20-F 1 fmx-20201231x20f.htm 20-F

As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on April 14, 2021

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 20-F

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)

OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020

Commission file number 001-35934

 

Fomento Económico Mexicano, S.A.B. de C.V.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Mexican Economic Development, Inc.

(Translation of registrant’s name into English)

 

United Mexican States

(Jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

 

General Anaya No. 601 Pte., Colonia Bella Vista, Monterrey, NL 64410 Mexico

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

Juan F. Fonseca; Tel (52-818) 328-6167; investor@femsa.com.mx

General Anaya No. 601 Pte., Colonia Bella Vista, Monterrey, NL 64410 Mexico

(Name, telephone, email and/or facsimile number and address of company contact person)

 

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of each class:

    

Trading Symbols:

   

Name of each exchange on which registered:

American Depositary Shares, each representing 10 BD Units, and each BD Unit consisting of one Series B Share, two Series D-B Shares and two Series D-L Shares, without par value

 

FMX

 

New York Stock Exchange

2.875% Senior Notes due 2023

 

FMX23

 

New York Stock Exchange

4.375% Senior Notes due 2043

 

FMX43

 

New York Stock Exchange

3.500% Senior Notes due 2050

 

FMX50

 

New York Stock Exchange

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

 

Securities for which there is a reporting obligation pursuant to Section 15(d) of the Act: None

 

Indicate the number of outstanding shares of each of the issuer’s classes of capital or common stock as of the close of the period covered by the annual report:

 

2,161,177,770

    

BD Units, each consisting of one Series B Share, two Series D-B Shares and two Series D-L Shares, without par value. The BD

Units represent a total of 2,161,177,770 Series B Shares, 4,322,355,540 Series D-B Shares and 4,322,355,540 Series D-L Shares.

1,417,048,500

B Units, each consisting of five Series B Shares without par value. The B Units represent a total of 7,085,242,500 Series B Shares.


Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.

Yes

  No

 

If this report is an annual or transition report, indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

  Yes

No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be file by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yes

  No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).

  Yes

  No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large Accelerated filer

Accelerated filer

Non-accelerated filer

Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company that prepares its financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards† provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.        

 

The term “new or revised financial accounting standard” refers to any update issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board to its Accounting Standards Codification after April 5, 2012.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.

Yes

  No

Indicate by check mark which basis of accounting the registrant has used to prepare the financial statements included in this filing:

U.S. GAAP

International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board

Other

If “Other” has been checked in response to the previous question, indicate by check mark which financial statement item the registrant has elected to follow.

  Item 17

  Item 18

 If this is an annual report, indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

  Yes

No


TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

    

1

References

1

Currency Translations and Estimates

1

Forward-Looking Information

1

ITEMS 1-2. NOT APPLICABLE

2

ITEM 3. KEY INFORMATION

2

Selected Consolidated Financial Data

2

Dividends

4

Risk Factors

5

ITEM 4. INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY

20

Introduction

20

Corporate Information

21

Corporate History and Recent Developments

21

Ownership Structure

23

Significant Subsidiaries

23

Business Strategy

24

Coca-Cola FEMSA

25

Overview

25

Capital Stock

25

Business Strategy

26

Coca-Cola FEMSA’s Territories

28

Coca-Cola FEMSA’s Products

28

Packaging

29

Sales Volume and Transactions Overview

29

Seasonality

31

Marketing

32

Product Sales and Distribution

32

Principal Competitors

34

i


Raw Materials

35

FEMSA Comercio

37

Proximity Division

38

Health Division

42

Fuel Division

45

Heineken Investment

46

Other Businesses

46

Description of Property, Plant and Equipment

47

Insurance

48

Capital Expenditures and Divestitures

48

 

Regulatory Matters

49

ITEM 4A. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

59

ITEM 5. OPERATING AND FINANCIAL REVIEW AND PROSPECTS

59

Overview of Events, Trends and Uncertainties

59

Effects of Changes in Economic Conditions

60

Operating Leverage

61

Critical Accounting Judgments and Estimates

61

Future Impact of Recently Issued Accounting Standards not yet in Effect

65

Operating Results

65

Liquidity and Capital Resources

71

ITEM 6. DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND EMPLOYEES

81

Directors

81

Senior Management

88

Compensation of Directors and Senior Management

92

EVA Stock Incentive Plan

92

Insurance Policies

93

Ownership by Management

93

Board Practices

93

ii


Employees

94

ITEM 7. MAJOR SHAREHOLDERS AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

95

Major Shareholders

95

Related-Party Transactions

96

Voting Trust

96

Interest of Management in Certain Transactions

97

Business Transactions between Coca-Cola FEMSA, FEMSA and The Coca-Cola Company

98

ITEM 8. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

99

Consolidated Financial Statements

99

Dividend Policy

99

Legal Proceedings

99

Significant Changes

100

ITEM 9. THE OFFER AND LISTING

100

Description of Securities

100

Trading Markets

101

Trading on the Mexican Stock Exchange

101

ITEM 10. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

101

Bylaws

101

Taxation

108

Material Contracts

112

Documents on Display

118

ITEM 11. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

118

Interest Rate Risk

118

Foreign Currency Exchange Rate Risk

121

Equity Risk

125

Commodity Price Risk

125

ITEM 12. DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES OTHER THAN EQUITY SECURITIES

125

ITEM 12A. DEBT SECURITIES

126

ITEM 12B.WARRANTS AND RIGHTS

126

iii



INTRODUCTION

This annual report contains information materially consistent with the information presented in the audited consolidated financial statements and is free of material misstatements of fact that would result in material inconsistencies with the information in the audited consolidated financial statements.

References

The terms “FEMSA,” “our company,” “the Group,” “we,” “us” and “our” are used in this annual report to refer to Fomento Económico Mexicano, S.A.B. de C.V. and, except where the context otherwise requires, its subsidiaries on a consolidated basis. We refer to our former subsidiary Cuauhtémoc Moctezuma Holding, S.A. de C.V. (formerly FEMSA Cerveza, S.A. de C.V.) as “Heineken Mexico” or “FEMSA Cerveza,” to our subsidiary Coca-Cola FEMSA, S.A.B. de C.V. as “Coca-Cola FEMSA” and to our subsidiary FEMSA Comercio, S.A. de C.V. as “FEMSA Comercio.” FEMSA Comercio is comprised of a “Proximity Division,” a “Fuel Division” and a “Health Division.” Our equity investment in Heineken, N.V., through subsidiaries of FEMSA, including CB Equity LLP (“CB Equity”) is referred to as the “Heineken Investment.”

The term “S.A.B.” stands for sociedad anónima bursátil, which is the term used in the United Mexican States (“Mexico”) to denominate a publicly traded company under the Mexican Securities Market Law (Ley del Mercado de Valores or “Mexican Securities Market Law”).

“U.S. dollars,” “US$,” “dollars” or “$” refer to the lawful currency of the United States of America (“United States”). “Mexican pesos,” “pesos” or “Ps.” refer to the lawful currency of Mexico. “Euros” or “€” refer to the lawful currency of the European Economic and Monetary Union (the “Euro Zone”).

As used in this annual report, “sparkling beverages” refers to non-alcoholic carbonated beverages. “Still beverages” refers to non-alcoholic non-carbonated beverages. “Waters” refers to flavored and non-flavored waters, whether or not carbonated.

Currency Translations and Estimates

This annual report contains translations of certain Mexican peso amounts into U.S. dollars at specified rates solely for the convenience of the reader. These translations should not be construed as representations that the Mexican peso amounts actually represent such U.S. dollar amounts or could be converted into U.S. dollars at the rate indicated. Unless otherwise indicated, such U.S. dollar amounts have been translated from Mexican pesos at an exchange rate of Ps. 19.8920 to US$ 1.00, the noon buying rate for Mexican pesos on December 31, 2020, as published by the U.S. Federal Reserve Board in its H.10 Weekly Release of Foreign Exchange Rates. On April 9, 2021, this exchange rate was Ps. 20.1620 to US$ 1.00.

To the extent estimates are contained in this annual report, we believe that such estimates, which are based on internal data, are reliable. Amounts in this annual report are rounded, and the totals may therefore not precisely equal the sum of the numbers presented.

Per capita growth rates, consumer price indices and population data have been taken from statistics prepared by the National Institute of Statistics, Geography and Information of Mexico (Instituto Nacional de Estadística, Geografía e Informática or “INEGI”), the U.S. Federal Reserve Board and the Mexican Central Bank (Banco de México), local entities in each country and upon our estimates.

Forward-Looking Information

This annual report contains words such as “believe,” “expect,” “anticipate” and similar expressions that identify forward-looking statements. Use of these words reflects our views about future events and financial performance. Actual results could differ materially from those projected in these forward-looking statements as a result of various factors that may be beyond our control, including, but not limited to, effects on our company from changes in our relationship with or among our affiliated companies, effects on our company’s points of sale performances from changes in economic conditions, changes or interruptions in our information technology systems, effects on our company from changes to our various suppliers’ business and demands, competition, significant developments in the countries where we operate, our ability to successfully integrate mergers and acquisitions we have completed in recent years, international economic or political conditions, health epidemics, pandemics and similar outbreaks including future outbreak of diseases, or the

1


spread of existing diseases (including COVID-19) and their effect on customer behavior and on economic, political, social and other conditions in the countries where we operate and globally. Accordingly, we caution readers not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. In any event, these statements speak only as of their respective dates, and we undertake no obligation to update or revise any of them, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

ITEMS 1-2. NOT APPLICABLE

ITEM 3. KEY INFORMATION

Selected Consolidated Financial Data

This annual report includes (under Item 18) our audited consolidated statements of financial position as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, and the related consolidated income statements, consolidated statements of comprehensive income, changes in equity and cash flows for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018. Our audited consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”) as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (“IASB”).

This annual report presents financial information for 2020, 2019, 2018, 2017 and 2016 in nominal terms in Mexican pesos, taking into account local inflation of any hyperinflationary economic environment pursuant to IFRS. Our non-Mexican subsidiaries maintain their accounting records in their local currency and in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the country where they are located. For presentation in our consolidated financial statements, we adjust these accounting records into IFRS and report in Mexican pesos under these standards.

In the case of Argentina, on July 1, 2018, the economy was designated as hyperinflationary based on various economic factors, including that Argentina’s cumulative inflation over the three-year period prior to such date exceeded 100%, according to the available indexes in the country. As a result, the financial statements of our Argentine operations were remeasured in its functional currency (Argentine peso) but they were not restated in its presentation currency (Mexican pesos) since Mexico is not considered a hyperinflationary economy. In addition, our financial statements for prior periods were not restated for comparative purposes. Effective as of January 1, 2018, we revised the financial information of our Argentine operations to recognize the inflationary effects before it was converted to Mexican pesos using the official exchange rate published by the local central bank at the end of each period. For further information, see Notes 3.3 and 3.4 to our audited consolidated financial statements.

For each non-hyperinflationary economic environment, local currency is converted to Mexican pesos using the year-end exchange rate for assets and liabilities, the historical exchange rate for equity and the average exchange rate for the period for the income statement and comprehensive income. For further information, see Notes 3.3 and 3.4 to our audited consolidated financial statements.

In August 2018, Coca-Cola FEMSA’s subsidiary Controladora de Inversiones en Bebidas Refrescantes, S.L. (“CIBR”) notified The Coca-Cola Company (“TCCC”) of its decision to exercise its option to sell its 51.0% stake in Coca-Cola FEMSA Philippines, Inc. (“KOF Philippines”) and, on December 13, 2018, CIBR completed this sale. As a result, KOF Philippines was classified as an asset held for sale commencing on August 31, 2018 and as a discontinued operation for the year ended December 31, 2018, and the corresponding results for 2017 were restated for comparative purposes. Commencing on January 1, 2018, Coca-Cola FEMSA stopped accounting for KOF Philippines and, specifically its Asia division, as a separate reporting segment. The net gain derived from the sale of KOF Philippines, as well as KOF Philippines’ results of operations from January 1, 2018 through December 12, 2018 were recorded in Coca-Cola FEMSA’s consolidated financial statements as part of its Mexico and Central America consolidated reporting segment.

Except when specifically indicated, information in this annual report is presented as of December 31, 2020 and does not give effect to any transaction, financial or otherwise, subsequent to that date.

The following table presents selected financial information of our company. This information should be read in conjunction with, and is qualified in its entirety by reference to, our audited consolidated financial statements, including the notes thereto. The selected financial information contained herein is presented on a consolidated basis and is not

2


necessarily indicative of our financial position or results at or for any future date or period. See Note 3 to our audited consolidated financial statements for our significant accounting policies.

December 31, 

 

    

2020(1)

    

2020

    

2019

    

2018(4)

    

2017(2)(3)(4)

    

2016(2)

 

(in millions of Mexican pesos or millions of

 

U.S. dollars, except percentages and share and per share data)

 

Income Statement Data (for the year ended):

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Total revenues

$

24,782

Ps.

492,966

Ps.

506,711

Ps.

469,744

Ps.

439,932

Ps.

399,507

Gross profit

 

9,534

 

189,653

 

191,481

 

175,170

 

162,090

 

148,204

Income before income taxes from continuing operations and share of the profit of equity accounted investees

 

970

 

19,311

 

32,296

 

33,630

 

35,771

 

28,556

Income taxes

 

745

 

14,819

 

10,476

 

10,169

 

10,213

 

7,888

Consolidated net income

 

188

 

3,756

 

28,048

 

33,079

 

37,207

 

27,175

Controlling interest net (loss) income from continuing operations

 

(98)

 

(1,930)

 

20,699

 

22,560

 

40,864

 

21,140

Non-controlling interest net income (loss) from continuing operations

 

286

 

5,686

 

7,349

 

7,153

 

(7,383)

 

6,035

Basic controlling interest net (loss) income from continuing operations:

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Per Series B Share

 

(0.00)

 

(0.10)

 

1.03

 

1.13

 

2.04

 

1.05

Per Series D Share

 

(0.01)

 

(0.12)

 

1.29

 

1.41

 

2.55

 

1.32

Diluted controlling interest net (loss) income from continuing operations:

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Per Series B Share

 

(0.00)

 

(0.10)

 

1.03

 

1.13

 

2.04

 

1.05

Per Series D Share

 

(0.01)

 

(0.12)

 

1.29

 

1.41

 

2.55

 

1.32

Weighted average number of shares outstanding (in millions):

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Series B Shares

 

9,246.4

 

9,246.4

 

9,246.4

 

9,246.4

 

9,246.4

 

9,246.4

Series D Shares

 

8,644.7

 

8,644.7

 

8,644.7

 

8,644.7

 

8,644.7

 

8,644.7

Allocation of earnings:

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Series B Shares

 

46.11

%  

46.11

%  

46.11

%  

46.11

%  

46.11

%  

46.11

%

Series D Shares

 

53.89

%  

53.89

%  

53.89

%  

53.89

%  

53.89

%  

53.89

%

Financial Position Data (as of):

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Total assets

$

34,428

Ps.

684,848

Ps.

637,541

Ps.

576,381

Ps.

588,541

Ps.

545,623

Total current liabilities

 

5,953

 

118,413

 

136,534

 

101,464

 

105,022

 

86,289

Long-term debt(5)

 

9,042

 

179,864

 

101,747

 

114,990

 

117,758

 

131,967

Leases liabilities(6)

 

2,591

 

51,536

 

47,292

 

 

 

Other non-current liabilities(7)

 

1,400

 

27,848

 

26,217

 

24,385

 

28,849

 

41,197

Capital stock

 

168

 

3,348

 

3,348

 

3,348

 

3,348

 

3,348

Total equity

 

15,442

 

307,187

 

325,751

 

335,542

 

336,912

 

286,170

Total controlling interest

 

11,951

 

237,743

 

251,989

 

257,053

 

250,291

 

211,904

Non-controlling interest

 

3,491

 

69,444

 

73,762

 

78,489

 

86,621

 

74,266

Other Information

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Depreciation

$

1,257

Ps.

25,006

Ps.

23,361

Ps.

14,698

Ps.

13,799

Ps.

