinafter the same) in other securities is changed from the fair value method based on their average prices during the final month of the fiscal year to the fair value method based on their fiscal year-end market prices. Derivative transactions are carried at fair value reflecting one’s own credit risks and counterparty’s credit risks etc.

As for stocks with market price, in accordance with transitional treatment stipulated in Item 19 of “Accounting Standards for Fair Value Measurement” and Item 44-2 of “Accounting Standard for Financial Instruments,” (ASBJ Statement No.10, July 4, 2019) the Company has applied new accounting policies since the beginning of the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021. As for fair value of derivative transactions, in accordance with transitional treatment stipulated in Item 20 of “Accounting Standards for Fair Value Measurement,” the cumulative effects are adjusted to “Retained earnings” of the beginning of the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021, in the case that the new accounting policy is retroactively applied prior to the beginning of the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021.

As a result, “Trading assets” decreased by 66,010 million yen, “Other assets” decreased by 29,768 million yen, “Deferred tax assets” increased by 2,306 million yen, “Trading liabilities” decreased by 21,557 million yen, “Other liabilities” decreased by 14,495 million yen, “Deferred tax liabilities” decreased by 15,570 million yen, “Retained earnings” decreased by 41,849 million yen, and “Net assets per share” decreased by 30.56 yen at the beginning of the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021.

 

  2.

Changes in recognition of installment-sales-related income and installment-sales-related expenses (Changes in accounting policies due to justifiable reasons other than above 1)

As for recognition of installment-sales-related income and installment-sales-related expenses, Sumitomo Mitsui Finance and Leasing Company, Limited (hereinafter, “SMFL”), which conducts leasing business, had been applying a method for which installment-sales-related income and installment-sales-related expenses are recognized on a due-date basis over the full period of the installment sales in accordance with “Implementation Guidance on Accounting Standards for Leasing Transactions” (ASBJ Guidance No.16, March 25, 2011). However, from the beginning of the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021, the net amount, which is calculated by deducting installment-sales-related expenses from installment-sales-related income, is recorded as “Interest on deferred payment.”

This change is made to properly reflect the fund transaction under the financial type installment-sales transactions on the consolidated financial statements due to SMFL becoming an equity method affiliate and other reasons.

This change has no effect on the “Net assets” at the beginning of the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021.

 

14


<Notes on Changes in Presentation Method>

The Company has adopted the “Accounting Standard for Disclosure of Accounting Estimates” (ASBJ Statement No. 31, March 31, 2020) from the consolidated financial statements as at the end of the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021, and notes related to significant accounting estimates are included in the consolidated financial statements.

<Notes to Significant Accounting Estimates >

The items whose amounts were recorded based on accounting estimates in the consolidated financial statements for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021, that have a potentially significant impact on the consolidated financial statements for the next fiscal year are as follows.

1. Reserve for possible loan losses

  (1)

The amount recorded in the consolidated financial statements for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021

 

Reserve for possible loan losses

  659,017 million yen

 

  (2)

Information that contributes to understanding the details of the significant accounting estimates for the identified items

Based on the assessment of all claims including loans and bills discounted conducted in accordance with the self-assessment procedures, and borrower category determined depending on their credit risk status, the following amounts are recorded as a reserve for possible loan losses.

  -

The estimated amount of expected loss calculated for each borrower category based on the average value of historical loan-loss ratio or probability of default over a certain past period is recorded as a reserve for loan losses

  -

As for claims classified as substandard or lower level classifications whose cash flows from collection of principals and interest can rationally be estimated, the Discount Cash Flows(“DCF”) method is applied for ones with large borrowers of those claims and the amount calculated by DCF method is recorded as a reserve for loan losses

  -

As for expected loss based on the future prospects with high probability, but cannot be reflected in historical loan-losses and in any individual borrower category, the amount deemed necessary based on an overall assessment is recorded as a reserve for loan losses

Reserve for possible loan losses recorded by the method above involves the following uncertainties in the process of estimation, hence requiring high-level managerial judgment.

  -

Consideration for qualitative factors including forward-looking information in determining borrower category

  -

Reasonable estimation of future individual cash flows in the DCF method

  -

Determination of a method for estimating expected loss based on future prospect in consideration of the latest economic environment and risk factors, and of the targeted portfolio

These may be affected by changes in economic environment, which have a potentially significant impact on the amount of reserve for possible loan losses for the next fiscal year.

(Note) For the estimation of the reserve for possible loan losses specifically related to COVID-19, refer to <Additional Information>.

2. Impairment loss for fixed assets

  (1)

The amount recorded in the consolidated financial statements for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021

 

Tangible fixed assets

  1,458,991 million yen

Intangible fixed assets

  738,759 million yen

Losses on impairment of fixed assets

  42,525 million yen

 

  (2)

Information that contributes to understanding the detail of the significant accounting estimates for the identified items

Fixed assets that have an indication of impairment are tested for recognition of impairment loss, and if recognition is required, their book values are reduced to the recoverable amount and the reduced amount is recorded as impairment loss. Recoverable amount is either net realizable value, which is deducting expected disposal cost from fair value of the fixed asset, or value in use which is the present value of cash flows expected to derive from the continuous use and disposal of the fixed asset after use.

Future cash flows and the growth rate used for testing the recognition of impairment loss as well as for calculating value in use are determined based on the factors including the estimation or judgment by management and the market growth rate, etc. Discount rate used for calculating value in use is determined based on the market interest rate and other market conditions, and this may be affected by changes in economic and financial environment. Therefore, if modification is required, it may have a potentially significant impact on the amount of impairment loss for fixed assets for the next fiscal year.

 

15


3. Fair value of financial instruments

  (1)

The amount recorded in the consolidated financial statements for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021

This is stated in <Notes to Financial Instruments>

  (2)

Information that contributes to understanding the detail of the significant accounting estimates for the identified items

This is stated in <Notes to Financial Instruments>

4. Reserve for losses on interest repayment

  (1)

The amount recorded in the consolidated financial statements for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021

 

Reserve for losses on interest repayment

  140,758 million yen

 

  (2)

Information that contributes to understanding the detail of the significant accounting estimates for the identified items

Reserve for losses on interest repayment is recorded based on estimated amount of claim of repayment in preparing for future claims of interest repayment from the customers whose loans are offered at interest rates in excess of the ceiling prescribed under the Interest Rate Restriction Act.

Estimated amount of claim for such repayment is calculated based on certain assumptions using the historical data regarding the number and amount of claims from customers. The trend in future claims of repayment from customers has a potentially significant impact on the amount of reserve for losses on interest repayment for the next fiscal year.

5. Retirement benefits expenses and retirement benefit obligations

  (1)

The amount recorded in the consolidated financial statements for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021

 

Net defined benefit asset

  565,534 million yen

Net defined benefit liability

  35,334 million yen

Retirement benefit expenses included in general and administrative expenses

          18,237 million yen

 

  (2)

Information that contributes to understanding the detail of the significant accounting estimates for the identified items

Retirement benefit expenses and retirement benefit obligations for the defined benefit plans for employees are recorded based on various assumptions including discount rate, employee turnover and future salary increase rate.

Discount rate is determined based on Japanese government bond yields, while the indicators such as employee turnover and future salary increase rate are determined based on historical data as well as the latest information on future outlook. Determining these key factors and metrics requires high-level managerial judgment, and if modifications are required, it may have significant impact on the amounts of retirement benefit expenses and retirement benefit obligations for the next fiscal year.

