20-F 1 f20f2020_nanodimension.htm ANNUAL REPORT
 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, DC 20549

 

FORM 20-F

 

☐ REGISTRATION STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OR (g) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

OR

 

☒ ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020

 

OR

 

☐ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

OR

 

☐ SHELL COMPANY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

Commission File No.: 001-37600

 

NANO DIMENSION LTD.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Translation of registrant’s name into English: Not applicable

 

State of Israel

(Jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

 

2 Ilan Ramon

Ness Ziona

7403635 Israel

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

Yoav Stern

President and Chief Executive Officer

+972-073-7509142

yoav.s@nano-di.com

2 Ilan Ramon

Ness Ziona

7403635 Israel

(Name, Telephone, E-mail and/or Facsimile number and Address of Company Contact Person)

 

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class   Trading Symbol(s)   Name of each exchange on which registered

American Depository Shares each representing one

Ordinary Shares par value NIS 5.00 per share(1)

Ordinary Shares, par value NIS 5.00 per share(2)

  NNDM   Nasdaq Capital Market

 

(1) Evidenced by American Depositary Receipts.
(2) Not for trading, but only in connection with the listing of the American Depositary Shares.

 

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

 

Securities for which there is a reporting obligation pursuant to Section 15(d) of the Act: None

 

 

 

 

Indicate the number of outstanding shares of each of the issuer’s classes of capital or common stock as of the close of the period covered by the annual report.

 

172,063,020 Ordinary Shares, par value NIS 5.00 per share, as of December 31, 2020.

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.

 

Yes ☐     No ☒

 

If this report is an annual or transition report, indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act of 1934.

 

Yes ☐     No ☒

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

 

Yes ☒     No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months.

 

Yes ☒     No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or an emerging growth company. See definition of “large accelerated filer, “accelerated filer,” and emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer ☐ Accelerated filer ☐ Non-accelerated filer
    Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company that prepares its financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards † provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

 

†The term “new or revised financial accounting standard” refers to any update issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board to its Accounting Standards Codification after April 5, 2012.

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark which basis of accounting the registrant has used to prepare the financial statements included in this filing.

 

U.S. GAAP ☐

 

International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board ☒

 

Other ☐

 

If “Other” has been checked in response to the previous question, indicate by check mark which financial statement item the registrant has elected to follow.

 

☐ Item 17     ☐ Item 18

 

If this is an annual report, indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company.

 

Yes ☐     No ☒

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

      Page
INTRODUCTION   iii
CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS   iv
       
PART I
       
ITEM 1. IDENTITY OF DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND ADVISERS.   1
ITEM 2. OFFER STATISTICS AND EXPECTED TIMETABLE.   1
ITEM 3. KEY INFORMATION.   1
A. [Removed and reserved.]   1
B. Capitalization and Indebtedness.   1
C. Reasons for the Offer and Use of Proceeds.   1
D. Risk Factors.   1
ITEM 4. INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY.   20
A. History and Development of the Company.   20
B. Business Overview.   21
C. Organizational Structure.   29
D. Property, Plants and Equipment.   29
ITEM 4A. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS.   29
ITEM 5. OPERATING AND FINANCIAL REVIEW AND PROSPECTS.   30
A. Operating Results.   30
B. Liquidity and Capital Resources.   34
E. Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements.   36
F. Tabular Disclosure of Contractual Obligations.   36
ITEM 6. DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND EMPLOYEES.   38
A. Directors and Senior Management.   38
B. Compensation.   41
C. Board Practices.   42
D. Employees.   51
E. Share Ownership.   51
ITEM 7. MAJOR SHAREHOLDERS AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS.   53
A. Major Shareholders.   53
B. Related Party Transactions.   54
C. Interests of Experts and Counsel.   54
ITEM 8. FINANCIAL INFORMATION.   55
A. Consolidated Statements and Other Financial Information.   55
B. Significant Changes.   55
ITEM 9. THE OFFER AND LISTING.   55
A. Offer and Listing Details.   55
B. Plan of Distribution.   55
C. Markets.   55
D. Selling Shareholders.   55
E. Dilution.   55
F. Expenses of the Issue.   55
ITEM 10. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION.   56
A. Share Capital.   56
B. Memorandum and Articles of Association.   56
C. Material Contracts.   56
D. Exchange Controls.   57
E. Taxation.   57
F. Dividends and Paying Agents.   64
G. Statement by Experts.   64
H. Documents on Display.   64
I. Subsidiary Information.   64

 

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ITEM 11. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK.   65
ITEM 12. DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES OTHER THAN EQUITY SECURITIES.   65
A. Debt Securities.   65
B. Warrants and rights.   65
C. Other Securities.   65
D. American Depositary Shares.   66
       
PART II
 
ITEM 13. DEFAULTS, DIVIDEND ARREARAGES AND DELINQUENCIES.   67
ITEM 14. MATERIAL MODIFICATIONS TO THE RIGHTS OF SECURITY HOLDERS AND USE OF PROCEEDS.   67
ITEM 15. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES.   67
ITEM 16A. AUDIT COMMITTEE FINANCIAL EXPERT.   67
ITEM 16B. CODE OF ETHICS.   68
ITEM 16C. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES.   68
ITEM 16D. EXEMPTIONS FROM THE LISTING STANDARDS FOR AUDIT COMMITTEES.   68
ITEM 16E. PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES BY THE ISSUER AND AFFILIATED PURCHASERS.   69
ITEM 16F. CHANGE IN REGISTRANT’S CERTIFYING ACCOUNTANT.   69
ITEM 16G. CORPORATE GOVERNANCE.   69
ITEM 16H. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURE.   70
       
PART III
 
ITEM 17. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS.   71
ITEM 18. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS.   71
ITEM 19. EXHIBITS.   71
SIGNATURES   73

 

ii

 

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

We are a leading additive electronics provider. We believe our flagship proprietary DragonFly Lights-Out Digital Manufacturing (LDM) system is the first and only precision system that produces professional multilayer circuit-boards (PCB), radio frequency (RF) antennas, sensors, conductive geometries, and molded connected devices for rapid prototyping through custom additive manufacturing. We have been actively developing our additive manufacturing technology since 2014. With our unique additive manufacturing technology for additively manufactured electronics, we are targeting the growing market for smart electronic devices that rely on printed circuit boards, connected devices, RF components and antennas, sensors, and smart products, including Internet of Things (IoT).

 

We were incorporated under the laws of the State of Israel in December 1960. On March 7, 2016, American Depositary Shares, or ADSs, representing our Ordinary Shares, commenced trading on the Nasdaq under the symbol “NNDM.” On June 29, 2020, we effected a change in the ratio of our ADSs to Ordinary Shares from one (1) ADS representing fifty (50) Ordinary Shares to a new ratio of one (1) ADS representing one (1) Ordinary Share. All descriptions of our ADS herein, including ADS amounts and per ADS amounts, are presented after giving effect to the ratio change.

 

Unless otherwise indicated, all references to the “Company,” “we,” “our” and “Nano Dimension” refer to Nano Dimension Ltd. and its subsidiaries, Nano Dimension Technologies Ltd., and Nano Dimension IP Ltd., Israeli corporations, Nano Dimension USA Inc., or Nano USA, a Delaware corporation, and Nano Dimension (HK) Limited, a Hong Kong corporation.

 

References to “U.S. dollars” and “$” are to currency of the United States of America, and references to “NIS” are to New Israeli Shekels. References to “Ordinary Shares” are to our Ordinary Shares, par value of NIS 5.00 per share. We report financial information under International Financial Reporting Standards, or IFRS, as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board, or IASB, and none of the financial statements were prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States.

 

iii

 

 

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

Certain information included or incorporated by reference in this annual report on Form 20-F may be deemed to be “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and other securities laws. Forward-looking statements are often characterized by the use of forward-looking terminology such as “may,” “will,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “estimate,” “continue,” “believe,” “should,” “intend,” “project” or other similar words, but are not the only way these statements are identified.

 

These forward-looking statements may include, but are not limited to, statements relating to our objectives, plans and strategies, statements that contain projections of results of operations or of financial condition, expected capital needs and expenses, statements relating to the research, development, completion and use of our products, and all statements (other than statements of historical facts) that address activities, events or developments that we intend, expect, project, believe or anticipate will or may occur in the future.

 

Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to risks and uncertainties. We have based these forward-looking statements on assumptions and assessments made by our management in light of their experience and their perception of historical trends, current conditions, expected future developments and other factors they believe to be appropriate.

 

Important factors that could cause actual results, developments and business decisions to differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements include, among other things:

 

  the overall global economic environment;
     
  the impact of competition and new technologies;
     
  general market, political and economic conditions in the countries in which we operate;
     
  projected capital expenditures and liquidity;
     
  changes in our strategy;
     
  the impact of the coronavirus, or COVID-19, pandemic, and resulting government actions on us;
     
  litigation; and
     
  those factors referred to in “Item 3. Key Information – D. Risk Factors,” “Item 4. Information on the Company,” and “Item 5. Operating and Financial Review and Prospects”, as well as in this annual report on Form 20-F generally.

 

Readers are urged to carefully review and consider the various disclosures made throughout this annual report on Form 20-F which are designed to advise interested parties of the risks and factors that may affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

 

You should not put undue reliance on any forward-looking statements. Any forward-looking statements in this annual report on Form 20-F are made as of the date hereof, and we undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law.

 

In addition, the section of this annual report on Form 20-F entitled “Item 4. Information on the Company” contains information obtained from independent industry sources and other sources that we have not independently verified.

 

iv

 

 

PART I

 

ITEM 1. IDENTITY OF DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND ADVISERS

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 2. OFFER STATISTICS AND EXPECTED TIMETABLE

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 3. KEY INFORMATION

 

A. [Removed and reserved]

 

B. Capitalization and Indebtedness

 

Not applicable.

 

C. Reasons for the Offer and Use of Proceeds

 

Not applicable.

 

D. Risk Factors

 

You should carefully consider the risks described below, together with all of the other information in this annual report on Form 20-F. The risks described below are not the only risks facing us. Additional risks and uncertainties not currently known to us or that we currently deem to be immaterial may also materially and adversely affect our business operations. If any of these risks actually occurs, our business and financial condition could suffer and the price of our ADSs could decline.

 

Summary of Risk Factors

 

Risks Related to Our Financial Condition and Capital Requirements

 

We are a development-stage company and have a limited operating history on which to assess the prospects for our business, have incurred losses since the date of inception of Nano Dimension Technologies Ltd., and anticipate that we will continue to incur significant losses until we are able to successfully commercialize our products;

 

We have generated limited revenues from the sale of our current products and may never be profitable.

 

Risks Related to Our Business and Industry

 

We depend entirely on the commercial success of our DragonFly LDM system and ink products, and we may not be able to successfully scale up their commercialization;

 

We may not be able to introduce products acceptable to customers and we may not be able to improve the technology used in our current systems in response to changing technology and end-user needs;

 

We may not be able to successfully manage our planned growth and expansion;

 

We face business disruption and related risks resulting from the recent outbreak of COVID-19, which could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of our operations.

 

1

 

 

Risks Related to Our Intellectual Property

 

If we are unable to obtain and maintain effective patent rights for our products, we may not able to compete effectively in our markets. If we are unable to protect the confidentiality of our trade secrets or know-how, such proprietary information may be used to compete against us;

 

If we are unable to maintain effective proprietary rights for our products, we may not be able to compete effectively in our markets;

 

We gave been subject, and may in the future be subject to further claims that our employees, consultants, or independent contractors have wrongfully or unavoidably used or disclosed confidential information of third parties or that our employees have wrongfully used or disclosed alleged trade secrets of their former employers.

 

Risks Related to the Ownership of the ADSs or our Ordinary Shares

 

The Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012, or the JOBS Act, allows us to postpone the date by which we must comply with some of the laws and regulations intended to protect investors and to reduce the amount of information we provide in our reports filed with SEC which could undermine investor confidence in our company and adversely affect the market price of our ADSs or Ordinary Shares;

 

As a “foreign private issuer” we follow certain home country corporate governance practices instead of otherwise applicable SEC and Nasdaq requirements, which may result in less protection than is accorded to investors under rules applicable to domestic U.S. issuers.

 

Risks Related Israeli Law and Our Operations in Israel

 

Our operations are subject to currency and interest rate fluctuations;

 

Provisions of Israeli law and our amended and restated articles of association may delay, prevent or otherwise impede a merger with, or acquisition of, our company, which could prevent a change of control, even when the terms of such transaction are favorable to us and our shareholders;

 

Our headquarters and other significant operations are located in Israel, and, therefore, our results may be adversely affected by political, economic and military instability in Israel;

 

We received Israeli government grants for certain of our research and development activities. The terms of those grants may require us to pay royalties and to satisfy specified conditions in order to manufacture products and transfer technologies outside of Israel. We may be required to pay penalties in addition to repayment of the grants.