12,076

Capital expenditures(8)

 

1,050

 

20,893

 

25,579

 

24,266

 

23,486

 

22,155

Gross margin(9)

 

38

%  

38

%  

38

%  

37

%  

37

%  

37

%


(1)Translation to U.S. dollar amounts at an exchange rate of Ps. 19.8920 to US$ 1.00 solely for the convenience of the reader.
(2)The exchange rate used to translate our operations in Venezuela as of and for the year ended on December 31, 2017 which was the DICOM rate of 22,793 bolivars to US$ 1.00 and compared to the year ended on December 31, 2016 of 673.76 bolivars to US$ 1.00. See “Item 3. Key Information—Selected Consolidated Financial Data” and Note 3.3 of our audited consolidated financial statements.
(3)Effective as of December 31, 2017, Coca-Cola FEMSA deconsolidated its operations in Venezuela and as a result began accounting for the results of operations of Coca-Cola FEMSA de Venezuela, S.A. (“KOF Venezuela”) as an investment under the fair value method pursuant to IFRS 9, Financial Instruments. Effective as of January 1, 2018, Coca-Cola FEMSA no longer includes the results of operations of KOF Venezuela in its consolidated financial statements.
(4)The consolidated information presented does not include Coca-Cola FEMSA’s 51% stake in KOF Philippines as a result of the sale which was finalized on December 13, 2018. The operations of KOF Philippines were reclassified as discontinued operations in our audited consolidated income statements for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017 (revised). For related information regarding the sale of KOF Philippines, see “Item 4. Information on the Company—Corporate History and Recent Developments”.
(5)Includes long-term debt minus the current portion of long-term debt.
(6)We have adopted IFRS 16 “Leases” as of January 1, 2019 using the modified retrospective approach under which the comparative information is not restated. See Note 2.4.1 to our audited consolidated financial statements.
(7)Includes employee benefits, deferred tax liabilities, provisions and other non-current financial liabilities.
(8)Includes investments in property, plant and equipment, intangible and other assets, net of cost of long-lived assets sold and writen-off.
(9)Gross margin is calculated by dividing gross profit by total revenues.

3


Dividends

We have historically paid dividends per BD Unit (including in the form of American Depositary Shares, or “ADSs”) approximately equal to or greater than 1% of the market price on the date of declaration, subject to changes in our results and financial position, including due to extraordinary economic events and to the factors described in “Item 3. Key Information— Risk Factors” that affect our financial condition and liquidity. These factors may affect whether or not dividends are declared and the amount of such dividends. We do not expect to be subject to any contractual restrictions on our ability to pay dividends, although our subsidiaries may be subject to such restrictions. Because we are a holding company with no significant operations of our own, we will have distributable profits and cash to pay dividends only to the extent that we receive dividends from our subsidiaries. Accordingly, we cannot assure you that we will pay dividends or as to the amount of any dividends.

The table below sets forth the nominal amount of dividends paid per share in Mexican pesos and translated into U.S. dollars and their respective payment dates for the 2016 to 2019 fiscal years. On March 24, 2021, our shareholders approved a cash dividend of Ps. 7,686,624,026, consisting of Ps. 0.3833 per Series B Share and Ps. 0.4792 per Series D Share, for the 2020 fiscal year, which will be paid in two installments on May 6, 2021 and November 5, 2021.

Fiscal Year

Aggregate

  

  

  

  

with Respect to

Amount

which Dividend

of Dividend

Per Series B Share

Per Series B Share

Per Series D Share

Per Series D Share

Date Dividend Paid

    

was Declared

    

Declared

    

Dividend

    

Dividend(1)

    

Dividend

    

Dividend(1)

May 5, 2017 and November 3, 2017

2016

 

Ps.

8,636,000,000

Ps.

0.4307

$

0.0226

Ps.

0.5383

$

0.0282

May 5, 2017

 

 

Ps.

0.2153

$

0.0113

 

Ps.

0.2692

$

0.0142

November 3, 2017

 

  

 

  

 

Ps.

0.2153

$

0.0112

 

Ps.

0.2692

$

0.0140

 

  

 

  

 

 

May 4, 2018 and November 6, 2018

 

2017

 

Ps.

9,220,625,674

Ps.

0.4598

$

0.0236

Ps.

0.5748

$

0.0294

May 4, 2018

 

Ps.

0.2299

$

0.0120

 

Ps.

0.2874

$

0.0150

November 6, 2018

 

  

 

  

 

Ps.

0.2299

$

0.0116

 

Ps.

0.2874

$

0.0145

 

  

 

  

 

 

May 7, 2019 and November 5, 2019

2018

 

Ps.

9,691,944,126

Ps.

0.4833

$

0.0253

Ps.

0.6042

$

0.0316

May 7, 2019

 

 

Ps.

0.2417

$

0.0127

 

Ps.

0.3021

$

0.0159

November 5, 2019

 

  

 

  

 

Ps.

0.2417

$

0.0126

 

Ps.

0.3021

$

0.0157

 

  

 

  

 

 

August 20, 2020 and November 5, 2020

2019

 

Ps.

10,360,354,065

Ps.

0.5167

$

0.0241

Ps.

0.6458

$

0.0301

August 20, 2020

 

 

Ps.

0.2583

$

0.0117

 

Ps.

0.3229

$

0.0146

November 5, 2020

 

  

 

  

 

Ps.

0.2583

$

0.0124

 

Ps.

0.3229

$

0.0155


(1)Translations to U.S. dollars are based on the exchange rates on the dates the payments were made.

Our shareholders approve our audited consolidated financial statements, together with a report by the board of directors, for the previous fiscal year at the annual ordinary general shareholders meeting (“AGM”). Once the holders of Series B Shares have approved the audited consolidated financial statements, they determine the allocation of our net profits for the preceding year. Mexican law requires the allocation of at least 5% of net profits to a legal reserve, which is not subsequently available for distribution, until the amount of the legal reserve equals 20% of our paid in capital stock. As of the date of this annual report, the legal reserve of our company is fully constituted. Thereafter, the holders of Series B Shares may determine and allocate a certain percentage of net profits to any general or special reserve, including a reserve for open-market purchases of our shares. The remainder of net profits is available for distribution in the form of dividends to our shareholders. Dividends may only be paid if net profits are enough to offset losses from prior fiscal years.

Our bylaws provide that dividends will be allocated among the outstanding and fully paid shares at the time a dividend is declared in such manner that each Series D-B Share and Series D-L Share receives 125% of the dividend distributed in respect of each Series B Share. Holders of Series D-B Shares and Series D-L Shares are entitled to this dividend premium in connection with all dividends paid by us other than payments in connection with the liquidation of our company.

Subject to certain exceptions contained in the deposit agreement dated May 11, 2007, among FEMSA, The Bank of New York Mellon, as ADS depositary and holders and beneficial owners from time to time of our ADSs, evidenced by American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”), any dividends distributed to holders of our ADSs will be paid to the ADS depositary in Mexican pesos and will be converted by the ADS depositary into U.S. dollars. As a result, restrictions on the conversion of Mexican pesos into foreign currencies may affect the ability of holders of our ADSs to receive U.S. dollars, and exchange rate fluctuations may affect the U.S. dollar amount received by holders of our ADSs.

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Risk Factors

Risks Related to Our Company

The COVID-19 pandemic has adversely affected, and could continue to adversely affect, our business, operating results and financial condition.

The COVID-19 pandemic has negatively affected global and regional economic conditions. Due to the speed with which the COVID-19 pandemic developed and the uncertainty of its duration, the full impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our business is unknown at this time and difficult to predict. Government responses aimed at containing the pandemic have caused temporary closures of points of sale, distribution centers, warehouses and manufacturing facilities of our key suppliers, causing fluctuations in the availability, sale volumes and prices of certain relevant categories in our stores and products we sell, such as beer, gasoline, some beverage categories and presentations, among others. To date, these measures and regulations have included the direction to refrain from dining at restaurants, the cancellation of major sporting and entertainment events, a material reduction in travel, the promotion of social distancing, the adoption of work-from-home policies and, in certain territories, compulsory lockdowns. Any prolonged or resurging outbreaks or any variant of COVID-19 could result in the imposition of more restrictive measures in the territories in which FEMSA operates, further quarantines or closures, supply-chain disruptions, travel and transportation restrictions and/or import and export restrictions which could further adversely affect FEMSA’s business. The COVID-19 pandemic has also impacted, and is expected to continue to impact, our non-consolidated entities, including Heineken. Most countries where Heineken operates reacted to the pandemic by taking far-reaching containment measures such as restrictions of movement for populations and outlet closures, sometimes combined with the mandatory lockdown of production facilities. Heineken’s volumes and results in 2020 were heavily affected by devaluation of emerging markets currencies versus the U.S. dollar and the euro, and increased risks on credit losses from customers, business continuity of small suppliers, impairments and non-effective hedge contracts. We cannot predict how long the pandemic will last, whether it will worsen or whether there will be further outbreaks in the future in any of the markets where we operate.

The pandemic has caused and continues to cause significant volatility in financial markets, undermining investors’ confidence in the growth of countries and businesses. In addition, the longer-term economic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic may include lower or negative growth rates in the markets where we operate, less favorable exchange rates in a variety of our businesses, and reduced demand for the products we sell or a shift to lower margin products.

Unfavorable outcome of legal proceedings could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our operations and the operations of our business units have from time to time been and may continue to be subject to investigations and proceedings by antitrust authorities relating to alleged anticompetitive practices, as well as investigations and proceedings on tax, consumer protection, environmental, labor and commercial matters. We cannot assure you that these investigations and proceedings will not have an adverse effect on our business units’ business, financial condition and results of operations. See “Item 8. Financial Information—Legal Proceedings.”

Cybersecurity incidents and other breaches of network or information technology security could have an adverse effect on our business and our reputation.

We use information systems to operate our business, to process financial information and results of operations for internal reporting purposes and to comply with regulatory financial reporting and legal and tax requirements. Because information systems are critical to many of our operating activities, our business may be impacted by system shutdowns, service disruptions or security breaches, such as failures during routine operations, network or hardware failures, malicious or disruptive software, unintentional or malicious actions of employees or contractors, cyber-attacks by common hackers, criminal groups or nation-state organizations or social-activist (hacktivist) organizations, natural disasters, failures or impairments of telecommunication networks or other catastrophic events. Such incidents could result in unauthorized disclosure of material confidential information, and we could experience delays in reporting our financial results. In addition, misuse, leakage or falsification of information could result in violations of data privacy laws and regulations, damage our reputation and credibility, loss of customers, and, therefore, could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results, or may require us to spend significant financial and other resources to prevent future attacks, remedy the damage caused by a security breach or to repair or replace networks and information systems.

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Our business expansion strategy and entry into new markets and new lines of business may not be successful and may lead to decreased profit margins and integration risks.

We and our business units have entered into new markets and new lines of business through the acquisition of other businesses and continue to seek investment opportunities through this strategy.  This includes the acquisition by FEMSA Comercio of other small-format retail businesses and our acquisition in 2020 of a majority-controlling interest in WAXIE Sanitary Supply (“WAXIE”) and North American Corporation. These new businesses may not experience the same growth rates or may be less profitable than our more established businesses.

Key elements to achieving the benefits and expected synergies of these acquisitions are our ability to implement our strategies for these acquisitions, the effectiveness of those strategies, the integration of acquired businesses’ operations into ours in a timely and effective manner, and the retention of qualified and experienced key personnel. We may incur unforeseen liabilities in connection with acquiring, taking control of, or managing businesses and may encounter difficulties and unforeseen or additional costs in restructuring and integrating them into our operating structure. We cannot assure you that these efforts will be successful or completed as expected, and our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected if we are unable to do so.

Risks Related to Coca-Cola FEMSA

Coca-Cola FEMSA’s business depends on its relationship with The Coca-Cola Company, and changes in this relationship may adversely affect Coca-Cola FEMSA’s business, financial condition and results of operations.

Substantially all of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s sales are derived from sales of Coca-Cola trademark beverages. Coca-Cola FEMSA produces, markets, sells and distributes Coca-Cola trademark beverages through standard bottler agreements in the territories where it operates, which we refer to as “Coca-Cola FEMSA’s territories.” Coca-Cola FEMSA is required to purchase concentrate for all Coca-Cola trademark beverages from affiliates of TCCC, which price may be unilaterally determined from time to time by TCCC in all such territories. Coca-Cola FEMSA is also required to purchase sweeteners and other raw materials only from companies authorized by TCCC. Increases in the cost, disruption of supply or shortage of ingredients for concentrate could have an adverse effect on Coca-Cola FEMSA’s business. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—Coca-Cola FEMSA—Coca-Cola FEMSA’s Territories.”

In addition, under Coca-Cola FEMSA’s bottler agreements, it is prohibited from bottling or distributing any other beverages without TCCC’s authorization or consent and it may not transfer control of the bottler rights of any of its territories without prior consent from TCCC.

TCCC makes significant contributions to Coca-Cola FEMSA’s marketing expenses, although it is not required to contribute a particular amount. Accordingly, TCCC may discontinue or reduce such contributions at any time.

Coca-Cola FEMSA depends on TCCC to continue with its bottler agreements. Coca-Cola FEMSA’s bottler agreements are automatically renewable for ten-year terms, subject to the right of either party to give prior notice that it does not wish to renew the applicable agreement. In addition, these agreements generally may be terminated in the case of material breach. See “Item 10. Additional Information—Material Contracts—Material Contracts Relating to Coca-Cola FEMSA—Bottler Agreements.” Termination of any such bottler agreement would prevent Coca-Cola FEMSA from selling Coca-Cola trademark beverages in the affected territory. The foregoing and any other adverse changes in Coca-Cola FEMSA’s relationship with TCCC would have an adverse effect on its business, financial condition and results of operations.

The Coca-Cola Company has substantial influence on the conduct of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s business, which may result in Coca-Cola FEMSA taking actions contrary to the interests of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s shareholders other than The Coca-Cola Company.

TCCC has substantial influence on the conduct of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s business. As of the date of this report, TCCC indirectly owned 27.8% of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s outstanding capital stock, representing 32.9% of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s capital stock with full voting rights. TCCC is entitled to appoint up to five of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s maximum of 21 directors and the vote of at least two of them is required to approve certain actions by Coca-Cola FEMSA’s board

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of directors. See “Item 10. Additional Information—Material Contracts—Material Contracts Relating to Coca-Cola FEMSA—Shareholders Agreements.” The interests of TCCC may be different from the interests of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s other shareholders, which may result in Coca-Cola FEMSA taking actions contrary to the interests of such other shareholders.

Changes in consumer preferences and public concern about health-related and environmental issues could reduce demand for some of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s products.

The beverage industry is evolving mainly as a result of changes in consumer preferences and regulatory actions. There have been different plans and actions adopted in recent years by governmental authorities in some of the countries where Coca-Cola FEMSA operates. These include increases in tax rates or the imposition of new taxes on the sale of certain beverages and other regulatory measures, such as restrictions on advertising for some of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s products and additional regulations concerning the labeling or sale of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s products. Moreover, researchers, health advocates and dietary guidelines encourage consumers to reduce their consumption of certain types of beverages sweetened with sugar, artificial sweeteners and high fructose corn syrup (“HFCS”). In addition, concerns over the environmental impact of plastic may reduce the consumption of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s products sold in plastic bottles or result in additional taxes that could adversely affect consumer demand. Increasing public concern about these issues, new or increased taxes, other regulatory measures or Coca-Cola FEMSA’s failure to meet consumers’ preferences or its inability to successfully introduce new beverage products or replace plastic bottles with more environmentally friendly containers, could reduce demand for some of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s products, which would adversely affect its business, financial condition and results of operations. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—Coca-Cola FEMSA—Business Strategy.”

The reputation of Coca-Cola trademarks and trademark infringement could adversely affect Coca-Cola FEMSA’s business.

Substantially all of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s sales are derived from sales of Coca-Cola trademark beverages owned by TCCC. Maintenance of the reputation and intellectual property rights of these trademarks is essential to Coca-Cola FEMSA’s ability to attract and retain retailers and consumers and is a key driver for its success. Failure to maintain the reputation of Coca-Cola trademarks and/or to effectively protect these trademarks could have a material adverse effect on its business, financial condition and results of operations.