6. Deferred tax assets

  (1)

The amount recorded in the consolidated financial statements for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021

 

Deferred tax assets

  29,840 million yen

Deferred tax liabilities

  532,193 million yen

 

  (2)

Information that contributes to understanding the detail of the significant accounting estimates for the identified items

The amount of tax associated with temporary differences is recorded as deferred tax assets or deferred tax liabilities excluding the amount of tax that is not expected to be collected or paid in the future accounting periods. Deferred tax assets and deferred tax liabilities of the same taxable entity are offset and presented on a net basis.

While the recoverability of deferred tax assets is determined by reasonably estimating the scheduling of temporary differences and taxable income, in the event of changes to the scheduling of temporary differences, taxable income which is lower than initial estimation, or tax reform such as reduction of corporate income tax rate, there is a potentially significant impact on the amount of deferred tax assets for the next fiscal year.

 

16


<Additional information>

  1.

The estimates of reserve for possible loan losses related to the impact of the spread of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19).

Considering the continuing uncertainty of the spread of COVID-19, estimation of the reserve for possible loan losses associated with COVID-19 is reflected on the consolidated financial statements in the following method.

For potential losses related to individual borrowers due to deterioration in business performance and funding, a reserve for possible loan losses is provided by reviewing, as necessary, borrower category based on the most recent available information.

In addition, for potential losses which cannot be reflected in any of individual borrower category, a reserve for possible loan losses is recorded at an amount deemed necessary based on an overall assessment. The assessment is conducted by specifying the portfolio significantly affected by COVID-19 and estimating the impact of the changes in economic trend and market condition due to the voluntary restraint on the economic activities caused by COVID-19, after consideration of the effect of the government’s financial support on bankruptcy trends.

 

  2.

Transition from the consolidated corporate-tax system to the group tax sharing system

Companies are required to shift from the consolidated corporate-tax system to the group tax sharing system from the fiscal year beginning on or after April 1, 2022, in accordance with the “Act for Partial Amendment of the Income Tax Act, etc.” (Act No. 8, 2020) enacted on March 31, 2020. However, the Company and certain consolidated domestic subsidiaries currently adopting the consolidated corporate-tax system applied the accounting treatment based on the provisions of the Income Tax Act before the revision for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021, in accordance with the “Practical Solution on the Treatment of Tax Effect Accounting for the Transition from the Consolidated Taxation System to the Group Tax Sharing System” (ASBJ Practical Issue Task Force No. 39, March 31, 2020).

 

17


<Notes to Consolidated Balance Sheet>

  1.

Classifications of assets and liabilities in the consolidated balance sheet conform to the provisions of Ordinance for the Enforcement of the Banking Act (Ordinance of the Ministry of Finance No. 10 of 1982).

  2.

Amounts less than one million yen have been rounded down.

  3.

Japanese government bonds under “Securities” and trading securities under “Trading assets” include total of 52,235 million yen of unsecured loaned securities for which borrowers have the right to sell or pledge. Among the unsecured borrowed securities, securities under resale agreements and securities borrowed with cash collateral, those with rights to sell or pledge without restrictions include 8,061,819 million yen of securities pledged, 394,493 million yen of securities lent and 4,090,071 million yen of securities held without being disposed as of the consolidated balance sheet date.

  4.

Bankrupt loans and non-accrual loans were 69,452 million yen and 422,551 million yen, respectively.

“Bankrupt loans” are loans, after write-off, to legally bankrupt borrowers as defined in Article 96, paragraph 1, items 3 and 4 of “Order for Enforcement of the Corporation Tax Act” (Cabinet Order No. 97 of 1965) and on which accrued interest income is not recognized as there is substantial doubt about the ultimate collectability of either principal or interest because they are past due for a considerable period of time or for other reasons.

“Non-accrual loans” are loans on which accrued interest income is not recognized, excluding “Bankrupt loans” and loans on which interest payments are deferred in order to support the borrowers’ recovery from financial difficulties.

  5.

Past due loans (3 months or more) totaled 16,784 million yen.

“Past due loans (3 months or more)” are loans on which the principal or interest is past due for 3 months or more, excluding “Bankrupt loans” and “Non-accrual loans.”

  6.

Restructured loans totaled 430,080 million yen.

“Restructured loans” are loans on which terms and conditions have been amended in favor of the borrowers (e.g. reduction of the original interest rate, deferral of interest payments, extension of principal repayments or debt forgiveness) in order to support the borrowers’ recovery from financial difficulties, excluding “Bankrupt loans,” “Non-accrual loans” and “Past due loans (3 months or more).”

  7.

The total amount of bankrupt loans, non-accrual loans, past due loans (3 months or more) and restructured loans was 938,868 million yen.

The amounts of loans presented in Notes 4 to 7 above are the amounts before deduction of reserve for possible loan losses.

  8.

Bills discounted are accounted for as financial transactions in accordance with JICPA Industry Committee Practical Guidance No. 24. The Company’s banking subsidiaries have rights to sell or pledge bank acceptance bought, commercial bills discounted, documentary bills and foreign exchanges bought without restrictions, etc. The total face value was 1,142,755 million yen.

  9.

Assets pledged as collateral were as follows:

 

     Unit: millions of yen         

Assets pledged as collateral:

     

Cash and due from banks

     15,483     

Trading assets

     713,410     

Securities

     14,933,325     

Loans and bills discounted

     10,152,979     

Liabilities corresponding to assets pledged as collateral:

     

Deposits

     13,972     

Payables under repurchase agreements

     7,516,287     

Payables under securities lending transactions

     1,060,066     

Borrowed money

     14,950,162     

Due to trust account

     588,785     

Acceptances and guarantees

     105,700     

In addition, cash and due from banks of 21 million yen, trading assets of 1,245,065 million yen, securities of 5,786,331 million yen and loans and bills discounted of 9,664 million yen were pledged as collateral for cash settlements, margins of futures markets and certain other purposes.

Other assets include collateral money deposited for financial instruments of 2,111,770 million yen, surety deposits of 86,727 million yen, margins of futures markets of 118,372 million yen and other margins of 98,958 million yen.

 

18


  10.

Commitment line contracts on overdrafts and loans are agreements to lend to customers, up to a prescribed amount, as long as there is no violation of any condition established in the contracts. The amount of unused commitments was 71,255,100 million yen and the amount of unused commitments whose original contract terms are within 1 year or unconditionally cancelable at any time was 49,932,323 million yen.

Since many of these commitments are expected to expire without being drawn upon, the total amount of unused commitments does not necessarily represent actual future cash flow requirements. Many of these commitments include clauses under which SMBC and other consolidated subsidiaries can reject an application from customers or reduce the contract amounts in the event that economic conditions change, SMBC and other consolidated subsidiaries need to secure claims, or other events occur. In addition, SMBC and other consolidated subsidiaries may request the customers to pledge collateral such as premises and securities at the time of the contracts, and take necessary measures such as monitoring customers’ financial positions, revising contracts when such need arises and securing claims after the contracts are made.

  11.

SMBC, a consolidated subsidiary of the Company, revaluated its own land for business activities in accordance with “Act on Revaluation of Land” (the “Act”) (Act No. 34, effective March 31, 1998) and “Act for Partial Revision of Act on Revaluation of Land” (Act No. 19, effective March 31, 2001). The income taxes corresponding to the net unrealized gains are reported in “Liabilities” as “Deferred tax liabilities for land revaluation,” and the Company’s share of net unrealized gains, net of deferred taxes, are reported as “Land revaluation excess” in “Net assets.”

Date of the revaluation

SMBC:

March 31, 1998 and March 31, 2002

Method of revaluation (stipulated in Article 3, paragraph 3 of the Act)

SMBC:

Fair values were determined by applying appropriate adjustments for land shape and timing of appraisal to the values stipulated in Article 2, item 3, 4 or 5 of “Order for Enforcement of Act on Revaluation of Land” (Cabinet Order No. 119 effective March 31, 1998).

