10-K 1 inve-10k_20201231.htm 10-K inve-10k_20201231.htm

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

Form 10-K

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020

OR

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                     to

COMMISSION FILE NUMBER 0-29440

 

IDENTIV, INC.

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)

 

 

Delaware

 

77-0444317

(State or other jurisdiction of

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Incorporation or organization)

 

Identification Number)

 

2201 Walnut Avenue, Suite 100, Fremont, California

 

94538

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

 

(Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code:

(949) 250-8888

 

Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

 

Trading Symbol(s)

 

Name of exchange on which registered

Common Stock, $0.001 par value per share

 

INVE

 

The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC

 

Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

Common Stock, $0.001 par value, and associated Preferred Share Purchase Rights

(Title of Class)

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes      No  

Indicated by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer

 

  

Accelerated filer

 

 

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer

 

☑  

  

Smaller reporting company

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emerging growth company

 

 

 

 

 

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes      No  

Based on the closing sale price of the Registrant’s Common Stock on the Nasdaq National Market System on June 30, 2020, the last business day of the Registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter, the aggregate market value of Common Stock held by non-affiliates of the Registrant was $76,644,391.

At March 2, 2021, the Registrant had outstanding 18,154,906 shares of Common Stock, excluding 1,417,371 shares held in treasury.

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Designated portions of the Company’s Proxy Statement to be filed within 120 days after the Registrant’s fiscal year end of December 31, 2020 are incorporated by reference into Part II, Item 5 and Part III of this Report.

 

 

 


 

 

Identiv, Inc.

Form 10-K

For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2020

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

  

   

Page

PART I

Item 1

  

Business

3

Item 1A

  

Risk Factors

10

Item 1B

  

Unresolved Staff Comments

19

Item 2

  

Properties

19

Item 3

  

Legal Proceedings

19

Item 4

  

Mine Safety Disclosures

19

 

  

Executive Officers of the Registrant

20

PART II

Item 5

  

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

21

Item 6

  

Selected Financial Data

21

Item 7

  

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

22

Item 7A

  

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

37

Item 8

  

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

38

Item 9

  

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

71

Item 9A

  

Controls and Procedures

71

Item 9B

  

Other Information

71

PART III

Item 10

  

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

72

Item 11

  

Executive Compensation

72

Item 12

  

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

72

Item 13

  

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

72

Item 14

  

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

72

PART IV

Item 15

  

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedule

73

Item 16

 

Form 10-K Summary

74

Signatures

75

 

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PART I

ITEM 1.

BUSINESS

Statement Regarding Forward Looking Statements

This Annual Report on Form 10-K (“Annual Report”) contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. For example, statements, other than statements of historical facts regarding our strategy, future operations and growth, financial position, expected financial or business results, projected costs, prospects, plans, market trends, potential market size, product attributes and benefits, competition, objectives of management, management judgements and estimates, and the expected impact of changes in laws or accounting pronouncements constitute forward-looking statements. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terms such as “will,” “believe,” “could,” “should,” “would,” “may,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan,” “estimate,” “expect,” “project” or the negative of these terms or other similar expressions. Although we believe that our expectations reflected in or suggested by the forward-looking statements that we make in this Annual Report are reasonable, we cannot guarantee future results, performance or achievements. You should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. All forward-looking statements speak only as of the date of this Annual Report. While we may elect to update forward-looking statements at some point in the future, we specifically disclaim any obligation to do so, even if our expectations change, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. We also caution you that such forward-looking statements are subject to risks, uncertainties and other factors, not all of which are known to us or within our control, and that actual events or results may differ materially from those indicated by these forward-looking statements. Factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially from our expectations include, but are not limited to our ability to successfully execute our business plan and sell our products; continued market acceptance and growth or expansion in our target markets; our ability to successfully compete; our history of losses; our ability to obtain additional capital; the benefits and attributes of our products and services; the level of customer orders; the ability of our products to perform as expected; risks related to the COVID-19 pandemic; fluctuations in net cash provided and used by operating, financing and investing activities; sources and uses of our cash, and expense levels; the loss of significant customers or types of business; and the risks discussed elsewhere in this Annual Report under the heading “Risk Factors”. These cautionary statements qualify all of the forward-looking statements included in this Annual Report.

Identiv and the Identiv logo are trademarks of Identiv, Inc., registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Certain product and service brands are also trademarks or registered trademarks of the Company, including HIRSCH, ScramblePad, TouchSecure, Velocity, Freedom, Enterphone MESH, 3VR, VisionPoint, Thursby Software, and Thursby SubRosa. Other product and brand names not belonging to Identiv that appear in this Annual Report may be trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.

Each of the terms the “Company,” “Identiv,” “we” and “us” as used herein refers collectively to Identiv, Inc. and its wholly-owned subsidiaries, unless otherwise stated.

Overview

Our mission is to software-enable the entire physical world.  

Our RFID (radio-frequency identification) devices digitally enable and secure any physical item. Our products enable frictionless digital interaction with the physical world, manage data flows from each physical object, creating a software-enabled experience that is far beyond a purely physical interaction.

By digitally enabling physical 'things,' we make them more secure, responsive, feature-rich, interactive and customer-connected. RFID powers a wide range of applications from customer engagement, product authenticity, enhanced consumer experiences, instrumentation and sensor enabling, brand protection, tamper detection, and other IoT applications. We add frictionless customer engagement, managing the interaction of products with mobile devices to create totally new experiences.  

Our strategy is to digitally enable the world at the smallest and largest scales. As each grows and becomes pervasive their interactions and network effects create exponentially greater value.

We execute our strategy of digitally enabling the smallest-scale things and largest-scale things by focusing in two segments:  our Identity business and our Premises business.

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Identity: Our Identity business is focused on digitally enabling and securing every physical thing. Our designs and products include embedded RFID solutions to make digital and physical devices more responsive, secure, feature-rich, interactive and customer-connected.  Our RFID devices have been integrated into and have digitally-enabled over a billion and a half physical internet of things around the world.

 

 

Premises: Our Premises business is focused on digitally enabling and securing every physical place. We apply much the same RFID and security technology from our Identity segment to our physical and logical security platforms to create a more secure, convenient and responsive experience in physical spaces. Our platform is deployed across buildings worldwide, ranging from sensitive government facilities to schools, utilities, hospitals, stores and the smallest shops and apartment buildings worldwide.

Market Drivers

The emerging market of RFID is driven by pervasive use cases. For example, RFID enables syringes to track whether the exact right amount of medication is filled into them and dispensed into the patient. Refrigerators can tell when the filter needs to be replaced, and make sure an authentic replacement is installed and working. Running shoes can sense how many steps you’ve taken. Phone accessories can work together intelligently with your phone to create novel experiences and applications. Governments can track the quality and authenticity of cannabis products for compliance and especially for tax collection. Temperature-sensitive medicine can be tracked to ensure it has stayed within its safety parameters and not spoiled. Bicycle and scooter tire pressure and frame wear can be monitored. Luxury goods can be authenticated, personalized and responsive. Vaping pods can be verified and tamper resistant for safety and authenticity. Blood test assays can be verified as authentic and matched with the right blood sample.

These examples demonstrate the scale of the market opportunity of hundreds of billions of units over time. We believe competitive pressures will drive adoption across each sector as technology improves and costs drop, until nearly every physical thing has a sensor-augmented, integrated, digital existence.  

 

We share the vision with leading chip makers that every physical thing on the planet will have a digital existence. Tiny, low-cost RFID chips with highly tuned and optimized antennas, systems, software and security that are embedded in everything we interact with. This is software reaching every physical thing on the planet, and Identiv enables it.

 

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Competitive Advantages

We believe our core differentiation is our best-in-class designs, technologies and intellectual property to enable the digital capabilities of RFID chips to work in the messy analog world of antennas, power harvesting, data conversion and security. They have to go on a shoe, in a syringe, embedded in the hair of a doll, then they have to communicate through RF, and harvest power from the radio signal of the phone or reader, to run the chip. They have to do this totally reliably, while the item is dropped, washed, stuffed in pockets and generally exposed to the real world. We design the systems, the antennas, software, security and physical form that connects the chips, accesses their capabilities, manages RF communications and power conversion, and creates the platform for the digital experience, all in harmony with the physical experience of the product.

 

 

Imagine, Design, Prototype

We make this happen with our library of designs, with patents like tag-on-metal and with IP we’ve developed working with advanced early adopters in their industries. We deepen our value and competitive advantage by providing both the devices themselves in high volume as well as the readers and programmers to personalize and read the RFID devices. Whether it’s in a pharmacy or any other place where RFID is read or programmed, our readers are among the most widely deployed for NFC and high-frequency RFID programming and reading. This gives us both credibility with our customers' engineers and the flexibility to add software value that providers of just RFID devices can’t.  

We then work closely with our customers' engineers to build the complicated analog bridge and system to make it all work across RF. With very high reliability, high data security and optimized power transfer, the end user gets an engaged interaction.  

 

 

Pilot, Scale-up, Re-Imagine, Re-Design....Repeat

Then because we own our own world class production facilities, we go directly to prototypes, pilot runs, ramp up production and deliver with high quality even for the most complicated devices. What usually happens next is the customers' engineers want to improve the product, either from what they’ve learned or because our chip partners come out with new chips, new features, new price points. We would then run another rapid cycle of re-design / re-prototype / re-pilot / re-production processes.  

We believe that in this market of thousands of designs and hundreds of billions of units there are substantial first-mover advantages. Our design through production platform keeps customers with us as they drive more capabilities and better performance into their customer experiences. We believe this will accelerate, driven by the chips Moore's Law speed advances, and by competitive forces created when any digitally enabled product is launched, pressuring others to keep up or lose the market opportunity.

 

Growth Strategy

Our strategy to deliver on our mission is focused on pervasive deployment of high-end, sensor-enabled RFID devices in every physical thing and every physical place. We believe the category of the most sophisticated products is where we’re the strongest. With over 150 active RFID customers, we’re engaged with some of the most advanced early adopters, built on our reputation as the go-to partner for advanced RFID devices. We believe there are three growth drivers in RFID: customer launches, design wins and technology expansion.  

 

Customer Launch & Use case Examples

 

 

Pharmaceutical prescriptions: Our RFID devices attached to prescription pill bottles enable an app to speak the contents, dosage, and regimen for the visually impaired. Our programmers are used by pharmacists to securely personalize the prescription for each customer. We believe this has the potential to expand to all prescriptions.

  

Mobile accessories: With the power of mobile phones, we believe accessories that are unconnected are a missed opportunity. When your phone case, wallet, glucose monitor and other accessories can talk directly to your phone, they become part of the mobile platform. Our RFID devices embedded in mobile phone accessories enable rich, extensible experiences on a mobile device with an RFID-enabled accessory.