 

Risks Related to Our Financial Condition and Capital Requirements

 

We are a development-stage company and have a limited operating history on which to assess the prospects for our business, have incurred significant losses since the date of inception of Nano Dimension Technologies Ltd., and anticipate that we will continue to incur significant losses until we are able to successfully commercialize our products.

 

From March 7, 2014 until August 25, 2014, we were a “shell corporation” and did not have any business activity, excluding administrative management. On August 25, 2014, we closed a merger transaction, or the Merger, with Nano Dimension Technologies Ltd., or the Subsidiary, whereby we acquired 100% of the share capital of the Subsidiary. Since the date of the Merger, we have been operating as a development-stage company and have a limited operating history on which to assess the prospects for our business, have incurred significant losses, and anticipate that we will continue to incur significant losses for the foreseeable future.

 

Since the date of inception of the Subsidiary, and as of December 31, 2020, we have incurred net losses of approximately $108 million.

 

2

 

 

Since the date of the Merger, we have devoted substantially all of our financial resources to develop our products. To date, we have generated limited revenues from the sale and lease of our products. Since the Merger, we have financed our operations primarily through the issuance of equity securities. The amount of our future net losses and our ability to finance our operations will depend, in part, on completing the development of our products, the rate of our future expenditures, our ability to generate significant revenues from the sales of our products and our ability to obtain funding through the issuance of our securities, strategic collaborations or grants. We expect to continue to incur significant losses until we are able to generate significant revenues from the sales of our products. We anticipate that our expenses will increase substantially if and as we:

 

  continue the development of our products;

 

  establish a sales, marketing, and distribution infrastructure to successfully commercialize our products;

 

  seek to identify, assess, acquire, license, and/or develop other products and subsequent generations of our current products;

 

  seek to maintain, protect, and expand our intellectual property portfolio;

 

  seek to attract and retain skilled personnel; and

 

  create additional infrastructure to support our operations as a public company and our product development and planned future commercialization efforts.

 

We have generated limited revenues from the sale of our current products and may never be profitable.

 

We began commercializing our products in the fourth quarter of 2017 and have generated limited revenues since the date of the Merger. Our ability to generate significant revenues and achieve profitability depends on our ability to successfully complete the development of, and to commercialize, our products. Our ability to generate future revenue from product sales depends heavily on our success in many areas, including but not limited to:

 

  completing development of our products;

 

  establishing and maintaining supply and manufacturing relationships with third parties that can provide adequate (in amount and quality) products to support market demand for our products;

 

  launching and commercializing products, either directly or with a collaborator or distributor;

 

  addressing any competing technological and market developments;

 

  identifying, assessing, acquiring and/or developing new products;

 

  negotiating favorable terms in any collaboration, licensing or other arrangements into which we may enter;

 

  maintaining, protecting and expanding our portfolio of intellectual property rights, including patents, trade secrets and know-how; and

 

  attracting, hiring and retaining qualified personnel.

 

The market price of our ADSs has been, and may continue to be, highly volatile, and such volatility could cause the market price of our ADSs to decrease and could cause you to lose some or all of your investment in our ADSs.

 

During the first quarter of 2021, the market price of our common stock fluctuated from a high of $17.89 per share to a low of $7.88 per ADS, and our share price continues to fluctuate. The market price of our ADSs may continue to fluctuate significantly in response to numerous factors, some of which are beyond our control, such as:

 

  our ability to grow our revenue and customer base;

 

  the announcement of new products or product enhancements by us or our competitors;

 

3

 

 

  variations in our and our competitors’ results of operations;

 

  successes or challenges in any future collaborative, licensing, or other arrangements or alternative funding sources;

 

  developments in the AME / PE industries;

 

  future issuances of ADSs or other securities;

 

  the addition or departure of key personnel;

 

  announcements by us or our competitors of acquisitions, investments or strategic alliances; and

 

  general market conditions and other factors, including factors unrelated to our operating performance and the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

These and other market and industry factors may cause the market price and demand for our ADSs to fluctuate substantially, regardless of our actual operating performance, which may limit or prevent investors from readily selling their ADSs and may otherwise negatively affect the liquidity of our ADSs. In addition, the stock market in general, and technology-based companies in particular, have experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations that have often been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of these companies. In the past, when the market price of a security has been volatile, holders of that security have sometimes instituted securities class action litigation against the issuer. If any of the holders of our ADSs were to bring such a lawsuit against us, we could incur substantial costs defending the lawsuit and the attention of our senior management would be diverted from the operation of our business. Any adverse determination in litigation could also subject us to significant liabilities.

 

Risks Related to Our Business and Industry

 

We depend entirely on the commercial success of our DragonFly LDM system and ink products, and we may not be able to successfully scale up their commercialization.

 

We have invested the majority of our efforts and financial resources in the research and development of our products. As a result, our business is entirely dependent on our ability to successfully commercialize our DragonFly LDM system and ink products. In the fourth quarter of 2017, we initiated commercial sales of our DragonFly LDM system. We cannot assure you that our commercialization efforts will lead to meaningful sales of our products.

 

We may not be able to introduce products acceptable to customers and we may not be able to improve the technology used in our current systems in response to changing technology and end-user needs.

 

The markets in which we operate are subject to rapid and substantial innovation and technological change, mainly driven by technological advances and end-user requirements and preferences, as well as the emergence of new standards and practices. Our ability to compete in the 3D printing and PCB markets will depend, in large part, on our future success in enhancing our existing products and developing new 3D printing systems that will address the increasingly sophisticated and varied needs of prospective end-users, and respond to technological advances and industry standards and practices on a cost-effective and timely basis or otherwise gain market acceptance.

 

It is likely that new systems and technologies that we develop will eventually supplant our existing systems or that our competitors will create systems that will replace our systems. As a result, any of our products may be rendered obsolete or uneconomical by our or others’ technological advances.

 

We may not be able to successfully manage our planned growth and expansion.

 

We expect to continue to make investments in our DragonFly LDM system and our related ink products. We expect that our annual operating expenses will continue to increase as we invest in sales and marketing, research and development, manufacturing and production infrastructure, and develop customer service and support resources for future customers. Our failure to expand operational and financial systems timely or efficiently could result in operating inefficiencies, which could increase our costs and expenses more than we had planned and prevent us from successfully executing our business plan. We may not be able to offset the costs of operation expansion by leveraging the economies of scale from our growth in negotiations with our suppliers and contract manufacturers. Additionally, if we increase our operating expenses in anticipation of the growth of our business and this growth does not meet our expectations, our financial results will be negatively impacted.

 

4

 

 

If our business grows, we will have to manage additional product design projects, materials procurement processes, and sales efforts and marketing for an increasing number of products, as well as expand the number and scope of our relationships with suppliers, distributors and end customers. If we fail to manage these additional responsibilities and relationships successfully, we may incur significant costs, which may negatively impact our operating results. Additionally, in our efforts to be first to market with new products with innovative functionality and features, we may devote significant research and development resources to products and product features for which a market does not develop quickly, or at all. If we are not able to predict market trends accurately, we may not benefit from such research and development activities, and our results of operations may suffer.

 

As our future development and commercialization plans and strategies develop, we expect to need additional managerial, operational, sales, marketing, financial and legal personnel. Our management may need to divert a disproportionate amount of its attention away from our day-to-day activities and devote a substantial amount of time to managing these growth activities. We may not be able to effectively manage the expansion of our operations, which may result in weaknesses in our infrastructure, operational mistakes, loss of business opportunities, failure to deliver and timely deliver our products to customers, loss of employees and reduced productivity among remaining employees. Our expected growth could require significant capital expenditures and may divert financial resources from other projects, such as the development of additional new products. If our management is unable to effectively manage our growth, our expenses may increase more than expected, our ability to generate and/or grow revenue could be reduced, and we may not be able to implement our business strategy.

 

Our operating results and financial condition may fluctuate.

 

Even if we are successful in introducing our products to the market, the operating results and financial condition of our company may fluctuate from quarter to quarter and year to year and are likely to continue to vary due to a number of factors, many of which will not be within our control. If our operating results do not meet the guidance that we provide to the market place or the expectations of securities analysts or investors, the market price of our Ordinary Shares will likely decline. Fluctuations in our operating results and financial condition may be due to a number of factors, including those listed below and those identified throughout this “Risk Factors” section:

 

  the degree of market acceptance of our products and services;

 

  the mix of products and services that we sell during any period;

 

  long sales cycles;

 

  changes in the amount that that we spend to develop, acquire or license new products, consumables, technologies or businesses;

 

  changes in the amounts that we spend to promote our products and services;

 

  changes in the cost of satisfying our warranty obligations and servicing our installed base of systems;

 

  delays between our expenditures to develop and market new or enhanced systems and consumables and the generation of sales from those products;

 

  development of new competitive products and services by others;

 

  difficulty in predicting sales patterns and reorder rates that may result from a multi-tier distribution strategy associated with new product categories;

 

  litigation or threats of litigation, including intellectual property claims by third parties;

 

  changes in accounting rules and tax laws;

 

  the geographic distribution of our sales;

 

5

 

 

  our responses to price competition;

 

  general economic and industry conditions that affect end-user demand and end-user levels of product design and manufacturing;

 

  changes in interest rates that affect returns on our cash balances and short-term investments;

 

  changes in dollar-shekel exchange rates that affect the value of our net assets, future revenues and expenditures from and/or relating to our activities carried out in those currencies; and

 

  the level of research and development activities by our company.

 

Due to all of the foregoing factors, and the other risks discussed in this annual report on Form 20-F, you should not rely on quarter-to-quarter comparisons of our operating results as an indicator of our future performance.

 

The markets in which we participate are competitive. Our failure to compete successfully could cause any future revenues and the demand for our products not to materialize or to decline over time.

 

We aim to compete for customers with a wide variety of manufacturers that create PCBs and RF antennas. Our principal current competition consists of companies that produce prototype PCBs by traditional reductive manufacturing means, which include etching, pressing and drilling. Many of these companies have extensive track records and relationships within the electronics industry. While we are not aware of any other company that currently offers an in-house 3D printer that is capable of printing multilayer PCBs, there are a large number of companies engaged in additive manufacturing and 3D printing solutions.

 

Many of our current and potential competitors have longer operating histories and more extensive name recognition than we have and may also have greater financial, marketing, manufacturing, distribution and other resources than we have. Current and future competitors may be able to respond more quickly to new or emerging technologies and changes in end-user demands and to devote greater resources to the development, promotion and sale of their products than we can. Our current and potential competitors may develop and market new technologies that render our existing or future products obsolete, unmarketable or less competitive (whether from a price perspective or otherwise). We cannot assure you that we will be able to maintain a competitive position or to compete successfully against current and future sources of competition.

 

Defects in products could give rise to product returns or product liability, warranty or other claims that could result in material expenses, diversion of management time and attention, and damage to our reputation.

 

Even if we are successful in introducing our products to the market, our products may contain undetected defects or errors that, despite testing, are not discovered until after a product has been used. This could result in delayed market acceptance of those products, claims from distributors, end-users or others, increased end-user service and support costs and warranty claims, damage to our reputation and business, or significant costs to correct the defect or error. We may from time to time become subject to warranty or product liability claims that could lead to significant expenses as we need to compensate affected end-users for costs incurred related to product quality issues.

 

This risk of product liability claims may also be greater due to the use of certain hazardous chemicals used in the manufacture of certain of our products. In addition, we may be subject to claims that our additive manufacturing systems have been, or may be, used to create parts that are not in compliance with legal requirements.

 

Any claim brought against us, regardless of its merit, could result in material expense, diversion of management time and attention, and damage to our reputation, and could cause us to fail to retain or attract customers. Currently, we maintain minimal product liability insurance. Our product liability insurance is subject to significant deductibles and there is no guarantee that such insurance will be available or adequate to protect against all such claims. Costs or payments made in connection with warranty and product liability claims and product recalls or other claims could materially affect our financial condition and results of operations.

 

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If our relationships with suppliers for our products and services, especially with single source suppliers of components of our products, were to terminate or our manufacturing arrangements were to be disrupted, our business could be interrupted.

 

We purchase component parts and raw materials that are used in our DragonFly LDM system and ink products from third-party suppliers, some of whom may compete with us. While there are several potential suppliers of most of these component parts and raw materials that we use, we currently choose to use only one or a limited number of suppliers for several of these components and materials. Our reliance on a single or limited number of vendors involves a number of risks, including:

 

  potential shortages of some key components;

 

  product performance shortfalls, if traceable to particular product components, since the supplier of the faulty component cannot readily be replaced;

 

  discontinuation of a product on which we rely;

 

  potential insolvency of these vendors; and

 

  reduced control over delivery schedules, manufacturing capabilities, quality and costs.

 

In addition, we require any new supplier to become “qualified” pursuant to our internal procedures. The qualification process involves evaluations of varying durations, which may cause production delays if we were required to qualify a new supplier unexpectedly. We generally assemble our systems and parts based on our internal forecasts and the availability of raw materials, assemblies, components and finished goods that are supplied to us by third parties, which are subject to various lead times. If certain suppliers were to decide to discontinue production of an assembly, component or raw material that we use, the unanticipated change in the availability of supplies, or unanticipated supply limitations, could cause delays in, or loss of, sales, increased production or related costs and consequently reduced margins, and damage to our reputation. If we were unable to find a suitable supplier for a particular component, material or compound, we could be required to modify our existing products or the end-parts that we offer to accommodate substitute components, material or compounds.