  12.

Accumulated depreciation on tangible fixed assets amounted to 834,990 million yen.

  13.

Deferred gain on tangible fixed assets deductible for tax purposes amounted to 55,626 million yen.

  14.

The balance of subordinated borrowings included in “Borrowed money” was 249,000 million yen.

  15.

The balance of subordinated bonds included in “Bonds” was 1,922,165 million yen.

  16.

Trust account includes borrowings of 588,785 million yen from trust account in relation to covered bonds issued by trust account.

  17.

The amount guaranteed by banking subsidiaries to privately-placed bonds (stipulated by Article 2, paragraph 3 of Financial Instruments and Exchange Act) in “Securities” was 1,431,071 million yen.

 

19


  18.

Stock options

Outline of stock options and changes

The Company

1) Outline of stock options

 

         

 Date of    

 resolution    

  July 28, 2010   July 29, 2011   July 30, 2012   July 29, 2013
Title and
number of grantees
 

Directors of the Company                   8 

Corporate Auditors
of the Company         3 

Executive Officers
of the Company         2 

Directors,
Corporate Auditors
and Executive
Officers of SMBC
                                 69 

 

Directors of the Company                     9

Corporate Auditors
of the Company           3

Executive Officers
of the Company           2

Directors,
Corporate Auditors
and Executive
Officers of SMBC
                                   71

 

Directors of the Company                     9

Corporate Auditors
of the Company           3

Executive Officers
of the Company           2

Directors,
Corporate Auditors
and Executive
Officers of SMBC
                                   71

 

Directors of the Company                      9 

Corporate Auditors
of the Company            3 

Executive Officers
of the Company            3

Directors,
Corporate Auditors
and Executive
Officers of SMBC
                                    67 

Number of
stock
options (Note)
  Common shares
102,600
  Common shares
268,200
  Common shares
280,500
  Common shares
115,700
Grant date   August 13, 2010   August 16, 2011   August 15, 2012   August 14, 2013

Condition
for vesting

  Stock acquisition right holders may exercise stock acquisition rights from the day when they are relieved of their positions either as a Director, Corporate Auditor or Executive Officer of the Company and SMBC.   Stock acquisition right holders may exercise stock acquisition rights from the day when they are relieved of their positions either as a Director, Corporate Auditor or Executive Officer of the Company and SMBC.   Stock acquisition right holders may exercise stock acquisition rights from the day when they are relieved of their positions either as a Director, Corporate Auditor or Executive Officer of the Company and SMBC.   Stock acquisition right holders may exercise stock acquisition rights from the day when they are relieved of their positions either as a Director, Corporate Auditor or Executive Officer of the Company and SMBC.
Requisite
service
period
  From June 29, 2010 to the closing of the Ordinary General Meeting of Shareholders of the Company for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2011   From June 29, 2011 to the closing of the Ordinary General Meeting of Shareholders of the Company for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2012   From June 28, 2012 to the closing of the Ordinary General Meeting of Shareholders of the Company for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013   From June 27, 2013 to the closing of the Ordinary General Meeting of Shareholders of the Company for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014

Exercise
period

 

 

August 13, 2010 to August 12, 2040

 

 

August 16, 2011 to August 15, 2041

 

 

August 15, 2012 to August 14, 2042

 

 

August 14, 2013 to August 13, 2043

 

 

20


       
 Date of    
 resolution    
  July 30, 2014      July 31, 2015      July 26, 2016       
Title and number of grantees  

Directors of the
Company                 10  

Corporate Auditors
of the Company         3

Executive Officers
of the Company         2

Directors,
Corporate Auditors
and Executive
Officers of SMBC
                                 67

 

Directors of the
Company                     8  

Corporate Auditors
of the Company           3

Executive Officers
of the Company           4

Directors,
Corporate Auditors

and Executive
Officers of SMBC
                                   68

 

Directors of the
Company                     8  

Corporate Auditors
of the Company           3

Executive Officers
of the Company           5

Directors,
Corporate Auditors
and Executive
Officers of SMBC
                                   73

 

Number of stock options

(Note)

 

Common shares
121,900

 

Common shares
132,400

 

Common shares
201,200

 
Grant date  

August 15, 2014

 

August 18, 2015

 

August 15, 2016

 
Condition for vesting  

Stock acquisition right holders may exercise stock acquisition rights from the day when they are relieved of their positions either as a Director, Corporate Auditor or Executive Officer of the Company and SMBC.

 

Stock acquisition right holders may exercise stock acquisition rights from the day when they are relieved of their positions either as a Director, Corporate Auditor or Executive Officer of the Company and SMBC.

 

Stock acquisition right holders may exercise stock acquisition rights from the day when they are relieved of their positions either as a Director, Corporate Auditor or Executive Officer of the Company and SMBC.

 
Requisite
service
period
 

From June 27, 2014 to the closing of the Ordinary General Meeting of Shareholders of the Company for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2015

 

From June 26, 2015 to the closing of the Ordinary General Meeting of Shareholders of the Company for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2016

 

From June 29, 2016 to the closing of the Ordinary General Meeting of Shareholders of the Company for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2017

 

Exercise
period

 

 

August 15, 2014 to August 14, 2044

 

 

August 18, 2015 to August 17, 2045

 

 

August 15, 2016 to August 14, 2046

 

 

(Note)

Number of stock options has been converted and stated as number of shares.

 

21


2) Stock options granted and changes

Number of stock options (Note)

  
       Date of resolution             July 28, 2010       July 29, 2011       July 30, 2012       July 29, 2013  
 

Before vested

               
 

Previous fiscal year-end

  5,200          6,400          58,300          39,200       
 

Granted

  —          —          —          —       
 

Forfeited

  —          —          —          —       
 

Vested

  600          600          1,400          11,800       
 

Outstanding

  4,600          5,800          56,900          27,400       
 

After vested

               
 

Previous fiscal year-end

  44,700          133,000          129,600          26,900       
 

Vested

  600          600          1,400          11,800       
 

Exercised

  5,600          13,300          22,800          13,300       
 

Forfeited

  —          —          —          —       
 

Exercisable

  39,700          120,300          108,200          25,400       
         
       Date of resolution             July 30, 2014       July 31, 2015       July 26, 2016      
 

Before vested

             
 

Previous fiscal year-end

  42,100          77,700          102,800         
 

Granted

  —          —          —         
 

Forfeited

  —          —          —         
 

Vested

  7,700          14,500          7,100         
 

Outstanding

  34,400          63,200          95,700         
 

After vested

             
 

Previous fiscal year-end

  27,800          13,100          15,700         
 

Vested

  7,700          14,500          7,100         
 

Exercised

  9,800          15,900          7,100         
 

Forfeited

  —          —          —         
 

Exercisable

  25,700          11,700          15,700         
 

(Note) Number of stock options has been converted and stated as number of shares.

 

Price Information

   
       Date of resolution           July 28, 2010       July 29, 2011       July 30, 2012       July 29, 2013  
 

Exercise price (yen)

  1          1          1          1       
 

Average exercise price

(yen)

  3,049          3,184          3,072          2,708       
 

Fair value at the grant date

(yen)

  2,215          1,872          2,042          4,159       
         
     Date of resolution           July 30, 2014       July 31, 2015       July 26, 2016    
 

Exercise price

(yen)

 

1       

 

 

1       

 

 

1       

 

 
 

Average exercise price

(yen)

  2,778          2,706          2,702         
 

Fair value at the grant date

(yen)

  3,661          4,904          2,811         
3) Method of estimating number of stock options vested

Only the actual number of forfeited stock options is reflected because it is difficult to rationally estimate the actual number of stock options that will be forfeited in the future.