 

 

Medical consumables: It’s critical that a part like a disposable breathing tube is authentic to go with a particular manufacturer's ventilator. Our RFID devices enable a customer's product to track authenticity and usage of breathing tubes for ventilators. We believe every medical device consumable should be RFID enabled to make sure the right part is used with the right machine, and to make sure it’s used only as intended, and replaced with a genuine part, creating a high-value, quality-sensitive, recurring, consumables-based use category.  

 

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These are just a few examples of use cases already in-market and growing, that we believe will expand to touch physical interaction with nearly every physical thing.

 

Design wins

Design wins are the key to our leadership in the market as it expands. We believe our technical lead, experience, IP and reputation provide a pipeline of design win opportunities. Specific recent examples include:

 

 

Personal transportation products (bikes, scooters, e-bikes): Our patented tag-on-metal RFID devices for authenticity,

tracking and customer engagement are early-adoption uses we’re designing for companies in this category. We’re also working on tag-on-metal designs to track tire pressure, permitting a phone-tap to the wheel to display pressure instead of awkwardly jamming a pressure gauge on a tube stem. Strain gauge enabled RFID devices to track wear-and-tear are in early stages. This cycle of immediate-benefit, low-risk applications, followed by second-generation more complicated applications and then planning ahead for later-generation, experience-changing applications we believe is the proliferation path many leading companies will follow to deploy the full range of capabilities of a digitally-enabled RFID-connected product.

 

 

Rapid blood analyzing systems: This application goes onto consumable cartridges to calibrate the system and confirm authenticity and content for the blood test assay. This use case is applicable to most testing and assays where authenticity, data integrity, reliability and seamless integration with existing form factors are critical.

 

 

Existing customer design expansion: Core to our strategy is continuously improving designs, to leverage new chip

features and price/performance. With one of our major customers, we shipped three different designs in their initial product cycle; we’ve since developed three new designs, at least two of these are moving into a new launch phase.

 

Technology expansion

Our ability to get more design wins and successful customer launches depends on our best-in-class engineering and production, but upstream of that it’s built on new technologies we’re constantly incorporating and designing as new capabilities for our customers.  

 

Passive temperature sensors and patches: These let you track the temperature of people or things, without having a

battery attached, flexibly attached on skin or integrated with other products, wherever temperature is critical to track.  Perpetually-functioning (no battery), usable almost anywhere (small, custom-designable, flexible) at a fraction of the cost of powered cold-chain trackers opens multiple use cases that were impractical or price-prohibitive.

 

 

Integrated strain gauges: Designs with integrated strain gauges to track the bending and strain of objects, whether

they’re made of metal, plastic or even concrete. Early use cases range from tracking bending and long-term wear in bridges, using hundreds of embedded sensors, to tracking the pounding and wear on mountain bike frames and other load-bearing consumer products.  

 

 

Capacitive fluid sensors: This senses fluid fill even through glass or other materials, so you can track medicine fills

in syringes, serum bottles, and anything else. For certainty of fluid fill and dispensing, medical and high value/high-sensitivity fluid measurement use cases are easily enabled at scale. Combined with a one-time counter, counterfeit re-fills can be precluded by the same device.

 

 

Multi-frequency devices: Combination RFID devices integrating both UHF and HF in a single device bring UHF's

long read-range to the rich feature set – but limited read-range - of NFC and other HF RFID devices.

 

 

New RFID chips: We continuously collaborate with RFID chip vendors as well as specialty chips makers. We develop integrated designs to deliver the price and features of the newest chips for easy adoption into new products.

 

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Premises Strategy

Just as our RFID products software enable things on the planet, our Premises platform software enables places on the planet. Our platform is anchored by our Velocity and Freedom software, our line of controllers and IoT gateways including Mx, our Freedom SmartBridge, our TouchSecure access sensors, our Velocity Vision video platform and a wide range of integrations.

 

Also identical to our RFID strategy, we believe our Premises competitive advantage is our technical depth and total solution. In Premises our platform encompasses the total digitization of physical places, incorporating our own access sensors, gateways, bridges, appliances, cards, access and video software, integrations and analytics.    

 

Premises Software: Our software platform for premises digitization enables centralized management of a physical

place, including control of doors, cameras, gates, elevators and other building equipment, monitoring users as they move around a facility, preventing unwanted access, maintaining compliance and providing a continuous audit trail. Our platforms are IT-centric and highly scalable from small businesses through global organizations, multi-tenant, special-purpose campuses such as schools, military bases, utilities and others. Our platforms are available as local software or cloud based, accessible through browser, mobile and desktop interfaces. We leverage data infrastructures across LAN's, Wifi, Bluetooth, mobile, RFID and emerging communication standards such as 5G and UWB. As communications infrastructure becomes fully wireless, low-power and high-security, our software is architected to support seamless migration to fully software-defined systems, compatible with pervasive RFID devices to enable a frictionless, convenient and secure experience in almost any physical location.  

 

Access Readers & Sensors: As most of the physical infrastructure becomes wireless, virtual and software-defined,

the remaining device will be the sensors at the door. As platforms for local presence confirmation, video and audio interaction, and to signal a door to open, our family of TouchSecure (TS) sensors will continue to play a key physical role in providing security and convenience at the door.

Sales & Marketing Strategy

Our go-to-market strategy is consistent across our business. We believe our competitive advantage is our technical expertise, technology and know-how which covers both the user side and the programmer/reader/infrastructure side.  With this depth of technology across the overall system we develop and prove our best-in-class use cases with our customers.  

 

Use-case Proliferation: We apply our digital marketing platforms, sales teams and channel partners to proliferate each use case as best-in-class. We target the product engineers or other decision makers to build awareness of a proven solution. We drive our marketing message in terms that engineers value because we’ve established the benefits from comparable use cases. As each company adopts RFID and delivers superior product experiences, we believe that drives faster adoption by others, until a use-case becomes pervasive.

 

Trusted advisor: Reducing adoption cost and risk: We have built a reputation as the trusted advisor to our customers by sharing benefits and pitfalls, risks and tradeoffs, as well as ways to mitigate them. We also communicate the risk of inaction, as others come to market with new capabilities. By highlighting risks of inaction, making customers aware of upcoming competitive threats and sharing insights into how they can confidently build competitive capabilities themselves, we believe we become their trusted advisor early in their learning and decision cycle. Then, because we help with the designs, provide devices as well as reader/programmers, and complete solutions or best-of-breed components, we become a long-term partner, reducing their risks and efforts and improving their competitive advantages.

 

Customer Confidentiality and Trust: Throughout this process confidentiality is paramount. A capability developed uniquely with and for a customer is not shared with another. That is fundamental to our culture and to our business practices.

 

Industry Leader and Facilitator: As we develop general use-case capabilities and insights, we share and leverage those cross-industry, adding value and building our competitive advantage. Specific differentiation established with a customer is protected. With this key guideline, we optimize our value across each use case, to each individual customer, and to the industry overall.

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Research and Development

In RFID, we’re a leader in a wide range of chip use cases, antenna designs across HF, UHF and LF as well as sensors, materials and form factors. We encompass both sides of the underlying technology platforms, the devices themselves as well as the programmers, testers, configurators and readers. This provides credibility with customers, demonstrating an understanding of all components of the devices in some cases even more deeply than the makers of the devices themselves, because our devices are programming, configuring, testing and validating them at the time of production, as well as in use among customers. Similarly with our physical security IoT platforms, we encompass the total solution. Our technology and products span a far greater range of the platform solution than most of our competitors, encompassing readers, controllers, cards and software across local, cloud, mobile, and hybrid modes.

Our R&D investment is highly leveraged because we optimally access expertise wherever we believe it is most advanced and most efficient. We maintain RFID R&D in Germany, in the region where the initial NFC and smart card technologies developed, and in Singapore/Southeast Asia, where the most advanced and flexible RFID production is centered. We also deploy software and systems teams in Chennai India, Vietnam, Mexico and across the U.S.  

Proprietary Technology and Intellectual Property

We currently rely on a combination of patent, copyright and trademark laws, trade secrets, confidentiality agreements and contractual provisions to protect our proprietary rights. Although we may seek to protect our proprietary technology through patents, it is possible that no new patents will be issued, that our proprietary products or technologies are not patentable, and that any issued patent will fail to provide us with any competitive advantages. The core of our proprietary technology is the combination of our advanced technical expertise combined with our intimate customer knowledge, enabling us to develop bring to market and sometimes patent products uniquely positioned to deliver benefits to customers. This is an intellectual property advantage characterized both by trade secrets and unique relationships as well as patents. We have a portfolio of approximately 36 patent families (designs, patents, utility models, patents pending and exclusive licenses) in individual or regional filings, covering products, electrical and mechanical designs, software systems and methods and manufacturing process ideas for our various businesses. Our issued patents expire between 2022 and 2034. We also submitted and have pending U.S. and foreign patent filings in RFID devices, converged access readers and systems, smart card manufacturing methods, authentication and NFC offerings. Additionally, we leverage our own ASIC designs for smart card interface in some of our reader devices.

Manufacturing and Sources of Supply

We utilize a combination of our own manufacturing facilities and the services of contract manufacturers in various countries around the world to manufacture our products and components. Our RFID devices are predominantly manufactured and assembled by our own internal manufacturing teams in Singapore primarily using locally sourced components and are certified to the ISO 9001:2015 and ISO 14001:2015 quality manufacturing standard. Our premises sensors readers, controllers and software are manufactured primarily in California. Our video appliances are manufactured primarily in Wisconsin and Arizona. The majority of our smart card reader products and components are manufactured in Singapore, Cambodia and South Korea. We have implemented formal quality control programs to satisfy customer requirements for high quality and reliable products. To ensure that products manufactured by third parties are consistent with internal standards, our quality control programs include management of all key aspects of the production process, including establishing product specifications, selecting the components to be used to produce products, selecting the suppliers of these components and negotiating the prices for certain of these components. In addition, we may work with suppliers to improve process control and product design.

For the majority of our product manufacturing, we utilize a global sourcing strategy that serves all business solution areas within the company, which allows us to achieve economies of scale and uniform quality standards for our products. On an ongoing basis, we analyze the need to add alternative sources for both our products and components. For example, we currently utilize the foundry services of external suppliers to produce our ASICs for smart cards readers and RFID devices, and we use chips and antenna components from third-party suppliers. Wherever possible, we have qualified additional sources of supply for components.

 

Government Regulation

Our business is subject to government regulation as discussed in Risk Factors.

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Employees

As of December 31, 2020, we had 326 employees, of which 74 were in research and development, 84 were in sales and marketing, 142 were in manufacturing and 26 were in general and administrative. We are not subject to any collective bargaining agreements and, to our knowledge, none of our employees are currently represented by a labor union. To date, we have experienced no work stoppages and believe that our employee relations are generally good.