 

Discontinuation of operations at our manufacturing sites could prevent us from timely filling customer orders and could lead to unforeseen costs for us.

 

We currently assemble and test the systems that we sell, and produce consumables for our systems, at a single facility. Because of our reliance on all of these production facilities, a disruption at any of those facilities could materially damage our ability to supply systems or consumable materials to the marketplace in a timely manner. Depending on the cause of the disruption, we could also incur significant costs to remedy the disruption and resume product shipments. Such disruptions may be caused by, among other factors, earthquakes, fire, flood and other natural disasters. Accordingly, any such disruption could result in a material adverse effect on our revenue, results of operations and earnings, and could also potentially damage our reputation.

 

Our international operations expose us to additional market and operational risks, and failure to manage these risks may adversely affect our business and operating results.

 

We derive a substantial percentage of our sales from international markets. Accordingly, we face significant operational risks from doing business internationally, including:

 

  fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates;

 

  potentially longer sales and payment cycles;

 

  potentially greater difficulties in collecting accounts receivable;

 

  potentially adverse tax consequences;

 

  reduced protection of intellectual property rights in certain countries, particularly in Asia and South America;

 

  difficulties in staffing and managing foreign operations;

 

  laws and business practices favoring local competition;

 

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  costs and difficulties of customizing products for foreign countries;

 

  compliance with a wide variety of complex foreign laws, treaties and regulations;

 

  an outbreak of a contagious disease, such as COVID-19, which may cause us, third party vendors and manufacturers and/or customers to temporarily suspend our or their respective operations in the affected city or country;

 

  tariffs, trade barriers and other regulatory or contractual limitations on our ability to sell or develop our products in certain foreign markets; and

 

  being subject to the laws, regulations and the court systems of many jurisdictions.

 

Our failure to manage the market and operational risks associated with our international operations effectively could limit the future growth of our business and adversely affect our operating results.

 

Under applicable employment laws, we may not be able to enforce covenants not to compete and therefore may be unable to prevent our competitors from benefiting from the expertise of some of our former employees.

 

We generally enter into non-competition agreements with our employees. These agreements prohibit our employees from competing directly with us or working for our competitors or clients for a limited period after they cease working for us. We may be unable to enforce these agreements under the laws of the jurisdictions in which our employees work and it may be difficult for us to restrict our competitors from benefiting from the expertise that our former employees or consultants developed while working for us. For example, Israeli courts have required employers seeking to enforce non-compete undertakings of a former employee to demonstrate that the competitive activities of the former employee will harm one of a limited number of material interests of the employer that have been recognized by the courts, such as the secrecy of a company’s confidential commercial information or the protection of its intellectual property. If we cannot demonstrate that such interests will be harmed, we may be unable to prevent our competitors from benefiting from the expertise of our former employees or consultants and our ability to remain competitive may be diminished.

 

We are subject to environmental laws due to the import and export of our products, which could subject us to compliance costs and/or potential liability in the event of non-compliance.

 

The export of our products internationally from our production facilities subjects us to environmental laws and regulations concerning the import and export of chemicals and hazardous substances such as the U.S. Toxic Substances Control Act and the Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemical Substances. These laws and regulations require the testing and registration of some chemicals that we ship along with, or that form a part of, our systems and other products. If we fail to comply with these or similar laws and regulations, we may be required to make significant expenditures to reformulate the chemicals that we use in our products and materials or incur costs to register such chemicals to gain and/or regain compliance. Additionally, we could be subject to significant fines or other civil and criminal penalties should we not achieve such compliance.

 

Our future success depends in part on our ability to retain our executive officers and to attract, retain and motivate other qualified personnel.

 

We are highly dependent on Yoav Stern, our President and Chief Executive Officer, Amit Dror, our Customer Success Officer and Zvi Peled, our Chief Revenue Officer and Chief Operation Officer. The loss of their services without a proper replacement may adversely impact the achievement of our objectives. Messrs. Stern, Dror, and Peled may leave our employment at any time subject to contractual notice periods, as applicable. Recruiting and retaining other qualified employees, consultants, and advisors for our business, including scientific and technical personnel, will also be critical to our success. There is currently a shortage of skilled personnel in our industry, which is likely to continue. As a result, competition for skilled personnel is intense and the turnover rate can be high. We may not be able to attract and retain personnel on acceptable terms given the competition in the industry in which we operate. The inability to recruit and retain qualified personnel, or the loss of the services of our executive officers, without proper replacement, may impede the progress of our development and commercialization objectives. There is no assurance that any equity or other incentives that we grant to our employees will be adequate to attract, retain and motivate employees in the future. Moreover, certain of our competitors or other technology businesses may seek to hire our employees.

 

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We face business disruption and related risks resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, which has had a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

 

Our operations and business have been disrupted and adversely affected by COVID-19. The pandemic has caused states of emergency to be declared in various countries, travel restrictions imposed globally, quarantines established in certain jurisdictions and various institutions and companies being closed. The COVID-19 has also adversely affect our ability to conduct our business effectively due to disruptions to our capabilities, availability and productivity of personnel, while we simultaneously attempt to comply with rapidly changing restrictions, such as travel restrictions, curfews and others. In particular, in January 2021, the Government of Israel announced that non-Israeli residents or citizens, except for non-nationals whose lives are based in Israel, are not allowed to enter Israel, and the number of Israeli citizens permitted to enter the country per day will be capped at 3,000. In addition, the Ministry of Health in the State of Israel issued guidelines in March 2020, which were most recently updated in March 2021, recommending people avoid gatherings in one space and providing that no gathering of more than 20 people should be held under any circumstances.

 

Employers (including us) are also required to prepare and increase as much as possible the capacity and arrangement for employees to work remotely. In addition, the U.S. government has restricted travel to the United States from foreign nationals who have recently been in China, Iran, South Africa, and certain European and Latin America countries. Although to date these restrictions have not impacted our operations other than the delay of one of our trials, the effect on our business, from the spread of COVID-19 and the actions implemented by the governments of the State of Israel, the United States and elsewhere across the globe, may worsen over time.

 

The spread of COVID-19 may also result in the inability of our suppliers to deliver supplies to us on a timely basis. In addition, we derive a certain portion of our revenue from the Asia-Pacific region. As a result of COVID-19, particularly in Asia, our sales and operations, and those of our customers and suppliers, have experienced delays or disruptions, such as difficulty obtaining components and temporary delay in sales. Although, as of the date of this annual report on Form 20-F, we do not expect any material impact on our long-term activity, the extent to which COVID-19 impacts our business will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted, including new information which may emerge concerning the severity of COVID-19 and the actions to contain COVID-19 or treat its impact, among others. We are actively monitoring the pandemic and we are taking any necessary measures to respond to the situation in cooperation with the various stakeholders.

 

Risks Related to Our Intellectual Property

 

If we are unable to obtain and maintain effective patent rights for our products, we may not be able to compete effectively in our markets. If we are unable to protect the confidentiality of our trade secrets or know-how, such proprietary information may be used by others to compete against us.

 

Since October 2014, we have sought patent protection for certain of our products, systems, designs and applications. Our success depends in large part on our ability to obtain, maintain, monitor and enforce patent and other intellectual property protection in the United States and in other countries with respect to our proprietary technology and new products.

 

We have sought to protect our proprietary position and sustain our competitive advantage by filing patent applications in the United States and in other countries, where our major production and sales take place. Patent prosecution in the United States and the rest of the world is uncertain, expensive and time consuming, and we may not be able to file and prosecute all necessary or desirable patent applications at a reasonable cost or in a timely manner. It is also possible that we will fail to identify patentable aspects of our research and development output before it is too late to obtain patent protection.

 

We have a growing portfolio of 64 provisional and non-provisional pending patent applications, with a robust pipeline. These are filed with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, or USPTO, the World Intellectual Property Organization, or WIPO, and various patent offices around the world, such as China, Japan, Taiwan, Europe, and South Korea. The patent applications, where available, were filed through the Paris Convention Treaty, or PCT, and nine for which we have issued U.S., Chinese, and South Korean patents, with three more applications that were indicated as allowed but have not issued yet. We cannot offer any assurances about which, if any of the pending patent applications will issue, the scope of protection of any such patent or whether any issued patents will be found invalid and/or unenforceable or will be threatened by third parties. Any successful opposition to these patents or any other patents owned by or licensed to us after patent issuance could deprive us of rights necessary for the successful commercialization of any new products that we may develop.

 

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We have two patents and their continuations and foreign counterparts licensed exclusively from the Hebrew University covering some of our underlying core technology. To the extent the licensed patents are found to be invalid or unenforceable, we may be limited in our ability to compete and market our products. The terms of our license with Hebrew University leave full control of any and all enforcement of the licensed patents with Hebrew University. If Hebrew University elects to not enforce any or all of the licensed patents it could significantly undercut the value of any of our products, which would materially adversely affect our future revenue, financial condition and results of operations. Moreover, fluctuating currency rates may create inconsistencies in the royalty payments we have under the license.

 

Further, there is no assurance that all potentially relevant prior art relating to our patent applications has been found, which can invalidate a patent or prevent a patent from issuing from a pending patent application. Even if patents do successfully issue, and even if such patents cover our products, third parties may challenge their validity, enforceability, or scope, which may result in such patents being narrowed, found unenforceable or invalidated. Furthermore, even if they are unchallenged, our patent applications and any future patents may not adequately protect our intellectual property, provide exclusivity for our new products, or prevent others from designing around our claims. Any of these outcomes could impair our ability to prevent competition from third parties, which may have an adverse impact on our business.

 

If we cannot obtain and maintain effective patent rights for our products, we may not be able to compete effectively, and our business and results of operations would potentially be harmed.

 

If we are unable to maintain effective proprietary rights for our products, we may not be able to compete effectively in our markets.

 

In addition to the protection afforded by any patents currently owned and that may be granted, historically, we have relied on trade secret protection and confidentiality agreements to protect proprietary know-how that is not patentable or that we elect not to patent, processes and helpful devices (jigs) that are not easily known, knowable or easily ascertainable, and for which patent infringement is difficult to monitor and/or enforce and any other elements of our product development processes, that involve proprietary know-how, as well as information or technology that is not covered by patents. However, trade secrets can be difficult to protect. We seek to protect our proprietary technology and processes, in part, by entering into confidentiality agreements with our employees, consultants, scientific advisors, and contractors. We also seek to preserve the integrity and confidentiality of our data, trade secrets and intellectual property by maintaining physical security of our premises and physical and electronic security of our information technology systems, as well as implementing various operating procedures designed to maintain that integrity. Agreements or security measures may be breached, and we may not have adequate remedies for any breach. In addition, our trade secrets and intellectual property may otherwise become known or be independently discovered by competitors.

 

We cannot provide any assurances that our trade secrets and other confidential proprietary information will not be disclosed in violation of our confidentiality agreements or that competitors will not otherwise gain access to our trade secrets or independently develop substantially equivalent information and techniques. Also, misappropriation or unauthorized and unavoidable disclosure of our trade secrets and intellectual property could impair our competitive position and may have a material adverse effect on our business. Additionally, if the steps taken to maintain our trade secrets and intellectual property are deemed inadequate, we may have insufficient recourse against third parties for misappropriating any trade secret.

 

Intellectual property rights of third parties could adversely affect our ability to successfully commercialize our products, and we might be required to litigate or obtain licenses from third parties in order to develop or market our product candidates. Such litigation or licenses could be costly or not available on commercially reasonable terms.

 

It is inherently difficult to conclusively assess our freedom to operate without infringing on third party rights. Our competitive position may be adversely affected if existing patents or patents resulting from patent applications issued to third parties or other third party intellectual property rights are held to cover our products or elements thereof, or our manufacturing or uses relevant to our development plans. In such cases, we may not be in a position to develop or commercialize products or our product candidates unless we successfully pursue litigation to nullify or invalidate the third party intellectual property right concerned, or enter into a license agreement with the intellectual property right holder, if available on commercially reasonable terms. There may also be pending patent applications that if they result in issued patents, could be alleged to be infringed by our new products. If such an infringement claim should be brought and be successful, we may be required to pay substantial damages, be forced to abandon our new products or seek a license from any patent holders. No assurances can be given that a license will be available on commercially reasonable terms, if at all.