If Coca-Cola FEMSA is unable to protect its information systems against service interruption, misappropriation of data or breaches of security, its operations could be disrupted, which could have a material adverse effect on its business, financial condition and results of operations.

Coca-Cola FEMSA relies on networks, information systems and other technology, or “IT systems,” including the Internet and third-party hosted platforms and services, to support a variety of business processes and activities, including procurement and supply chain, manufacturing, distribution, invoicing and collection of payments and to store client and employee personal data. Coca-Cola FEMSA uses IT systems to process financial information and results of operations for internal reporting purposes and to comply with regulatory financial reporting and legal and tax requirements. Because IT systems are critical to many of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s operating activities, its business may be impacted by system shutdowns, service disruptions or security breaches. In addition, such incidents could result in unauthorized disclosure of material confidential information or regulated individual personal data. Coca-Cola FEMSA could be required to spend significant financial and other resources to remedy the damage caused by a security breach or to repair or replace networks and IT systems. Any severe damage, disruption or shutdown in Coca-Cola FEMSA’s IT systems could have a material adverse effect on its business, financial condition and results of operations.

Coca-Cola FEMSA makes investments in personnel, technologies, cyber insurance and training of its personnel. Coca-Cola FEMSA also maintains an IT risk management program that is supervised by its senior management. Reports on such IT risk management program are presented to the Audit Committee of its board of directors on a quarterly basis. As part of this program, Coca-Cola FEMSA has a cybersecurity framework, internal policies and cross-functional surveillance. Despite Coca-Cola FEMSA’s investments and focus on risk management programs, Coca-Cola FEMSA may be subject to unexpected security breaches, and there is no assurance that the measures Coca-Cola FEMSA implements will be sufficient to prevent such breaches.

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Negative or inaccurate information on social media could adversely affect Coca-Cola FEMSA’s reputation.

Negative or inaccurate information concerning or affecting Coca-Cola FEMSA or the Coca-Cola trademarks may be posted at any time on social media and similar platforms, including weblogs (blogs), social media websites, and other forms of Internet-based communications which allow individual access to a broad audience of consumers and other interested persons. This information may harm Coca-Cola FEMSA’s reputation without affording the corporation an opportunity for redress or correction, which could in turn have a material adverse effect on its business, financial condition and results of operations.

Competition could adversely affect Coca-Cola FEMSA’s business, financial condition and results of operations.

The beverage industry in the territories where Coca-Cola FEMSA operates is highly competitive. Coca-Cola FEMSA faces competition from other bottlers of sparkling beverages, such as Pepsi trademark products and other bottlers and distributors of local beverage brands, and from producers of low-cost beverages or “B brands.” Coca-Cola FEMSA also competes in beverage categories other than sparkling beverages, such as water, juice-based beverages, coffee, teas, milk, value-added dairy products, sports drinks, energy drinks and plant-based beverages. We expect that Coca-Cola FEMSA will continue to face strong competition in its beverage categories in all of its territories and anticipate that existing or new competitors may broaden their product lines and extend their geographic scope.

Although competitive conditions are different in each of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s territories, Coca-Cola FEMSA competes mainly in terms of price, packaging, effective promotional activities, access to retail outlets and sufficient shelf space, customer service, product innovation and product alternatives and the ability to identify and satisfy consumer preferences. Lower pricing and activities by Coca-Cola FEMSA’s competitors may have an adverse effect on its business, financial condition and results of operations.

Water shortages or any failure to maintain existing concessions or contracts could adversely affect Coca-Cola FEMSA’s business, financial condition and results of operations.

Water is an essential component of all of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s products. Coca-Cola FEMSA obtains water from various sources in its territories, including springs, wells, rivers and municipal and state water companies pursuant to either concessions granted by governments in its various territories (including governments at the federal, state or municipal level) or pursuant to contracts.

Coca-Cola FEMSA obtains the vast majority of the water used in its production from municipal utility companies and pursuant to concessions to use wells, which are generally granted based on studies of the existing and projected groundwater supply. Coca-Cola FEMSA’s existing water concessions or contracts to obtain water may be terminated by governmental authorities under certain circumstances and their renewal depends on several factors, including having paid all fees in full, having complied with applicable laws and obligations and receiving approval for renewal from local and/or federal water authorities. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—Regulatory Matters—Water Supply.” In some of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s territories, its existing water supply may not be sufficient to meet its future production needs, and the available water supply may be adversely affected by shortages or changes in governmental regulations and environmental changes.

Coca-Cola FEMSA cannot assure you that water will be available in sufficient quantities to meet Coca-Cola FEMSA’s future production needs or will prove sufficient to meet its water supply needs. Continued water scarcity in the regions where Coca-Cola FEMSA operates may adversely affect its business, financial condition and results of operations.

Increases in the prices of raw materials, supply chain disruptions or shortages of raw materials could increase Coca-Cola FEMSA’s cost of goods sold and may adversely affect its business, financial condition and results of operations.

In addition to water, Coca-Cola FEMSA’s most significant raw materials are concentrate, which Coca-Cola FEMSA acquires from affiliates of TCCC, sweeteners and packaging materials.

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Prices for Coca-Cola trademark beverages concentrate are determined by TCCC as a percentage of the weighted average retail price in local currency, net of applicable taxes. TCCC has the right to unilaterally change concentrate prices or change the manner in which such prices are calculated. In the past, TCCC has increased concentrate prices for Coca-Cola trademark beverages in some of the countries where Coca-Cola FEMSA operates. Coca-Cola FEMSA may not be successful in negotiating or implementing measures to mitigate the negative effect this may have in the pricing of its products or its results.

The prices for Coca-Cola FEMSA’s other raw materials are driven by market prices and local availability, the imposition of import duties and restrictions and fluctuations in exchange rates. Coca-Cola FEMSA is also required to meet all of its supply needs (including sweeteners and packaging materials) from suppliers approved by TCCC and TCCC may limit the number of suppliers available to Coca-Cola FEMSA. Coca-Cola FEMSA’s sales prices are denominated in the local currency in each country where it operates, while the prices of certain materials, including those used in the bottling of its products, mainly polyethylene terephthalate (“PET”) resin, preforms to make plastic bottles, finished plastic bottles, aluminum cans, HFCS and certain sweeteners, are paid in, or determined with reference to, the U.S. dollar, and therefore may increase if the U.S. dollar appreciates against the applicable local currency. Coca-Cola FEMSA cannot anticipate whether the U.S. dollar will appreciate or depreciate with respect to such local currencies in the future, and we cannot assure you that Coca-Cola FEMSA will be successful in mitigating any such fluctuations through derivative instruments or otherwise. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—Raw Materials.”

Coca-Cola FEMSA’s most significant packaging raw material costs arise from the purchase of PET resin, the price of which is related to crude oil prices and global PET resin supply. Crude oil prices have a cyclical behavior and are determined with reference to the U.S. dollar; therefore, high currency volatility may affect the average price for PET resin in local currencies. In addition, since 2010, international sugar prices have been volatile due to various factors, including shifting demand, availability, climate change and other issues affecting production and distribution. In all of the countries where Coca-Cola FEMSA operates, other than Brazil, sugar prices are subject to local regulations and other barriers to market entry that cause Coca-Cola FEMSA to purchase sugar above international market prices. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—Raw Materials.” We cannot assure you that Coca-Cola FEMSA’s raw material prices will not further increase in the future or that Coca-Cola FEMSA will be successful in mitigating any such increase through derivative instruments or otherwise. Increases in the prices of raw materials would increase Coca-Cola FEMSA’s cost of goods sold and adversely affect its business, financial condition and results of operations.

Increases in the cost, disruption of supply or shortage of energy or fuel could adversely affect Coca-Cola FEMSA’s business and results of operations.

Coca-Cola FEMSA’s bottling operations operate large fleets of trucks and other motor vehicles to distribute and deliver beverage products to its business partners and customers. In addition, Coca-Cola FEMSA uses a significant amount of electricity, natural gas and other energy sources to operate its bottling plants and distribution facilities. An increase in the price, disruption of supply or shortage of fuel and other energy sources in the countries where Coca-Cola FEMSA operates, which may be caused by increased demand, natural disasters, power outages or government regulations, taxes, policies or programs, including programs designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to address climate change, could increase its operating costs and negatively impact its business and results of operations. Changes in government regulations in the countries where Coca-Cola FEMSA operates, including reforms related to distribution and other costs, could lead to a substantial increase in its electricity cost. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—Regulatory Matters.”

Regulatory developments may adversely affect Coca-Cola FEMSA’s business, financial condition and results of operations.

The principal areas in which Coca-Cola FEMSA is subject to laws and regulations are anti-corruption, anti-bribery, anti-money laundering, water, environment, energy, labor (including with respect to outsourcing), taxation, health, antitrust and price controls. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—Regulatory Matters.” Changes in existing laws and regulations, the adoption of new laws or regulations, or a stricter interpretation or enforcement thereof in the countries where Coca-Cola FEMSA operates may increase Coca-Cola FEMSA’s operating and compliance costs or impose restrictions on its operations which, in turn, may adversely affect its business, financial condition and results of operations.

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Coca-Cola FEMSA currently offers non-refillable and refillable containers across its territories, among other product presentations. Certain legislative and regulatory reforms have been proposed in some of the territories where Coca-Cola FEMSA operates to restrict the sale of single-use plastics and similar legislation or regulations may be proposed or enacted in the future. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—Coca-Cola FEMSA—Raw Materials.” Consumers’ increased concerns and changing attitudes about the solid waste streams and environmental responsibility and the related publicity could result in the adoption of such legislation or regulations. If these types of requirements are adopted and implemented on a large scale in any of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s territories, they could affect Coca-Cola FEMSA’s costs or require changes in its distribution model and packaging, which could reduce Coca-Cola FEMSA’s net operating revenues and profitability.

Voluntary price restraints or statutory price controls have been imposed historically in several of the countries where Coca-Cola FEMSA operates. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—Regulatory Matters—Price Controls.” We cannot assure you that existing or future laws and regulations in the countries where Coca-Cola FEMSA operates relating to goods and services (in particular, laws and regulations imposing statutory price controls) will not affect Coca-Cola FEMSA’s products, Coca-Cola FEMSA’s ability to set prices for its products, or that Coca-Cola FEMSA will not need to implement price restraints, which could have a negative effect on Coca-Cola FEMSA’s business, financial condition and results of operations.

Coca-Cola FEMSA operates in multiple territories and is subject to complex regulatory frameworks with increased enforcement activities. Coca-Cola FEMSA maintains a global integrity and compliance program that is supervised by its senior management and employs a chief compliance officer in each country where it operates. Reports on such compliance program are presented to the Audit Committee of its board of directors on a semi-annual basis. Despite Coca-Cola FEMSA’s internal governance and compliance processes, Coca-Cola FEMSA may be subject to unexpected breaches by its employees, contractors or other agents to its code of ethics, anti-corruption and anti-money laundering policies and other internal guidelines, including instances of fraudulent behavior, corrupt practices and dishonesty by any of them. Coca-Cola FEMSA’s failure to comply with applicable laws and other standards could harm its reputation, subject Coca-Cola FEMSA to substantial fines, sanctions or penalties and adversely affect its business. There is no assurance that Coca-Cola FEMSA will be able to comply with changes in any laws and regulations within the timelines established by the relevant regulatory authorities.

Taxes could adversely affect Coca-Cola FEMSA’s business, financial condition and results of operations.

The countries where Coca-Cola FEMSA operates may adopt new tax laws or modify existing tax laws to increase taxes applicable to its business or products. Coca-Cola FEMSA’s products are subject to certain taxes in many of the countries where Coca-Cola FEMSA operates. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—Regulatory Matters—Taxation of Beverages.” The imposition of new taxes, increases in existing taxes, or changes in the interpretation of tax laws and regulation by tax authorities may have a material adverse effect on Coca-Cola FEMSA’s business, financial condition and results of operations.

Climate change and legal or regulatory responses thereto may have an adverse impact on Coca-Cola FEMSA’s business.

There is increasing concern that a gradual rise of global average temperatures due to increased concentration of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will cause significant changes in weather patterns around the globe and an increase in the frequency and severity of natural disasters. Decreased agricultural productivity in certain regions of the world as a result of changing weather patterns may limit the availability or increase the cost of key agricultural commodities, such as sugarcane, and corn, which are important sources of ingredients for Coca-Cola FEMSA’s products. Increasing concern over climate change also may result in additional legal or regulatory requirements designed to reduce or mitigate the effects of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas emissions on the environment. Increased energy or compliance costs and expenses due to increased legal or regulatory requirements may cause disruptions in, or an increase in the costs associated with, the manufacturing and distribution of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s beverage products. The effects of climate change and legal or regulatory initiatives to address climate change could have an adverse impact on Coca-Cola FEMSA’s business.

In addition, from time to time, Coca-Cola FEMSA establishes and publicly announces goals and commitments to reduce its carbon footprint by increasing its use of recycled packaging materials and participating in environmental and sustainability programs and initiatives organized or sponsored by non-governmental organizations and other groups

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to reduce greenhouse gas emissions industrywide. If Coca-Cola FEMSA fails to achieve or improperly report on its progress toward achieving its carbon footprint reduction goals and commitments, the resulting negative publicity could adversely affect consumer preference and demand for its beverage products.

Unfavorable outcome of legal proceedings could have an adverse effect on Coca-Cola FEMSA’s business, financial condition and results of operations.

Coca-Cola FEMSA’s operations have from time to time been and may continue to be subject to investigations and proceedings by antitrust authorities relating to alleged anticompetitive practices, as well as investigations and proceedings on tax, consumer protection, environmental, labor and commercial matters. We cannot assure you that these investigations and proceedings will not have an adverse effect on Coca-Cola FEMSA’s business, financial condition and results of operations. See “Item 8. Financial Information—Legal Proceedings.”

Tax legislation in some of the countries where Coca-Cola FEMSA operates has recently been subject to major changes. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—Regulatory Matters—Tax Reforms.” We cannot assure you that these reforms or other reforms adopted by governments in the countries where Coca-Cola FEMSA operates will not have a material adverse effect on its business, financial condition and results of operations.

Weather conditions, natural disasters and public health crises may adversely affect Coca-Cola FEMSA’s business, financial condition and results of operations.

Lower temperatures, higher rainfall, other adverse weather conditions such as hurricanes, natural disasters such as earthquakes and floods, and public health crises such as pandemics or epidemics may negatively impact consumer patterns, which may result in reduced sales of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s beverage offerings. Additionally, such adverse weather conditions, natural disasters and public health crises may affect plant installed capacity, road infrastructure and points of sale in the territories where Coca-Cola FEMSA operates and limit its ability to produce, sell and distribute its products, thus affecting its business, financial condition and results of operations.

An impairment in the carrying value of distribution rights under Coca-Cola FEMSA’s bottler agreements and goodwill of acquired businesses could negatively affect its financial condition and results of operations.

Coca-Cola FEMSA periodically reviews the carrying value of its intangible assets, including distribution rights under its bottler agreements and goodwill of acquired businesses, to determine whether there is any indication that such assets have suffered an impairment. An impairment is recognized and the asset is reduced to fair value via a charge to earnings, when the carrying value of such asset exceeds its recoverable amount, which is the higher of its fair value less the cost to sell the asset, and its value in use. Events and conditions that could result in an impairment include changes in the industry in which Coca-Cola FEMSA operates, including competition, changes in consumer preferences, and other factors leading to reduction in expected sales or profitability. An impairment on the value of the distribution rights under its bottler agreements or goodwill of acquired businesses could have a material adverse effect on Coca-Cola FEMSA’s financial condition and results of operations.

Risks Related to FEMSA Comercio

Competition from other retailers in the markets where FEMSA Comercio operates could adversely affect its business, financial condition and results of operations.

The retail sector is highly competitive in the markets where FEMSA Comercio operates. The Proximity Division participates in the retail sector primarily through its OXXO stores, which face competition from small-format stores (such as 7-Eleven, Circle K, Tiendas D1, Ara, Tostao, Tambo Mas and OK Market), other numerous chains of grocery retailers with different size formats (such as Wal-Mart, H-E-B, Soriana, La Comer, and Chedraui, among others), other regional small-format retailers and small neighborhood stores. In particular, small neighborhood stores in Mexico may improve their technological capabilities to enable credit card processing or online bill payments or carry other products or provide other services, which would diminish one of the Proximity Division’s competitive advantages.