Corporate Information

Our corporate headquarters are located in Fremont, California. We maintain research and development facilities in California and Texas; Chennai, India; Munich, Germany; and local operations and sales facilities in Germany, the United Kingdom, Hong Kong, Singapore, Vancouver, Canada; India and the United States. We were founded in 1990 in Munich, Germany and incorporated in 1996 under the laws of the State of Delaware.

Availability of SEC Filings

We make available through our website our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and Current Reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports free of charge as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such reports with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). Our Internet address is www.identiv.com. The content on our website is not, nor should it be deemed to be, incorporated by reference into this Annual Report. Our filings with the SEC are also available to the public through the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov.

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Item 1A.

Risk Factors

Risks Related to Our Customers, Products and Markets, and Our Business

Our financial performance depends on the extent and pace of RFID market adoption and end-user adoption of our RFID products and the timing of new customer deployments.

Our financial performance depends on the pace, scope and depth of end-user adoption of our RFID products in multiple industries. That pace, scope and depth has accelerated during 2020 which has caused large fluctuations in our operating results. If RFID market adoption, and adoption of our products specifically, does not meet our expectations then our growth prospects and operating results will be adversely affected. If we are unable to meet end-user or customer volume or performance expectations, then our business prospects may be adversely affected. In addition, given the uncertainties of the specific timing of our new customer deployments, we cannot be assured that we will have appropriate inventory and capacity levels or that we will not experience inventory shortfalls or overages in the future. We seek to mitigate those risks by being deeply embedded in our customers design cycle, working with our chip partners on long lead time components, managing our limited capital equipment needs within a short cycle and expanding our facilities to accommodate several scenarios for growth potential. If end users with sizable projects change or delay them, we may experience significant fluctuation in revenue on a quarterly or annual basis, and we anticipate that such uncertainty and fluctuations may continue to characterize our business for the foreseeable future.

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, or similar global health concerns, could negatively impact our operations, supply chain and customer base.

The COVID-19 pandemic has severely restricted the level of economic activity around the world, which has and may continue to impact timing of demand for our products and services. Our operations and supply chains for certain of our products or services may be negatively impacted by the regional or global outbreak of illnesses, including COVID-19. Any quarantines, labor shortages or other disruptions to our operations, or those of our suppliers or customers, have and may continue to adversely impact our sales and operating results, including additional expenses and strain on the business as well as our supply chain. In addition, the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in a widespread health crisis that has and may continue to adversely affect some of the market verticals that we participate in as well as the general economies and financial markets of many countries, including those in which we operate, and negatively impacted supply and demand for our products and services, and has and may continue to result in delayed sales and extended payment cycles for our products and services. We are unable to accurately fully predict the effect of the ongoing pandemic on our business, which could be material to our 2021 results, and which could be affected by other factors we are not currently able to predict, including the success of actions taken to contain or treat COVID-19, and reactions by consumers, companies, governmental entities and capital markets.

Our business could be adversely affected by reductions or delays in the purchase of our products or services for government security programs in the United States and globally.

We derive a substantial portion of our revenues from indirect sales to U.S. federal, state and local governments and government agencies, as well as from subcontracts under federal government prime contracts. Large government programs are an important market for our business, as high-security systems employing physical access, smart card, RFID or other access control technologies are increasingly used to enable applications ranging from authorizing building and network access for federal employees to paying taxes online, to citizen identification, to receiving health care. We believe that the success and growth of our business will continue to be influenced by our successful procurement of government business either directly or through our indirect sales channels. Accordingly, changes in government purchasing policies or government budgetary constraints, including government shutdowns, could directly affect our financial performance. Sales to government agencies and customers primarily serving the U.S. Government, including further sales pursuant to existing contracts, may be adversely affected by factors outside our control, such as, federal government shutdowns or other Congressional actions to reduce federal spending, and by adverse economic, political or market conditions. A reduction in current or future anticipated sales to the U.S. Government sector could harm our results of operations.

Additionally, we anticipate that an increasingly significant portion of our future revenues will come from government programs outside the U.S., such as electronic national identity, eGovernment and eHealth programs. We currently supply smart card readers, RFID products and credential provisioning and management solutions for various government programs in Europe, Asia and Australia and are actively targeting additional programs in these and other geographic areas. However, the allocation and availability of funding for such programs are often impacted by economic or political factors over which we have no control, and which may cause delays in program implementation, which could negatively impact our sales and results of operations.

Our U.S. Government business depends upon the continuance of regulations that require federal agencies to implement security systems such as ours, and upon our ability to receive certain government approvals or certifications and demonstrate

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compliance in government audits or investigations. A failure to receive these government approvals or certifications or a negative audit result could result in a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

While we are not able to quantify the amount of sales made to end customers in the U.S. Government market due to the indirect nature of our selling process, we believe that orders from U.S. Government agencies represent a significant portion of our revenues. The U.S. Government, suppliers to the U.S. Government and certain industries in the public sector currently fall, or may in the future fall, under particular regulations that require federal agencies to implement security systems that utilize physical and logical access control products and solutions such as ours. These regulations include, but are not limited to HSPD 12 and FIPS 201 produced by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (“NIST”). Discontinuance of, changes in, or lack of adoption of laws or regulations pertaining to security related to sales to end customers in the U.S. Government market could adversely affect our sales.

Our U.S. Government business is also dependent upon the receipt of certain governmental approvals or certifications and failure to receive such approvals or certifications could have a material adverse effect on our sales in those market segments for which such approvals or certifications are customary or required. Government agencies in the U.S. and other countries may audit our business as part of their routine audits and investigations of government procurement programs. Based on the outcome of any such audit, if any of our costs are found to be improperly allocated to a specific order, those costs may not be reimbursed, and any costs already reimbursed for such order may have to be refunded. If a government agency audit uncovers improper or illegal activities, we may be subject to civil and criminal penalties and administrative sanctions. A negative audit could materially affect our competitive position and result in a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our revenues may decline if we cannot compete successfully in an intensely competitive market.

We target our products at the rapidly evolving market for security technologies. Many of our current and potential competitors have significantly greater financial, technical, marketing, purchasing and other resources than we do. As a result, our competitors may be able to respond more quickly to new or emerging technologies or standards and to changes in customer requirements. Our competitors may also be able to devote greater resources to the development, promotion and sale of products or solutions and may be able to deliver competitive products or solutions at a lower end user price.

We also experience indirect competition from certain of our customers who currently offer alternative products or solutions or are expected to introduce competitive offerings in the future. For example, in our Premises business, many of our dealer channel partners act as system integrators, providing installation and service, and therefore carry competitive lines of products and systems. This is a common practice within the industry as the integrators need access to multiple lines in order to support all potential service and user requirements. Depending on the technical competence of their sales forces, the comfort level of their technical staff with our systems and price pressures from customers, these integrators may choose to offer a competitor’s product. There is also business pressure to provide some level of sales to all vendors to maintain access to a range of products and systems.

We believe that the principal competitive factors affecting the markets for our products and solutions include:

 

the extent to which products and systems must support evolving industry standards and provide interoperability;

 

the extent to which products are differentiated based on technical features, quality and reliability, ease of use, strength of distribution channels and price;

 

the ability to quickly develop new products and solutions to satisfy new market and customer requirements; and

 

the total cost of ownership including installation, maintenance and expansion capability of systems.

Increased competition and increased market volatility in our industry could result in lower prices, reduced margins or the failure of our product and service offerings to achieve or maintain market acceptance, any of which could have a serious adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our percentage of revenue and customer concentration is significant in certain of our businesses.

Sales to our ten largest customers accounted for 33% of total net revenue in 2020 and 24% of total net revenue in 2019. No customer accounted for 10% or more of our total net revenue in 2020 or 2019. A significant amount of revenue is sourced from sales of products and systems to our original equipment manufacturer partners and an indirect sales network who sell to various entities within the U.S. federal government sector. We cannot guarantee that future reductions in U.S. Government budgets will not impact our sales to these government entities or that the terms of existing contracts will not be subject to renegotiation. Our loss of one or more significant customers could have a significant adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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Our business will not be successful if we do not keep up with the rapid changes in our industry.

The market for security products and related services is characterized by rapid technological developments, frequent new product introductions and evolving industry standards. To be competitive, we have to continually improve the performance, features and reliability of our products and services, particularly in response to competitive offerings, and quickly demonstrate the value of new products and services or enhancements to existing products and services. Our failure to develop and introduce new products and services successfully on a timely basis and to achieve market acceptance for such products and services could have a significant adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Security breaches, whether or not related to our products, could result in the disclosure of sensitive government information or private personal information that could result in the loss of clients and negative publicity.

Many of the systems we sell manage private personal information or protect sensitive information related to our customers in the government or commercial markets. A well-publicized actual or perceived breach of network or computer security in one of these systems, regardless of whether such a breach is attributable to our products, could adversely affect the market’s perception of us and our products, and could result in the loss of customers, have an adverse effect on our reputation and reduce demand for our products.

As part of our technical support services, we agree, from time to time, to possess all or a portion of the security system database of our customers. This service is subject to a number of risks. For example, despite our security measures our systems may be vulnerable to cyber-attacks by hackers, physical break-ins and service disruptions that could lead to interruptions, delays or loss of data. If any such compromise of our security were to occur, it could be very expensive to correct, could damage our reputation and result in the loss of customers, and could discourage potential customers from using our services. We could also be liable for damages and penalties. Although we have not experienced a cyber or physical security breach, we may experience breaches in the future. Our systems also may be affected by outages, delays and other difficulties. Our insurance coverage may be insufficient to cover losses and liabilities that may result from such events.

Our business and reputation may adversely affected by information technology system failures or network disruptions.

We may be subject to information technology system failures and network disruptions. These may be caused by natural disasters, accidents, power disruptions, telecommunications failures, acts of terrorism or war, computer viruses, physical or electronic break-ins, or other events or disruptions. System redundancy may be ineffective or inadequate, and our disaster recovery planning may not be sufficient for all eventualities. Such failures or disruptions could compromise company or customer data and result in delayed or cancelled orders and expose us to liability. System failures and disruptions could also impede the manufacturing and shipping of products, delivery of online services, processing of transactions and reporting of financial results. In addition, any such failures or disruptions could harm our reputation.

Sales of our products could decline and we could be subject to legal claims for damages if our products are found to have defects.

Despite our testing efforts, our products may contain defects that are not detected until after the products have been shipped. The discovery of defects or potential defects may result in damage to our reputation, delays in market acceptance of our products and additional expenditures to resolve issues related to the products’ implementation. If we are unable to provide a solution to actual or potential product defects that is acceptable to our customers, we may be required to incur substantial costs for product recall, repair and replacement, or costs related to legal or warranty claims made against us.