 

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It is also possible that we have failed to identify relevant third party patents or applications. For example, U.S. patent applications filed before September 29, 2018 and certain U.S. patent applications filed after that date that will not be filed outside the United States remain confidential until patents issue. Patent applications in the United States and elsewhere are published approximately 18 months after the earliest filing for which priority is claimed, with such earliest filing date being commonly referred to as the priority date. Therefore, patent applications covering our new products or platform technology could have been filed by others without our knowledge. Additionally, pending patent applications which have been published can, subject to certain limitations, be later amended in a manner that could cover our platform technologies, our new products or the use of our new products. Third party intellectual property right holders may also actively bring infringement claims against us. We cannot guarantee that we will be able to successfully settle or otherwise resolve such infringement claims. If we are unable to successfully settle future claims on terms acceptable to us, we may be required to engage in or continue costly, unpredictable and time-consuming litigation and may be prevented from or experience substantial delays in pursuing the development of and/or marketing our new products. If we fail in any such dispute, in addition to being forced to pay damages, we may be temporarily or permanently prohibited from commercializing our new products that are held to be infringing. We might, if possible, also be forced to redesign our new products so that we no longer infringe the third party intellectual property rights. Any of these events, even if we were ultimately to prevail, could require us to divert substantial financial and management resources that we would otherwise be able to devote to our business.

 

Third-party claims of intellectual property infringement may prevent or delay our development and commercialization efforts.

 

Our commercial success depends in part on our avoiding infringement of the patents and proprietary rights of third parties. Numerous U.S. and foreign issued patents and pending patent applications, which are owned by third parties, exist in the fields in which we are developing new products. As our industries expand and more patents are issued, the risk increases that our products may be subject to claims of infringement of the patent rights of third parties.

 

Third parties may assert that we are employing their proprietary technology without authorization. There may be third-party patents or patent applications with claims to materials, designs or methods of manufacture related to the use or manufacture of our products. There may be currently pending patent applications that may later result in issued patents that our products may infringe. In addition, third parties may obtain patents in the future and claim that use of our technologies infringes upon these patents.

 

If any third-party patents were held by a court of competent jurisdiction to cover aspects of our formulations, processes for designs, or methods of use, the holders of any such patents may be able to block our ability to develop and commercialize the applicable product candidate unless we obtain a license or until such patent expires or is finally determined to be invalid or unenforceable. In either case, such a license may not be available on commercially reasonable terms or at all.

 

Parties making claims against us may obtain injunctive or other equitable relief, which could effectively block our ability to further develop and commercialize one or more of our products. Defense of these claims, regardless of their merit, would involve substantial litigation expense and would be a substantial diversion of employee resources from our business. In the event of a successful claim of infringement against us, we may have to pay substantial damages, including treble damages and attorneys’ fees for willful infringement, pay royalties, redesign our infringing products or obtain one or more licenses from third parties, which may be impossible or require substantial time and monetary expenditure.

 

Patent policy and rule changes could increase the uncertainties and costs surrounding the prosecution of our patent applications and the enforcement or defense of any issued patents.

 

Changes in either the patent laws or interpretation of the patent laws in the United States and other countries may diminish the value of any patents that may issue from our patent applications, or narrow the scope of our patent protection. The laws of foreign countries may not protect our rights to the same extent as the laws of the United States. Publications of discoveries in the scientific literature often lag behind the actual discoveries, and patent applications in the United States and other jurisdictions are typically not published until 18 months after filing, or in some cases not at all. We therefore cannot be certain that we were the first to file the invention claimed in our owned and licensed patent or pending applications, or that we or our licensor were the first to file for patent protection of such inventions. Assuming all other requirements for patentability are met, in the United States prior to 2013, the first to make the claimed invention without undue delay in filing, was entitled to the patent, while outside the United States, the first to file a patent application is entitled to the patent. Since 2013, the United States has moved to a first to file system. Changes in the way patent applications will be prosecuted could increase the uncertainties and costs surrounding the prosecution of our patent applications and the enforcement or defense of any issued patents, all of which could have a material adverse effect on our business and financial condition.

 

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We may be involved in lawsuits to protect or enforce our intellectual property, which could be expensive, time consuming, and unsuccessful.

 

Competitors may infringe our intellectual property. If we were to initiate legal proceedings against a third party to enforce a patent covering one of our new products, the defendant could counterclaim that the patent covering our product candidate is invalid and/or unenforceable. In patent litigation in the United States, defendant counterclaims alleging invalidity and/or unenforceability are commonplace. Grounds for a validity challenge could be an alleged failure to meet any of several statutory requirements, including lack of novelty, obviousness or non-enablement. Grounds for an unenforceability assertion could be an allegation that someone connected with prosecution of the patent withheld relevant information from the USPTO, or made a misleading statement, during prosecution. The validity of U.S. patents may also be challenged in post-grant proceedings before the USPTO. The outcome following legal assertions of invalidity and unenforceability is unpredictable.

 

Derivation proceedings initiated by third parties or brought by us may be necessary to determine the priority of inventions and/or their scope with respect to our patent or patent applications or those of our licensors. An unfavorable outcome could require us to cease using the related technology or to attempt to license rights to it from the prevailing party. Our business could be harmed if the prevailing party does not offer us a license on commercially reasonable terms. Our defense of litigation or interference proceedings may fail and, even if successful, may result in substantial costs and distract our management and other employees. In addition, the uncertainties associated with litigation could have a material adverse effect on our ability to raise the funds necessary to continue our clinical trials, continue our research programs, license necessary technology from third parties, or enter into development partnerships that would help us bring our new products to market.

 

Furthermore, because of the substantial amount of discovery required in connection with intellectual property litigation, there is a risk that some of our confidential information could be compromised by disclosure during this type of litigation. There could also be public announcements of the results of hearings, motions, or other interim proceedings or developments. If securities analysts or investors perceive these results to be negative, it could have a material adverse effect on the price of our Ordinary Shares.

 

We have been subject, and may in the future be subject to further claims that our employees, consultants, or independent contractors have wrongfully or unavoidably used or disclosed confidential information of third parties or that our employees have wrongfully used or disclosed alleged trade secrets of their former employers.

 

In the past, we have been subject to litigation disputes involving the ownership of our intellectual property. In 2015, a claim was filed in the District Court in Tel-Aviv Jaffa alleging that certain of our officers and employees misappropriated commercial secrets and technology while employed at a previous employer. While this claim was settled without material effects to our business, we continue to employ individuals who were previously employed at our competitors or potential competitors. We try to ensure that our employees, consultants, and independent contractors do not use the proprietary information or know-how of others in their work for us, but we may nevertheless be subject to claims that we or our employees, consultants, or independent contractors have inadvertently or otherwise used or disclosed intellectual property, including trade secrets or other proprietary information, of any of our employees’ former employers or other third parties. Litigation may result and be necessary to defend against these claims. If we fail in defending any such claims, in addition to paying monetary damages, we may lose valuable intellectual property rights or personnel, which could adversely impact our business. Even if we are successful in defending against such claims, litigation could result in substantial costs and be a distraction to management and other employees.

 

We may be subject to claims challenging the inventorship of our intellectual property.

 

We may be subject to claims that former employees, collaborators or other third parties have an interest in, or right to compensation, with respect to our current patent and patent applications, future patents or other intellectual property as an inventor or co-inventor. For example, we may have inventorship disputes arise from conflicting obligations of consultants or others who are involved in developing our products. Litigation may be necessary to defend against these and other claims challenging inventorship or claiming the right to compensation. If we fail in defending any such claims, in addition to paying monetary damages, we may lose valuable intellectual property rights, such as exclusive ownership of, or right to use, valuable intellectual property. Such an outcome could have a material adverse effect on our business. Even if we are successful in defending against such claims, litigation could result in substantial costs and be a distraction to management and other employees.

 

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We may not be able to protect our intellectual property rights throughout the world.

 

Filing, prosecuting, and defending patents on products, as well as monitoring their infringement in all countries throughout the world would be prohibitively expensive, and our intellectual property rights in some countries can be less extensive than those in the United States. In addition, the laws of some foreign countries do not protect intellectual property rights to the same extent as federal and state laws in the United States.

 

Competitors may use our technologies in jurisdictions where we have not obtained patent protection to develop their own products and may also export otherwise infringing products to territories where we have patent protection, but enforcement is not as strong as that in the United States. These products may compete with our products. Future patents or other intellectual property rights may not be effective or sufficient to prevent them from competing.

 

Many companies have encountered significant problems in protecting and defending intellectual property rights in foreign jurisdictions. The legal systems of certain countries, particularly certain developing countries, do not favor the enforcement of patents, trade secrets, and other intellectual property protection, which could make it difficult for us to stop the marketing of competing products in violation of our proprietary rights generally. Proceedings to enforce our patent rights in foreign jurisdictions, whether or not successful, could result in substantial costs and divert our efforts and attention from other aspects of our business, could put our future patents at risk of being invalidated or interpreted narrowly and our patent applications at risk of not issuing and could provoke third parties to assert claims against us. We may not prevail in any lawsuits that we initiate and the damages or other remedies awarded, if any, may not be commercially meaningful. Accordingly, our efforts to monitor and enforce our intellectual property rights around the world may be inadequate to obtain a significant commercial advantage from the intellectual property that we develop or license.

 

Risks Related to the Ownership of Our ADSs or Ordinary Shares

 

We do not anticipate paying any dividends.

 

No dividends have been paid on our Ordinary Shares. We do not intend to pay cash dividends on our Ordinary Shares in the foreseeable future, and anticipate that profits, if any, received from operations will be reinvested in our business. Any decision to pay dividends will depend upon our profitability at the time, cash available and other relevant factors including, without limitation, the conditions set forth in the Israeli Companies Law of 1999, or the Companies Law.

 

The JOBS Act allows us to postpone the date by which we must comply with some of the laws and regulations intended to protect investors and to reduce the amount of information we provide in our reports filed with the SEC, which could undermine investor confidence in our company and adversely affect the market price of our ADSs or Ordinary Shares.

 

For so long as we remain an “emerging growth company” as defined in the JOBS Act, we intend to take advantage of certain exemptions from various requirements that are applicable to public companies that are not “emerging growth companies” including:

 

  the provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act requiring that our independent registered public accounting firm provide an attestation report on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting; and
     
  any rules that may be adopted by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board requiring mandatory audit firm rotation or a supplement to the auditor’s report on the financial statements.

 

We intend to take advantage of these exemptions until we are no longer an “emerging growth company.” We will remain an emerging growth company until the earlier of (1) the last day of the fiscal year (a) following the fifth anniversary of the date of our first sale of common equity securities pursuant to an effective registration statement under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Act, which will be December 31, 2021, (b) in which we have total annual gross revenue of at least $1.07 billion, or (c) in which we are deemed to be a large accelerated filer, which means the market value of our Ordinary Shares that is held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the prior June 30, and (2) the date on which we have issued more than $1.0 billion in non-convertible debt during the prior three-year period.

 

We cannot predict if investors will find our ADSs or Ordinary Shares less attractive because we may rely on these exemptions. If some investors find our ADSs or Ordinary Shares less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our ADSs or Ordinary Shares, and our market prices may be more volatile and may decline.

 

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As a “foreign private issuer” we follow certain home country corporate governance practices instead of otherwise applicable SEC and Nasdaq requirements, which may result in less protection than is accorded to investors under rules applicable to domestic U.S. issuers.

 

Our status as a foreign private issuer also exempts us from compliance with certain SEC laws and regulations and certain regulations of the Nasdaq Stock Market, including the proxy rules, the short-swing profits recapture rules, and certain governance requirements such as independent director oversight of the nomination of directors and executive compensation. In addition, we will not be required under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, to file current reports and financial statements with the SEC as frequently or as promptly as U.S. domestic companies whose securities are registered under the Exchange Act and we will generally be exempt from filing quarterly reports with the SEC. Also, although the Companies Law, requires us to disclose the annual compensation of our five most highly compensated senior officers on an individual basis, this disclosure is not as extensive as that required of a U.S. domestic issuer. For example, the disclosure required under Israeli law would be limited to compensation paid in the immediately preceding year without any requirement to disclose option exercises and vested stock options, pension benefits or potential payments upon termination or a change of control. Furthermore, as a foreign private issuer, we are also not subject to the requirements of Regulation FD (Fair Disclosure) promulgated under the Exchange Act.

 

These exemptions and leniencies will reduce the frequency and scope of information and protections to which you are entitled as an investor.

 

We may be a “passive foreign investment company”, or PFIC, for U.S. federal income tax purposes in the current taxable year or may become one in any subsequent taxable year. There generally would be negative tax consequences for U.S. taxpayers that are holders of our ADSs or Ordinary Shares if we are or were to become a PFIC.