FEMSA Comercio participates through the Health Division in Mexico, Chile, Colombia and Ecuador. In Mexico, it faces competition from other drugstore chains such as Farmacias Similares, Farmacias Guadalajara, Farmacias del Ahorro and Farmacias Benavides, as well as regional and independent pharmacies, supermarkets and

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other informal neighborhood drugstores. In Chile, relevant competitors are chain drugstores such as Farmacias Ahumada and Salcobrand, while in Colombia, the most relevant competitors are La Rebaja, Unidrogas, Olimpica, Cafam, Colsubsidio and Farmatodo. In Ecuador, Grupo Difare and Farmaenlace are the main competitors.

For the Fuel Division, the government reforms over Mexico’s fuel distribution market have altered the competitive dynamics of the industry. The consolidation process, expected to continue as more large companies and international competitors continue to enter and expand through the market, may occur rapidly and materially alter the market dynamics in Mexico. Currently, the Fuel Division faces competition from international players such as British Petroleum, Mobil, Repsol and Shell, regional chains such as Corpogas, Hidrosina, G500 and Petro-7 and hard discount chains like Good Price, Cargo Gas and Gulf, as well as small independently owned and operated service stations.

FEMSA Comercio may face additional competition from new market participants. The increase in competition may limit the number of new locations available or result in a reduction in revenues. Consequently, future competition may affect the results of operations and financial condition of FEMSA Comercio. The shift in the retail sector from brick-and-mortar retailers to online and mobile platforms could also adversely affect FEMSA Comercio’s business, results of operations and financial condition.

We expect the competitive environment will continue to evolve as new technologies are developed based on changing consumer behavior. The continuing migration and evolution of retailing and financial services to online and mobile-based platforms for consumers may increase competition that could adversely affect FEMSA Comercio.

FEMSA Comercio’s points of sale performance may be adversely affected by changes in economic conditions in the markets where it operates.

The markets in which FEMSA Comercio operates are highly sensitive to economic conditions, because a decline in consumer purchasing power is often a consequence of an economic slowdown which, in turn, results in a decline in the overall consumption of main product categories. During periods of economic slowdown, FEMSA Comercio’s points of sale may experience a decline in same-store traffic and average ticket per customer, which may result in a decline in overall performance. See “Item 5. Operating and Financial Review and Prospects—Overview of Events, Trends and Uncertainties.”

Regulatory changes in the countries where we operate may adversely affect FEMSA Comercio’s business.

In the markets where it operates, FEMSA Comercio is subject to regulation in areas such as labor, zoning, operations, environmental and related local permits, health and safety and anti-money laundering regulations. Changes in existing laws and regulations, the adoption of new laws or regulations, changes in policy by regulators or a stricter or changing interpretation or enforcement thereof in the countries where FEMSA Comercio operates may increase its operating and compliance costs or impose restrictions on its operations and expansion which, in turn, may adversely affect the results of operations and financial condition of FEMSA Comercio’s business. In addition, changes in current laws and regulations may negatively impact customer traffic, revenues, operational costs and commercial practices, which may have an adverse effect on results of operations and financial condition of FEMSA Comercio.

FEMSA Comercio is subject to anti-money laundering laws and regulations in the countries in which it operates. Any violation of any such laws or regulations may adversely affect FEMSA Comercio’s business.

FEMSA Comercio is subject to anti-money laundering laws and regulations in the jurisdictions in which it operates and is required to comply with the applicable laws and regulations of the countries in which it operates. Such laws and regulations require FEMSA Comercio to adopt and implement policies, procedures and controls designed to detect and prevent transactions with third parties involved in money laundering. Although we have such policies, procedures and controls in place, given the number of transactions made in its stores, FEMSA Comercio may be subject to the risk that its clients or third parties may misuse its services and engage in money laundering or other related illegal activities. There can be no assurance that FEMSA Comercio’s internal policies, procedures and controls will be sufficient to detect or prevent all inappropriate practices, including money laundering, fraud or other violations of law or that any person will not take actions in violation of FEMSA Comercio’s policies, procedures and controls. If FEMSA Comercio is unable to fully comply with anti-money laundering laws and regulations, the relevant governmental authorities have the power and authority to investigate FEMSA Comercio and, in the event that it determines that FEMSA Comercio is in violation of anti-money laundering laws and regulations, impose significant fines, penalties and

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remedies. Third parties that FEMSA Comercio has partnerships or commercial relationships with, or otherwise interacts with in the ordinary course may also fail to comply with their obligations under anti-money laundering regulations applicable to them.

FEMSA Comercio’s business highly depends on information technology and a failure, interruption or breach of its IT systems could adversely affect it.

FEMSA Comercio’s businesses rely heavily on advanced IT systems to effectively manage its data, communications, connectivity and other business processes. FEMSA Comercio invests aggressively in IT to maximize its value generation potential. The development of IT systems, hardware and software needs to keep pace with the businesses’ growth due to the high speed at which the division adds new services and products to its commercial offerings. If these systems become obsolete or if the planning for future IT investments is inadequate, FEMSA Comercio businesses could be adversely affected.

In order to address risks to its IT systems, FEMSA Comercio continues to make investments in training personnel, technologies and cyber insurance. FEMSA Comercio maintains an IT risk management program which is supervised by its senior management. Reports on such IT risk management program are presented to the Audit Committee of the board of directors on a quarterly basis. As part of this program, FEMSA Comercio has a cybersecurity framework, internal policies and cross-functional surveillance and governance.

Although FEMSA Comercio constantly improves and protects its IT systems with advanced security measures, they still may be subject to defects, interruptions or security breaches such as viruses or data theft. Such a defect, interruption or breach could adversely affect the results of operations and financial condition of FEMSA Comercio.

FEMSA Comercio’s business may be adversely affected by an increase in the price of electricity in the markets where it operates.

The performance of FEMSA Comercio’s points of sale would be adversely affected by increases in the price of utilities on which the stores and stations depend, such as electricity. Electricity prices could potentially increase further as a result of inflation, shortages, interruptions in supply, changes in the regulatory framework or other reasons, and such an increase could adversely affect the results of operations and financial condition of FEMSA Comercio’s business.

Negative or inaccurate information on social media could adversely affect FEMSA Comercio’s reputation.

In recent years, there has been a considerable increase in the use of social media and similar platforms, including weblogs (blogs), social media websites, and other forms of Internet-based communications that allow individual access to a broad audience of consumers and other interested persons. Consumers value readily available information concerning retailers, manufacturers and their goods and services, and often act on such information without further investigation, authentication and without regard to its accuracy. The availability of information on social media platforms and devices is virtually immediate as is its impact. Social media platforms and devices immediately publish the content their subscribers and participants post, often without filters or checks on accuracy of the content posted. The opportunity for dissemination of information, including inaccurate information, is virtually limitless.

Negative or inaccurate information concerning or affecting FEMSA Comercio’s trademarks may be posted on such platforms at any time. This information may harm FEMSA Comercio’s reputation or brand image without affording the corporation an opportunity for redress or correction. Further, the disclosure of non-public company-sensitive information by FEMSA Comercio’s workforce or others through external social media channels may have adverse legal implications. The risks associated with any such negative publicity could in turn have a material adverse effect on its business, results of operations and financial condition.

An erosion of FEMSA Comercio’s business reputation could have a material adverse effect on its brand, its ability to secure new resources and its business and results of operations

FEMSA Comercio’s reputation, trademarks and other proprietary rights are important to its competitive position, and FEMSA Comercio benefits from well-recognized brands. If FEMSA Comercio is unsuccessful in protecting its intellectual property rights, or if another party prevails in litigation claiming any rights thereto, the value of the brands could be diminished, causing customer confusion and materially adversely impacting FEMSA Comercio’s

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business and financial results. Failure to maintain product safety and quality could materially adversely affect FEMSA Comercio’s brand image and reputation and lead to potential product liability claims, governmental agency investigations and damages claims.  

Societal expectations of businesses are also increasing, with a focus on business ethics, contribution to society, safety and minimizing damage to the environment, among others. Also, there is increasing focus on the role of oil and gas and large retail businesses in the context of climate change and energy transition. If FEMSA Comercio is unable to meet society demands in this regard, its brands and reputation could be negatively affected, thus limiting FEMSA Comercio’s ability to deliver its strategy, reducing consumer demand for its products, harming its ability to secure new resources and contracts and restricting its ability to access capital markets or attract employees. Many other factors, including the materialization of the risks discussed in several of the other risk factors herein, could negatively affect FEMSA Comercio’s reputation and could have a material adverse effect on its business, financial condition and results of operations.

Tax changes in the countries where we operate could adversely affect FEMSA Comercio’s business.

The imposition of new taxes, increases in existing taxes or changes in the interpretation of tax laws and regulations by tax authorities, may have a material adverse effect on the results of operations and financial condition of FEMSA Comercio’s business.

The Proximity Division may not be able to maintain its historic growth rate.

The Proximity Division increased the number of OXXO stores at a compound annual growth rate of 6.5% from 2016 to 2020. The growth in the number of OXXO stores has driven growth in total revenue and results of operations at the Proximity Division over the same period. As the overall number of stores increases, percentage growth in the number of OXXO stores is likely to slow. In addition, as small-format store penetration in Mexico grows, the number of viable new store locations may decrease, and new store locations may be less favorable in terms of same-store sales, average ticket and store traffic. As a result, our future results and financial condition may not be consistent with prior periods and may be characterized by lower growth rates in terms of total revenue and results of operations. In view of the uncertain outlook in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic in the countries where the Proximity Division operates, it opened fewer new stores than in previous years and various OXXO stores were closed as they did not reach the profitability desired. We cannot assure that the revenues and cash flows of the Proximity Division that come from future retail stores will be comparable with those generated by existing retail stores. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—FEMSA Comercio—Proximity Division—Store Locations.”

The Health Division’s sales may be affected by a material change in institutional sale trends in some of the markets where it operates.

In some of the markets where we operate, the sales of the Health Division are highly dependent on institutional sales, as well as traditional, open-market sales. The institutional market involves public and private health care providers, and the performance of the Health Division could be affected by its ability to maintain and grow its client base.

The Health Division’s performance may be affected by contractual conditions with its suppliers.

The Health Division acquires the majority of its inventories and healthcare products from a limited number of suppliers. Its ability to maintain favorable conditions in its current commercial agreements could potentially affect the Health Division’s operating and financial performance.

Energy regulatory changes may impact fuel prices and therefore adversely affect the Fuel Division’s business.

The Fuel Division mainly sells gasoline and diesel through owned or leased retail service stations. Previously, the prices of these products were regulated in Mexico by the Energy Regulatory Commission (Comisión Reguladora de Energía, or “CRE”). Since 2017, fuel prices gradually began to follow the dynamics of the international fuel market, and in 2021 we expect them to continue to do so in accordance with the regulatory framework, which may also adversely affect the results of operations and financial condition of the Fuel Division’s business.

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The Fuel Division’s performance may be affected by changes in commercial terms with suppliers, or disruptions to the industry supply chain.

The Fuel Division mainly purchases gasoline and diesel for its operations in Mexico. The fuel market in Mexico recently experienced structural changes that should gradually increase the number of suppliers. In the event of changes in the industry, commercial terms for the Fuel Division could deteriorate in the future, and potential disruptions to the supply chain to our gas stations could adversely impact the financial performance of the Fuel Division.

The Fuel Division’s business could be affected by new safety and environmental regulations enforced by the government, global environmental regulations and new energy technologies.

Federal, state and municipal laws and regulations for the installation and operation of service stations are becoming more stringent. Compliance with these laws and regulations is often difficult and costly. Global trends to reduce the consumption of fossil fuels through incentives and taxes could push sales of these fuels at service stations to slow or decrease in the future and automotive technologies, including efficiency gains in traditional fuel vehicles and increased popularity of alternative fuel vehicles, such as electric and liquefied petroleum gas (“LPG”) vehicles, have caused a significant reduction in fuel consumption globally. Other new technologies could further reduce the sale of traditional fuels, all of which could adversely affect results of operations and financial condition of the Fuel Division. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—Regulatory Matters—Environmental Regulations.”

The nature of the Fuel Division’s operations exposes it, and the communities in which it operates, to a range of health, safety, security and environmental risks.

The nature of the Fuel Division’s operations expose it to certain risks, particularly at its fuel stations. These risks include equipment failure, work accidents, fires, explosions, vapor emissions, spills and leaks at its facilities, service stations or other sites. These types of hazards and accidents may cause personal injuries or the loss of life, business interruptions and damage or contamination to the environment and the Fuel Division’s property, equipment or reputation. Further, we may be subject to litigation, compensation claims, governmental fines or penalties or other liabilities or losses in relation to such incidents and accidents, and may incur significant costs as a result. Such incidents and accidents may also affect our reputation or our brands, leading to a decline in sales of our products and services, and may adversely impact our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Risks Related to Mexico and the Other Countries Where We Operate

Adverse economic conditions in Mexico may adversely affect our financial position and results.

We are a Mexican corporation and our Mexican operations are our single most important geographic territory. For the year ended December 31, 2020, 65.1% of our consolidated total revenues were attributable to Mexico. During 2019 and 2020, the Mexican gross domestic product (“GDP”) decreased by approximately 0.1% and 8.5%, respectively, on an annualized basis compared to the previous year. We cannot assure that such conditions will not continue to slow down in the future or will not have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition going forward. The Mexican economy continues to be heavily influenced by the U.S. economy, and therefore, deterioration in economic conditions in, or delays in the recovery of, the U.S. economy may hinder any recovery. In the past, Mexico has experienced both prolonged periods of weak economic conditions and deteriorations in economic conditions that have had a negative impact on our results.

Our business may be significantly affected by the general condition of the Mexican economy, or by the rate of inflation in Mexico, interest rates in Mexico and exchange rates for, or exchange controls affecting, the Mexican peso. Decreases in the growth rate of the Mexican economy, periods of negative growth and/or increases in inflation or interest rates may result in lower demand for the products we carry in our stores, lower real pricing of products, a shift to lower margin products or decrease in store traffic. Because a large percentage of our costs and expenses are fixed, we may not be able to reduce costs and expenses upon the occurrence of any of these events and our profit margins may suffer as a result.

In addition, an increase in interest rates in Mexico would increase the cost of our debt and would cause an adverse effect on our financial position and results. Mexican peso-denominated debt (including currency hedges) constituted 33.1% of our total debt as of December 31, 2020.

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Depreciation of the Mexican peso and of our other local currencies relative to the U.S. dollar could adversely affect our financial position and results.

Depreciation of the Mexican peso and of our other local currencies relative to the U.S. dollar increases the cost of a portion of the raw materials we acquire, the price of which is paid in or determined with reference to U.S. dollars, and of our debt obligations denominated in U.S. dollars, and thereby negatively affects our financial position and results. A severe devaluation or depreciation of the Mexican peso, which is our main operating currency, may result in disruption of the international foreign exchange markets and may limit our ability to transfer or to convert Mexican pesos into U.S. dollars and other currencies for the purpose of making timely payments of interest and principal on our U.S. dollar-denominated debt or obligations in other currencies. The Mexican peso is a free-floating currency and, as such, it experiences exchange rate fluctuations relative to the U.S. dollar over time. As of December 31, 2020, the Mexican peso depreciated relative to the U.S. dollar by approximately 5.5% compared to 2019. As of December 31, 2019 and 2018, the Mexican peso experienced fluctuations relative to the U.S. dollar consisting of 3.9% and 0.02% of appreciation, respectively, compared to the prior year. Through April 9, 2021, the Mexican peso has depreciated 1.1% since December 31, 2020.

While the Mexican government does not currently restrict, and since 1982 has not restricted, the right or ability of Mexican or foreign persons or entities to convert Mexican pesos into U.S. dollars or to transfer other currencies out of Mexico, the Mexican government could impose restrictive exchange rate policies in the future, as it has done in the past. Currency fluctuations may have an adverse effect on our financial position, results and cash flows in future periods.