The global nature of our business exposes us to operational and financial risks and our results of operations could be adversely affected if we are unable to manage them effectively.

We market and sell our products and solutions to customers in many countries around the world. To support our global sales, customer base and product development activities, we maintain offices and/or business operations in several locations around the world, including Germany, Hong Kong, India, Japan, Singapore, Canada, and the U.S. We also maintain manufacturing facilities in Singapore and California and engage contract manufacturers in multiple countries outside the U.S. Managing our global development, sales, administrative and manufacturing operations places a significant burden on our management resources and our financial processes and exposes us to various risks, including:

 

longer accounts receivable collection cycles;

 

changes in foreign currency exchange rates;

 

compliance with and changes in foreign laws and regulatory requirements;

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changes in political or economic conditions and stability, particularly in emerging markets;

 

difficulties managing widespread sales and manufacturing operations; 

 

export controls;

 

less effective protection of our intellectual property; and

 

potentially adverse tax consequences.

Any failure to effectively mitigate these risks and effectively manage our global operations could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or operating results.

If current or future export laws limit or otherwise restrict our business, we could be prohibited from shipping our products to certain countries, which could cause our business, financial condition and results of operations to suffer.

Some of our products are subject to export controls or other laws restricting the sale of our products under the laws of the U.S., the European Union (“EU”) and other governments. The export regimes and the governing policies applicable to our business are subject to change. We cannot be certain that such export authorizations will be available to us or for our products in the future. In some cases, we rely upon the compliance activities of our prime contractors, and we cannot be certain they have taken or will take all measures necessary to comply with applicable export laws. If we or our prime contractor partners cannot obtain required government approvals under applicable regulations, we may not be able to sell our products in certain international jurisdictions.

A significant portion of our revenue is through an indirect sales channel, and the loss of dealers, systems integrators, resellers, or other channel partners could result in decreased revenue.

We currently use an indirect sales channel that includes dealers, systems integrators, value added resellers and resellers to sell a significant portion of our products and solutions, primarily into markets or to customers where the channel partner may have closer customer relationships or greater access than we do. Some of these channel partners also sell our competitors’ products, and if they favor our competitors’ products for any reason, they may fail to market our products as effectively or to devote necessary resources that result in sales of our products, which would cause our sales to suffer. Indirect selling arrangements are intended to benefit both us and the channel partner, and may be long- or short-term relationships, depending on market conditions, competition in the marketplace and other factors. If we are unable to maintain effective indirect sales channels, there could be a reduction in the amount of product we are able to sell, and our revenues could decrease.

We depend upon third-party manufacturers and a limited number of suppliers, and if we experience disruptions in our supply chain or manufacturing, our business may suffer.

We rely upon a limited number of suppliers for some key components of our products which exposes us to various risks, including whether or not our suppliers will provide adequate quantities with sufficient quality on a timely basis and the risk that supplier pricing may be higher than anticipated. In addition, some of the basic components used in some of our products, such as semiconductors, may at any time be in great demand. This could result in components not being available to us in a timely manner or at all, particularly if larger companies have ordered significant volumes of those components, or in higher prices being charged for components we require. Disruption or termination of the supply of components or software used in our products could delay shipments of our products, which could have a material adverse effect on our business and operating results and could also damage relationships with current and prospective customers.

Many of our products are manufactured outside the U.S. by contract manufacturers. Our reliance on these manufactures poses a number of risks, including lack of control over the manufacturing process and ultimately over the quality and timing of delivery of our products. If any of our contract manufacturers cannot meet our production requirements, we may be required to rely on other contract manufacturing sources or identify and qualify new contract manufacturers, and we may not be able to do this in a timely manner or on reasonable terms. Additionally, we may be subject to currency fluctuations, potentially adverse tax consequences, unexpected changes in regulatory requirements, tariffs and other trade barriers, export controls, or political and economic instability. Any significant delay in our ability to obtain adequate supplies of our products from our current or alternative manufacturers could materially and adversely affect our business and operating results. In addition, if we are not successful at managing the contract manufacturing process, the quality of our products could be jeopardized or inventory levels could be inadequate or excessive, which could result in damage to our reputation with our customers and in the marketplace, as well as possible shortages of products or write-offs of excess inventory.

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Our success depends largely on the continued service and availability of key personnel.

Our future success depends on our ability to continue to attract, retain, and motivate our senior management as well as qualified technical personnel, particularly software engineers. Competition for these employees is intense and many of our competitors may have greater name recognition and significantly greater financial resources to better compete for these employees. If we are unable to retain our existing personnel, or attract and train additional qualified personnel, our growth may be limited. Our key employees are employed on an “at will” basis, meaning either we or the employee may terminate their employment with us at any time. The loss of key employees could slow our product development processes and sales efforts or harm our reputation. Also, if our stock price declines, it may result in difficulty attracting and retaining personnel as equity incentives generally comprise a significant portion of our employee compensation. Further, restructurings and reductions in force that we have recently experienced may have a negative effect on employee morale and the ability to attract and retain qualified personnel.

Risks Related to Our Financial Results, Liquidity and Need for Additional Capital

Our revenue and operating results are subject to significant fluctuations and such fluctuations may lead to a reduced market price for our stock.

Our revenue and operating results have varied in the past and will likely continue to fluctuate in the future. We believe that period-to-period comparisons of our operating results are not necessarily meaningful, but securities analysts and investors often rely upon these comparisons as indicators of future performance. If our operating results in any future period fall below the expectations of securities analysts and investors, or the guidance that we provide, the market price of our stock would likely decline.

Factors that have caused our results to fluctuate in the past and which are likely to affect us in the future include the following:

 

business and economic conditions overall and in our markets;

 

the timing and size of customer orders, including orders that may be tied to annual or other budgetary cycles, seasonal demand, product plans or program roll-out schedules;

 

the effects of U.S. Government shut downs, spending cuts and other changes in budget allocation or availability that create uncertainty for customers in certain parts of our business;

 

the absence of significant backlog in our business;

 

cancellations or delays of customer orders or the loss of a significant customer;

 

the length of sales cycles associated with our product or service offerings;

 

variations in the mix of products and services we sell;

 

reductions in the average selling prices that we are able to charge due to competition, new product introductions or other factors;

 

our ability to obtain an adequate supply of quality components and to deliver our products on a timely basis;

 

our inventory levels and the inventory levels of our customers and indirect sales channels;

 

the extent to which we invest in development, sales and marketing, and other expense categories;

 

acquisitions, dispositions or organizational restructuring;

 

fluctuations in the value of foreign currencies against the U.S. dollar;

 

the cost or impact of litigation; and

 

the write-off of investments.

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Estimating the amount and mix of future revenues is difficult, and our failure to do so accurately could affect our ability to be profitable or reduce the market price for our stock.

Accurately estimating future revenues is difficult because the purchasing patterns of our customers can vary depending upon a number of factors. We sell our smart card readers primarily through a channel of distributors who place orders on an ongoing basis depending on their customers’ requirements. As a result, the size and timing of these orders can vary from quarter to quarter. Market demand for RFID and NFC technology is resulting in larger program deployments of these products and components, as well as increasing competition for these solutions. Across our business, the timing of closing larger orders increases the risk of quarter-to-quarter fluctuation in revenues. If orders forecasted for a specific group of customers for a particular quarter are not realized or revenues are not otherwise recognized in that quarter, our operating results for that quarter could be materially adversely affected. In addition, from time to time, we may experience an unexpected increase or decrease in demand for our products resulting from fluctuations in our customers’ budgets, purchasing patterns or deployment schedules. These occurrences are not always predictable and can have a significant impact on our results in the period in which they occur. Failure to accurately forecast customer demand may result in excess or obsolete inventory, which if written down might adversely impact our cost of revenues and financial condition.

In addition, our expense levels are based, in significant part, upon our expectations as to future revenues and are largely fixed in the short term. We may be unable to adjust spending in a timely manner to compensate for any unexpected shortfall in revenues. Any significant shortfall in revenues in relation to our expectations could have an immediate and significant effect on our operating results for that quarter and may lead to a reduced market price for our stock.

Our loan agreement may affect our liquidity or limit our ability to incur debt, make investments, sell assets, merge or complete other significant transactions.

Our amended and restated Loan and Security Agreement with East West Bank (the “Loan and Security Agreement”) provides for a $20.0 million revolving loan facility subject to a borrowing base and a $4.0 million non-formula revolving loan facility that is not subject to a borrowing base. Our obligations under the Loan and Security Agreement are collateralized by substantially all of our assets. The maturity date of the main revolving loan facility is February 8, 2023. The non-formula revolving loan facility will terminate on February 7, 2022, however we may, at our option if certain conditions are met, convert prior to their maturity any loans under the non-formula revolving loan facility to a term loan that will fully amortize and mature on February 1, 2025. Advances under the revolving loan facilities and the term loan (if converted) will initially bear interest at a per annum rate equal to the prime rate as determined under the Loan and Security Agreement plus 0.25%.We may voluntarily prepay amounts outstanding under the revolving loan facilities and the term loan without prepayment charges. In the event the Loan and Security Agreement is terminated prior to February 8, 2023, we would be required to pay an early termination fee in the amount of 2.0% of the main revolving loan line if terminated prior to February 8, 2022 and 1% of the main revolving loan line thereafter. Additional borrowing requests under the revolving loan facilities are subject to various customary conditions precedent, including a borrowing base for the main revolving loan facility. The Loan and Security Agreement contains customary representations and warranties and customary affirmative and negative covenants, including, limits or restrictions on our ability to incur liens, incur indebtedness, make certain restricted payments (including dividends), merge or consolidate and dispose of assets. In addition, the Loan and Security Agreement contains financial covenants.

The Loan and Security Agreement also contains customary events of default that entitle the lender to cause any or all of our indebtedness under it to become immediately due and payable. The events of default (some of which are subject to applicable grace or cure periods), include, among other things, non-payment defaults, covenant defaults, cross-defaults to other material indebtedness, bankruptcy and insolvency defaults and material judgment defaults. Upon the occurrence and during the continuance of an event of default, the lender may terminate its lending commitment and/or declare all or any part of the unpaid principal of all loans, all interest accrued and unpaid thereon and all other amounts payable under the Loan and Security Agreement to be immediately due and payable. If repayment of the indebtedness is accelerated, we could face a substantial liquidity problem and may be forced to dispose of material assets or operations, seek to obtain equity capital, or restructure or refinance our indebtedness. Such alternative measures may not be available or successful. Also, our loan covenants may limit our ability to dispose of material assets or operations or to restructure or refinance our indebtedness. Even if we are able to restructure or refinance our indebtedness, the economic terms may not be favorable to us. Any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. Our ability to make periodic interest payments and to repay our debt when due depends on our financial and operating performance, which in turn, is subject to prevailing economic and competitive conditions and other factors. If our cash flow and capital resources are insufficient to fund our debt service obligations, we could face substantial liquidity problems and may be forced to dispose of material assets or operations, seek to obtain equity capital, or restructure or refinance our indebtedness. Such alternative measures may not be successful and may not permit us to meet our scheduled debt service obligations.