 

Based on the projected composition of our income and valuation of our assets, we do not expect to be a PFIC for 2020, and we do not expect to become a PFIC in the future, although there can be no assurance in this regard. The determination of whether we are a PFIC is made on an annual basis and will depend on the composition of our income and assets from time to time. We will be treated as a PFIC for U.S. federal income tax purposes in any taxable year in which either (1) at least 75% of our gross income is “passive income” or (2) on average at least 50% of our assets by value produce passive income or are held for the production of passive income. Passive income for this purpose generally includes, among other things, certain dividends, interest, royalties, rents and gains from commodities and securities transactions and from the sale or exchange of property that gives rise to passive income. Passive income also includes amounts derived by reason of the temporary investment of funds, including those raised in a public offering. In determining whether a non-U.S. corporation is a PFIC, a proportionate share of the income and assets of each corporation in which it owns, directly or indirectly, at least a 25% interest (by value) is taken into account. The tests for determining PFIC status are applied annually, and it is difficult to make accurate projections of future income and assets which are relevant to this determination. In addition, our PFIC status may depend in part on the market value of our ADSs or Ordinary Shares. Accordingly, there can be no assurance that we currently are not or will not become a PFIC in the future. If we are a PFIC in any taxable year during which a U.S. taxpayer holds our ADSs or Ordinary Shares, such U.S. taxpayer would be subject to certain adverse U.S. federal income tax rules. In particular, if the U.S. taxpayer did not make an election to treat us as a “qualified electing fund,” or QEF, or make a “mark-to-market” election, then “excess distributions” to the U.S. taxpayer, and any gain realized on the sale or other disposition of our ADSs or Ordinary Shares by the U.S. taxpayer: (1) would be allocated ratably over the U.S. taxpayer’s holding period for the ADSs or Ordinary Shares; (2) the amount allocated to the current taxable year and any period prior to the first day of the first taxable year in which we were a PFIC would be taxed as ordinary income; and (3) the amount allocated to each of the other taxable years would be subject to tax at the highest rate of tax in effect for the applicable class of taxpayer for that year, and an interest charge for the deemed deferral benefit would be imposed with respect to the resulting tax attributable to each such other taxable year. In addition, if the U.S. Internal Revenue Service, or the IRS, determines that we are a PFIC for a year with respect to which we have determined that we were not a PFIC, it may be too late for a U.S. taxpayer to make a timely QEF or mark-to-market election. U.S. taxpayers that have held our ADSs or Ordinary Shares during a period when we were a PFIC will be subject to the foregoing rules, even if we cease to be a PFIC in subsequent years, subject to exceptions for U.S. taxpayer who made a timely QEF or mark-to-market election. A U.S. taxpayer can make a QEF election by completing the relevant portions of and filing IRS Form 8621 in accordance with the instructions thereto. We do not intend to notify U.S. taxpayers that hold our ADSs or Ordinary Shares if we believe we will be treated as a PFIC for any taxable year in order to enable U.S. taxpayers to consider whether to make a QEF election. In addition, we do not intend to furnish such U.S. taxpayers annually with information needed in order to complete IRS Form 8621 and to make and maintain a valid QEF election for any year in which we or any of our subsidiaries are a PFIC. U.S. taxpayers that hold our ADSs or Ordinary Shares are strongly urged to consult their tax advisors about the PFIC rules, including tax return filing requirements and the eligibility, manner, and consequences to them of making a QEF or mark-to-market election with respect to our ADSs or Ordinary Shares in the event that we are a PFIC. See “Item 10.E. Taxation — U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations — Passive Foreign Investment Companies” for additional information.

 

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ADSs holders may not be entitled to a jury trial with respect to claims arising under the deposit agreement, which could result in less favorable results to the plaintiff(s) in any such action.

 

The deposit agreement governing the ADSs representing our Ordinary Shares provides that holders and beneficial owners of ADSs irrevocably waive the right to a trial by jury in any legal proceeding arising out of or relating to the deposit agreement or the ADSs, including claims under federal securities laws, against us or the depositary to the fullest extent permitted by applicable law. If this jury trial waiver provision is prohibited by applicable law, an action could nevertheless proceed under the terms of the deposit agreement with a jury trial. To our knowledge, the enforceability of a jury trial waiver under the federal securities laws has not been finally adjudicated by a federal court. However, we believe that a jury trial waiver provision is generally enforceable under the laws of the State of New York, which govern the deposit agreement, by a court of the State of New York or a federal court, which have non-exclusive jurisdiction over matters arising under the deposit agreement, applying such law. In determining whether to enforce a jury trial waiver provision, New York courts and federal courts will consider whether the visibility of the jury trial waiver provision within the agreement is sufficiently prominent such that a party has knowingly waived any right to trial by jury. We believe that this is the case with respect to the deposit agreement and the ADSs. In addition, New York courts will not enforce a jury trial waiver provision in order to bar a viable setoff or counterclaim sounding in fraud or one which is based upon a creditor’s negligence in failing to liquidate collateral upon a guarantor’s demand, or in the case of an intentional tort claim (as opposed to a contract dispute), none of which we believe are applicable in the case of the deposit agreement or the ADSs. No condition, stipulation or provision of the deposit agreement or ADSs serves as a waiver by any holder or beneficial owner of ADSs or by us or the depositary of compliance with any provision of the federal securities laws. If you or any other holder or beneficial owner of ADSs brings a claim against us or the depositary in connection with matters arising under the deposit agreement or the ADSs, you or such other holder or beneficial owner may not be entitled to a jury trial with respect to such claims, which may have the effect of limiting and discouraging lawsuits against us and / or the depositary. If a lawsuit is brought against us and / or the depositary under the deposit agreement, it may be heard only by a judge or justice of the applicable trial court, which would be conducted according to different civil procedures and may result in different results than a trial by jury would have had, including results that could be less favorable to the plaintiff(s) in any such action, depending on, among other things, the nature of the claims, the judge or justice hearing such claims, and the venue of the hearing.

 

ADS holders may not have the same voting rights as the holders of our Ordinary Shares and may not receive voting materials in time to be able to exercise the right to vote.

 

Holders of the ADSs are not be able to exercise voting rights attaching to the Ordinary Shares underlying the ADSs on an individual basis. Instead, holders of the ADSs will only be able to exercise the voting rights attaching to the Ordinary Shares represented by ADSs indirectly by giving voting instructions to the depositary in accordance with and subject to the provisions of the deposit agreement. Holders of ADSs may not receive voting materials in time to instruct the depositary to vote, and it is possible that they, or persons who hold their ADSs through brokers, dealers or other third parties, will not have the opportunity to exercise a right to vote. Furthermore, the depositary will not be liable for any failure to carry out any instructions to vote, for the manner in which any vote is cast or for the effect of any such vote. As a result, you may not be able to exercise voting rights and may lack recourse if your ADSs are not voted as requested.

 

ADS holders may be subject to limitations on transfer of their ADSs.

 

ADSs are transferable on the books of the depositary. However, the depositary may close its transfer books at any time or from time to time when it deems expedient in connection with the performance of its duties. In addition, the depositary may refuse to deliver, transfer or register transfers of ADSs generally when our books or the books of the depositary are closed, or at any time if we or the depositary deems it advisable to do so because of any requirement of law or of any government or governmental body, or under any provision of the deposit agreement, or for any other reason in accordance with the terms of the deposit agreement.

 

ADS holders may not receive the same distributions or dividends as those we make to the holders of our Ordinary Shares, and, in some limited circumstances, they may not receive dividends or other distributions on our Ordinary Shares and they may not receive any value for them, if it is illegal or impractical to make them available to ADS holders.

 

The depositary for the ADSs has agreed to pay to you the cash dividends or other distributions it or the custodian receives on our Ordinary Shares or other deposited securities underlying the ADSs, after deducting its fees and expenses. You will receive these distributions in proportion to the number of Ordinary Shares your ADSs represent. However, the depositary is not responsible if it decides that it is unlawful or impractical to make a distribution available to any holders of ADSs. For example, it would be unlawful to make a distribution to a holder of ADSs if it consists of securities that require registration under the Securities Act, but that are not properly registered or distributed under an applicable exemption from registration. In addition, conversion into U.S. dollars from foreign currency that was part of a dividend or distribution made in respect of deposited Ordinary Shares may require the approval or license of, or a filing with, a government or an agency thereof, which may be unobtainable. In these cases, the depositary may determine not to distribute such property and hold it as “deposited securities” or may seek to effect a substitute dividend or distribution, including net cash proceeds from the sale of the dividends or distributions in accordance with the terms of the deposit agreement. We have no obligation to register under U.S. securities laws any ADSs, Ordinary Shares, rights or other securities received through such distributions. We also have no obligation to take any other action to permit the distribution of ADSs, Ordinary Shares, rights or anything else to holders of ADSs. In addition, the depositary may withhold from such dividends or distributions its fees and an amount on account of taxes or other governmental charges. This means that you may not receive the same distributions or dividends as those we make to the holders of our Ordinary Shares, and, in some limited circumstances, you may not receive any value for such distributions or dividends if it is illegal or impractical for us to make them available to you. These restrictions may cause a material decline in the value of the ADSs.

 

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Risks Related to Israeli Law and Our Operations in Israel

 

Our operations are subject to currency and interest rate fluctuations.

 

We incur expenses in U.S. dollars and NIS, but our functional currency is the U.S. dollar and our financial statements are denominated in U.S. dollars. The U.S. dollar is the currency that represents the principal economic environment in which we operate. As a result, we are affected by foreign currency exchange fluctuations through both translation risk and transaction risk. As a result, we are exposed to the risk that the U.S. dollar may appreciate relative to the NIS, or, if the U.S. dollar instead devalues relative to the NIS, that the inflation rate in Israel may exceed such rate of devaluation of the NIS, or that the timing of such devaluation may lag behind inflation in Israel. In any such event, the NIS cost of our operations in Israel would increase and our dollar-denominated results of operations would be adversely affected.

 

Provisions of Israeli law and our amended and restated articles of association may delay, prevent or otherwise impede a merger with, or an acquisition of, our company, which could prevent a change of control, even when the terms of such a transaction are favorable to us and our shareholders.

 

Provisions of Israeli law and our amended and restated articles of association could have the effect of delaying or preventing a change in control and may make it more difficult for a third party to acquire us or our shareholders to elect different individuals to our board of directors, even if doing so would be considered to be beneficial by some of our shareholders, and may limit the price that investors may be willing to pay in the future for our ordinary shares. Among other things:

 

Israeli corporate law regulates mergers and requires that a tender offer be effected when more than a specified percentage of shares in a company are purchased;

 

Israeli corporate law does not provide for shareholder action by written consent, thereby requiring all shareholder actions to be taken at a general meeting of shareholders;

 

our amended and restated articles of association divide our directors into three classes, each of which is elected once every three years;

 

our amended and restated articles of association require a vote of the holders of a majority of our outstanding ordinary shares entitled to vote present and voting on the matter at a general meeting of shareholders (referred to as simple majority), and the amendment of a limited number of provisions, such as the provision dividing our directors into three classes, requires a vote of the holders of 70% of our outstanding ordinary shares entitled to vote at a general meeting, provided the majority constitutes more than 33.33% of the total issued and outstanding share capital as of the record date of such meeting; and

 

our amended and restated articles of association provide that director vacancies may be filled by our board of directors.

 

Further, Israeli tax considerations may make potential transactions undesirable to us or to some of our shareholders whose country of residence does not have a tax treaty with Israel granting tax relief to such shareholders from Israeli tax. With respect to mergers, Israeli tax law allows for tax deferral in certain circumstances but makes the deferral contingent on the fulfillment of numerous conditions, including a holding period of two years from the date of the transaction during which certain sales and dispositions of shares of the participating companies are restricted. See “Item 10.E. Taxation—Israeli Tax Considerations and Government Programs” for additional information.

 

It may be difficult to enforce a judgment of a United States court against us and our officers and directors in Israel or the United States, to assert United States securities laws claims in Israel or to serve process on our officers and directors and these experts.

 

We were incorporated in Israel. Most of our executive officers and directors reside outside of the United States, and all of our assets and most of the assets of these persons are located outside of the United States. Service of process upon us or our non-U.S. resident directors and officers and enforcement of judgments obtained in the United States against us or our non-U.S. our directors and executive officers may be difficult to obtain within the United States. We have been informed by our legal counsel in Israel that it may be difficult to assert claims under U.S. securities laws in original actions instituted in Israel, or obtain a judgment based on the civil liability provisions of U.S. federal securities laws. Israeli courts may refuse to hear a claim based on a violation of U.S. securities laws against us or our non-U.S. officers and directors because Israel may not be the most appropriate forum to bring such a claim. In addition, even if an Israeli court agrees to hear a claim, it may determine that Israeli law and not U.S. law is applicable to the claim. If U.S. law is found to be applicable, the content of applicable U.S. law must be proved as a fact, which can be a time-consuming and costly process. Certain matters of procedure will also be governed by Israeli law. There is little binding case law in Israel addressing the matters described above. Israeli courts might not enforce judgments rendered outside Israel, which may make it difficult to collect on judgments rendered against us or our non-U.S. officers and directors.

 

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Moreover, an Israeli court will not enforce a non-Israeli judgment if it was given in a state whose laws do not provide for the enforcement of judgments of Israeli courts (subject to exceptional cases), if its enforcement is likely to prejudice the sovereignty or security of the State of Israel, if it was obtained by fraud or in the absence of due process, if it is at variance with another valid judgment that was given in the same matter between the same parties, or if a suit in the same matter between the same parties was pending before a court or tribunal in Israel at the time the foreign action was brought.

 

Our headquarters and other significant operations are located in Israel, and, therefore, our results may be adversely affected by political, economic and military instability in Israel.