 

22


<Notes to Consolidated Statement of Income>

1.

Classifications of income and expenses in the consolidated statement of income conform to the provisions of Enforcement Ordinance of the Banking Act (Ministry of Finance Ordinance No. 10 of 1982).

2.

Amounts less than one million yen have been rounded down.

3.

“Other” in the “Other income” included gains on sales of stocks and other securities of 124,730 million yen.

4.

“Other” in “Other expenses” included write-off of loans of 117,415 million yen, expenses related to equity derivatives of 45,968 million yen, devaluation of stocks and other securities of 24,073 million yen and losses on sales of delinquent loans of 20,762 million yen.

5.

“Other extraordinary gains” is gains on step acquisitions.

6.

The difference between the recoverable amount and the book value of the following assets is recognized as “Losses on impairment of fixed assets” and included in “Extraordinary losses” in the fiscal year.

 

      Year ended March 31, 2021

        Unit: millions of yen    

Area    

   Purpose of use        Type        Impairment loss

Tokyo metropolitan area

   Branches    6 items    Land and buildings, etc.    873 million yen 
   Idle assets    164 items    7,786 million yen 

Kinki area

   Branches    1 item    Land and buildings, etc.    16 million yen 
   Idle assets    56 items    2,415 million yen 

Other area

   Branches    6 items    Land and buildings, etc.    128 million yen 
   Idle assets    20 items    390 million yen 

—    

   —        Goodwill    30,914 million yen 

As for land and buildings, etc., at SMBC, a consolidated subsidiary of the Company, a branch, which continuously manages and determines its income and expenses, is the smallest unit of asset group for recognition and measurement of impairment loss of fixed assets. Assets such as corporate headquarters facilities, training facilities, data and system centers, and health and recreational facilities which do not produce cash flows that can be attributed to individual assets are treated as corporate assets. As for idle assets, impairment loss is measured individually. At the Company and other consolidated subsidiaries, a branch or other group is the smallest asset grouping unit as well.

For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021, the carrying amounts of idle assets, etc. are reduced to their recoverable amounts, and the decreased amounts are included in “Extraordinary losses” as “Losses on impairment of fixed assets,” if there are indicators that the invested amounts may not be recoverable.

The recoverable amount is calculated using net realizable value which is basically determined by subtracting the expected disposal cost from the appraisal value based on the Real Estate Appraisal Standard.

The grouping unit for goodwill is mainly based on each consolidated subsidiary. For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021, Sumitomo Mitsui DS Asset Management Company, Limited reviewed its future cash flows because it underperformed its full-year targets despite upward trend in its performance from the second half. This review found that the carrying amount of goodwill may not be recoverable, and as a result, 30.9 billion yen of the unamortized balance of goodwill at the end of the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021 was recorded as “Losses on impairment of fixed assets” under “Extraordinary losses.” The recoverable amount is measured by value in use, which is calculated by discounting future cash flows by 9%.

 

23


<Notes to Consolidated Statement of Changes in Net Assets>

1.

Amounts less than one million yen have been rounded down.

2.

Type and number of shares issued and treasury stock

 

   Year ended March 31, 2021

  Unit: number of shares
       As of    
beginning of  
the fiscal year  
  Increased in  
the fiscal year  
  Decreased in  
the fiscal year  
  As of the  
fiscal year-end  
   Remarks  

Shares issued

                    

Common stock

  1,373,171,556     868,505     —     1,374,040,061      (Notes 1)

Total

  1,373,171,556     868,505     —     1,374,040,061                              

Treasury stock

                    

Common stock

  3,645,043     57,918     90,659     3,612,302      (Notes 2, 3)        

Total

  3,645,043     57,918     90,659     3,612,302       

(Notes)

  1.

The increase of 868,505 shares in the total number of shares issued was due to issuance of new stocks as stock-based compensation.

  2.

The increase of 57,918 shares in the number of treasury common stock was due to purchase of fractional shares and acquisition of restricted stocks without compensation under the Stock Compensation Plans.

  3.

The decrease of 90,659 shares in the number of treasury common stock was due to sales of fractional shares as well as exercise of stock options.

 

3.

Information on stock acquisition rights

 

  March 31, 2021

        
    

Detail of

stock

acquisition

rights

         Type of   shares           Number of shares      Balance as       of the fiscal       year-end     (millions of yen)      Remarks    
   Beginning

of the

fiscal year

       Increase in

the fiscal

year

       Decrease

in the

fiscal year

       Fiscal

year-end

   
The Company      Stock acquisition rights as stock options           1,791           

Total

        1,791           

 

4.

Information on dividends:

  (1)

Dividends paid in the fiscal year

Date of resolution         Type of shares   

Cash    

dividends    
(millions of    
yen)    

  

Cash dividends    

per share (yen)    

      Record date              Effective date       
Ordinary General Meeting of Shareholders held on June 26, 2020        Common stock    136,952      100      March 31, 2020             June 29, 2020        
Meeting of the Board of Directors held on November 13, 2020        Common stock    130,190      95      September 30, 2020            December 3, 2020            

 

24


  (2)

Dividends to be paid in the next fiscal year

Date of resolution      

Type of

shares   

  

Cash  

dividends  

(millions of  
yen)  

  

Source of  

dividends  

  

Cash  

dividends per  

share (yen)  

   Record date       Effective date  
Ordinary General Meeting of Shareholders held on June 29, 2021    Common stock    130,190      Retained earnings    95      March 31, 2021    June 30, 2021

 

25


<Notes to Financial Instruments>

  1.

Status of financial instruments

  (1)

Policies on financial instruments

The Group conducts banking and other financial services such as leasing, securities, consumer finance, system development and information processing. Its banking business includes deposit taking, lending, securities trading and investment, remittance and transfer, foreign exchange, bond subscription agent, trust business, and over-the-counter sales of securities investment trusts and insurance products.

These services entail holding of financial assets such as loans and bills discounted, bonds, and stocks. Meanwhile, the Group raises funds through deposit taking, borrowing, bond offering, etc. Furthermore, it undertakes derivative transactions to meet customers’ hedging needs to control market risk associated with deposit taking and lending (“ALM purposes”), and to make profit on short-term fluctuations in interest rates, foreign exchange rates, etc. (“trading purposes”). At SMBC, the Company’s major consolidated subsidiary, derivative transactions for ALM purposes are undertaken by the Treasury Dept. of the Treasury Unit, while derivative transactions for trading purposes are undertaken by the Trading Dept. of the Treasury Unit (derivative transactions for both ALM and trading purposes are undertaken by the Treasury Dept., Asia Pacific Division in Asia and Oceania region, and are undertaken by the Treasury Dept., East Asia Division in East Asia region).

  (2)

Details of financial instruments and associated risks

  1)

Financial assets

The main financial assets held by the Group include loans to foreign and domestic companies and domestic individuals, and securities such as bonds (government and corporate bonds) and stocks (foreign and domestic stocks), etc. Bonds such as government bonds are held for both trading and ALM purposes, and certain bonds are held as held-to-maturity securities. Stocks are held mainly for strategic purposes. These assets expose the Group to credit risk, market risk and liquidity risk. Credit risk is the risk of loss arising from nonperformance of obligations by the borrower or issuer due to factors such as deterioration in the borrower’s/issuer’s financial conditions. Market risk is the risk stemming from fluctuations in interest rates, exchange rates, or share prices. Liquidity risk is the risk arising from difficulty executing transactions in desired quantities at appropriate prices due to low market liquidity. These risks are properly monitored and managed based on “(3) Risk management framework for financial instruments” below.