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If we are not able to secure additional capital when needed, our business could be adversely affected.

We may seek or need to raise additional funds for general corporate and commercial purposes or for acquisitions. Our ability to obtain financing depends on our historical and expected future operating and financial performance, and is also subject to prevailing economic conditions and to financial, business and other factors beyond our control. If we are unable to secure additional financing when desired, our ability to fund our business operations, make capital expenditures, pursue additional expansion or acquisition opportunities, or have resources available to capitalize on other opportunities could be limited, and this could adversely impact our financial results. There can be no assurance that additional capital will be available to us on favorable terms or at all. The sale of additional debt or equity securities may cause dilution to existing stockholders. Any debt or equity securities issued may also provide for rights, preferences or privileges senior to those of our common stock and could impose significant restrictions on our operations.

Fluctuations in foreign exchange rates between the U.S. dollar and other major currencies in which we do business may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

A significant portion of our business is conducted in foreign currencies, principally the euro and Indian Rupee. Fluctuations in the value of foreign currencies relative to the U.S. dollar will result in currency exchange gains and losses in our reported results. If a significant portion of operating expenses are incurred in a foreign currency such as the euro or Indian Rupee, and revenues are generated in U.S. dollars, exchange rate fluctuations might have a positive or negative net financial impact on these transactions, depending on whether the value of the U.S. dollar decreases or increases compared to that currency. In addition, the valuation of current assets and liabilities that are denominated in a currency other than the functional currency can result in currency exchange gains and losses. For example, when one of our subsidiaries uses the euro as the functional currency, and this subsidiary has a receivable in U.S. dollars, a devaluation of the U.S. dollar against the euro of 10% would result in a foreign exchange loss to the reporting entity of 10% of the value of the underlying U.S. dollar receivable. We cannot predict the effect of exchange rate fluctuations upon future operating results. The effect of currency exchange rate changes may increase or decrease our costs and/or revenues in any given period, and we may experience currency losses in the future. To date, we have not adopted a hedging program to protect against the risks associated with foreign currency fluctuations.

Risks Related to Acquisitions

Acquisitions and strategic investments require substantial resources, expose us to significant risks and may adversely impact our business.

As part of our growth strategy, we seek to acquire or make investments in companies, products or technologies that we believe complement or augment our existing business, product offerings or technology portfolio. For example, in January 2019, we completed the purchase of substantially all the assets of the Freedom, Liberty, and Enterphone™ MESH products and services of Viscount Systems, Inc., or VSI, and the assumption of certain liabilities for $2.9 million in cash and common stock. Additionally, in the event that revenue from the assets purchased under the agreement in 2019 was greater than certain specified revenue targets, we would have been obligated to issue earnout consideration of up to a maximum of $3.5 million payable in shares of our common stock. At the date of acquisition, we assessed the probability of the issuance of shares related to the earnout consideration and determined its fair value to be $200,000. In the third and fourth quarter of 2019, we reassessed the probability and increased the fair value of the earnout consideration liability by $550,000 to $750,000. In the second quarter of 2020, we issued earnout consideration consisting of 157,233 shares of our common stock with a fair value of approximately $489,000. These adjustments to the earnout consideration were included in operating expenses in our consolidated statements of comprehensive loss in the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019. In the event that such revenue targets were not met in 2019, but 2020 revenue from the assets purchased exceeded certain higher targets for 2020, then we would have been obligated to issue up to a maximum of $2.25 million in earnout consideration payable in shares of our common stock. However, earnout targets were not achieved in 2020.           

Acquiring and integrating acquired businesses and assets into our business exposes us to certain risks. Executing acquisition or investment transactions and assimilating personnel and operations from an acquired business may require significant attention and resources, which may divert the attention of our management and employees from day-to-day operations and disrupt our business. This may adversely impact our results of operations. In addition, there can be no assurances that the expected benefits of any acquisitions will be achieved.

The costs associated with an acquisition may be significant, whether or not the acquisition transaction is successfully concluded. As a result, acquisition activities may reduce the amount of capital available to fund our business. To purchase another company or assets, we may be required to issue additional equity securities, which would result in additional dilution to our stockholders. Acquisitions may result in the assumption of additional liabilities or debt, including unanticipated liabilities, or charges to earnings for such items as amortization of purchased intangibles or in-process research and development expenses. Such liabilities, indebtedness or charges could have a material and adverse impact on our financial condition and results of operations. Acquisitions and strategic investments may also lead to substantial increases in noncurrent assets, including goodwill. Write-downs of these assets may materially and adversely impact our financial condition and results of operations.

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Additionally, we have in the past acquired companies that we have subsequently divested, in some cases for less than we paid to acquire the companies. Such divestitures involve risks, such as difficulty separating out portions of or entire businesses, distracting our management and employees, potential loss of revenue and potentially disrupting customer relationships. We have and may again in the future incur significant costs associated with exit or disposal activities, related impairment charges, or both, if we exit or divest a business or product line. If we are not able to successfully integrate or divest products, technologies, or personnel from businesses that we acquire or divest, or if we are not able to realize the expected benefits of our acquisitions, divestitures, or strategic investments, our business and financial results could be adversely affected.

Impairment in the value of our goodwill or other intangible assets could have a material adverse effect on our operating results and financial condition.

We record goodwill and intangible assets at their fair values upon the acquisition of a business. Goodwill represents the excess of amounts paid for acquiring businesses over the fair value of the net assets acquired. Goodwill is evaluated for impairment annually or more frequently if conditions warrant, by comparing the carrying value of a reporting unit to its estimated fair value. Intangible assets with definite lives are reviewed for impairment when events or circumstances indicate that their carrying value may not be recoverable. Declines in operating results, divestitures, sustained market declines and other factors that impact the fair value of a reporting unit could result in an impairment of goodwill or intangible assets and, in turn, a charge to net income. Any such charges could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations or financial condition.

Risks Related to Our Intellectual Property, and Litigation

We may not be able to protect our intellectual property rights, which could make us less competitive and cause us to lose market share.

Our future success will depend, in part, upon our intellectual property rights and our ability to protect these rights. We rely on a combination of patent, copyright, trademark and trade secret laws, nondisclosure agreements and other contractual provisions to establish, maintain and protect our proprietary rights. From time to time, we may be required to use litigation to protect our proprietary technology. This may result in our incurring substantial costs and we may not be successful in any such litigation. Despite our efforts to protect our proprietary rights, unauthorized third parties may copy aspects of our products, obtain and use information that we regard as proprietary, or infringe upon our patents. In addition, the laws of some foreign countries do not protect proprietary and intellectual property rights to the same extent as do the laws in the U.S. Because many of our products are sold and a significant portion of our business is conducted outside the U.S., our exposure to intellectual property risks may be higher. Our efforts to protect our proprietary and intellectual property rights may not be adequate. Additionally, there is a risk that our competitors will independently develop similar technology or duplicate our products or design around patents or other intellectual property rights. If we are unsuccessful in protecting our intellectual property or our products or technologies are duplicated by others, our competitive position could be harmed and we could lose market share.

We face risks from future claims of third parties and litigation, which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations.

From time to time, we may be subject to claims of third parties, possibly resulting in litigation, which could include, among other things, claims regarding infringement of the intellectual property rights of third parties, product defects, employment-related claims, and claims related to acquisitions, dispositions or restructurings. Addressing any such claims or litigation may be time-consuming and costly, divert management resources, cause product shipment delays, require us to redesign our products, require us to accept returns of products and to write-off inventory, or result in other adverse effects to our business. Any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and could require us to pay significant monetary damages.

We expect the likelihood of intellectual property infringement and misappropriation claims may increase as the number of products and competitors in the security market grows and as we increasingly incorporate third-party technology into our products. As a result of infringement claims, we could be required to license intellectual property from a third party or redesign our products. Licenses may not be offered when required or on acceptable terms. If we do obtain licenses from third parties, we may be required to pay license fees or royalties or we may be required to license some of our intellectual property to others in return for such licenses. If we are unable to obtain a license necessary for us or our third-party manufacturers to manufacture our allegedly infringing products, we could be required to suspend the manufacture of products or stop our suppliers from using processes that may infringe the rights of third parties. We may also be unsuccessful in redesigning our products. Our suppliers and customers may be subject to infringement claims based on intellectual property included in our products. We have historically agreed to indemnify our suppliers and customers for patent infringement claims relating to our products. The scope of this indemnity varies, but may, in some instances, include indemnification for damages and expenses, including attorney’s fees. We may periodically engage in litigation as a result of these indemnification obligations. Our insurance policies exclude coverage for third-party claims for patent infringement.

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We have in the past been named as a defendant in putative securities class action and derivative lawsuits.

Securities class action lawsuits have often been brought against a company following periods of volatility in the market price of its securities. Companies such as ours in the technology industry are particularly vulnerable to this kind of litigation due to the volatility of their stock prices. We have in the recent past been named as a defendant in putative securities class action and derivative lawsuits and may again be so named in the future. Any litigation to which we were a party has and may in the future result in the diversion of management attention and resources from our business and business strategy. In addition, any litigation to which we may become a party to may result in onerous or unfavorable judgments that may not be reversed upon appeal and that may require us to pay substantial monetary damages or fines, or we may decide to settle lawsuits on similarly unfavorable terms, which could have a material adverse effect our business, financial condition or results of operations.

General Risk Factors

Our stock price has been and is likely to remain volatile.

Over the past few years, The Nasdaq Capital Market has experienced significant price and volume fluctuations that have particularly affected the market prices of the stocks of technology companies. Volatility in our stock price may result from a number of factors, some of which are beyond our control, including, among others:

 

low volumes of trading activity in our stock;

 

technical trading patterns of our stock;

 

variations in our or our competitors’ financial and/or operational results;

 

the fluctuation in market value of comparable companies in any of our markets;

 

expected or announced news about partner relationships, customer wins or losses, product announcements or organizational changes;

 

comments and forecasts by securities analysts;

 

litigation developments; 

 

global developments, including war, acts of terrorism, contagions such as COVID-19, and other such events; and

 

general market downturns.