 

Our executive offices are located in Israel. In addition, most of our officers and directors are residents of Israel. Accordingly, political, economic and military conditions in Israel may directly affect our business. Any armed conflicts, political instability, terrorism, cyberattacks or any other hostilities involving Israel or the interruption or curtailment of trade between Israel and its present trading partners could affect adversely our operations. Ongoing and revived hostilities in the Middle East or other Israeli political or economic factors, could harm our operations and solution development and cause any future sales to decrease.

  

In addition, instability in the region may lead to deterioration in the political and trade relationships that exist between the State of Israel and certain other countries. Any armed conflicts, terrorist activities or political instability in the region could adversely affect business conditions, could harm our results of operations and could make it more difficult for us to raise capital. Parties with whom we do business may sometimes decline to travel to Israel during periods of heightened unrest or tension, forcing us to make alternative arrangements when necessary in order to meet our business partners face to face. Several countries, principally in the Middle East, still restrict doing business with Israel and Israeli companies, and additional countries may impose restrictions on doing business with Israel and Israeli companies if hostilities in Israel or political instability in the region continues or increases. Similarly, Israeli companies are limited in conducting business with entities from several countries. For instance, in 2008, the Israeli legislature passed a law forbidding any investments in entities that transact business with Iran. In addition, the political and security situation in Israel may result in parties with whom we have agreements involving performance in Israel claiming that they are not obligated to perform their commitments under those agreements pursuant to force majeure provisions in such agreements.

 

Our commercial insurance does not cover losses that may occur as a result of events associated with war and terrorism. Although the Israeli government currently covers the reinstatement value of direct damages that are caused by terrorist attacks or acts of war, we cannot assure you that this government coverage will be maintained or that it will sufficiently cover our potential damages. Any losses or damages incurred by us could have a material adverse effect on our business. Any armed conflicts or political instability in the region would likely negatively affect business conditions and could harm our results of operations.

 

Further, in the past, the State of Israel and Israeli companies have been subjected to economic boycotts. Several countries still restrict business with the State of Israel and with Israeli companies. These restrictive laws and policies may have an adverse impact on our operating results, financial conditions or the expansion of our business. A campaign of boycotts, divestment and sanctions has been undertaken against Israel, which could also adversely impact our business.

 

In addition, Israel is experiencing a level of unprecedented political instability. The Israeli government has been in a transitionary phase since December 2018, when the Israeli Parliament, or the Knesset, first resolved to dissolve itself and call for new general elections. Since then, Israel held general elections three times – in April and September of 2019 and in March of 2020. A fourth election is due to take place on March 23, 2021. The Knesset has not passed a budget for the year 2021, and certain government ministries, which may be critical to the operation of our business, are without necessary resources and may not receive sufficient funding moving forward. In the event that the current political stalemate is not resolved during 2021, our ability to conduct our business effectively may be adversely affected.

 

Finally, many Israeli citizens are obligated to perform several days, and in some cases more, of annual military reserve duty each year until they reach the age of 40 (or older, for reservists who are military officers or who have certain occupations) and, in the event of a military conflict, may be called to active duty. In response to increases in terrorist activity, there have been periods of significant call-ups of military reservists. It is possible that there will be military reserve duty call-ups in the future. Our operations could be disrupted by such call-ups, which may include the call-up of members of our management. Such disruption could materially adversely affect our business, prospects, financial condition and results of operations.

 

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Your rights and responsibilities as a shareholder will be governed by Israeli law, which differs in some material respects from the rights and responsibilities of shareholders of U.S. companies.

 

We are incorporated under Israeli law. The rights and responsibilities of holders of our Ordinary Shares are governed by our amended and restated articles of association and the Companies Law. These rights and responsibilities differ in some respects from the rights and responsibilities of shareholders in typical U.S. corporations. In particular, pursuant to the Companies Law, each shareholder of an Israeli company has to act in good faith and in a customary manner in exercising his or her rights and fulfilling his or her obligations toward the Company and other shareholders and to refrain from abusing his or her power in the Company, including, among other things, in voting at the general meeting of shareholders, on amendments to a company’s articles of association, increases in a company’s authorized share capital, mergers and certain transactions requiring shareholders’ approval under the Companies Law. In addition, a controlling shareholder of an Israeli company or a shareholder who knows that it possesses the power to determine the outcome of a shareholder vote or who has the power to appoint or prevent the appointment of a director or officer in the Company, or has other powers toward the Company has a duty of fairness toward the Company. However, Israeli law does not define the substance of this duty of fairness. There is little case law available to assist in understanding the implications of these provisions that govern shareholder behavior.

 

We received Israeli government grants for certain of our research and development activities. The terms of those grants may require us to pay royalties and to satisfy specified conditions in order to manufacture products and transfer technologies outside of Israel. We may be required to pay penalties in addition to repayment of the grants.

 

Our research and development efforts have been financed in part through royalty-bearing grants in an aggregate amount of approximately $1,865,000 that we received from Israel’s Innovation Authority, or the IIA, as of March 8, 2021. As of December 31, 2020, our contingent liabilities regarding IIA grants received by us were in an aggregate amount of $1,076,000. With respect to the royalty-bearing grants we are committed to pay royalties at a rate of 3% to 5% on sales proceeds from our products that were developed under IIA programs up to the total amount of grants received, linked to the U.S. dollar and bearing interest at an annual rate of London Interbank Offered Rate, or LIBOR, applicable to U.S. dollar deposits. The United Kingdom’s Financial Conduct Authority, which regulates the LIBOR, announced in July 2017 that it will no longer persuade or require banks to submit rates for LIBOR after 2021. Accordingly, there is considerable uncertainty regarding the publication of LIBOR beyond 2021. While it is not currently possible to determine precisely whether, or to what extent, the withdrawal and replacement of LIBOR would affect us, the implementation of alternative benchmark rates to LIBOR may increase our financial liabilities to the IIA. Management continues to monitor the status and discussions regarding LIBOR. We are not yet able to reasonably estimate the expected impact.

 

Regardless of any royalty payment, we are further required to comply with the requirements of the Israeli Encouragement of Industrial Research and Development Law, 5744-1984, as amended, and related regulations, or the Research Law, with respect to those past grants. When a company develops know-how, technology or products using IIA grants, the terms of these grants and the Research Law restrict the transfer of such know-how, and the transfer of manufacturing or manufacturing rights of such products, technologies or know-how outside of Israel, without the prior approval of the IIA. Therefore, the discretionary approval of an IIA committee would be required for any transfer to third parties inside or outside of Israel of know-how or manufacturing or manufacturing rights related to those aspects of such technologies. We may not receive those approvals. Furthermore, the IIA may impose certain conditions on any arrangement under which it permits us to transfer technology or development out of Israel.

 

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The transfer of IIA-supported technology or know-how outside of Israel may involve the payment of significant amounts, depending upon the value of the transferred technology or know-how, our research and development expenses, the amount of IIA support, the time of completion of the IIA-supported research project and other factors. These restrictions and requirements for payment may impair our ability to sell or otherwise transfer our technology assets outside of Israel or to outsource or transfer development or manufacturing activities with respect to any product or technology outside of Israel. Furthermore, the consideration available to our shareholders in a transaction involving the transfer outside of Israel of technology or know-how developed with IIA funding (such as a merger or similar transaction) may be reduced by any amounts that we are required to pay to the IIA.

 

General Risk Factors

 

Raising additional capital would cause dilution to our existing shareholders, and may affect the rights of existing shareholders.

 

We may seek additional capital through a combination of private and public equity offerings, debt financings and collaborations and strategic and licensing arrangements. To the extent that we raise additional capital through the issuance of equity or convertible debt securities, your ownership interest will be diluted, and the terms may include liquidation or other preferences that adversely affect your rights as a holder of our ADSs.

 

Significant disruptions of our information technology systems or breaches of our data security could adversely affect our business.

 

A significant invasion, interruption, destruction or breakdown of our information technology systems and/or infrastructure by persons with authorized or unauthorized access could negatively impact our business and operations. We could also experience business interruption, information theft and/or reputational damage from cyber-attacks, which may compromise our systems and lead to data leakage either internally or at our third party providers. Our systems have been, and are expected to continue to be, the target of malware and other cyber-attacks. Although we have invested in measures to reduce these risks, we cannot assure you that these measures will be successful in preventing compromise and/or disruption of our information technology systems and related data.

 

We may be subject to securities litigation, which is expensive and could divert management attention.

 

In the past, companies that have experienced volatility in the market price of their stock have been subject to securities class action litigation. We may be the target of this type of litigation in the future. Litigation of this type could result in substantial costs and diversion of management’s attention and resources, which could seriously hurt our business. Any adverse determination in litigation could also subject us to significant liabilities.

 

If securities or industry analysts do not publish or cease publishing research or reports about us, our business or our market, or if they adversely change their recommendations or publish negative reports regarding our business or our ADSs or Ordinary Shares, and the price and trading volume of our ADSs or Ordinary Shares could decline.

 

The trading market for our ADSs or Ordinary Shares will be influenced by the research and reports that industry or securities analysts may publish about us, our business, our market or our competitors. We do not have any control over these analysts and we cannot provide any assurance that analysts will cover us or provide favorable coverage. If any of the analysts who may cover us adversely change their recommendation regarding our ADSs or Ordinary Shares, or provide more favorable relative recommendations about our competitors, the price of our ADSs or Ordinary Shares would likely decline. If any analyst who may cover us were to cease coverage of our company or fail to regularly publish reports on us, we could lose visibility in the financial markets, which in turn could cause the price or trading volume of our ADSs or Ordinary Shares to decline.

 

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ITEM 4. INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY

 

A. History and Development of the Company

 

Our legal and commercial name is Nano Dimension Ltd. We were incorporated in the State of Israel in December 1960, and are subject to the Companies Law. From March 7, 2014, until August 25, 2014, we were a “shell corporation” and did not have any business activity, excluding administrative management. On August 25, 2014, we closed the Merger with the Subsidiary, whereby we acquired 100% of the share capital of the Subsidiary. The Subsidiary was incorporated in the State of Israel in July 2012. The Merger resulted in a change of control whereby the management of the Company was replaced by the management of the Subsidiary.

 

ADSs representing our Ordinary Shares currently trade in the United States on the Nasdaq Capital Market under the symbol “NNDM.”

 

Our registered office and principal place of business is located at 2 Ilan Ramon St., Ness Ziona 7403635, Israel. Our telephone number in Israel is +972 -73-7509142.

 

Our website address is www.nano-di.com. The information contained on our website or available through our website is not incorporated by reference into and should not be considered a part of this annual report on Form 20-F, and the reference to our website in this annual report on Form 20-F is an inactive textual reference only. The SEC also maintains an Internet website that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC. Our filings with the SEC will also be available to the public through the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov. Nano USA is our agent in the United States, and its address is 13798 NW 4th Street, Suite 315, Sunrise, FL 33325.

 

We are an emerging growth company, as defined in Section 2(a) of the Securities Act, as implemented under the JOBS Act. As such, we are eligible to, and intend to, take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies including but not limited to not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of the SEC rules under Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. We could remain an emerging growth company until the earlier of (1) the last day of the fiscal year (a) following the fifth anniversary of the date of our first sale of common equity securities pursuant to an effective registration statement under the Securities Act, (b) in which we have total annual gross revenue of at least $1.07 billion, or (c) in which we are deemed to be a large accelerated filer, which means the market value of our Ordinary Shares that is held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the prior June 30th, and (2) the date on which we have issued more than $1.0 billion in non-convertible debt during the prior three-year period.

 

We are a foreign private issuer as defined by the rules under the Securities Act and the Exchange Act. Our status as a foreign private issuer also exempts us from compliance with certain laws and regulations of the SEC and certain regulations of the Nasdaq Stock Market, including the proxy rules, the short-swing profits recapture rules, and certain governance requirements such as independent director oversight of the nomination of directors and executive compensation. In addition, we will not be required to file annual, quarterly and current reports and financial statements with the SEC as frequently or as promptly as U.S. domestic companies registered under the Exchange Act.

 

Our cash used in investing activities for 2018, 2019 and 2020 amounted to $1,232,000, $641,000 and $87,011,000, respectively. The cash was used primarily for investment in bank deposits and purchases of fixed assets. Our purchases of fixed assets primarily include leasehold improvements, computers, and equipment used for the development of our products, and we financed these expenditures primarily from cash on hand.

 

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B. Business Overview

 

We are a leading additive electronics provider. We believe our flagship proprietary DragonFly LDM system is the first and only precision system that produces professional multilayer PCBs, RF antennas, sensors, conductive geometries, and molded connected devices for rapid prototyping through custom additive manufacturing. We have been actively developing our additive manufacturing technology since 2014. With our unique additive manufacturing technology for additively manufactured electronics, we are targeting the growing market for smart electronic devices that rely on printed circuit boards, connected devices, RF components and antennas, sensors, and smart products, including IoT.

 

Additive manufacturing industry analysts predict that 3D printed electronics is likely to be the next high-growth application for product innovation, with its market size forecasted to reach $2.4 billion by 2025 based on a market study.