  2)

Financial liabilities

Financial liabilities of the Group include borrowed money and bonds, etc. in addition to deposits. Deposits mainly comprise deposits of domestic and foreign companies and domestic individuals. Borrowed money and bonds include subordinated borrowings and subordinated bonds with special clause specifying that repayment order of borrowing or bond subordinates to other borrowings or bonds. Also, financial liabilities, like financial assets, expose the Group to not only market risk but also funding liquidity risk: the risk of the Group not being able to raise funds due to market turmoil, deterioration in the Group’s creditworthiness or other factors. These risks are properly monitored and managed based on “(3) Risk management framework for financial instruments” below.

  3)

Derivative transactions

Derivatives handled by the Group include foreign exchange futures; futures, forwards, swaps and options related to interest rates, currencies, equities, bonds and commodities; and credit and weather derivatives.

Major risks associated with derivatives include market risk, liquidity risk, and credit risk arising from nonperformance of contractual obligations due to deterioration in the counterparty’s financial conditions. These risks are properly monitored and managed based on “(3) Risk management framework for financial instruments” below.

Hedge accounting is applied to derivative transactions executed for ALM purposes, as necessary. Hedging instruments, hedged items, hedging policy and hedging method to assess the effectiveness of the hedge are described in Notes to <Significant Accounting Policies for Preparing Consolidated Financial Statements>, 3. Accounting policies, (16) Hedge accounting.

  (3)

Risk management framework for financial instruments

The fundamental matters on risk management for the entire Group are set forth in “Regulations on Risk Management.” The Company’s Management Committee establishes the basic risk management policy for the entire Group, based on the regulations, which is then approved by the Board of Directors. Each Group company has a risk management system based on the characteristics of its particular businesses and in accordance with the basic policy. Furthermore, the Group CRO is established to assess risk management across the Group unitarily and implement appropriate risk management. The Company is sharing information on group-wide risk management and strengthening related systems through the Group CRO Committee, which consists of the Group CRO and risk management representatives from strategically important Group companies.

 

26


  1)

Management of credit risk

The Company has established fundamental principles on credit risk management to thoroughly manage the credit risk of the entire Group. Each group company conducts integrated management of credit risk according to its operational characteristics, and the credit risk inherent in the entire portfolio as well as the risk in individual credits are managed quantitatively and continuously.

  a.

Credit risk management system

The Group CRO formulates credit risk management policies each year based on the group-wide basic policies for risk management. Meanwhile, the Credit & Investment Planning Dept. is responsible for the comprehensive management of credit risk. This department drafts and administers credit risk regulations, including the Group’s credit policies, and performs credit portfolio management including non-performing loans. The Company has also established the Credit Risk Committee to serve as a body for deliberating on matters related to group-wide credit portfolios.

At SMBC, the Company’s major consolidated subsidiary, the Credit & Investment Planning Dept. of the Risk Management Unit is responsible for the comprehensive management of credit risk. This department establishes, revises or abolishes credit policies, the internal rating system, credit authority regulations, credit application regulations, and manages non-performing loans and other aspects of credit portfolio management. The department also controls SMBC’s total credit risk by quantifying credit risk (i.e. calculating risk capital and risk-weighted assets) in cooperation with the Corporate Risk Management Dept. Moreover, the Credit Portfolio Management Dept. within the Credit & Investment Planning Dept. works to stabilize SMBC’s overall credit portfolio through selling credit derivatives and loan claims. Each credit department is responsible, in cooperation with branches, for credit risk management for loans as well as management of their units’ portfolios. Credit approval authority is generally determined based on the credit amounts and internal grades, and the credit departments focus on analysis and management of customers and transactions with relatively high credit risk. The Credit Administration Dept. is mainly responsible for formulating and implementing measures to reduce the exposure of non-performing loans. Through industrial and sector-specific surveys and studies of individual companies, the Corporate Research Dept. works to form an accurate idea of the circumstances of borrower companies and identify those with potentially troubled credit positions at early stage. Moreover, the Credit Risk Committee, a cross-departmental consultative body, rounds out SMBC’s oversight systems for undertaking flexible and efficient control of credit risk and ensuring the overall soundness of SMBC’s loan operations. In addition to these, the Internal Audit Unit, operating independently of the business units, audits asset quality, grading accuracy, self-assessment, and appropriateness of the credit risk management system, and reports the results directly to the Management Committee and the Audit Committee.

  b.

Method of credit risk management

The Company properly manages the credit risk inherent in individual loans and the entire portfolio by assessing and quantifying the credit risk of each borrower/loan using the internal rating system. In addition to management of individual loans through credit screening and monitoring, it manages the credit portfolio as described below in order to secure and improve the credit portfolio’s soundness and medium-term profitability.

- Appropriate risk-taking within capital

To keep credit risk exposure to a permissible level relative to capital, the Company has, in terms of total risk capital which is the risk appetite indicators for soundness, set allowable risk limits based on the risk appetite and portfolio plan at each business unit. The Company regularly monitors credit risk capital as part of this framework.

- Controlling concentration of risk

Because concentration of credit risk in an industry or corporate group has the potential to impair the Company’s capital significantly, the Company implements measures to prevent excessive concentration of loan in a single industry and to control large exposure to individual borrowers by setting maximum loan amounts and conducting loan reviews thoroughly. To manage country risk, the Company also has credit limit guidelines based on each country’s creditworthiness.

- Greater understanding of actual corporate conditions and balancing returns and risks

The Company runs credit operations on the basic principle of thoroughly understanding actual corporate conditions and gaining profit commensurate with the level of credit risk entailed, and makes every effort to improve profit at after-cost (credit cost, capital cost and overhead cost) level.

 

27


- Reduction and prevention of non-performing loans

For non-performing loans and potential non-performing loans, the Company carries out loan reviews to clarify credit policies and action plans, enabling it to swiftly implement measures to prevent deterioration of borrowers’ business situations, support business recoveries, collect on loans, and enhance loan security.

In regard to financial instruments such as investments in certain funds, securitized products and credit derivatives that indirectly retain risks related to assets such as corporate bonds and loan claims (underlying assets), such instruments entail market and liquidity risks in addition to credit risk, since such instruments are traded on the market. Credit risk management for these instruments involving detailed analysis and evaluation of characteristics of underlying assets is performed while market risk is comprehensively managed within the framework for managing market and liquidity risks. Moreover, guidelines have been established based on the characteristics of each type of risk to appropriately manage risks of incurring losses.

In regard to credit risk of derivative transactions, the potential exposure based on the market price is regularly calculated and properly managed. When the counterparty is a financial institution with which the Company frequently conducts derivative transactions, measures such as a close-out netting provision, which provide offsetting credit exposures between two parties in a single net payment from one party to the other in case of bankruptcy or other default event, are implemented to reduce credit risk.

  2)

Management of market and liquidity risks

The Company manages market and liquidity risks across the entire Group by setting allowable risk limits; ensuring the transparency of the risk management process; and clearly separating front-office, middle-office, and back-office operations for a highly efficient system of mutual checks and balances.

  a.

Market and liquidity risk management systems

In accordance with the group-wide basic policies for risk management decided upon by the Management Committee, the Company determines important matters relating to the management of market and liquidity risks, such as basic policies and risk limits, in order to manage these risks. The ALM Committee meets four times a year, in principle, to report on the state of market and liquidity risk management and to discuss ALM operation policies. The Corporate Risk Management Dept., which is independent from the business units that directly handle market transactions, manages market and liquidity risks in an integrated manner. This department not only monitors the current risk situations but also reports regularly to the Audit Committee and the Management Committee. Furthermore, the ALM Committee at SMBC, a consolidated subsidiary of the Company, meets on a monthly basis to examine reports on the state of observance of limits on market and liquidity risks and to discuss ALM operation policies.