In addition, the stock markets have experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations that have affected and continue to affect the market prices of equity securities of many companies. These fluctuations have often been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of those companies. Broad market and industry factors, as well as general economic, political, regulatory and market conditions, may negatively affect the market price of our common stock, regardless of our actual operating performance.

You may experience dilution of your ownership interests due to the future issuance of additional shares of our stock, and future sales of shares of our common stock could adversely affect our stock price.

We have issued a significant number of shares of our common stock, together with warrants to purchase shares of our common stock and convertible preferred stock, in connection with a number of financing transactions and acquisitions in recent years. In the future, from time to time we may issue additional previously authorized and unissued securities, resulting in additional dilution of the ownership interests of our current stockholders.

In addition, we have reserved shares of common stock for potential future issuance including stock issuable pursuant to our equity incentive plans, the conversion of our preferred stock and warrants issued in connection with previous capital raises and other transactions. As of March 2, 2021, 1,709,347 shares of common stock are reserved for future grants and outstanding equity awards under our equity incentive plans and an additional 9,115,922 shares of common stock are reserved for future issuance in connection with other potential issuances, including conversion of our preferred stock. We may issue additional shares of common stock or other securities that are convertible into or exercisable for shares of common stock in connection with the hiring of personnel, future acquisitions, future financings or for other business purposes. If we issue additional securities, the aggregate percentage ownership of our existing stockholders will be reduced. In addition, any new securities that we issue may have rights senior to those of our common stock. The issuance of additional shares of common stock or preferred stock or other securities, or the perception that such issuances could occur, may create downward pressure on the trading price of our common stock.

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Provisions in our charter documents and Delaware law may delay or prevent our acquisition by another company, which could decrease the value of your shares.

Our certificate of incorporation and bylaws and Delaware law contain provisions that could make it more difficult for a third party to acquire us or enter into a material transaction with us without the consent of our board of directors. These provisions include a classified board of directors and limitations on actions by our stockholders by written consent. Delaware law imposes some restrictions on mergers and other business combinations between us and any holder of 15% or more of our outstanding common stock. In addition, our board of directors has the right to issue preferred stock without stockholder approval, which could be used to dilute the stock ownership of a potential hostile acquirer. These provisions will apply even if the offer were to be considered adequate by some of our stockholders. Because these provisions may be deemed to discourage a change of control, they may delay or prevent the acquisition of our company, which could decrease the value of our common stock.

ITEM 1B.

UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.

ITEM 2.

PROPERTIES

Our corporate headquarters are located in Fremont, California and we maintain operational headquarters in Santa Ana, California. We lease additional facilities to house our engineering, sales and marketing, administrative and manufacturing functions. At December 31, 2020, our major facilities consisted of the following:

 

Location

 

Function

 

Square Feet

 

 

Lease Expiration

Fremont, California

 

Corporate headquarters

 

 

3,082

 

 

November 2022

Santa Ana, California

 

Administration; manufacturing; research and

   development

 

 

34,599

 

 

January 2023

Arlington, Texas

 

Administration; sales

 

 

5,700

 

 

October 2023

Vancouver, Canada

 

Manufacturing; research and

   development

 

 

7,206

 

 

December 2025

Sauerlach, Germany

 

European operations; research and

   development; sales

 

 

5,156

 

 

Month to Month

Chennai, India

 

Research and development

 

 

17,500

 

 

October 2022

Singapore

 

RFID/NFC product manufacturing

 

 

16,060

 

 

May 2023

 

ITEM 3.

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

From time to time, we may become subject to claims arising in the ordinary course of business or could be named a defendant in other lawsuits. The outcome of such claims or other proceedings cannot be predicted with certainty and may have a material effect on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

ITEM 4.

MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable.

19


 

Executive Officers of the Registrant

Information concerning our executive officers as of March 1, 2021 is as follows:

 

Steven Humphreys, 59, has served as our Chief Executive Officer since September 2015 and as a director since July 1996. Mr. Humphreys previously served as Chairman of the Board from September 2013 until September 9, 2015. Previously, he also served as Lead Director from May 2010 until April 2013 and as Chairman of the Board from April 2000 to March 2007. Mr. Humphreys also served as an executive officer of the Company, as President from July 1996 to December 1996 and as President and Chief Executive Officer from January 1997 to July 1999. From November 2011 to December 2014, Mr. Humphreys served as chief executive officer of Flywheel Software, Inc., a venture-backed, location-based mobile solutions company. From October 2008 until its acquisition by SMSC in February 2011, Mr. Humphreys served as Chief Executive Officer and President of Kleer Corporation, a venture-backed provider of wireless audio technology. From October 2001 to October 2003, he served as Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of ActivIdentity, a provider of digital identity solutions, a publicly-listed company until its acquisition by HID Global in December 2010. He also served as a director of ActivIdentity from March 2008 until December 2010. Previously, Mr. Humphreys was President of Caere Corporation, a publicly-listed optical character recognition software company. Prior to Caere, he spent ten years with General Electric in a variety of factory automation and information technology positions, most recently leading the Information Delivery Services business unit of GE Information Services. Philanthropically, Mr. Humphreys has been an elected public school board trustee and a contributor to a range of education-oriented charities. He also serves on the board of Summit Public Schools, a charter school system with schools across the West Coast, and developer of the Summit Learning System, developed in cooperation with Facebook and deployed in over 1,000 schools nationwide. Mr. Humphreys holds a B.S. degree from Yale University and M.S. and M.B.A. degrees from Stanford University. Mr. Humphreys brings to the Board of Directors his many years of experience as an executive officer of technology companies ranging from startups to public companies, and as senior management within large multinational corporations. His continued involvement with emerging technologies, venture and angel investing, as well as his knowledge of the U.S. investment markets, and the wider technology and management communities are relevant to Identiv’s success.

Sandra Wallach, 56, has served as our Chief Financial Officer since February 2017. Ms. Wallach previously served as VP Finance for MiaSole, a thin film solar technology company, from May 2011 to January 2013. From January 2013 to June 2013, she served as Chief Financial Officer of UBM Tech, a wholly-owned subsidiary of UBM LLC. In June 2013, she returned to MiaSole and served as their VP Finance until February 2017. Prior to that, she served as VP Finance at Juniper Networks (from 2008-2011) as well as holding different financial management positions with Intuit (2003-2007). Before joining Intuit, Ms. Wallach served as Chief Financial Officer of General Electric’s (GE) Industrial Systems, Drives & Controls division. Previously she held a range of financial and management positions at General Electric since joining GE in 1986. Ms. Wallach holds a B.A. in Economics and Public Policy from the University of California at Berkeley.

20


 

PART II

ITEM 5.

MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Our common stock is traded on The Nasdaq Capital Market under the symbol “INVE.” According to data available at March 2, 2021, we had 121 registered holders of our common stock. Not represented in this figure are individual stockholders in Germany whose custodian banks do not release stockholder information to us.

The disclosure required by Item 201(d) of Regulation S-K is included in Item 12 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

During the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, we repurchased 171,641 shares and 175,878 shares, respectively, of common stock surrendered to us to satisfy tax withholding obligations in connection with the vesting of RSUs issued to employees.

ITEM 6.

SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

Not applicable.

21


 

ITEM 7.

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in Part II, Item 8 of this Annual Report.

Overview

 

Identiv is a global provider of secure identification and physical security.

 

We are leveraging our RFID-based physical device-management expertise as well as our physical access, video and analytics solutions to provide leading solutions as our customers, and our customers’ customers, embracing the IoT. Customers in the technology and mobility, consumer, government, healthcare, education and other sectors rely on Identiv’s identification and access solutions. Identiv’s platform encompasses RFID and NFC, cybersecurity, and the full spectrum of physical access, video, and audio security. We are bringing the benefits of the IoT to a wide range of physical, connected items.

 

Identiv’s mission is to digitally enable every physical thing and every physical place on the planet. Our full continuum of security solutions is delivered through our platform of RFID enabled devices, mobile, client/server, cloud, web, dedicated hardware and software defined architectures. In doing so, we believe that we will create smart physical security and a smarter physical world.

Segments

We have organized our operations into two reportable business segments, principally by solution families: Identity and Premises. Our Identity segment includes products and solutions enabling secure access to information serving the logical access and cyber security market, and protecting connected objects and information using RFID embedded security. Our Premises segment includes our solutions to address the premises security market for government and enterprise, including access control, video surveillance, analytics, audio, access readers and identities.

Factors Affecting Our Performance

Market Adoption

Our financial performance depends on the pace, scope and depth of end-user adoption of our RFID products in multiple industries. That pace, scope and depth has accelerated during 2020 causing large fluctuations in our operating results. For example, in 2019 our Identity segment experienced a reduction from 2018 overall with modest gains in our RFID business offset by lower access card revenue. During 2020, we saw several events that we believe are opening up the third wave of RFID deployments which is occurring at a much faster pace of growth than historically. We believe significant improvement in chip capabilities at lower costs, combined with the incorporation of the full NDEF protocol by Apple in its iPhone 12 and iOS 14 has accelerated the opportunities for product engineers to integrate RFID into their products to create new and more engaging customer experiences, product reliability and performance. As the market hit this pivot point, we expanded both our capacity and technical leadership. As a result, our Identity segment experienced an increase in revenue of 25% year over year, driven by our performance in the RFID products growing 80% year over year in total, and growing over 100% for the second half of 2020 over the comparable period in 2019. We track growth indicators including design wins, customer launches and technology launches. We have made investments in our technology, world class quality and automation, and we believe that our competitive advantages will continue to drive growth.

We believe the underlying, long-term trend is continued RFID adoption by multiple verticals. We also believe that expanding use cases fosters adoption across verticals and into other markets. In addition, we do not have any significant concentration of customers so we believe that our demand will continue to be resilient to any individual customer or application.  

If RFID market adoption, and adoption of our products specifically, does not meet our expectations then our growth prospects and operating results will be adversely affected. If we are unable to meet end-user or customer volume or performance expectations, then our business prospects may be adversely affected. In contrast, if our RFID sales exceed expectations, then our revenue and profitability may be positively affected.

22


 

Given the uncertainties of the specific timing of our new customer deployments, we cannot assure you that we have appropriate inventory and capacity levels or that we will not experience inventory shortfalls or overages in the future. We mitigate those risks by being deeply embedded in our customers design cycle, working with our chip partners on long lead time components, managing our limited capital equipment needs within a short cycle and future proofing our facilities with the most recent expansion to accommodate several scenarios for growth potential.

If end users with sizable projects change or delay them, we may experience significant fluctuation in revenue on a quarterly or annual basis, and we anticipate that uncertainty to continue to characterize our business for the foreseeable future.