 

Traditionally, electronic circuitry is developed through a back-and-forth process that involves design, trial and error and third-party manufacturer outsourcing. We believe that the traditional process for developing complex and advanced electronics is outdated. Until now, additive manufacturing technology has been unable to offer a solution for the electronics market, mainly because of the difficulty of printing multiple layers of electrically conductive and dielectric materials at a high resolution that is suitable for professional electronics. We are the first to develop an integrated solution for additive manufacturing of electronics. We are disrupting, leading, and defining how electronics are made.

 

Our DragonFly LDM precision system for additive manufacturing of printed electronics uses our proprietary liquid nano-conductive and dielectric inks that are designed specifically to print multilayer circuitry and 3D electronics. We believe that our DragonFly LDM precision system will obviate the reliance on third-party manufacturers during the development, short run manufacturing and prototyping of smart connected products, such as sensors, conductive geometries, antennas and RF components, professional multilayer PCBs and molded connected devices for rapid prototyping and custom additive manufacturing.

 

In 2020, 2019 and 2018, we increased our sales and commercialization efforts and sold 61 systems worldwide during those years. As a part of scaling our operations, we have three Customer Experience Centers, or CECs, spanning across the United States, Hong Kong and Israel. The CECs are designed to accelerate the adoption of additive manufacturing for electronics development and serve as customer and training facilities and sales support centers.

 

Industry Overview

 

Additive manufacturing of 3D Printed electronics as part of Industry 4.0

 

Additive manufacturing or 3D printing in general is a process of making a three-dimensional solid object from a digital model. 3D printing is achieved using an additive process, where successive layers of material are laid down in different shapes. 3D printing is also considered distinct from traditional machining techniques, which mostly rely on the removal of material by methods such as cutting or drilling (subtractive processes).

 

We perceive that additive manufacturing is at a defining inflection point by worldwide commitment to industry 4.0 transformation by companies large and small. To underscore the potential of additive manufacturing, during the past 24 months several Fortune 500 and other tier one companies operating across a number of distinct industries have made substantial investments to decisively enter the additive manufacturing market. Examples include leading companies in aerospace and defense, dental/cosmetics and apparel and footwear. With the production world increasingly depending on additive manufacturing, we see exciting new printing technologies in metal and in liquid-polymers.

 

The industry 4.0 manufacturing revolution includes the electrification of products across multiple industries and refers to the connectivity, the sensors and electronic circuitry which are crucial in every product, from satellites to sneakers, smart cars and IoT devices. This electrification is the horizon of Nano Dimension and that is where we elevate industry 4.0 – by making additive manufacturing complete with the 3D printing of smart products made digitally. We believe that fully 3D printed smart connected products are the next phase of industry 4.0.

 

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Traditional Printed Circuit Boards (PCB)

 

 

A conventional PCB is a board containing a pattern of conducting material, such as copper, which becomes an electrical circuit when electrical components are attached to it. It is the basic platform used to interconnect electronic components and can be found in most electronic products, including computers and computer peripherals, communications equipment, cellular phones, high-end consumer electronics, automotive and aeronautical components and medical and industrial equipment. Conventional PCBs are more product-specific than other electronic components because generally they are unique for a specific electronic device or appliance. Conventional PCBs can be classified as single-sided, double-sided and multilayer boards.

 

A multilayer electronic circuit contains two or more different conductive layers, while an older single-layer circuit contains only one layer of conductors. In the past, in inexpensive circuits, there were single or dual layer circuits. Advanced circuits, which are required for modern products (such as mobile phones, computer cards and more), contain advanced multilayer circuits with a much larger number of layers. Modern electronics have become more complex and often contain thousands of connections between various components of the same electronic circuit. In order to enable this complexity in a limited area and to prevent electronic short circuits, the connections are divided into a number of layers that are connected within the same multilayer electronic circuit. Our DragonFly LDM system is designed to efficiently print prototype PCBs, circuits and antennas that conform to the requirements of modern complex electronics.

 

One of the main issues with the traditional process of PCB prototype development is the outsourced manufacturing delay. Modern and advanced PCBs are complex and are often comprised of more than ten layers. As a general rule, the time for manufacturing depends on the complexity and number of layers that a PCB contains. Consequently the time it takes to receive an advanced PCB prototype from a third party manufacturer may reach several weeks. While the life cycle of modern products is shortening, the need for rapid prototyping increases. Our DragonFly LDM system offers a solution to the pain of a slow time-to-market turnaround of advanced PCB prototypes, and enables developers of PCBs the freedom to innovate and painlessly employ an efficient trial-and-error process on a day to day basis.

 

Another issue with the traditional process of PCB prototyping is confidentiality. The usage of outsource services in order to produce a PCB prototype forces the developer to share the PCB design files of a future product months before the product is expected to reach the market. Our DragonFly LDM system is intended to be an in-house solution to this issue.

 

Market Opportunity

 

The future of the 3D printed electronics market looks promising with opportunities in IoT connected products, communication, computer/peripheral, and defense, automotive industries and in aerospace. We estimate market potential by looking at several market references including the 3D printed electronics market, the total PCB market, and PCB software design market.

 

Technavio’s market research analysts predict that the total PCB market will grow at a compound annual growth rate, or CAGR, of more than 6% by 2021. Other analysts estimate that the PCB market will reach an estimated $72.6 billion by 2022.

 

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Within the total PCB market is the more specific market of PCB design software. We believe that many users of design software would benefit from the use of an in-house additive manufacturing system. Future Market Insights forecasts the global PCB design software market to increase at 12.9% CAGR during 2016-2026, and reach $4.75 billion in revenues by the end of 2026.

 

Additive manufacturing industry analysts predict that 3D printed electronics is likely to be the next high-growth application for product innovation, with its market size forecasted to reach approximately $2.4 billion by 2025. Many industry leaders expect the 3D printed electronics industry to expand quickly as manufacturing companies and consumer industries discover new methods and applications for 3D printed electronic technology. The chart below gives an indication of the size of the 3D printed electronics market, and illustrates that it is both large and growing.

 

 

Source: DataM Intelligence, 2018

 

Strategy

 

By creating our own installed-base of printers that require our own dedicated inks – we are establishing a “Razor and Blades” business model in which our customers buy the printer first and then continue to purchase the dedicated inks and maintenance over time.

 

We market and sell our products and services worldwide, primarily to companies that develop products with electronic components, including companies in the defense industry, including the U.S. Armed Forces, the automotive sector, consumer electronics, semiconductor, aerospace, and medical industries and to research institutes. Our primary market is the U.S., though we have also experienced growth in Asia Pacific and Europe and expect that trend to continue.

 

Our goal is to expedite our growth and to further advance our breakthrough technologies and commercialization efforts. To achieve these objectives, we plan to:

 

  Increase sales. We are advancing our commercialization efforts and infrastructure, and allocating more resources to activities executed by our U.S. and Hong Kong headquarters, including increasing sales manpower.

 

  Increase amount of applications and advanced electronics applicable use cases. In collaboration with our customers, create applications that can expedite the usage of our products for production grade products and consequently increase our sales. Our main focus is in collaboration with customers in the fields of automotive, aerospace, medical devices and defense.

 

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  Form alliances with industry leaders. We plan to collaborate with companies in the fields of design and manufacturing in order to expedite the adoption of our technology by the market.

 

  Capitalize on our nano-conductive and dielectric inks, and software technology products. We plan to exploit our inks as supplemental products to our DragonFly LDM system. We also plan to increase the software options and enable levels of licensing that we could monetize.

 

Our strategic growth plan includes the following:

 

  Current state: Monetize commercially available products and services for additive electronics design.

 

  Horizon 1: Deliver higher speed production-grade additive electronics systems and more materials and services.

 

  Horizon 2: Deliver hybridized capabilities that combine mechanical functionality within electrified geometries.

 

  M&A: We are focusing on two kinds of acquisition targets: One would expand our go-to-market channels and give us exposure to vertical markets, while the other targets include a set of companies that we believe have transformative technologies and products which are complementary to our product roadmap. Our search has evolved as we have expanded our geographical footprint.

 

Products

 

Our products currently consist of three main product lines – our DragonFly LDM precision system, proprietary ink products and software.

 

DragonFly LDM Precision System for additive manufacturing of printed electronics

 

 

Our DragonFly LDM can print sensors, conductive geometries, RF devices, antennas, professional multilayer PCBs, and molded connected devices for rapid prototyping and custom additive manufacturing.

 

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Our DragonFly LDM precision system is the first and only system that we are aware of that is customized specifically to print multilayer PCBs for advanced electronics. The Dragonfly LDM is designed to allow users the ability to print ready-to-use electronics and connected devices in-house, within hours. Possible applications of our products include aerospace, smart cars, IoT-connected products, RF components and encapsulated sensors for military and civil applications.

 

Our DragonFly LDM system is designed to print electronic conductors and dielectric (non-conductive) layers based on a user’s specific design plan. Our DragonFly LDM system uses at least two types of ink (i.e. conductive and dielectric) in order to lay down successive layers that literally build ready-to-use electronics. The printer receives digital files as input and converts them into print jobs in order to build the multilayer PCB, sensors, antenna or circuit. No cutting or drilling is required in the process of additive manufacturing of a multilayer PCB with our DragonFly LDM precision system.

 

Our DragonFly LDM system includes our dedicated and proprietary print-job editing software named ‘Switch’ and a printing control software named DragonFly, which enable smooth and seamless usage for our customers. Our software is not intended to be a replacement for PCB or computer aided design (CAD) design software, but rather conveniently allow our customers to continue to design their smart parts with their preferred PCB/CAD design software. After the user has concluded the design, the files are simply sent to the DragonFly LDM in Gerber (.gbr) or stereolithographic (.stl) format with a user-friendly interface, similar to the usage of commonplace inkjet and laser printers. Our proprietary software employs traditional methods of 3D printing by virtually converting end products to be printed (such as PCBs) into a large number of thin slices, which are then printed one on top of the other.

 

Additionally, and depending on the sales channel employed, we will offer different levels of product warranty and after-sales services. We anticipate that channel partners, such as established distributors will typically be key to providing support and warranty services to the wider market. In instances where deeper and more strategic relationships are at stake, we intend to provide dedicated account management, both in terms of support and servicing, which may be fee or subscription-based. We plan to support and train a select number of experienced channel partners with the capabilities to ensure that end customers are satisfied with our products and any after-sales services and support that we may offer in the future.

 

Our DragonFly LDM system has multiple advantages, including:

 

  In-house prototypes and low volume production. Our DragonFly LDM system offers its users an efficient, quick, available, accessible and immediate solution for prototype production of smart products such as encapsulated sensors, antennas, multilayer PCBs and free-form geometry 3D circuits. Currently, electronics companies and others engaged in the development of products based on PCBs are forced to rely on service suppliers that manufacture PCBs through a complex and inefficient process.

 

Turn-around of multilayer advanced smart parts can often take weeks and involves significant costs. Also, for electronics in development, several cycles of prototyping are often necessary until the specs of the final electronic part are created. This means that a developer of a new electronic product may have to repeat the process of going through a service supplier several times during lab testing – which may increase cost and slow the momentum of product development.

 

Our DragonFly LDM system obviates the reliance on external service suppliers and provides electronics companies and others the luxury of an office-friendly system in their in-house research laboratory with the ability to print prototypes of PCBs as required for electronic device development – all during a relatively short period of time.

 

  Information security and professional secrecy. Contracting with external service suppliers (outsourcing) in order to create prototypes of PCBs during early stages of the development process of novel electronic devices may unnecessarily compromise the security of sensitive and confidential information. Currently, however, there is hardly a practical solution. By allowing companies to bring prototype development in-house, our DragonFly LDM system offers a practical solution to this issue.
     
  Industry first. We believe that we are a pioneer and a leader in our industry. We are not aware of any other company in the global electronics market that currently offers a 3D printer that prints professional grade smart parts.

 

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Supplementary Products

 

Conductive Ink

 

We have developed a uniquely formulated nano-conductive ink for use in our systems. Using advanced nano-technology, we have developed a liquid ink that contains nano-particles of conductive materials such as silver and copper. Nano-particles are particles between 1 and 100 nanometers in size. By employing this technology, we are able to create a liquid ink that maintains its transport properties and electric conductivity. The liquid properties of our nano-conductive ink allow us to take advantage of inkjet printing technology for fast and efficient 3D printing of PCBs.

 

Our wet-chemistry approach to making silver nano-particles starts with a raw material compound containing silver which may be acquired from a number of chemical suppliers. The patented process, licensed from the Hebrew University, is highly efficient and very clean. We can reliably extract 10 to 100 nanometer sized particles of pure silver. We are able to control the size, shape and dispersion of the silver nano-particles in accordance with specific printing requirements. We can also formulate inks for a variety of substrates and printing profiles.

 

In addition, in July 2016, we filed a patent application with the USPTO for the development of a new nano metric conductive ink, which is based on a unique synthesis. The new nano-particle synthesis further minimizes the size of the silver nano-particles in our ink products. The new process achieves silver nano-particles as small as 4 nano-meters. We believe that accurate control of nano-particles’ size and surface properties will allow for improved performance of our DragonFly LDM system. The innovative ink enables lower melting temperatures and more complete sintering (fusing of particles into solid conductive trace), leading to an even higher level of conductivity. The innovative ink has the potential to accelerate printing speeds and save ink for the 3D printing of electronics.