When the financial markets are volatile, as they have been in recent periods, our results may be substantially affected by variations in exchange rates and commodity prices and, to a lesser degree, interest rates. These effects include foreign exchange gain and loss on assets and liabilities denominated in U.S. dollars, fair value gain and loss on derivative financial instruments, commodities prices and changes in interest income and interest expense. These effects can be much more volatile than our operating performance and our operating cash flows. See “Item 11. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk—Foreign Currency Exchange Rate Risk.”

Political events in Mexico could adversely affect our operations.

Mexican political events may significantly affect our operations. We cannot predict whether potential changes in Mexican governmental and economic policy could adversely affect economic conditions in Mexico or the sector in which we operate. The Mexican president and Congress have a strong influence over new policies and governmental actions regarding the Mexican economy, and the current federal administration could implement substantial changes in law, policy and regulations in Mexico, including reforms to the Constitution, which could negatively affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. In response to these actions, opponents of the administration could react with, among other things, riots, protests and looting that could negatively affect our operations.

As of the date of this annual report, the MORENA Political Party holds an absolute majority in the Chamber of Deputies and the Senate and a strong influence in various local legislatures. Moreover, mid-term federal and local elections will take place in Mexico in June 2021, after which the Chamber of Representatives may have new representatives and 15 Mexican states will elect new governors. We cannot provide any assurances that political developments in Mexico, over which we have no control, will not have an adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Economic, political and social conditions in Mexico and other countries may adversely affect our results.

Many countries worldwide, including Mexico, have suffered significant economic, political and social volatility in recent years, and this may occur again in the future. Global instability has been caused by many different factors, including substantial fluctuations in economic growth, high levels of inflation, changes in currency values, changes in governmental economic or tax policies and regulations and overall political, social and economic instability. We cannot assure you that such conditions will not return or that such conditions will not have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results.

The Mexican economy and the market value of securities issued by Mexican issuers may be, to varying degrees, affected by economic and market conditions in other emerging market countries and in the United States. Furthermore, economic conditions in Mexico have been highly correlated with economic conditions in the United States

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primarily as a result of the North American Free Trade Agreement (“NAFTA”) and more recently, the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (“USMCA”), which came into force on July 1, 2020. It remains to be seen what impact the adoption of the USMCA or any subsequent trade agreements made as a response to the USMCA will have on us and our business. For example, in June and July 2020, the Mexican Congress approved several new laws and reforms to existing laws in connection with the enactment of the USMCA, including the new Ley Federal de Protección a la Propiedad Industrial and reforms to the Ley de los Impuestos Generales de Importación y Exportación. If the United States were to withdraw from or materially modify other international trade agreements to which it is a party, or if the United States were to withdraw from the World Trade Organization, certain foreign-sourced goods that we sell may no longer be available at a commercially attractive price or at all, which in turn could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. However, there can be no assurance as to what the new U.S. administration will do, and the impact of these measures or any others adopted by the new U.S. administration cannot be predicted.

Adverse economic conditions in the United States or other related events could have an adverse effect on the Mexican economy. Although economic conditions in other emerging market countries and in the United States may differ significantly from economic conditions in Mexico, investors’ reactions to developments in other countries may have an adverse effect on the market value of securities of Mexican issuers or of Mexican assets. For example, in Chile, an increase in social unrest in late 2019 led to the announcement of a constitutional referendum, which was held on October 25, 2020 and resulted in the approval of a plan to call a Constitutional Convention, to be composed of elected members, in which a new constitution will be drafted. In June 2022, a second nationwide referendum will take place, in which the new constitution will be submitted for voters’ approval. If social unrest continues in Chile, FEMSA Comercio’s business in the country could be negatively affected. There can be no assurance that future developments in other emerging market countries and in the United States, over which we have no control, will not have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results.

Natural disasters, weather conditions and public health issues, such as the coronavirus pandemic, could adversely affect our business.

Different regions of Mexico and other countries in which we operate could experience torrential rains, hurricanes, earthquakes or other adverse weather and climate conditions, as well as public health issues (including tainted food, food-borne illnesses, food tampering, tampering with or failure of water supply or widespread/pandemic illness such as COVID-19, Ebola, the avian or H1N1 flu, MERS) which may negatively impact consumer purchasing power and behavior that could result in reduced sales across our businesses. Additionally, such adverse weather conditions, natural disasters and public health issues may affect our personnel, assets, road infrastructure and points of sale in the territories in which we operate and thereby limit our ability to operate. Such events, or the containment measures to prevent or control them could also trigger increases in costs, disruption of supply, shortages of products, or consumer behavior changes including a decrease in an overall consumer mobility, thus affecting our business, financial condition and results of operations. If any of these events becomes significant in duration, our financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected. FEMSA Comercio’s points of sales and some operating facilities have been affected by hurricanes and other weather events in the past, which have resulted in temporary closures and losses. Also, any of these events could force us to increase our capital expenditures to put our assets back in operation. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—Insurance.”

Security risks in Mexico could increase, and this could adversely affect our results.

In recent years, Mexico has experienced a period of increasing criminal activity and particularly homicide rates, primarily due to organized crime. The presence of violence among drug cartels, and between these and the Mexican law enforcement and armed forces, or an increase in other types of crime, pose a risk to our business, and might negatively impact business continuity. Historically, these incidents have been relatively concentrated along the northern Mexican border, in cities such as in Tijuana, Ciudad Juarez and the state of Tamaulipas, and during recent years in certain other Mexican states such as Baja California, Colima, Chihuahua, Zacatecas and Guanajuato. The north of Mexico is an important region for some of our FEMSA Comercio operations, and an increase in crime rates could negatively affect our sales and customer traffic, increase our security expenses, affect our hours of operation and result in higher turnover of personnel or damage to the perception of our brands. This situation could worsen and adversely impact our business and financial results because consumer habits and patterns adjust to the increased perceived and real security risks, as people refrain from going out as much and gradually shift some on-premise consumption to off-premise consumption of food and beverages on certain occasions.

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Depreciation of local currencies in other Latin American countries where we operate may adversely affect our financial position.

The devaluation of the local currencies against the U.S. dollar in our non-Mexican territories can increase our operating costs in these countries, and depreciation of the local currencies against the Mexican peso can negatively affect the translation of our results for these countries. Future currency devaluation or the imposition of exchange controls in any of these countries, or in Mexico, would have an adverse effect on our financial position and results.

More generally, future currency devaluations or the imposition of exchange controls in any of the countries where we operate may potentially increase our operating costs, which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. See “Item 11. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk—Foreign Currency Exchange Rate Risk.”

Risks Related to the Heineken Investment

FEMSA does not control Heineken N.V.’s and Heineken Holding N.V.’s decisions.

In 2010, we exchanged 100% of our beer operations for a 20% economic interest in Heineken N.V. and Heineken Holding N.V. (together with their respective subsidiaries, “Heineken” or the “Heineken Group”). As a result of this transaction (the “Heineken transaction”), we participate in the Heineken Holding N.V. Board of Directors (the “Heineken Holding Board”) and in the Heineken N.V. Supervisory Board (the “Heineken Supervisory Board”). However, we are not a majority or controlling shareholder of Heineken N.V. or Heineken Holding N.V., nor do we control the decisions of the Heineken Holding Board or the Heineken Supervisory Board. Therefore, the decisions made by the majority or controlling shareholders of Heineken N.V. or Heineken Holding N.V. or the Heineken Holding Board or the Heineken Supervisory Board may not be consistent with or may not consider the interests of our shareholders or may be adverse to the interests of our shareholders. Additionally, we have agreed not to disclose non-public information and decisions taken by Heineken. In 2017, we completed the sale of a 5.24% of combined shareholding in the Heineken Group, reducing our economic interest from 20% to 14.76%. Our aforementioned governance rights did not change as a result of the sale.

Heineken operates in a large number of countries.

Heineken is a global brewer and distributor of beer in a large number of countries. Because of the Heineken Investment, our shareholders are indirectly exposed to the political, economic and social circumstances affecting the markets in which Heineken is present, which may have an adverse effect on the value of our interest in Heineken, and, consequently, the value of our shares.

The Mexican peso may strengthen compared to the euro.

In the event of a depreciation of the euro against the Mexican peso, the fair value of the Heineken Investment will be adversely affected. Furthermore, the cash flow that is expected to be received in the form of dividends from Heineken will be in euros, and therefore, in the event of a depreciation of the euro against the Mexican peso, the amount of expected cash flow will be adversely affected. “Item 11. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk—Foreign Currency Exchange Rate Risk.”

Heineken N.V. and Heineken Holding N.V. are publicly listed companies.

Heineken N.V. and Heineken Holding N.V. are listed companies whose stocks trade publicly and are subject to market fluctuation. A reduction in the price of Heineken N.V. or Heineken Holding N.V. shares would result in a reduction in the economic value of the Heineken Investment.

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Risks Related to Our Principal Shareholders and Capital Structure

A majority of our voting shares are held by a voting trust, which effectively controls the management of our company, and the interests of which may differ from those of other shareholders.

As of March 24, 2021 the voting trust owned 38.69% of our capital stock and 74.86% of our capital stock with full voting rights, consisting of Series B Shares. Consequently, the voting trust has the power to elect a majority of the members of our board of directors and to play a significant or controlling role in the outcome of substantially all matters to be decided by our board of directors or our shareholders. The interests of the voting trust may differ from those of our other shareholders. See “Item 7. Major Shareholders and Related-Party Transactions” and “Item 10. Additional Information— Bylaws—Voting Rights and Certain Minority Rights.”

Holders of Series D-B and D-L Shares have limited voting rights.

Holders of Series D-B and D-L Shares have limited voting rights and are only entitled to vote on specific matters, such as certain changes in the form of our corporate organization, dissolution or liquidation, a merger with a company with a distinct corporate purpose, a merger in which we are not the surviving entity, a change of our jurisdiction of incorporation, the cancellation of the registration of the Series D-B and D-L Shares and any other matters that expressly require approval from such holders under the Mexican Securities Market Law. As a result of these limited voting rights, Series D-B and D-L holders will not be able to influence our business or operations. See “Item 7. Major Shareholders and Related-Party Transactions—Major Shareholders” and “Item 10. Additional Information—Bylaws—Voting Rights and Certain Minority Rights.”

Holders of ADSs may not be able to vote at our shareholder meetings.

Our shares are traded on the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) in the form of ADSs. We cannot assure that holders of our shares in the form of ADSs will receive notice of shareholders’ meetings from our ADS depositary in sufficient time to enable such holders to return voting instructions to the ADS depositary in a timely manner. In the event that instructions are not received with respect to any shares underlying ADSs, the ADS depositary will, subject to certain limitations, grant a proxy to a person designated by us in respect of these shares. In the event that this proxy is not granted, the ADS depositary will vote these shares in the same manner as the majority of the shares of each class for which voting instructions are received.

Holders of BD Units in the United States and holders of ADSs may not be able to participate in any future preemptive rights offering and as a result may be subject to dilution of their equity interests.

Under applicable Mexican law, if we issue new shares for cash as a part of a capital increase, other than in connection with a public offering of newly issued shares or treasury stock, we are generally required to grant our shareholders the right to purchase a sufficient number of shares to maintain their existing ownership percentage. Rights to purchase shares in these circumstances are known as preemptive rights. By law, we may not allow holders of our shares or ADSs who are located in the United States to exercise any preemptive rights in any future capital increases unless (1) we file a registration statement with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) with respect to that future issuance of shares or (2) the offering qualifies for an exemption from the registration requirements of the U.S. Securities Act of 1933. At the time of any future capital increase, we will evaluate the costs and potential liabilities associated with filing a registration statement with the SEC, as well as the benefits of preemptive rights to holders of our shares in the form of ADSs in the United States and any other factors that we consider important in determining whether to file a registration statement.

We may decide not to file a registration statement with the SEC to allow holders of our shares or ADSs who are located in the United States to participate in a preemptive rights offering. In addition, under current Mexican law, the sale by the ADS depositary of preemptive rights and the distribution of the proceeds from such sales to the holders of our shares in the form of ADSs is not possible. As a result, the equity interest of holders of our shares in the form of ADSs would be diluted proportionately. See “Item 10. Additional Information—Preemptive Rights.”

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The protections afforded to minority shareholders in Mexico are different from those afforded to minority shareholders in the United States.

Under Mexican law, the protections afforded to minority shareholders are different from, and may be less than, those afforded to minority shareholders in the United States. Mexican laws do not provide a remedy to shareholders relating to violations of fiduciary duties. There is no procedure for class actions as such actions are conducted in the United States and there are different procedural requirements for bringing shareholder lawsuits against directors for the benefit of companies. Therefore, it may be more difficult for minority shareholders to enforce their rights against us, our directors or our controlling shareholders than it would be for minority shareholders of a United States company.

Investors may experience difficulties in enforcing civil liabilities against us or our directors, officers and controlling persons.

FEMSA is organized under the laws of Mexico, and most of our directors, officers and controlling persons reside outside the United States. In addition, nearly all or a substantial portion of our assets and the assets of our subsidiaries are located outside the United States. As a result, it may be difficult for investors to effect service of process within the United States on such persons or to enforce judgments against them, including any action based on civil liabilities under the U.S. federal securities laws. There is doubt as to the enforceability against such persons in Mexico, whether in original actions or in actions to enforce judgments of U.S. courts, of liabilities based solely on the U.S. federal securities laws.

Developments in other countries may adversely affect the market for our securities.

The market value of securities of Mexican companies is, to varying degrees, influenced by economic and securities market conditions in other emerging market countries. Although economic conditions are different in each country, investors’ reactions to developments in one country can have effects on the securities of issuers in other countries, including Mexico. We cannot assure you that events elsewhere, especially in emerging markets, will not adversely affect the market value of our securities.

The failure or inability of our subsidiaries to pay dividends or other distributions to us may adversely affect us and our ability to pay dividends to holders of ADSs.

We are a holding company. Accordingly, our cash flows are principally derived from dividends, interest and other distributions made to us by our subsidiaries. Currently, our subsidiaries do not have contractual obligations that require them to pay dividends to us. In addition, debt and other contractual obligations of our subsidiaries may in the future impose restrictions on our subsidiaries’ ability to make dividend or other payments to us, which in turn may adversely affect our ability to pay dividends to shareholders and meet our debt and other obligations. As of March 31, 2021, we had no restrictions on our ability to pay dividends. Further, our non-controlling shareholder position in Heineken means that we will be unable to require payment of dividends with respect to the Heineken Investment.

ITEM 4. INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY

Introduction

FEMSA is a leading company that participates in the following businesses:

In the beverage industry, through Coca-Cola FEMSA, the largest franchise bottler of Coca-Cola products in the world by volume;
In the retail industry, through FEMSA Comercio, comprised of the following divisions: (1) the Proximity Division, operating the OXXO small-format store chain, (2) the Fuel Division, operating the OXXO Gas chain of retail service stations and (3) the Health Division, which includes drugstores and related operations;
In the beer industry, through the Heineken Investment, which is the second largest equity holding in Heineken, one of the world’s leading brewers with operations in over 70 countries; and

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In other ancillary businesses, through our Other Businesses (as defined below), including logistics services, specialized distribution, point-of-sale refrigeration, food processing equipment and plastics solutions.

Corporate Information

Our company was incorporated under the laws of Mexico on May 30, 1936 for a duration of 99 years. The duration can be extended indefinitely by resolution of our shareholders. We are organized as a sociedad anónima bursátil de capital variable under the laws of Mexico. Our legal name is Fomento Económico Mexicano, S.A.B. de C.V., and in commercial and business contexts we frequently refer to ourselves as “FEMSA.” Our principal headquarters are located at General Anaya No. 601 Pte., Colonia Bella Vista, Monterrey, Nuevo León 64410, Mexico. Our telephone number at this location is (+52-81) 8328-6000.

Any filings we make electronically are available to the public over the internet at our website www.femsa.com. This URL is intended to be an inactive textual reference only. It is not intended to be an active hyperlink to our website. The information on our website, which might be accessible through a hyperlink resulting from this URL, is not and shall not be deemed to be incorporated into this annual report. The SEC maintains an internet site that contains reports and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC at www.sec.gov. See “Item 10. Additional Information—Documents on Display.”