In addition, the Internal Audit Dept., which is independent of other departments, periodically performs comprehensive internal audits to verify that the risk management framework is properly functioning and reports the audit results to the Audit Committee, the Management Committee and other concerned committees and departments.

  b.

Market and liquidity risk management methodology

- Market risk management

The Company manages market risk by setting maximum loss and VaR (value at risk: maximum potential loss that may be incurred to a specific financial instrument for a given probability) within the market risk capital, which is set taking into account stockholders’ equity and other factors in accordance with the market transaction policies.

The Company uses the historical simulation method (a method for estimating the maximum loss by running simulations of changes in profit and loss on market fluctuations scenarios based on historical data) to measure VaR. Regarding banking activities (activities for generating profit through management of interest rates, terms, and other aspects such as loans and bonds in assets, deposits in liabilities) and trading activities (activities for generating profit by taking advantage of short-term fluctuations in market values and differences in value among markets), the Company calculates the maximum loss that may occur as a result of market fluctuations in 1 day with a probability of 1% based on 4 years of historical observation. With regard to the holding of shares (such as listed shares) for the purpose of strategic investment, the Company calculates the maximum loss that may occur as a result of market fluctuations in 1 year with a probability of 1% based on 10 years of historical observation.

 

28


Regarding risks associated with foreign exchange rates, interest rates, equity risk, option prices and other market risk factors, the Company manages such risks by setting a maximum limit on the indicator suited for each market risk factor such as BPV (basis point value: denotes the change in value of a financial instrument resulting from a 0.01 percentage-point change in the yield).

- Quantitative information on market risks

As of the end of the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021, total VaR of SMBC and its major consolidated subsidiaries was 55.0 billion yen for the banking activities, 20.7 billion yen for the trading activities and 1,284.1 billion yen for the holding of shares (such as listed shares) for the purpose of strategic investment.

However, it should be noted that these figures are statistical figures that change according to changes in assumptions and calculation methods, and may not cover the risk of future market conditions fluctuating drastically compared to market fluctuations of the past.

- Liquidity risk management

The Company manages liquidity risk based on the framework of “setting management levels of risk appetite indicators” and “developing contingency plans.” Risk appetite indicators are quantitative benchmarks that select the types and indicate the levels of risk that the Company is willing to take on or tolerate. As an example, the Company sets a lower limit on the number of days over which cash flows could be maintained in the event of stressed conditions such as deposit outflow, so as to secure funding sources that do not fall below the benchmark to avoid excessive reliance on short term funding. In addition, the Company develops contingency plans consisting of instructions, reporting lines and action plans in case of emergency.

Moreover, to manage the liquidity risk of marketable instruments, derivative transactions, etc., the Company has trading limits for each business office classified by currency, instrument, transaction period, etc. As for financial futures, etc., risks are managed by restricting positions to within a certain percentage of open interest in the entire market.

  (4)

Supplementary explanations about matters concerning fair value of financial instruments

Fair values of financial instruments are based on their market prices and, in cases where market prices are not available, on reasonably calculated prices. These prices have been calculated using certain assumptions, and may differ if calculated based on different assumptions.

 

29


  2.

Matters concerning fair value of financial instruments and breakdown by input level

The amounts on the consolidated balance sheet and the fair value of financial instruments as well as the difference between them, and fair value by input level are as follows.

The amounts shown in the following tables do not include stocks with no market price, etc., and investments in partnerships (refer to (4)).

The fair values of financial instruments are classified into the following three levels depending on the observability and significance of the input used in the fair value measurement.

Level 1: Fair value determined based on the (unadjusted) quoted price in an active market for the same asset or liability

Level 2: Fair value determined based on directly or indirectly observable inputs other than Level 1 inputs

Level 3: Fair value determined based on significant unobservable inputs

If multiple inputs with a significant impact are used for the fair value measurement of a financial instrument, the financial instrument is classified to the lowest priority level of fair value measurement in which each input belongs.

  (1)

Financial assets and liabilities at fair value on the consolidated balance sheet

Unit: millions of yen

 

March 31, 2021    Consolidated balance sheet amount  
   Level 1             Level 2             Level 3             Total         

Monetary claims bought

            276,989        454,827        731,817  

Trading assets

               

Securities classified as trading

purposes (Note 1)

     2,473,813        591,976        270        3,066,060  

Money held in trust

            309               309  

Securities

               

Other securities (Note 1)

     25,055,919        8,840,677        52,193        33,948,790  

Total assets

     27,529,732        9,709,953        507,291        37,746,977  

Trading liabilities

               

Trading securities sold for short

sales (Note 1)

     1,997,985        77,072               2,075,058  

Total liabilities

     1,997,985        77,072               2,075,058  

Derivative transactions (Note 2, 3)

               

Interest rate derivatives

     24,638        416,233        1,013        441,886  

Currency derivatives

     (560      91,268        4,807        95,514  

Equity derivatives

     (29,846      106        21,696        (8,043

Bond derivatives

     484        19               503  

Commodity derivatives

     532        1,486               2,019  

Credit derivative transactions

            (6,512      796        (5,716

Total derivative transactions

     (4,751      502,601        28,314        526,164  

 

(Notes)

 

1. 

 

The amount of investment trusts for which transitional measures are applied in accordance with Paragraph 26 of the “Implementation Guidance on Accounting Standard for Fair Value Measurement” (ASBJ Guidance No.31, hereinafter, “Guidance for Application of Fair Value Measurement”) are not included in the table above. The amount of such investment trusts on the consolidated balance sheet are 1,200,314 million yen in the financial assets and 1,510 million yen in the financial liabilities.

 

2. 

 

The amounts collectively represent the derivative transactions which are recorded in “Trading assets,” “Trading liabilities,” “Other assets” and “Other liabilities.” Debts and credits arising from derivative transactions are presented on a net basis, with a net debt presented in round brackets.

 

3. 

 

As for derivative transactions applying hedge accounting, 207,017 million yen is recorded on the consolidated balance sheet.

   

These are interest rate swap and other derivative transactions designated as hedging instruments for stabilizing cash flows of loans and bills discounted, etc., that are hedged items. The Company has mainly applied deferred hedge accounting for those derivative transactions. For these hedging relationships, the Company has applied “Practical Solution on the Treatment of Hedge Accounting for Financial Instruments that Reference LIBOR” (PITF No.40, September 29, 2020).

 

30


  (2)

Financial assets and liabilities which are not stated at fair value on the consolidated balance sheet Cash and due from banks, Call loans and bills bought, Receivables under resale agreements, Receivables under securities borrowing transactions, Foreign exchanges, Call money and bills sold, Payable under repurchase agreements, Payable under securities lending transactions, Commercial papers, and Short-term bonds payable are not included in the following tables since they are mostly short-term, and their fair values approximate their carrying amounts.

Unit: millions of yen

 

March 31, 2021    Fair Value     

Consolidated

balance sheet
amount

     Net
unrealized
gains
(losses)
 
  

Level 1

    

Level 2

     Level 3      Total  

Monetary claims

bought (Note)

                   3,971,664        3,971,664        3,930,431        41,233  

Securities

                   

Bonds classified

as held-to-

maturity

     22,239                      22,239        22,300        (60

Loans and bills

discounted

                 85,132,738       

Reserve for possible

loan losses (Note)

                 (456,861     
                     86,450,361        86,450,361        84,675,876        1,774,484  

Lease receivables

and investment

assets (Note)

                   239,867        239,867        235,723        4,144  

Total assets

              22,239               90,661,893        90,684,133        88,864,331        1,819,802  

Deposits

            142,023,649               142,023,649        142,026,156        (2,507

Negotiable

certificates of

deposit

            12,579,851               12,579,851        12,570,617        9,233  

Borrowed money

            17,773,586               17,773,586        17,679,690        93,895  

Bonds

            8,621,373        702,346        9,323,720        9,043,031        280,688  

Due to trust account

            2,335,221               2,335,221        2,321,223        13,998  

Total liabilities

            183,333,682               702,346        184,036,029        183,640,720        395,308  

 

(Note)

 

General reserves and special reserves corresponding to loans are deducted. The reserve for possible loan losses on “Monetary claims bought” and “Lease receivables and investment assets” are deducted directly from the consolidated balance sheet amount since they are immaterial.