Seasonality and Other Factors

In our business overall, we may experience variations in demand for our offerings from quarter to quarter, and typically experience a stronger demand cycle in the second half of our fiscal year. Sales of our physical access control solutions and related products to U.S. Government agencies are subject to annual government budget cycles and generally are highest in the third quarter of each year. Sales of our identity readers, many of which are sold to government agencies worldwide, are impacted by project schedules of government agencies, as well as roll-out schedules for application deployments. Further, this business is typically subject to seasonality based on differing commercial and global government budget cycles. Lower sales are expected in the U.S. in the first half, and in particular, the first quarter of the year, with higher sales typically in the second half of each year. In Asia-Pacific, with fiscal year-ends in March and June, order demand can be higher in the first quarter as customers attempt to complete projects before the end of the fiscal year. Accordingly, our net revenue levels in the first quarter each year often depend on the relative strength of project completions and sales mix between our U.S. customer base and our international customer base.

Purchasing of our Products and Services for U.S. Federal Government Security Programs

In addition to the general seasonality of demand, overall U.S. Federal Government expenditure patterns have a significant effect on demand for our products due to the significant portion of revenue that are typically sourced from U.S. Federal Government agencies. During 2020, we experienced an increase in our U.S. Federal Government revenue of 30% over the preceding full year. Drivers of growth included our technology strength and proven security solutions, work from home mandates, and continued strength in investments for security across a number of different agencies. We believe that the success and growth of our business will continue through the U.S. Federal Government focus on security and our successful procurement of government business. If there are changes in government purchasing policies or budgetary constraints there could be implications for our growth prospects and operating results. If we are unable to meet end-user or customer volume or performance expectations, then our business prospects may be adversely affected.

Effects of the COVID-19 Pandemic on our Business.

In March 2020, the World Health Organization characterized the coronavirus (“COVID-19”) a pandemic, and the President of the United States declared the COVID-19 outbreak a national emergency. The rapid spread of the pandemic and the continuously evolving responses to combat it have had an increasingly negative impact on the global economy. In view of the rapidly changing business environment created by the uncertainty related to the depth and or duration of the impact resulting from COVID-19, we have experienced delays in our sales in select vertical markets and are currently unable to determine if there will be any continued disruption and the extent to which this may have future impact on our businessWe continue to monitor the progression of the pandemic and its effect on our financial position, results of operations, and cash flows.

23


 

Results of Operations

The following table includes net revenue and net profit information by business segment and reconciles gross profit to loss before income taxes (in thousands).

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Identity:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net revenue

 

$

52,742

 

 

$

42,176

 

Gross profit

 

 

14,781

 

 

 

14,570

 

Gross profit margin

 

 

28

%

 

 

35

%

Premises:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net revenue

 

 

34,178

 

 

 

41,579

 

Gross profit

 

 

18,900

 

 

 

22,084

 

Gross profit margin

 

 

55

%

 

 

53

%

Total:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net revenue

 

 

86,920

 

 

 

83,755

 

Gross profit

 

 

33,681

 

 

 

36,654

 

Gross profit margin

 

 

39

%

 

 

44

%

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

 

9,781

 

 

 

8,616

 

Selling and marketing

 

 

17,270

 

 

 

18,138

 

General and administrative

 

 

8,623

 

 

 

9,445

 

Increase (decrease) in fair value of earnout liability

 

 

(261

)

 

 

550

 

Restructuring and severance

 

 

1,716

 

 

 

14

 

Total operating expenses

 

 

37,129

 

 

 

36,763

 

Loss from operations

 

 

(3,448

)

 

 

(109

)

Non-operating income (expense):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest expense, net

 

 

(1,462

)

 

 

(917

)

Gain on sale of investment

 

 

 

 

 

142

 

Foreign currency gains (losses), net

 

 

(122

)

 

 

59

 

Loss before income taxes

 

$

(5,032

)

 

$

(825

)

 

The following table sets forth our statements of comprehensive loss as a percentage of net revenue:

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Net revenue

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

100.0

%

Cost of revenue

 

 

61.3

 

 

 

56.2

 

Gross profit

 

 

38.7

 

 

 

43.8

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

 

11.3

 

 

 

10.3

 

Selling and marketing

 

 

19.9

 

 

 

21.7

 

General and administrative

 

 

9.8

 

 

 

11.2

 

Increase (decrease) in fair value of earnout liability

 

 

(0.3

)

 

 

0.7

 

Restructuring and severance

 

 

2.0

 

 

 

-

 

Total operating expenses

 

 

42.7

 

 

 

43.9

 

Loss from operations

 

 

(4.0

)

 

 

(0.1

)

Non-operating income (expense)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest expense, net

 

 

(1.7

)

 

 

(1.2

)

Gain on sale of investment

 

 

-

 

 

 

0.2

 

Foreign currency gains (losses), net

 

 

(0.1

)

 

 

0.1

 

Loss before income taxes

 

 

(5.8

)

 

 

(1.0

)

Income tax provision

 

 

(0.1

)

 

 

(0.4

)

Net loss

 

 

(5.9

)%

 

 

(1.4

)%

24


 

 

 

Geographic net revenue, based on each customer’s ship-to location, for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 is as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Americas

 

$

58,302

 

 

$

61,365

 

Europe and the Middle East

 

 

9,497

 

 

 

11,417

 

Asia-Pacific

 

 

19,121

 

 

 

10,973

 

Total

 

$

86,920

 

 

$

83,755

 

As a percentage of net revenue:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Americas

 

 

67

%

 

 

73

%

Europe and the Middle East

 

 

11

%

 

 

14

%

Asia-Pacific

 

 

22

%

 

 

13

%

Total

 

 

100

%

 

 

100

%

 

Fiscal 2020 Compared with Fiscal 2019

Net Revenue

Net revenue in 2020 was $86.9 million, an increase of 4% compared with $83.8 million in 2019. Net revenue in the Americas was $58.3 million in 2020, a decrease of 5% compared with $61.4 million in 2019. Net revenue from our Premises solution for security programs within various U.S. government agencies and commercial customers for access control and video solutions, as well as reader, controller and appliance products, represented approximately 54% of our net revenue in the Americas. Net revenue in Europe, the Middle East, and Asia-Pacific was approximately $28.6 million in 2020, an increase of 28% compared with 2019. Sales of RFID and NFC products and smart card readers comprise a significant proportion of our net revenue in these regions.

Net revenue in our Identity segment, which represented 61% of our net revenue, was $52.7 million in 2020, an increase of 25% compared with $42.2 million in 2019. Net revenue in this segment in the Americas in 2020 increased 11% compared with 2019 primarily due to higher sales of RFID transponder products and smart card readers, partially offset by lower sales of access card products primarily attributable to the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on the hospitality and education markets. The primary driver of higher sales of our RFID transponder products was the broad adoption of NFC, and the continued demand for smart card reader products with shelter in place actions driving the need for more work from home technologies. Net revenue in this segment in Europe, the Middle East, and the Asia-Pacific increased approximately 44% in 2020 compared with 2019 primarily due to higher sales of RFID transponder products, partially offset by lower sales of smart card readers and access cards. RFID transponder products comprised approximately 65% of net revenue in these regions in 2020, and 36% of net revenue in 2019, while smart card reader sales in 2020 and 2019 comprised approximately 24% and 36% of the net revenue.

Net revenue in our Premises segment, which represented 39% of our net revenue, was $34.2 million in 2020, a decrease of 18% compared with $41.6 million in 2019. Net revenue in this segment in the Americas in 2020 decreased 15% compared with 2019 primarily due to delays associated with the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our partners’ ability to access customer site locations, as well as the impact of business closures in the retail, hospitality and education markets. These delays were partially offset by higher Hirsch Velocity software product sales and related support services, particularly in the federal government. Net revenue in this segment across Europe, the Middle East, and Asia-Pacific decreased 38% in 2020 compared with 2019 primarily due to lower sales of Hirsch related physical access control solutions associated with the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our partners’ ability to access customer site locations as discussed above.

As a general trend, U.S. Federal agencies continue to be subject to security improvement mandates under programs such as Homeland Security Presidential Directive-12 (“HSPD-12”) and reiterated in memoranda from the Office of Management and Budget (“OMB M-11-11”). We believe that our solutions for trusted physical access is an attractive offering to help federal agency customers move towards compliance with federal directives and mandates. To address sales opportunities in the United States in general and with our U.S. Government customers in particular, we focus on a strong U.S. sales organization and our sales presence in Washington D.C.

25


 

More recently, in response to the new needs for health and safety in the physical security market overall, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we have released products to address these trends. During the first half of 2020, we launched our contact tracing downloadable extension for our Velocity access system, our occupancy tracking system based on our 3VR platform, our MobilisID touchless reader and our temperature tracking tag. In addition, with the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic creating more uncertainty for our customers, we have released several products which are subscription based which allow payments over time for our physical access and video solutions as a service.

Gross Profit and Gross Margin

Gross profit for 2020 was $33.7 million, or 39% of net revenue, compared to $36.7 million or 44% of net revenue in 2019. Gross profit represents net revenue less direct cost of product sales, manufacturing overhead, other costs directly related to preparing the product for sale including freight, scrap, inventory adjustments and amortization, where applicable.

In our Identity segment, gross profit was $14.8 million in 2020 compared with $14.6 million in 2019. Gross profit margins in the Identity segment in 2020 decreased to 28% compared to 35% in 2019 primarily due to the change in product mix, with a higher proportion of lower margin RFID transponder product sales, and a large higher margin bulk order of readers to the U.S. Navy Reserve in the first quarter of 2019.

In our Premises segment, gross profit was $18.9 million in 2020 compared with $22.1 million in 2019. Gross profit margins in the Premises segment increased to 55% in 2020 from 53% in 2019 primarily due to adjustments to our inventory reserves in the first quarter of 2019 as a result of management’s assessment of on-hand inventory levels and demand forecasts.

We expect there will be variation in our total gross profit from period to period, as our gross profit has been and will continue to be affected primarily by varying mix among our products. Within each product category, gross margins have tended to be consistent, but over time may be affected by a variety of factors, including, without limitation, competition, product pricing, the volume of sales in any given quarter, manufacturing volumes, product configuration and mix, the availability of new products, product enhancements, software and services, risk of inventory write-downs and the cost and availability of components.

Operating Expenses

Information about our operating expenses for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 is set forth below.

Research and Development

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

$ Change

 

 

% Change

 

 

 

($ in thousands)

 

Research and development expenses

 

$

9,781

 

 

$

8,616

 

 

$

1,165

 

 

 

14

%

Percentage of revenue

 

 

11

%

 

 

10

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development expenses consist primarily of employee compensation and fees for the development of hardware, software and firmware products. We focus the bulk of our research and development activities on the continued development of existing products and the development of new offerings for emerging market opportunities.