Corporate History and Recent Developments

FEMSA traces its origins to the establishment of Mexico’s first brewery, Cervecería Cuauhtémoc, S.A. (“Cervecería Cuauhtémoc”), which was established in 1890. Descendants of certain of the founders of Cervecería Cuauhtémoc are participants of the voting trust that controls our company.

The following paragraphs describe certain key transactions and developments of FEMSA in the past three years.

In 2018, FEMSA Comercio renamed its businesses formerly known as the “Retail Division” to the “Proximity Division” and transferred those operations that are not directly related to its proximity store business, such as its restaurant and discount retail formats, into Other Businesses. The Proximity Division now only includes the operations from its small-format chain stores mainly under the OXXO brand. For more information, see “Item 4. Information on the Company—Proximity Division.”

In 2018, FEMSA Comercio entered the market in Peru starting operations through the Proximity Division.

In 2018, Coca-Cola FEMSA sold, through its subsidiary CIBR, its 51% stake in KOF Philippines to TCCC through an exercise of CIBR’s option to sell. CIBR originally acquired KOF Philippines from TCC in 2013.

In 2019, FEMSA Comercio, through its subsidiary Socofar, acquired Corporación FYBECA GPF (“GPF”), a leading drugstore operator based in Quito, Ecuador with more than 620 points of sale nationwide under the Fybeca and SanaSana trademarks.

In 2019, FEMSA Comercio acquired a 50% interest in Raízen Conveniências (“Raízen”), now commercially known as “Grupo Nós.” Raízen is a 50-50 joint venture in Brazil between Cosan Limited and Royal Dutch Shell. Raízen operates more than 6,200 Shell service stations in Brazil, approximately 1,000 of which have a Select brand convenience store. The acquisition is limited to the convenience store business and excludes the fuel service station operations.

In 2019, FEMSA acquired a minority stake in Jetro Restaurant Depot (“JRD”), a privately held cash and carry retailer. The transaction includes an investment in the operating and real estate-holding entities of JRD as well as the terms and conditions for a proposed joint venture between FEMSA and JRD to implement JRD’s business model in Mexico and other Latin American markets. In October 2020, FEMSA acquired an additional minority stake in JRD.

In 2019, FEMSA, through its subsidiary, Solistica, S.A. de C.V., completed the acquisition of AGV, a leader in value-added warehousing and distribution in Brazil.

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In January 2020, FEMSA Comercio became the sole shareholder of Grupo Socofar, a leading South American drugstore operator based in Santiago, Chile, acquiring the remaining 40% interest that it did not already own in Socofar following the exercise of a put right by its minority partner to sell its interest. FEMSA Comercio acquired its original 60% stake in Socofar in 2015.

In May 2020, FEMSA closed a transaction with the shareholders of WAXIE and North American Corporation to form a new company (now known as “Envoy Solutions”) within the janitorial-sanitation, packaging and specialized distribution industry in the United States, with FEMSA acquiring a majority controlling interest in the combined company.

In May 2020, Specialty's Cafe & Bakery, Inc. (“Specialty’s”), a subsidiary of the company, filed for bankruptcy pursuant to Chapter 7 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code after receiving approval to do so from its board of directors on May 26, 2020. The case is pending before the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Northern District of California.

In October 2020, FEMSA Comercio entered into definitive agreements with SMU, S.A., a leading Chilean retailer, to acquire its OK Market store chain, with more than 120 locations in Chile. The transaction is subject to customary regulatory and anti-trust approvals and is expected to close during 2021.

In December 2020, FEMSA announced and closed the acquisition of two independent specialized distribution businesses in the United States: Southeastern Paper Group, Inc., based in Spartanburg, South Carolina, and Southwest Paper Company, Inc., (doing business as “SWPlus”) based in Wichita, Kansas.

In February 2021, Coca-Cola FEMSA entered into a new distribution agreement with Heineken Brazil that is intended to replace its previous distribution agreement with Heineken Brazil. The effectiveness of this distribution agreement is subject to various conditions, including the approval of the Brazilian antitrust authorities. Pursuant to the new distribution agreement, Coca-Cola FEMSA will continue to sell and distribute Kaiser, Bavaria and Sol beer brands in Brazil and will add the premium brand Eisenbahn and other premium international brands to its portfolio. Coca-Cola FEMSA will also cease to sell and distribute Heineken and Amstel beer brands upon the effectiveness of the new distribution agreement. Moreover, Coca-Cola FEMSA will have the right to produce and distribute alcoholic beverages and other beers in Brazil based on a certain proportion of Heineken’s portfolio in Brazil. The agreement has a five-year term and may be automatically renewed for an additional five-year term subject to certain conditions. Upon the effectiveness of the new distribution with Heineken Brazil, Coca-Cola FEMSA intends to withdraw from the arbitration and other legal proceedings against Heineken Brazil and waive any rights with respect to any awards or judgements resulting from such arbitration and legal proceedings. 

For more information on: (i) the recent Heineken transaction, see “Item 10. Additional Information—Material Contracts,” (ii) FEMSA Comercio’s recent transactions, see “Item 4. Information on the Company—FEMSA Comercio” and (iii) Coca-Cola FEMSA’s recent transactions, see “Item 4. Information on the Company—Coca-Cola FEMSA.”

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Ownership Structure

We conduct our business through our principal subsidiary companies as shown in the following diagram and table:

Ownership Structure as of March 31, 2021

Graphic


(1)Compañía Internacional de Bebidas, S.A. de C.V., which we refer to as “CIBSA.”
(2)Percentage of issued and outstanding capital stock owned by CIBSA (56% of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s capital stock with full voting rights). See “Item 4. Information on the Company—Coca-Cola FEMSA—Capital Stock.”
(3)Our Heineken Investment is held indirectly by various subsidiaries of FEMSA, including CB Equity.
(4)Includes the Proximity Division, the Health Division and the Fuel Division. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—FEMSA Comercio.”

Significant Subsidiaries

The following table sets forth our significant subsidiaries as of December 31, 2020:

Name of Company

    

Jurisdiction of Establishment

    

Percentage Owned

 

CIBSA:

 

Mexico

 

100.0

%

Coca-Cola FEMSA

 

Mexico

 

47.2

%(1)

Emprex:

 

Mexico

 

100.0

%

FEMSA Comercio

 

Mexico

 

100.0

%

CB Equity

 

United Kingdom

 

100.0

%


(1)

Percentage of capital stock. FEMSA, through CIBSA, owns 56% of the ordinary voting shares of Coca-Cola FEMSA after giving effect to the eight-for-one stock split consummated by Coca-Cola FEMSA on April 11, 2019. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—Coca-Cola FEMSA—Capital Stock.”

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The following table presents an overview of our operations by reportable segment and by geographic area:

Operations by Segment—Overview

Year Ended December 31, 2020 and % of growth (decrease) vs. previous year

FEMSA Comercio

    

Coca-Cola FEMSA

    

Proximity Division

    

Fuel Division

    

Health Division

    

Heineken Investment

(in millions of Mexican pesos, except for employees and percentages)

Total revenues

Ps.

183,615

    

(6)

%  

Ps.

181,277

    

(2)

%  

Ps.

34,292

    

(28)

%  

Ps.

65,172

    

11

%  

Ps.

    

Gross profit

82,811

 

(5)

%  

74,296

 

(1)

%  

4,300

 

(10)

%  

19,575

 

11

%  

 

Share of the (loss) of equity accounted investees, net of taxes

(281)

 

115

%  

(18)

 

(300)

%(1)  

 

 

 

 

(434)

 

(107)

%

Total assets

263,066

 

2

%  

121,200

 

3

%  

15,878

 

(10)

%  

60,107

 

11

%  

92,444

 

7

%

Employees

82,334

 

0

%  

165,433

 

1

%  

7,487

 

(3)

%  

28,482

 

3

%  

 


(1)Reflects the percentage decrease between the loss of Ps. 18 million recorded in 2020 and the gain of Ps. 9 million recorded in 2019.

Total Revenues Summary by Segment(1)

Year Ended December 31, 

    

2020

    

2019

    

2018

(in millions of Mexican pesos)

Coca-Cola FEMSA

 

Ps.

183,615

 

Ps.

194,471

 

Ps.

182,342

FEMSA Comercio

 

  

 

  

 

  

Proximity Division

 

181,277

 

184,810

 

167,458

Health Division

 

65,172

 

58,922

 

51,739

Fuel Division

 

34,292

 

47,852

 

46,936

Other Businesses

 

49,414

 

41,788

 

42,293

Consolidated total revenues

 

Ps.

492,966

 

Ps.

506,711

 

Ps.

469,744


(1)The sum of the financial data for each of our segments differs from our consolidated total revenues due to intercompany transactions, which are eliminated in consolidation, and certain assets and activities of FEMSA.

Business Strategy

We understand the importance of connecting with our end consumers by understanding their needs, and ultimately delivering the right products to them for the right occasions and the optimal value proposition. We strive to achieve this by developing brand value, expanding our significant distribution capabilities and improving the efficiency of our operations while aiming to reach our full potential. We continue to improve our information gathering and processing systems in order to better know and understand what our consumers want and need, and we are improving our production and distribution by more efficiently leveraging our asset base.

Our objective is to generate economic and social value through our companies and institutions.

We believe that the competencies that our businesses have developed can be replicated in other geographic regions. This underlying principle guides our consolidation and growth efforts, which have led to our current continental footprint. We currently operate in Mexico, Central, South America and in the United States, including some of the most populous metropolitan areas in Latin America—which provides us with opportunities to create value through both an improved ability to execute our strategies in both complex and developed markets including the United States, and the use of superior commercial tools. We have also increased our capabilities to operate and succeed in other geographic regions by improving management skills in order to obtain a precise understanding of local consumer needs. Going forward, we intend to use those capabilities to continue our international expansion of Coca-Cola FEMSA, FEMSA Comercio and other business units, expanding both our geographic footprint and our presence in the non-alcoholic beverage industry, small box retail formats, and other ancillary businesses such as logistics services and distribution, as well as taking advantage of potential opportunities across markets to leverage our capability set.

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In our drugstore business in Mexico and South America, and our fuel service station business in Mexico, we are applying our retail and operational capabilities to develop attractive value propositions for consumers in these formats.

Coca-Cola FEMSA

Overview

Coca-Cola FEMSA is the largest franchise bottler of Coca-Cola trademark beverages in the world in terms of volume. Coca-Cola FEMSA operates in territories in the following countries:

Mexico—a substantial portion of central Mexico, the southeast and northeast of Mexico.
Guatemala.
Nicaragua.
Costa Rica.
Panama.
Colombia—most of the country.
Brazil—a major part of the states of São Paulo and Minas Gerais, the states of Parana, Santa Catarina and Mato Grosso do Sul and part of the states of Rio de Janeiro, Rio Grande do Sul and Goias.
Argentina—Buenos Aires and surrounding areas.
Uruguay.

Coca-Cola FEMSA also operates in Venezuela through its investment in KOF Venezuela.

Coca-Cola FEMSA was organized on October 30, 1991 as a stock corporation with variable capital (sociedad anónima de capital variable) under the laws of Mexico for a term of 99 years. On December 5, 2006, as required by amendments to the Mexican Securities Market Law, Coca-Cola FEMSA became a publicly traded stock corporation with variable capital (sociedad anónima bursátil de capital variable). Coca-Cola FEMSA’s legal name is Coca-Cola FEMSA, S.A.B. de C.V. Coca-Cola FEMSA’s principal executive offices are located at Calle Mario Pani No. 100, Colonia Santa Fe Cuajimalpa, Alcaldía Cuajimalpa de Morelos, 05348, Ciudad de México, México. Coca-Cola FEMSA’s telephone number at this location is (52-55) 1519-5000. Coca-Cola FEMSA’s website is www.coca-colafemsa.com.

The following is an overview of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s operations by consolidated reporting segment in 2020.

Operations by Consolidated Reporting Segment—Overview Year Ended December 31, 2020

    

Total Revenues

    

Gross Profit

 

(in millions of Mexican pesos, except percentages)

 

Mexico and Central America(1)

 

Ps.

106,783

    

58.2

%  

Ps.

52,906

    

63.9

%

South America(2)

 

76,832

 

41.8

%  

29,905

 

36.1

%

Consolidated

 

183,615

 

100.0

%  

82,811

 

100.0

%


(1)Includes Mexico, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama.
(2)Includes Colombia, Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay.

Capital Stock

On April 11, 2019, Coca-Cola FEMSA completed an eight-for-one stock split, whereby (a) for each Series A share, holders of Series A shares received eight new Series A shares, (b) for each Series D share, holders of Series D shares received eight new Series D shares and (c) for each Series L share, holders of Series L shares received one unit (each consisting of 3 Series B shares (with full voting rights) and 5 Series L shares (with limited voting rights)).

25


Effective on April 11, 2019, Coca-Cola FEMSA’s units were listed for trading on the Mexican Stock Exchange and ADSs, each representing 10 units, were listed for trading on the NYSE.

As of the date of this report, (1) FEMSA indirectly owned Series A shares equal to 47.2% of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s capital stock (56.0% of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s capital stock with full voting rights), and (2) TCCC indirectly owned Series D shares equal to 27.8% of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s capital stock (32.9% of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s capital stock with full voting rights). Series L shares with limited voting rights constituted 15.6% of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s capital stock, and Series B shares constituted the remaining 9.4% of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s capital stock (the remaining 11.1% of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s capital stock with full voting rights).

Graphic

Business Strategy

Coca-Cola FEMSA operates with a large geographic footprint in Latin America. To consolidate its position as a global leader in the beverage business, Coca-Cola FEMSA continues to expand its robust portfolio of beverages, transforming and enhancing its operational capabilities, inspiring a cultural evolution, and embedding sustainability throughout its business to create economic, social and environmental value for all of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s stakeholders.

Coca-Cola FEMSA’s view on sustainable development is a comprehensive part of its business strategy. Coca-Cola FEMSA bases its efforts in its ethics and values, focusing on (i) its people, (ii) its communities and (iii) the planet. Coca-Cola FEMSA also takes a responsible and disciplined approach to the use of resources and capital allocation.

To maximize growth and profitability and driven by its centers of excellence’s initiatives, Coca-Cola FEMSA plans on continuing to execute the following key strategies: (i) accelerate revenue growth, (ii) increase its business scale and profitability across categories, (iii) continue its expansion through organic growth and strategic joint ventures, mergers and acquisitions, (iv) accelerate its end-to-end transformation through the digitization of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s processes, (v) empower people to lead this transformation and (vi) create a leaner and more efficient organization focused on value creation.

Coca-Cola FEMSA seeks to accelerate its revenue growth through the introduction of new categories, products and presentations that better meet its consumers’ needs and preferences, while maintaining its core products and improving its profitability. To address its consumers’ diverse lifestyles, Coca-Cola FEMSA has developed new products through innovation and has expanded the availability of low-and non-caloric beverages by reformulating and broadening its product portfolio to reduce added sugar and offering smaller presentations of its products. As of December 31, 2020, approximately 38.8% of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s brands were low-or non-caloric beverages, and Coca-Cola FEMSA continues to expand its product portfolio to offer more options to its consumers so they can satisfy their hydration and

26


nutrition needs. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—Coca-Cola FEMSA Products” and “Item 4. Information on the Company—Coca-Cola FEMSA—Packaging.” In addition, Coca-Cola FEMSA informs its consumers through front labeling on the nutrient composition and caloric content of its beverages. Coca-Cola FEMSA has been a pioneer in the introduction of the Guideline Daily Amounts (“GDA”), and Coca-Cola FEMSA performs responsible advertising practices and marketing. Coca-Cola FEMSA voluntarily adheres to national and international codes of conduct in advertising and marketing, including communications targeted to minors who are developed based on the Responsible Marketing policies and Global School Beverage Guidelines of TCCC, achieving full compliance with all such codes and guidelines in all of the countries where Coca-Cola FEMSA operates.

Coca-Cola FEMSA views its relationship with TCCC as integral to Coca-Cola FEMSA’s business, and together Coca-Cola FEMSA and TCCC have developed marketing strategies to better understand and address Coca-Cola FEMSA’s consumer needs. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—Coca-Cola FEMSA—Marketing.”