 

  (3)

Description of the valuation techniques and inputs used to measure fair value

Assets

Monetary claims bought

The fair values of subordinated trust beneficiary interests related to securitized housing loans among monetary claims bought, are determined by estimating future cash flows using the probability of default, loss given default and prepayment rate, and assessing the value by deducting the value of senior beneficial interests, etc. from the value of underlying housing loans.

The fair values of other transactions are, in principle, based on methods similar to the methods applied to Loans and bills discounted.

These transactions are mainly classified into Level 3.

Trading assets

The fair values of bonds and other securities held for trading purposes are, in principle, based on their market prices at the at the end of the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021.

The fair values of such bonds and other securities are mainly classified into Level 1 depending on the level of market activity. When fair value is determined based on either the prices quoted by the financial institutions, or future cash flows discounted using observable inputs such as interests, spreads, and others, they are classified into Level 2.

 

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Money held in trust

The fair values of money held in trust are, in principle, fair values of securities in trust property calculated by the same method for securities that the Company owns. They are classified into Level 2.

Securities

In principle, the fair values of stocks (including foreign stocks) are based on the market price as of the end of the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021. They are mainly classified into Level 1 depending on the level of market activity. The fair values of securities with market prices other than stocks are based on the market price as of the end of the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021. Japanese Government bonds are classified into Level 1 and other bonds are classified into Level 2.

The fair values of privately-placed bonds with no market prices are based on the present value of estimated future cash flows, taking into account the borrower’s probability of default, loss given default, etc. Those present values are discounted by a rate comprising a risk free interest rate with certain adjustment. However, the fair values of bonds, such as privately-placed bonds issued by bankrupt borrowers, effectively bankrupt borrowers and potentially bankrupt borrowers are based on the bond’s book value after the deduction of the expected amount of a loss on the bond computed by using the same method applied to the estimation of a loan loss.

These transactions are mainly classified into Level 2.

Loans and bills discounted, and Lease receivables and investment assets

Of these transactions, considering the characteristics of these transaction, the fair values of overdrafts with no specified repayment dates are their book values as they are considered to approximate their fair values.

For short-term transactions, the fair values are also their book values as they are considered to approximate their fair values.

The fair values of long-term transactions are, in principle, based on the present value of estimated future cash flows taking into account the borrower’s probability of default, loss given default, etc. Those present values are discounted by a rate comprising a risk free interest rate with certain adjustment. At certain consolidated subsidiaries of the Company, the fair values are calculated based on the present values of estimated future cash flows, which are computed based on the contractual interest rate. Those present values are discounted by a rate comprising a risk-free rate and a credit risk premium.

Regarding claims on bankrupt borrowers, effectively bankrupt borrowers and potentially bankrupt borrowers, expected losses on such claims are calculated based on either the expected recoverable amount from disposal of collateral or guarantees, or the present value of expected future cash flows. Since the claims’ consolidated balance sheet amounts minus the expected amount of loan losses approximate their fair values, such amounts are considered to be their fair values.

These transactions are mainly classified into Level 3.

Liabilities

Trading liabilities

The fair values of bonds sold for short sales and other securities for trading purposes are, in principle, based on their market prices at the end of the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021. They are mainly classified into Level 1.

Deposits, Negotiable certificates of deposit, and Due to trust account

Out of these transactions, the fair values of demand deposits and deposits without maturity are their book values. The fair values of transactions with a short-term remaining maturity are also based on their book values, as their book values are regarded to approximate their fair values. The fair values of transactions with a long-term remaining maturity are, in principle, based on the present value of estimated future cash flows discounted by the interest rate assuming that the same type of deposit is newly accepted until the end of the remaining maturity.

The fair values of borrowings from the trust account related to covered bond issued by the trust account are based on the amount calculated in accordance with the price quoted by industry associations, etc.

These transactions are mainly classified into Level 2.

 

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Borrowed money and Bonds

The fair values of short-term transactions are based on their book values, as their book values are considered to approximate their fair values. For long-term transactions, their fair values are based on the present value of estimated future cash flows discounted using the refinancing rate applied to the same type of instruments for the remaining maturity.

For transactions with the price quoted by industry associations, etc., fair value is based on the amount calculated by using the published price data, yield data, etc.

These transactions are mainly classified into Level 2.

Derivative transactions

The fair values of listed derivatives are based on their closing prices. The fair values of over-the-counter derivative transactions are based on the present value of the future cash flows, option valuation models, etc., using inputs such as interest rate, foreign exchange rate, stock price, commodity price, etc.

Over-the-counter derivative transactions takes into account the counterparty’s and the Company’s credit risks, and the liquidity risks of the unsecured lending funds. Listed derivative transactions are mainly classified into level 1. Over-the-counter derivative transactions are classified into Level 2 if observable inputs are available or impact of unobservable inputs to the fair values is not significant. If impact of unobservable inputs to the fair values is significant, they are classified into Level 3.

 

  (4)

Consolidated balance sheet amounts of stocks with no market prices, etc. and investments in partnership, etc. are as follows. In accordance with Paragraph 5 of “Implementation Guidance on Disclosures about Fair Value of Financial Instruments” (ASBJ Guidance No.19, March 31, 2020) and Paragraph 27 of “Guidance for Application of Fair Value Measurement,” these amounts are not included in “Trading assets” and “Securities” stated in the tables disclosed in “Matters concerning fair value of financial instruments and breakdown by input level.”

Unit: millions of yen

 

     As of March 31, 2021

Stocks with no market prices, etc. (Note)

  187,204

Investments in partnership, etc.

  278,072

Total

  465,276

(Note) Unlisted stocks are included in stocks with no market prices, etc.

<Notes to Per Share Data>

Net assets per share:

 

8,629.73 yen

Earnings per share attributable to owners of parent:

 

374.26 yen

 

33


[The Independent Auditor’s Report herein is the English translation of the Independent Auditor’s Report as required by the Companies Act for the conveniences of the reader.]

Independent Auditor’s Report

May 10, 2021

To the Board of Directors of

Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group, Inc.:

KPMG AZSA LLC

Tokyo Office, Japan

Toshihiro Otsuka (Seal)

Designated Limited Liability Partner

Engagement Partner

Certified Public Accountant

Noriaki Habuto (Seal)

Designated Limited Liability Partner

Engagement Partner

Certified Public Accountant

Kazuhide Niki (Seal)

Designated Limited Liability Partner

Engagement Partner

Certified Public Accountant

Opinion

We have audited the consolidated financial statements, which comprise the consolidated balance sheet, the consolidated statement of income, the consolidated statement of changes in net assets, a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information of Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group, Inc. (“the Company”) and its consolidated subsidiaries (collectively referred to as “the Group”), as at March 31, 2021 and for the year from April 1, 2020 to March 31, 2021 in accordance with Article 444-4 of the Companies Act.

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position and the results of operations of the Group for the period, for which the consolidated financial statements were prepared, in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in Japan.

Basis for the Opinion

We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in Japan. Our responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Consolidated Financial Statements section of our report. We are independent of the Group in accordance with the ethical requirements that are relevant to our audit of the consolidated financial statements in Japan, and we have fulfilled our other ethical responsibilities in accordance with these requirements. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion.