Research and development expenses in 2020 increased compared with 2019 primarily due to higher salaries and related costs associated with the re-alignment of certain individuals in the first quarter of 2020 from sales and marketing to research and development, as well as continued investments in engineering, including additional headcount and higher external contractor costs.

26


 

Selling and Marketing

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

$ Change

 

 

% Change

 

 

 

($ in thousands)

 

Selling and marketing expenses

 

$

17,270

 

 

$

18,138

 

 

$

(868

)

 

 

(5

)%

Percentage of revenue

 

 

20

%

 

 

22

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Selling and marketing expenses consist primarily of employee compensation as well as amortization expense of certain intangible assets, customer lead generation activities, tradeshow participation, advertising and other marketing and selling costs.

Selling and marketing expenses in 2020 decreased compared with 2019 primarily due to the re-alignment of certain individuals in the first quarter of 2020 from sales and marketing to research and development, lower travel related costs associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, and lower trade show and advertising costs, partially offset by an increase in employment recruiting fees.

General and Administrative

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

$ Change

 

 

% Change

 

 

 

($ in thousands)

 

General and administrative expenses

 

$

8,623

 

 

$

9,445

 

 

$

(822

)

 

 

(9

)%

Percentage of revenue

 

 

10

%

 

 

11

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General and administrative expenses consist primarily of compensation expenses for employees performing administrative functions, and professional fees incurred for legal, auditing and other consulting services.

General and administrative expenses decreased compared with the prior year period primarily due to reductions in headcount and related costs associated with our continued integration efforts across general and administrative functions as well as lower external services costs and professional fees.

Increase (Decrease) in Fair Value of Earnout Liability

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

$ Change

 

 

% Change

 

 

 

($ in thousands)

 

Increase (decrease) in fair value of earnout liability

 

$

(261

)

 

$

550

 

 

$

(811

)

 

 

(147

)%

 

Earnout consideration expense for the year ended December 31, 2019 was attributable to the increase in fair value of the earnout liability associated with the Viscount acquisition from $200,000 to $750,000. During the year ended December 31, 2020, the reduction in the earnout expense of $261,000 was attributable to the decrease in the fair value of the earnout liability from $750,000 to $489,000, representing settlement date fair value of the earnout shares issued to the selling shareholders. See Note 4, Business Combinations, in the accompanying notes to our consolidated financial statements for more information.

Restructuring and Severance

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

$ Change

 

 

% Change

 

 

($ in thousands)

Restructuring and severance

 

$

1,716

 

 

$

14

 

 

$

1,702

 

 

N/A

 

Restructuring expenses incurred during the year ended December 31, 2020 consists of severance related costs of $375,000 and facility rental related costs associated with office space of an acquired business of approximately $1,341,000. The latter included a charge of $1,199,000 associated with the impairment of the right-of-use operating lease asset, which was subleased, but subsequently went into default due to non-payment of rent beginning April 1, 2020. Sublease income of $198,000 was received in the first quarter of 2020, however, since the first quarter of 2020, no rental payments were received. In addition, we recorded a charge of $97,000 related to the impairment of a right-of-use operating lease asset for office space we vacated in Oakland, California in the fourth quarter of 2020.

27


 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, we incurred restructuring and severance related costs of $105,000. These costs were partially offset by the reversal of a restructuring accrual of $91,000 for future rental payment obligations associated with vacated office space at our Fremont, California facility, which was sublet in the third quarter of 2019.

See Note 15, Restructuring and Severance, in the accompanying notes to our consolidated financial statements for more information.

Non-operating Income (Expense)

Information about our non-operating income (expense) for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 is set forth below.

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

$ Change

 

 

% Change

 

 

 

($ in thousands)

 

Interest expense, net

 

$

(1,462

)

 

$

(917

)

 

$

(545

)

 

 

59

%

Gain on sale of investment

 

$

 

 

$

142

 

 

$

(142

)

 

 

(100

)%

Foreign currency gains (losses), net

 

$

(122

)

 

$

59

 

 

$

(181

)

 

 

(307

)%

 

Interest expense, net consists of interest on financial liabilities, amortization of debt issuance costs, and interest accretion expense for a liability on a contractual payment obligation arising from our acquisition of Hirsch Electronics Corporation. The increase in interest expense in 2020 compared to 2019 was primarily attributable to both the amortization of warrants and amortization of debt issuance costs associated with our loan and security agreement with our lender. See Note 8, Contractual Payment Obligation and Note 9, Financial Liabilities, in the accompanying notes to our consolidated financial statements for more information.

Gain on the sale of investment of $142,000 was related to the sale of our investment in a private company in the fourth quarter of 2019, which had no carrying value.

Changes in currency valuation in the periods mainly were the result of exchange rate movements between the U.S. dollar, the Indian Rupee, the Canadian dollar, and the euro. Our foreign currency gains and losses primarily result from the valuation of current assets and liabilities denominated in a currency other than the functional currency of the respective entity in the local financial statements.

Income Tax Provision

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

$ Change

 

 

% Change

 

 

 

($ in thousands)

 

Income tax provision

 

$

(73

)

 

$

(326

)

 

$

(253

)

 

 

(78

)%

 

As of December 31, 2020, our deferred tax assets are fully offset by a valuation allowance. Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 740, Income Taxes, provides for the recognition of deferred tax assets if realization of such assets is more likely than not. Based upon the weight of available evidence, which includes historical operating performance, reported cumulative net losses since inception and difficulty in accurately forecasting our future results, we provided a full valuation allowance against all of our net U.S. and foreign deferred tax assets. We reassess the need for our valuation allowance on a quarterly basis. If it is later determined that a portion or all of the valuation allowance is not required, it generally will be a benefit to the income tax provision in the period such determination is made. 

We recorded an income tax provision during the year ended December 31, 2020. The effective tax rates for the year ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 differ from the federal statutory rate of 21% primarily due to a change in valuation allowance, and the provision or benefit in certain foreign jurisdictions, which are subject to higher tax rates.

28


 

Quarterly Statements of Comprehensive Income (Loss)

The following tables set forth our unaudited quarterly statements of comprehensive income (loss) for the last eight quarters. In the opinion of management, these data have been prepared on the same basis as the audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this report and reflect all adjustments, including normal recurring adjustments, necessary for a fair presentation of the data. The results of historical periods are not indicative of expectations for any future period. You should read these data together with our audited consolidated financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this report. 

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

 

Dec. 31,

2020

 

 

Sep. 30,

2020

 

 

Jun 30,

2020

 

 

Mar 31,

2020

 

 

Dec. 31,

2019

 

 

Sep. 30,

2019

 

 

Jun 30,

2019

 

 

Mar 31,

2019

 

 

 

(In thousands, except per share data)

 

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive

   Income (Loss):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net revenue

 

$

24,836

 

 

$

24,859

 

 

$

19,105

 

 

$

18,120

 

 

$

18,970

 

 

$

23,026

 

 

$

22,237

 

 

$

19,522

 

Cost of revenue

 

 

16,252

 

 

 

14,974

 

 

 

11,393

 

 

 

10,620

 

 

 

11,429

 

 

 

12,500

 

 

 

12,354

 

 

 

10,818

 

Gross profit

 

 

8,584

 

 

 

9,885

 

 

 

7,712

 

 

 

7,500

 

 

 

7,541

 

 

 

10,526

 

 

 

9,883

 

 

 

8,704

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

 

2,383

 

 

 

2,380

 

 

 

2,422

 

 

 

2,596

 

 

 

2,387

 

 

 

2,125

 

 

 

2,078

 

 

 

2,026

 

Selling and marketing

 

 

4,292

 

 

 

4,245

 

 

 

4,236

 

 

 

4,497

 

 

 

4,449

 

 

 

4,470

 

 

 

4,721

 

 

 

4,498

 

General and administrative

 

 

2,163

 

 

 

2,118

 

 

 

2,151

 

 

 

2,191

 

 

 

1,953

 

 

 

2,591

 

 

 

2,279

 

 

 

2,622

 

Increase (decrease) in fair value of earnout liability

 

 

 

 

 

 

(261

)

 

 

 

 

375

 

 

 

175

 

 

 

 

 

Restructuring and severance

 

 

71

 

 

 

163

 

 

 

1,417

 

 

 

65

 

 

 

115

 

 

 

(87

)

 

 

(2

)

 

 

(12

)

Total operating expenses

 

 

8,909

 

 

 

8,906

 

 

 

9,965

 

 

 

9,349

 

 

 

9,279

 

 

 

9,274

 

 

 

9,076

 

 

 

9,134

 

Income (loss) from operations

 

 

(325

)

 

 

979

 

 

 

(2,253

)

 

 

(1,849

)

 

 

(1,738

)

 

 

1,252

 

 

 

807

 

 

 

(430

)

Interest expense, net

 

 

(396

)

 

 

(407

)

 

 

(407

)

 

 

(252

)

 

 

(151

)

 

 

(246

)

 

 

(241

)

 

 

(279

)

Gain on sale of investment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

142

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Foreign currency gains (losses), net

 

 

(3

)

 

 

(175

)

 

 

(30

)

 

 

86

 

 

 

(37

)

 

 

168

 

 

 

(70

)

 

 

(2

)

Income (loss) before income tax provision

 

 

(724

)

 

 

397

 

 

 

(2,690

)

 

 

(2,015

)

 

 

(1,784

)

 

 

1,174

 

 

 

496

 

 

 

(711

)

Income tax benefit (provision)

 

 

26

 

 

 

(8

)

 

 

(59

)

 

 

(32

)

 

 

(37

)

 

 

(105

)

 

 

(80

)

 

 

(104

)

Net income (loss)

 

 

(698

)

 

 

389

 

 

 

(2,749

)

 

 

(2,047

)

 

 

(1,821

)

 

 

1,069

 

 

 

416

 

 

 

(815

)

Cumulative dividends on Series B preferred stock

 

 

(276

)

 

 

(275

)

 

 

(272

)

 

 

(270

)

 

 

(263

)

 

 

(262

)

 

 

(259

)

 

 

(258

)

Net income (loss) income attributable to common

   stockholders

 

$

(974

)

 

$

114

 

 

$

(3,021

)

 

$

(2,317

)

 

$

(2,084

)

 

$

807

 

 

$

157

 

 

$

(1,073

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income (loss) per common share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

$

(0.05

)

 

$

0.01

 

 

$

(0.17

)

 

$

(0.13

)

 

$

(0.12

)

 

$

0.05

 

 

$

0.01

 

 

$

(0.06

)

Diluted

 

$

(0.05

)

 

$

0.01

 

 

$

(0.17

)

 

$

(0.13

)

 

$

(0.12

)

 

$

0.05

 

 

$

0.01

 

 

$

(0.06

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted average shares used in computing net

   income (loss) per common share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

 

18,302