27


Coca-Cola FEMSA’s Territories

The following map shows Coca-Cola FEMSA’s territories, giving estimates in each case of the population to which Coca-Cola FEMSA offers products and the number of retailers carrying its beverages as of December 31, 2020:

Graphic

Coca-Cola FEMSA’s Products

Coca-Cola FEMSA produces, markets, sells and distributes Coca-Cola trademark beverages. The Coca-Cola trademark beverages include: sparkling beverages (colas and flavored sparkling beverages), waters and still beverages (including juice drinks, coffee, teas, milk, value-added dairy, sports drinks, energy drinks and plant-

28


based drinks). In addition, Coca-Cola FEMSA distributes and sells Heineken beer products in its Brazilian territories and Monster products in all of the countries where it operates.

Coca-Cola FEMSA’s most important brand, Coca-Cola, together with its line of low-calorie products, accounted for 63.9%, 62.4% and 62.2% of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s total sales volume in 2020, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

The following table sets forth the trademarks of the main products Coca-Cola FEMSA distributed in 2020:

Colas:

Coca-Cola

Coca-Cola Sin Azúcar

Coca-Cola Light

Flavored Sparkling Beverages:

 

 

Crush

Kuat

Schweppes

Fanta

Mundet

Sprite

Fresca

Quatro

Yoli

Still Beverages:

 

 

 

AdeS

FUZE Tea

Leão

Cepita

Hi-C

Monster

Santa Clara

Del Valle

Kapo

Powerade

Valle Frut

Water:

 

 

 

Alpina

Brisa

Dasani

Shangri-la

Aquarius

Ciel

Manantial

Topo Chico

Bonaqua

Crystal

Kin

Vitale

Packaging

Coca-Cola FEMSA produces, markets, sells and distributes Coca-Cola trademark beverages in each of its territories in containers authorized by TCCC, which consist primarily of a variety of returnable and non-returnable presentations in the form of glass bottles, cans and plastic bottles mainly made of PET resin. Coca-Cola FEMSA uses the term presentation to refer to the packaging unit in which Coca-Cola FEMSA sells its products. Presentation sizes for Coca-Cola FEMSA’s Coca-Cola trademark beverages range from a 6.5-ounce personal size to a 3-liter multiple serving size. For all of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s products excluding water, Coca-Cola FEMSA considers a multiple serving size as equal to, or larger than, 1.0 liter. In general, personal sizes have a higher price per unit case as compared to multiple serving sizes. Coca-Cola FEMSA offers both returnable and non-returnable presentations, which allow it to offer portfolio alternatives based on convenience and affordability to implement sales strategies and to target specific distribution channels and population segments in its territories. In addition, Coca-Cola FEMSA sells some Coca-Cola trademark beverage syrups in containers designed for soda fountain use, which Coca-Cola FEMSA refers to as fountain. Coca-Cola FEMSA also sells bottled water products in bulk sizes, which refer to presentations equal to or larger than 5.0 liters and up to 20.0 liters, which have a much lower average price per unit case than its other beverage products.

Sales Volume and Transactions Overview

Coca-Cola FEMSA measures total sales volume in terms of unit cases and number of transactions. “Unit case” refers to 192 ounces of finished beverage product (24 eight-ounce servings) and, when applied to soda fountains, refers to the volume of syrup, powders and concentrate that is required to produce 192 ounces of finished beverage product. “Transactions” refers to the number of single units (e.g. a can or a bottle) sold, regardless of their size or volume or whether they are sold individually or in multipacks, except for fountain which represents multiple transactions based on a standard 12 oz. serving. Except when specifically indicated, “sales volume” in this annual report refers to sales volume in terms of unit cases.

29


The following table illustrates historical sales volume and number of transactions for each of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s consolidated reporting segments, as well as its unit case and transaction mix by category.

Sales Volume

    

Transactions

 

    

2020

    

2019

    

2020

    

2019

 

(Millions of unit cases or millions of single units, except percentages)

 

Mexico

 

1,759.2

 

1,838.3

 

8,202.6

 

9,584.6

Central America(1)

 

232.4

 

236.9

 

1,635.8

 

1,945.0

Mexico & Central America

 

1,991.6

 

2,075.3

 

9,838.4

 

11,529.6

Growth

 

(4.0)

%  

0.5

%  

(14.7)

%  

0.2

%

Colombia

 

254.8

 

265.5

 

1,572.8

 

1,967.9

Brazil(2)

 

862.9

 

846.5

 

5,208.3

 

5,726.2

Argentina

 

133.8

 

139.3

 

593.1

 

782.9

Uruguay

 

41.2

 

42.4

 

185.1

 

214.0

South America

 

1,292.7

 

1,293.6

 

7,559.2

 

8,691.0

Growth

 

(0.1)

%  

2.9

%  

(13.0)

%  

5.8

%

Total

 

3,284.4

 

3,368.9

 

17,397.7

 

20,220.6

Growth

 

(2.5)

%  

1.4

%  

(14.0)

%  

2.5

%

The following table illustrates the multiple serving presentations and returnable packaging for sparkling beverages volume:

Multiple Serving Presentations

Returnable packaging

 

    

2020

    

2019

    

2020

    

2019

 

Mexico

 

71.3

%  

66.2

%  

42.2

%  

38.0

%

Central America(1)

 

59.6

%  

49.3

%  

40.6

%  

41.4

%

Colombia

 

80.3

%  

74.6

%  

27.1

%  

31.3

%

Brazil(2)

 

81.2

%  

79.3

%  

19.7

%  

18.5

%

Argentina

 

88.9

%  

78.7

%  

29.7

%  

27.5

%

Uruguay

 

85.3

%  

81.5

%  

22.0

%  

23.6

%

Total

 

74.9

%  

69.9

%  

33.6

%  

31.8

%

30


The following table illustrates Coca-Cola FEMSA’s historical sales volume and number of transactions performance by category for each of its operations and its reporting segments for 2020 as compared to 2019:

    

Year Ended December 31, 2020

 

    

Sparkling

    

Stills

    

Water

    

Bulk Water

    

Total

 

Sales Volume Growth

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Mexico

(3.7)

%  

(4.9)

%  

(26.0)

%  

0.5

%  

(4.3)

%

Central America(1)

1.3

%  

(16.8)

%  

(29.9)

%  

(20.9)

%  

(1.9)

%

Mexico and Central America

(3.1)

%  

(6.7)

%  

(26.5)

%  

0.4

%  

(4.0)

%

Colombia

0.9

%  

(8.7)

%  

(33.8)

%  

(13.7)

%  

(4.0)

%

Brazil(2)

2.8

%  

(1.2)

%  

(9.4)

%  

18.8

%  

1.9

%

Argentina

(2.8)

%  

3.5

%  

(32.0)

%  

48.4

%  

(3.9)

%

Uruguay

(5.1)

%  

36.2

%  

18.0

%  

 

(2.8)

%

South America

1.6

%  

(1.9)

%  

(18.3)

%  

2.5

%  

(0.1)

%

Total

(1.1)

%  

(5.0)

%  

(22.6)

%  

0.6

%  

(2.5)

%

Year Ended December 31, 2020

 

    

Sparkling

    

Stills

    

Water

    

Bulk

    

Total

 

Number of Transactions Growth

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Mexico

 

(13.2)

%  

(16.4)

%  

(25.8)

%  

 

(14.4)

%

Central America(1)

 

(13.0)

%  

(30.7)

%  

(28.2)

%  

 

(15.9)

%

Mexico and Central America

 

(13.2)

%  

(19.3)

%  

(26.1)

%  

 

(14.7)

%

Colombia

 

(15.0)

%  

(26.4)

%  

(39.6)

%  

 

(20.1)

%

Brazil(2)

 

(8.7)

%  

(7.6)

%  

(14.5)

%  

 

(9.0)

%

Argentina

 

(23.9)

%  

(8.4)

%  

(39.3)

%  

 

(24.2)

%

Uruguay

 

(16.5)

%  

9.0

%  

9.2

%  

 

(13.5)

%

South America

 

(11.6)

%  

(11.2)

%  

(25.9)

%  

 

(13.0)

%

Total

 

(12.5)

%  

(16.1)

%  

(26.0)

%  

 

(14.0)

%

The following table illustrates Coca-Cola FEMSA’s unit case mix by category for each of its operations and its consolidated reporting segments for 2020:

Sparkling Beverages

Stills

Water(3)

 

Years Ended December 31, 

 

    

2020

    

2019

    

2020

    

2019

    

2020

    

2019

Unit Case Mix by Category

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Mexico

 

73.6

%  

73.2

%  

6.3

%  

6.4

%  

20.0

%  

20.4

%

Central America(1)

 

88.9

%  

86.1

%  

7.3

%  

8.6

%  

3.8

%  

5.3

%

Mexico and Central America

 

75.4

%  

74.7

%  

6.5

%  

6.6

%  

18.1

%  

18.7

%

Colombia

 

81.8

%  

77.8

%  

5.2

%  

5.5

%  

13.0

%  

16.7

%

Brazil(2)

 

87.6

%  

86.8

%  

5.9

%  

6.1

%  

6.5

%  

7.1

%

Argentina

 

80.9

%  

80.0

%  

7.5

%  

7.0

%  

11.6

%  

13.0

%

Uruguay

 

89.0

%  

91.1

%  

1.2

%  

0.9

%  

9.8

%  

8.0

%

South America

 

85.8

%  

84.4

%  

5.8

%  

5.9

%  

8.4

%  

9.7

%

Total

 

79.5

%  

78.4

%  

6.2

%  

6.4

%  

14.3

%  

15.2

%


(1)Includes sales volume and transactions from Guatemala, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama.
(2)Excludes beer sales volume and transactions.
(3)Includes bulk water volume and transactions.

Seasonality

Sales of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s products are seasonal in all of the countries where it operates, as Coca-Cola FEMSA’s sales volumes generally increase during the summer of each country and during the year-end holiday season. In Mexico, Central America and Colombia, Coca-Cola FEMSA typically achieves its highest sales during the months of April through August as well as during the year-end holidays in December. In Brazil, Uruguay and

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Argentina, Coca-Cola FEMSA’s highest sales levels occur during the summer months of October through March, including the year-end holidays in December.

Marketing

Coca-Cola FEMSA, in conjunction with TCCC, has developed a marketing strategy to promote the sale and consumption of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s products. Coca-Cola FEMSA relies extensively on advertising, sales promotions and retailer support programs to target the particular preferences of its consumers. Coca-Cola FEMSA’s consolidated marketing expenses in 2020 were Ps. 5,043 million, net of Ps. 1,482 million contributed by TCCC.

Retailer Support Programs. Support programs include providing retailers with point-of-sale display materials and consumer sales promotions, such as contests, sweepstakes and the giveaway of product samples.

Coolers. Coolers play an integral role in Coca-Cola FEMSA’s clients’ plans for success. Increasing both cooler coverage and the number of cooler doors among Coca-Cola FEMSA’s retailers is important to ensure that its wide variety of products are properly displayed, while strengthening its merchandising capacity in its distribution channels to significantly improve its point-of-sale execution.

Advertising. Coca-Cola FEMSA advertises in all major communications media. Coca-Cola FEMSA focuses its advertising efforts on increasing brand recognition by consumers and improving its customer relations. National advertising campaigns are designed and proposed by TCCC’s local affiliates in the countries where Coca-Cola FEMSA operates, with its input at the local or regional level. Point-of-sale merchandising and advertising efforts are proposed and implemented by Coca-Cola FEMSA, with a focus on increasing its connection with customers and consumers.

Marketing in Coca-Cola FEMSA’s Distribution Channels. In order to provide more dynamic and specialized marketing of its products, Coca-Cola FEMSA’s strategy is to classify its markets and develop targeted efforts for each consumer segment or distribution channel. Coca-Cola FEMSA’s principal channels are small retailers, “on-premise” accounts, such as restaurants and bars, supermarkets and third-party distributors. Presence in these channels entails a comprehensive and detailed analysis of the purchasing patterns and preferences of various groups of beverage consumers in each of the different types of locations or distribution channels. In response to this analysis, Coca-Cola FEMSA tailors its product, price, packaging and distribution strategies to meet the particular needs of and exploit the potential of each channel.

Multi-Segmentation. Coca-Cola FEMSA has implemented a multi-segmentation strategy in all of its markets. These strategies consist of the definition of a strategic market cluster or group and the implementation and assignment of different product/price/package portfolios and service models to such market cluster or group. These clusters are defined based on consumption occasion, competitive environment, income level, and types of distribution channels.

Product Sales and Distribution

The following table provides an overview of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s distribution centers and the retailers to which Coca-Cola FEMSA sold its products:

As of December 31, 2020

Mexico and

    

Central America(1)

    

South America(2)

Distribution centers

 

196

 

72

Retailers

 

1,059,181

 

879,040


(1)Includes Mexico, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama.
(2)Includes Colombia, Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay.

Coca-Cola FEMSA continuously evaluates its distribution model in order to fit with the local dynamics of the marketplace and analyze the way it goes to market, recognizing different service needs from its customers, while looking for a more efficient distribution model. As part of this strategy, Coca-Cola FEMSA is rolling out a variety of new distribution models throughout its territories looking for improvements in its distribution network.

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Coca-Cola FEMSA uses several sales and distribution models depending on market, geographic conditions and the customer’s profile: (i) the pre-sale system, which separates the sales and delivery functions, permitting trucks to be loaded with the mix of products that retailers have previously ordered, thereby increasing both sales and distribution efficiency; (ii)the conventional truck route system, in which the person in charge of the delivery makes immediate sales from inventory available on the truck; (iii) sales through digital platforms to access technologically enabled customers; (iv) the telemarketing system, which could be combined with pre-sales visits; and (v) sales through third-party wholesalers and other distributors of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s products.

As part of the pre-sale system, sales personnel also provide merchandising services during retailer visits, which Coca-Cola FEMSA believes enhance the shopper experience at the point-of-sale. Coca-Cola FEMSA believes that an adequate number of service visits to retailers and frequency of deliveries are essential elements in an effective selling and distribution system of its products.

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, Coca-Cola FEMSA continues to reinforce its presence in its emerging distribution channels, which consist primarily of digital sales channels, such as food aggregators, digital platforms and telemarketing, in an effort to safeguard the health of its workforce and business partners and to address the growing demand from its business partners through such sales channels. This reinforcement is aligned with Coca-Cola FEMSA’s overall digitization and omnichannel strategies.

In 2020, no single customer accounted for more than 10.0% of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s consolidated total sales.

Coca-Cola FEMSA’s distribution centers range from large warehousing facilities to small cross-docking facilities. In addition to its fleet of trucks, Coca-Cola FEMSA distributes its products in certain locations through electric carts and hand-trucks in order to comply with local environmental and traffic regulations. In some of its territories, Coca-Cola FEMSA relies on third parties to transport its finished products from its bottling plants to its distribution centers and, in some cases, directly to its customers.

Mexico. Coca-Cola FEMSA contracts with a subsidiary of FEMSA, Solistica, S.A. de C.V., for most of the transportation of finished products from Coca-Cola FEMSA’s bottling plants to its distribution centers in Mexico. See “Item 7. Major Shareholders and Related Party Transactions—Related Party Transactions.” From the distribution centers, Coca-Cola FEMSA distributes its finished products to retailers mainly through its own fleet of trucks. In designated areas in Mexico, third-party distributors deliver Coca-Cola FEMSA’s products to retailers and consumers, allowing Coca-Cola FEMSA to access these areas on a cost-effective basis.

In Mexico, Coca-Cola FEMSA sells a majority of its beverages through its traditional distribution channel, which consists of sales at small retail stores to consumers who may take the beverages for consumption at home or elsewhere. Coca-Cola FEMSA also sells products through modern distribution channels, the “on-premise” consumption segment, home delivery, supermarkets and other locations. Modern distribution channels include large and organized chain retail outlets such as wholesale supermarkets, discount stores and convenience stores that sell fast-moving consumer goods, where retailers can buy large volumes of products from various producers. The “on-premise” consumption segment consists of sales through points-of-sale where products are consumed at the establishment from which they were purchased. This includes retailers such as restaurants and bars as well as stadiums, auditoriums and theaters.