Responsibilities of Management and the Audit Committee for the Consolidated Financial Statements

Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of the consolidated financial statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in Japan, and for such internal control as management determines is necessary to enable the preparation of consolidated financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

In preparing the consolidated financial statements, management is responsible for assessing the Group’s ability to continue as a going concern, disclosing, as applicable, matters related to going concern in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in Japan.

The Audit Committee are responsible for overseeing the directors and the corporate executive officers’ performance of their duties with regard to the design, implementation and maintenance of the Group’s financial reporting process.

 

34


Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Consolidated Financial Statements

Our objectives are to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements as a whole are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes our opinion. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of these consolidated financial statements.

As part of our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in Japan, we exercise professional judgment and maintain professional skepticism throughout the audit. We also:

 

 

Identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the consolidated financial statements, whether due to fraud or error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion. The selection and application of audit procedures depends on the auditor’s judgment.

 

Obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, while the objective of the audit is not to express an opinion on the effectiveness of the Group’s internal control.

 

Evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates and related disclosures made by management.

 

Conclude on the appropriateness of management’s use of the going concern basis of accounting and based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the Group’s ability to continue as a going concern. If we conclude that a material uncertainty exists, we are required to draw attention in our auditor’s report to the related disclosures in the consolidated financial statements or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify our opinion. Our conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of our auditor’s report. However, future events or conditions may cause the Group to cease to continue as a going concern.

 

Evaluate whether the presentation and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements are in accordance with accounting standards generally accepted in Japan, the overall presentation, structure and content of the consolidated financial statements, including the disclosures, and whether the consolidated financial statements represent the underlying transactions and events in a manner that achieves fair presentation.

 

Obtain sufficient appropriate audit evidence regarding the financial information of the entities or business activities within the Group to express an opinion on the consolidated financial statements. We are responsible for the direction, supervision and performance of the group audit. We remain solely responsible for our audit opinion.

We communicate with the Audit Committee regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit, significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that we identify during our audit.

We also provide the Audit Committee with a statement that we have complied with relevant ethical requirements regarding independence, and communicate with them all relationships and other matters that may reasonably be thought to bear on our independence, and where applicable, related safeguards.

Interest required to be disclosed by the Certified Public Accountants Act of Japan

We do not have any interest in the Group which is required to be disclosed pursuant to the provisions of the Certified Public Accountants Act of Japan.

 

35


Notes to Non-Consolidated Financial Statements

<Notes to Significant Accounting Policies for Non-Consolidated Financial Statements>

1.

Standards for recognition and measurement of securities

    

As for the measurement of securities, investments in subsidiaries and affiliates are carrier at cost using the moving-average method, and other securities are also carried at cost using the moving-average method since they are stocks with no market prices.

2.

Depreciation

  (1)

Tangible fixed assets

    

Declining balance method (However, buildings are depreciated on the straight-line method.)

  (2)

Intangible fixed assets

    

Capitalized software for internal use owned by the Company is depreciated using the straight-line method over its estimated useful life (basically 5 years).

3.

Accounting method for deferred assets

    

Bond issuance cost is expensed in full amount at the time of expenditure.

4.

Translation of assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies

    

Assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are translated into Japanese yen mainly at the exchange rate prevailing at the balance sheet date, with the exception of stocks of subsidiaries and affiliates translated at the exchange rate prevailing at the time of acquisition.

5.

Accounting standards for reserves

  (1)

Reserve for employee bonuses

    

Reserve for employee bonuses is provided for payment of bonuses to employees, in the amount of estimated bonuses, which are attributable to the fiscal year.

  (2)

Reserve for executive bonuses

    

Reserve for executive bonuses is provided for payment of bonuses to executives (including executive officers, hereinafter the same), in the amount of estimated bonuses, which are attributable to the fiscal year.

6.

Consumption taxes

National and local consumption taxes are accounted for using the tax-excluded method.

7.

Adoption of the consolidated corporate-tax system

The Company applies the consolidated corporate-tax system with the Company as a parent company.

<Additional information>

  

Transition from the consolidated corporate-tax system to the group tax sharing system

  

Companies are required to shift from the consolidated corporate-tax system to the group tax sharing system from the fiscal year beginning on or after April 1, 2022, in accordance with the “Act for Partial Amendment of the Income Tax Act, etc.” (Act No. 8, 2020) enacted on March 31, 2020. However, the Company, currently adopting the consolidated corporate-tax system, applied the accounting treatment based on the provisions of the Income Tax Act before the revision for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021, in accordance with the “Practical Solution on the Treatment of Tax Effect Accounting for the Transition from the Consolidated Taxation System to the Group Tax Sharing System” (ASBJ Practical Issue Task Force No. 39, March 31, 2020).

<Notes to Non-Consolidated Balance Sheet>

1.

Amounts less than one million yen have been rounded down.

2.

Accumulated depreciation on tangible fixed assets: 60 million yen

3.

Subordinated loans

    

Current portion of long-term loans receivable from subsidiaries and affiliates, and long-term loans receivable from subsidiaries and affiliates are subordinated loans.

4.

Subordinated bonds

    

Bonds include subordinated bonds of 1,604,201 million yen.

5.

Subordinated borrowings

    

Long-term borrowings include subordinated borrowings of 41,000 million yen.

6.

Guarantee liabilities

    

The Company is offering guarantees in the amount of 324,150 million yen to the Deposit Protection Fund of the Association of German Banks, in regard to withdrawals of deposits by customers within Germany at SMBC and SMBC Bank EU AG.

 

36


7.   Short-term monetary claims to affiliates:

   1,093,332 million yen

Long-term monetary claims to affiliates:

   7,454,394 million yen

Short-term monetary debts to affiliates:

   1,296,038 million yen

 

 

<Notes to Non-Consolidated Statement of Income>

1.   Amounts less than one million yen have been rounded down.

  

2.   Related party transactions

  

Operating income:

   483,459 million yen

Operating expenses:

   3,966 million yen

Transactions other than operating transactions:

   6,642 million yen

<Notes to Non-Consolidated Statement of Changes in Net Assets>

1.

Amounts less than one million yen have been rounded down.

2.

Type and number of treasury stock:

 

   Year ended March 31, 2021

      Unit: number of shares
    

As of  

beginning of the  
fiscal year  

 

Increased in  

the fiscal year  

 

Decreased in  

the fiscal year  

 

As of the  

fiscal year-end  

  Remarks

Treasury stock

                                                                                                                                                                                   

Common stock

  3,645,043     57,918     90,659     3,612,302     (Notes 1, 2)

Total

  3,645,043     57,918     90,659     3,612,302      

(Notes)

  1.

The increase of 57,918 shares in the number of treasury common stock was due to purchase of fractional shares, and acquisition of restricted stocks without compensation under the Stock Compensation Plans.

  2.

The decrease of 90,659 shares in the number of treasury common stock was due to sales of fractional shares as well as exercise of stock options.

<Notes to Tax Effect Accounting>

Breakdown of major factors leading to the occurrence of deferred tax assets and deferred tax liabilities

 

Millions of yen

 

 

Deferred tax assets

  

 

Shares of subsidiaries

     930,863  

 

Others

     16,916  

 

Subtotal deferred tax assets

     947,780  

 

Valuation allowance

     (946,802

 

Total deferred tax assets

     978  

 

Deferred tax liabilities

  

 

Others

     (505

 

Total deferred tax liabilities

     (505

 

Net amount of deferred tax assets

     472  

<Notes to Per Share Information>

Net assets per share:

     4,364.96 yen  

Earnings per share:

     205.78 yen  

 

37