In 2020, the “on-premise” channel was the most affected in Coca-Cola FEMSA’s Mexican operations, as a result of COVID-19 containment measures. This effect was partially offset by increased sales through its emerging distribution channels, which consist primarily of digital channels and platforms such as food aggregators, e-commerce and other digital platforms. Additionally, other “direct-to-consumer” channels such as Coca-Cola FEMSA’s own home delivery routes had an increase in demand.

Brazil. In Brazil, Coca-Cola FEMSA distributes its finished products to retailers through a combination of its own fleet of trucks and third-party distributors, while maintaining control over the selling activities. In designated zones in Brazil, third-party distributors purchase Coca-Cola FEMSA’s products and resell them to retailers. In Brazil, Coca-Cola FEMSA sells a majority of its beverages at small retail stores. Coca-Cola FEMSA also sells products through modern distribution channels and “on-premise” consumption. Modern distribution channels in Brazil include large and organized chain retail outlets such as wholesale supermarkets and discount stores that sell fast-moving consumer goods.

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In 2020, the “on-premise” channel in Coca-Cola FEMSA’s Brazil operations was the most affected as a result of COVID-19 containment measures. This effect was partially offset by increased sales through its emerging distribution channels, which consist primarily of digital channels and platforms such as food aggregators, e-commerce and other digital platforms. Additionally, the rollout of the omnichannel platform allowed Coca-Cola FEMSA to serve its consumers in Brazil through a digital app and its proprietary chatbot-enabled order-taking platform.

Territories other than Mexico and Brazil. Coca-Cola FEMSA distributes its finished products to retailers through a combination of its own fleet of trucks and third-party distributors. In most of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s territories, an important part of its total sales volume is sold through small retailers.

In 2020, a large percentage of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s sales in its territories other than Mexico and Brazil were made through modern distribution channels, as the imposition of measures and regulations aimed at containing the COVID-19 pandemic had an impact on consumer preferences towards these channels. The “on-premise” channel was the most affected sales and distribution channel in these territories as a result of containment measures. As these countries began to ease restrictions and lockdowns, there was a subsequent recovery in the “on-premise” channel. This effect was partially offset by an increase in demand for its emerging distribution channels, which consist primarily of digital channels and platforms such as food aggregators, e-commerce and other digital platforms.

Principal Competitors

Coca-Cola FEMSA is a leader in the beverage market, being the largest franchise bottler of Coca-Cola trademarks in the world by sales volume. During 2020, Coca-Cola FEMSA produced and sold approximately 11.3% of the Coca-Cola system’s volume worldwide.

The characteristics of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s territories are very diverse. Central Mexico and Coca-Cola FEMSA’s territories in Argentina are densely populated and have a large number of competing beverage brands as compared to the rest of its territories. Coca-Cola FEMSA’s territories in Brazil are densely populated but have lower consumption of beverage products as compared to Mexico. Uruguay has a high per capita consumption and low population density. Portions of southern Mexico, Central America and Colombia are large and mountainous areas with low population density, low per capita income and low consumption of beverages.

Coca-Cola FEMSA’s principal competitors are local Pepsi bottlers and other bottlers and distributors of local beverage brands. Coca-Cola FEMSA also faces competition in many of its territories from producers of low price beverages, commonly referred to as “B brands.” A number of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s competitors in Central America, Brazil, Argentina and Colombia offer beer in addition to sparkling beverages, still beverages and water, which may enable them to achieve distribution efficiencies that other competitors who do not offer an integrated portfolio may not be able to achieve.

While competitive conditions are different in each of its territories, Coca-Cola FEMSA competes mainly in terms of price, packaging, effective promotional activities, access to retail outlets and sufficient shelf space, customer service, product innovation and product alternatives and the ability to identify and satisfy consumer preferences. Coca-Cola FEMSA competes by seeking to offer products at an attractive price in the different segments in its markets and by building on the value of its brands. Coca-Cola FEMSA believes that the introduction of new products and new presentations has been a significant competitive advantage that allows Coca-Cola FEMSA to increase demand for its products, provide different options to consumers and increase new consumption opportunities. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—Coca-Cola FEMSA—Coca-Cola FEMSA’s Products” and “Item 4. Information on the Company—Coca-Cola FEMSA—Packaging.”

Mexico and Central America. Coca-Cola FEMSA’s principal competitors in Mexico are bottlers of Pepsi products. Coca-Cola FEMSA competes with Organización Cultiba, S.A.B. de C.V., a joint venture formed by Grupo Embotelladoras Unidas, S.A.B. de C.V., the former Pepsi bottler in central and southeast Mexico, a subsidiary of PepsiCo and Empresas Polar, S.A., a beer distributor and Pepsi bottler. Coca-Cola FEMSA’s main competition in the juice category in Mexico is Grupo Jumex. In the water category, Coca-Cola FEMSA’s main competitor is Bonafont, a water brand owned by Danone. In addition, Coca-Cola FEMSA competes with Cadbury Schweppes in sparkling beverages and with other local brands in its Mexican territories, as well as “B brand” producers, such as Ajemex, S.A. de C.V. (Big Cola bottler) and Consorcio AGA, S.A. de C.V. (Red Cola bottler), that offer various presentations of sparkling and still beverages.

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In the countries that comprise Coca-Cola FEMSA’s Central America region, its main competitors are Pepsi and Big Cola bottlers. In Guatemala and Nicaragua, Coca-Cola FEMSA competes with a joint venture between AmBev and The Central American Bottler Corporation. In Costa Rica, Coca-Cola FEMSA’s principal competitor is Florida Bebidas S.A., subsidiary of Florida Ice and Farm Co. In Panama, Coca-Cola FEMSA’s main competitor is Cervecería Nacional, S.A. Coca-Cola FEMSA also faces competition from “B brands” offering multiple serving size presentations in some Central American countries.

South America. Coca-Cola FEMSA’s principal competitor in Colombia is Postobón, a local bottler (Manzana Postobón and Colombiana bottler). Postobón sells Pepsi products and is a vertically integrated producer, the owners of which hold other significant commercial and industrial interests in Colombia. Coca-Cola FEMSA also competes with low-price producers, such as Ajecolombia S.A., the producers of Big Cola, which principally offer multiple serving size presentations in the sparkling and still beverage industry.

In Brazil, Coca-Cola FEMSA competes against AmBev, a company that distributes Pepsi brands, local brands with flavors such as guarana, and proprietary beer brands. Coca-Cola FEMSA also competes against “B brands” or “Tubainas,” which are small, local producers of low-cost sparkling beverages that represent a significant portion of the sparkling beverage market.

In Argentina, Coca-Cola FEMSA’s main competitor is Buenos Aires Embotellador S.A. (BAESA), a Pepsi bottler, which is owned by Argentina’s principal brewery, Quilmes Industrial S.A., and indirectly controlled by AmBev. In the water category, Levité, Villavicencio and Villa del Sur are water brands owned by Danone, which is Coca-Cola FEMSA’s main competition. In addition, Coca-Cola FEMSA competes with a number of competitors offering “B brands,” low-priced sparkling beverages, as well as many other generic products and private label proprietary supermarket brands that are gaining importance in the market. Manaos, a brand owned by Refres Now S.A. is Coca-Cola FEMSA’s main competitor in this segment.

In Uruguay, Coca-Cola FEMSA’s main competitor is Salus, a water brand owned by Danone. Coca-Cola FEMSA also competes against Fábricas Nacionales de Cerveza S.A. (FNC), a Pepsi bottler and distributor that is partially owned by Argentina’s principal brewery, Quilmes Industrial S.A., and indirectly controlled by AmBev. In addition, Coca-Cola FEMSA competes with low-priced regional producers, as well as many other “B brands” and imported products.

Raw Materials

Pursuant to Coca-Cola FEMSA’s bottler agreements, Coca-Cola FEMSA is authorized to manufacture, sell and distribute Coca-Cola trademark beverages within specific geographic areas, and Coca-Cola FEMSA is required to purchase concentrate for all Coca-Cola trademark beverages in all of its territories from affiliates of TCCC and sweeteners and other raw materials from companies authorized by TCCC. Concentrate prices for Coca-Cola trademark beverages are determined as a percentage of the weighted average retail price in local currency net of applicable taxes. Although TCCC has the right to unilaterally set the price of concentrates, in practice this percentage has historically been set pursuant to periodic negotiations with TCCC. See “Item 10. Additional Information—Material Contracts—Material Contracts Relating to Coca-Cola FEMSA—Bottler Agreements.”

In the past, TCCC has increased concentrate prices for Coca-Cola trademark beverages in some of the countries where Coca-Cola FEMSA operates. For example, TCCC (i) gradually increased concentrate prices for certain Coca-Cola trademark beverages in Costa Rica and Panama beginning in 2014 and through 2018; (ii) gradually increased concentrate prices for flavored water in Mexico beginning in 2015 and through 2018 and (iii) began to gradually increase concentrate prices for certain Coca-Cola trademark beverages in Mexico beginning in 2017 and through 2019, followed by a subsequent increase in 2020. TCCC may continue to unilaterally increase concentrate prices in the future, and Coca-Cola FEMSA may not be successful in negotiating or implementing measures to mitigate the negative effect this may have in the prices of its products or its results. See “Item 10. Additional Information—Material Contracts—Material Contracts Relating to Coca-Cola FEMSA—Cooperation Framework with The Coca-Cola Company.”

In addition to concentrate, Coca-Cola FEMSA purchases sweeteners, carbon dioxide, PET resin and preforms to make plastic bottles, finished plastic and glass bottles, cans, caps and fountain containers, as well as other packaging materials and raw materials. Coca-Cola FEMSA’s bottler agreements provide that these materials may be purchased only from suppliers approved by TCCC. Prices for certain raw materials, including those used in the bottling of Coca-

35


Cola FEMSA’s products, mainly PET resin, finished plastic bottles, aluminum cans, HFCS and certain sweeteners, are paid in or determined with reference to the U.S. dollar, and therefore local prices in a particular country may increase based on changes in the applicable exchange rates. Coca-Cola FEMSA’s most significant packaging raw material costs arise from the purchase of PET resin, the price of which is related to crude oil prices and global PET resin supply. The average price that Coca-Cola FEMSA paid for PET resin in U.S. dollars in 2020 decreased 17.0% as compared to 2019 in all Coca-Cola FEMSA’s territories. In addition, given that high currency volatility has affected and continues to affect most of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s territories, the average price for PET resin in local currencies was lower in 2020 in Mexico, Colombia and Brazil and higher in Argentina. In 2020, Coca-Cola FEMSA purchased certain raw materials in advance, implemented a price fixing strategy and entered into certain derivative transactions, which helped Coca-Cola FEMSA captures opportunities with respect to raw material costs and currency exchange rates.

Under its agreements with TCCC, Coca-Cola FEMSA may use raw or refined sugar, artificial sweeteners and HFCS in its products. Sugar prices in all of the countries where Coca-Cola FEMSA operates, other than Brazil, are subject to local regulations and other barriers to market entry that, in certain countries, often cause Coca-Cola FEMSA to pay for sugar in excess of international market prices. In recent years, international sugar prices experienced significant volatility. Across Coca-Cola FEMSA’s territories, its average price for sugar in U.S. dollars, taking into account its financial hedging activities, decreased by approximately 9.2% in 2020 as compared to 2019.

Coca-Cola FEMSA categorizes water as a raw material in its business. Coca-Cola FEMSA obtains water for the production of some of its natural spring water products, such as Manantial in Colombia and Crystal in Brazil, from spring water pursuant to concessions granted.

None of the materials or supplies that Coca-Cola FEMSA uses is presently in short supply, although the supply of specific materials could be adversely affected by strikes, weather conditions, governmental controls, national emergency situations, water shortages or the failure to maintain Coca-Cola FEMSA’s existing water concessions.

Mexico and Central America. In Mexico, Coca-Cola FEMSA mainly purchases PET resin from Indorama Ventures Polymers México, S. de R.L. de C.V. and DAK Resinas Americas Mexico, S.A. de C.V., which Alpla México, S.A. de C.V., known as Alpla, and Envases Universales de México, S.A.P.I. de C.V. manufacture into non-returnable plastic bottles for us. Also, Coca-Cola FEMSA has introduced into its business Asian global suppliers, such as Far Eastern New Century Corp., known as FENC, SFX – Jiangyin Xingyu New Material Co. Ltd. and Hainan Yisheng Petrochemical Co. Ltd., which support its PET resin strategy and are known as the top PET global suppliers.

Coca-Cola FEMSA purchases all of its cans from Crown Envases México, S.A. de C.V., formerly known as Fábricas de Monterrey, S.A. de C.V., and Envases Universales de México, S.A.P.I. de C.V. Coca-Cola FEMSA mainly purchases its glass bottles from Owens America, S. de R.L. de C.V., FEVISA Industrial, S.A. de C.V., known as FEVISA, and Glass & Silice, S.A. de C.V.

Coca-Cola FEMSA purchases sugar from, among other suppliers, PIASA, Beta San Miguel, S.A. de C.V. or Beta San Miguel and Ingenio La Gloria, S.A., all of them sugar cane producers. As of April 8, 2021, Coca-Cola FEMSA held a 36.4% and 2.7% equity interest in PIASA and Beta San Miguel, respectively. Coca-Cola FEMSA purchases HFCS from Ingredion México, S.A. de C.V. and Almidones Mexicanos, S.A. de C.V., known as Almex.

Sugar prices in Mexico are subject to local regulations and other barriers to market entry that often cause Coca-Cola FEMSA to pay higher prices than those paid in the international market. As a result, prices in Mexico have no correlation to international market prices. In 2020, sugar prices in local currency in Mexico increased approximately 11.2% as compared to 2019.

In Central America, the majority of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s raw materials such as glass and non-returnable plastic bottles are purchased from several local suppliers. Coca-Cola FEMSA purchases its cans from Envases Universales Ball de Centroamérica, S.A. and Envases Universales de México, S.A.P.I. de C.V. Sugar is available from suppliers that represent several local producers. In Costa Rica, Coca-Cola FEMSA acquires plastic non-returnable bottles from Alpla C.R. S.A., and in Nicaragua Coca-Cola FEMSA acquires such plastic bottles from Alpla Nicaragua, S.A.

South America. In Colombia, Coca-Cola FEMSA uses sugar as a sweetener in all of its caloric beverages, which Coca-Cola FEMSA buys from several domestic sources. Sugar prices in Colombia decreased by 11.9% in U.S. dollars and decreased 0.7% in local currency, as compared to 2019. Coca-Cola FEMSA purchases non-returnable plastic

36


bottles from Amcor Rigid Plastics de Colombia, S.A. and Envases de Tocancipa S.A.S. (affiliate of Envases Universales de México, S.A.P.I. de C.V.). Coca-Cola FEMSA has historically purchased all of its non-returnable glass bottles from O-I Peldar and other global suppliers in the Middle East. Coca-Cola FEMSA purchases all of its cans from Crown Envases México, S.A. de C.V. and Crown Colombiana, S.A. Grupo Ardila Lulle (owners of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s competitor Postobón) owns a minority equity interest in certain of Coca-Cola FEMSA’s suppliers, including O-I Peldar and Crown Colombiana, S.A.

In Brazil, Coca-Cola FEMSA also uses sugar as a sweetener in all of its caloric beverages. Sugar is available at local market prices, which historically have been similar to international prices. Sugar prices in Brazil decreased approximately 6.2% in U.S. dollars and increased 20.8% in local currency as compared to 2019. Taking into account Coca-Cola FEMSA’s financial hedging activities, its sugar prices in Brazil decreased approximately 10.0% in U.S. dollars. See “Item 11. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk—Commodity Price Risk.” Coca-Cola FEMSA purchases non-returnable glass bottles, plastic bottles and cans from several domestic and international suppliers. Coca-Cola FEMSA mainly purchases PET resin from local suppliers such as Indorama Ventures Polímeros S.A.

In Argentina, Coca-Cola FEMSA mainly uses HFCS that it purchases from several different local suppliers as a sweetener in its products. Coca-Cola FEMSA purchases glass bottles and other r