 

Dielectric Ink

 

Our proprietary dielectric ink is a unique ink that contains dielectric and dielectric materials that are not electrically conductive. The use of non-conductive ink is crucial in the production of multilayer circuit boards, as the conducting layers that are placed on top of each other must be separated by dielectric layers. Our internally developed, proprietary dielectric ink is a unique one-part-epoxy material. The dielectric ink can withstand high temperature (e.g., five hundred degrees Fahrenheit and more) without distorting its shape, which is a necessary requirement for professional PCBs and electronics components.

 

Both our nano-conductive and dielectric ink products have completed development stages and we have begun to manufacture these products in-house. We plan to commercialize these ink products as a supplementary product to our systems. Based on our proprietary technology, our ink products may be adjusted specifically for additional uses.

 

Software

 

Our proprietary software, the ‘DragonFly’ and ‘Switch’ are used to manage the design file and printing process. The Switch software enables seamless transition into an additive manufacturing workflow.

 

In July 2016, we completed the development of the initial version of our software package and we have been adding features and improvements to it from time to time. The Switch is included in our DragonFly LDM system. The Switch software enables preparation of production files of printed electronic circuits using the DragonFly LDM system. The software supports customary formats in the electronics industry such as Gerber files, as well as vertical interconnect access (VIA) and DRILL files. The Switch software presents a unique interface that displays Gerber files and an accurate and detailed description of the PCB’s structure, which facilitates a highly precise conversion to a 3D file format.

 

Multilayer 3D files can be prepared from standard file formats, with the software allowing for adjustments in numerous parameters such as layer order and thickness.

 

When the print-job is ready the user simply loads the design file from Switch straight into the Dragonfly LDM printer and uses the DragonFly software to manage and control the print.

 

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Intellectual Property

 

We seek patent protection as well as other effective intellectual property rights for our products and technologies in the United States and internationally. Our policy is to pursue, maintain and defend intellectual property rights developed internally and to protect the technology, inventions and improvements that are commercially important to the development of our business.

 

We have a growing portfolio of seven issued U.S. patents and 64 provisional and non-provisional patent applications with the USPTO, WIPO filed through the PCT, and with the respective patent offices of China, Europe, South Korea, Japan and Taiwan. A provisional patent application is a preliminary application that can be filed less formally than a non-provisional application, and establishes a priority date for the patenting process for the invention disclosed therein.

 

Our growing patent portfolio can be divided into four main areas:

 

1. Mechanical: covering printer components and peripherals with three granted U.S. patents (9,227,444, 9,259,933, and 9,878,549), as well as several patent applications, directed to components and systems varying from print heads regeneration systems, print heads cleaning and ink recycling systems.

 

2. Chemical: covering ink compositions and related nanoparticles, both dielectric and conducting. Of these, two applications were granted in the U.S. (10,385,175, 10,626,233), Chinese (201580058899.5) and South Korean (10-2017-7013551) Patent offices. Other chemical applications are directed to ceramic inks, flexible ink (indicated as allowable), oxidation-resistant conductive inks, and support inks.

 

3. Applications: covering 3D printing applications and computer applications. The 3D printing applications are directed to various methods of printing additive manufacturing electronics, flexible printed circuits (FPCs) and high-density interconnects (HDIs) circuits with embedded components. Additional filings were directed inter-alia to composite printing, shielded traces (10,905,017) cooling pads and infrastructures, bridging members between integrated circuits, vertically embedded integrated circuit (IC) wells and their interconnectivity, as well as coreless transformers.

 

4. Industrial Design/Design: covering the ornamental aspects of the printer and various printer components, with one granted U.S. patent (D543,612).

 

In addition to patent applications, in September 2014, we entered into an exclusive license agreement with the Research and Development Company of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Ltd., or Yissum, for two patents that cover the unique method of manufacturing our consumable nano-conductive ink for the 3D printing of electronic circuits. The agreement was amended and restated in April 2015. Pursuant to the license agreement, we will be required to pay Yissum low to mid-single digit percentage royalties on sales of our conductive ink. The exclusive license agreement is in effect for the longer of remaining usable life of the patents and patent applications, or 15 years from the first commercial sale of a product relating to the licensed technology in the country in which the first commercial sale occurred. Currently, the status of the license is under review and it is possible that we may terminate the license to one of the patents.

 

Competition

 

Many companies providing 3D printing services concentrate their efforts on printing prototypes in resin polymers or other plastics. We differentiate ourselves from these companies by focusing on the niche market of in-house PCB printing using a combination of nano-conductive and dielectric inks, and to that extent we consider ourselves a pioneer in our industry. However, it may be possible for more developed 3D printing companies to adapt their products to print PCBs. Accordingly, our competitors may include other companies providing 3D printing services with substantial customer bases and working history. Older, well-established companies providing 3D printing and rapid prototyping services with records of success currently attract customers. There can be no assurance that we can maintain a competitive position against current or future competitors, particularly those with greater financial, marketing, service, technical and other resources. Our failure to maintain a competitive position within the market could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We also compete with companies that use traditional prototype development of PCBs and customized manufacturing technologies, and expect future competition to arise from the development of new technologies or techniques.

 

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To the best of our knowledge, our additive manufacturing system is the first and only one of its kind, and as of the date of this annual report on Form 20-F, there are no three-dimensional ink injection printers that print multilayer electronic circuits for the purposes of in-house PCB prototype development. However, there are many companies worldwide that manufacture PCBs.

 

In the United States and globally, we face many competitors that specialize in contract electronic manufacturing, and specifically the manufacturing of prototype PCBs. We estimate that there are approximately 1,800 companies in the United States that manufacture or provide PCBs on a per-order basis.

 

Research and Development

 

From time to time we explore the application of our technology to additional areas within 3D printing and other industries.

 

In January 2017, we successfully 3D printed a series of multilayer rigid PCBs, connected through printed flexible conductive connections. This process provides a solution to traditional production limitations in the electronics industry, such as continuous transfer of conductors between circuits, loose contacts, size of connections between the circuits as well as fabrication of multilayer flexible material.

 

In January 2017, we successfully 3D printed electrical circuits, in which we embedded electrical components, through placement, as an integral part of the printing process. We filed a patent application with the USPTO for this unique development.

 

In February 2017, we received a budget from MEIMAD committee of the IIA which will be used to finance a project to develop 3D printing of advanced ceramic materials in inkjet technology. The total approved budget for this project is approximately $372,000, of which the IIA will finance 50%. The terms of the grant provide that we will be required to pay royalties on future sales of any funded technology up to the full grant amount.

 

For the years ended December 31, 2018, 2019 and 2020, we incurred $8,623,000, $8,082,000 and $9,878,000, respectively, of research and development expenses.

 

Grants from Israel’s Innovation Authority

 

Our research and development efforts are financed in part through royalty-bearing grants from the IIA. As of December 31, 2020, we have received the aggregate amount of $1,865,000 from the IIA for the development of our additive manufacturing system and nano-inks. With respect to such grants we are committed to pay royalties of 3% to 5% on sales proceeds from our products that were developed under IIA programs up to the total grant amount plus annual interest calculated at a rate based on 12-month LIBOR. Regardless of any royalty payment, we are further required to comply with the requirements of the Research Law, with respect to those past grants. When a company develops know-how, technology or products using IIA grants, the terms of these grants and the Research Law restrict the transfer of such know-how, change of control transactions and the transfer of manufacturing or manufacturing rights of such products, technologies or know-how outside of Israel, without the prior approval of the IIA. In addition, any change of control and any change of ownership of our Ordinary Shares that would make a non-Israel citizen or resident an “interested party,” as defined in the Research Law, requires prior written notice from the IIA. We do not believe that these requirements will materially restrict us in any way.

 

Production and Manufacturing

 

We purchase the raw materials required for the production of our products, including components of additive manufacturing systems and materials to produce our nano-inks products. To date, all of our printers, including our DragonFly LDM, are manufactured in-house.

 

With respect to our ink products, we intend to keep full control of the value chain, from research and development through self-manufacturing and global sales. We have a production facility to support the commercialization and production of our proprietary nano-conductive ink and dielectric ink for our DragonFly additive manufacturing system. We believe that the size and capacity of this facility, located in the same building as our offices, will be sufficient to support our future commercialization activities. We have achieved certification for two international standards- the OHSAS 18001:2007 for occupational health and safety within the workplace and the ISO 14001:2015 Standard – EMS (Environmental Management System).

 

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Sales and Marketing

 

We began commercializing our first professional grade 3D Printer, the DragonFly Pro 3D printer, during the fourth quarter of 2017. In July 2019, we introduced our new DragonFly LDM printing technology. We are now focused on accelerating our direct reach to end-customers through direct sales.

 

Potential Material Impact of COVID-19

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has negatively impacted the global economy, disrupted consumer spending and global supply chains and created significant volatility and disruption of financial markets. Although to date the COVID-19 pandemic has mainly affected our current revenues and has not had a material adverse effect on us, and we do not expect any material impact on our long-term activity, the COVID-19 pandemic may have a material adverse effect on our business and financial performance in the future. The extent of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, including our ability to execute our business strategies as planned, will depend on future developments, including the duration and severity of the pandemic, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted, including new information which may emerge concerning the severity of COVID-19 and the actions to contain COVID-19 or treat its impact, among others. See “Item 3.D. Risk Factors – We face business disruption and related risks resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, which has had a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.”

 

C. Organizational Structure

 

We currently have four wholly owned subsidiaries: Nano Dimension Technologies Ltd., which was incorporated in 2012 in the State of Israel, Nano Dimension IP Ltd., which was incorporated in 2018 in the State of Israel, Nano Dimension USA Inc., which was incorporated in 2017 in Delaware, and Nano Dimension (HK) Limited, which was incorporated in 2018 in Hong Kong.

 

D. Property, Plant and Equipment

 

Our offices, research and development facility and in-house laboratory are located at our headquarters at 2 Ilan Ramon, Ness Ziona 74036, Israel, where we currently occupy approximately 34,000 square feet. We lease our headquarters under three separate leases. The first lease, which accounts for about 37% of our office space, ends on August 31, 2024, the second lease, which accounts for about 37% of our office space, ends on December 31, 2023, and the third lease, which accounts for about 26% of our office space, ends on August 31, 2021. We have an option to extend two of the lease agreements for an additional five years with a 10% increase of the monthly rental fee. We expect to extend the lease agreement ended in August 2021 for an additional five years. The total monthly rent payment for the facilities in Israel is currently approximately $62,000. From March 2018 through February 2020, we had offices in Santa Clara, California, where we occupied approximately 1,915 square feet. The total monthly rent payment for the facilities in Santa Clara was approximately $3,400. Effective from February 1, 2020, we entered into an administrative services agreement between Nano Dimension USA Inc. and Breezer Holdings LLC, whereby the Company will lease space and will use logistic services for of our office in Boca Raton, Florida, for consideration of $6,000 per month. This agreement was terminated in September 2020, when we moved our U.S. office to Sunrise, Florida, where we currently occupy approximately 5,300 square feet. The total monthly rent payment for the facilities in Florida is currently approximately $10,000. Since March 2019, we also have offices in Hong Kong Science Park, where we occupy approximately 1,500 square feet. The total monthly rent payment for the facilities in Hong Kong is currently approximately $7,000.

 

We consider that our current office space is sufficient to meet our anticipated needs for the foreseeable future and is suitable for the conduct of our business.

 

ITEM 4A. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

None.

 

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ITEM 5. OPERATING AND FINANCIAL REVIEW AND PROSPECTS

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of
Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

The following discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with our financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this annual report on Form 20-F. This discussion and other parts of this annual report on Form 20-F contain forward-looking statements based upon current expectations that involve risks and uncertainties. Our actual results and the timing of selected events could differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements as a result of several factors, including those set forth under “Item 3.D. Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this annual report in Form 20-F. We report financial information under IFRS as issued by the IASB and none of the financial statements were prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States. Our discussion and analysis for the year ended December 31, 2019 can be found in our annual report on Form 20-F for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019, filed with the SEC on March 10, 2020.

 

Overview

 

To date, we have generated limited revenues from the sale and lease of our products. In the fourth quarter of 2017 we begun commercializing our products and our ability to generate significant revenues and achieve profitability depends on our ability to successfully complete the development of, and to commercialize, our products. As of December 31, 2020, we had an accumulated deficit of $108,457,000. Our financing activities are described below under “Liquidity and Capital Resources.” We currently estimate that we have the necessary capital in order to establish our commercial infrastructure.

 

5.A Operating Results

 

Operating Expenses

 

Our current operating expenses consist of three components – research and development expenses, sales and marketing expenses, and general and administrative expenses.

 

Research and Development Expenses, net

 

Our research and development expenses consist primarily of salaries and related personnel expenses, subcontractor expenses, patent registration fees, rental fees, materials, and other related research and development expenses.

 

The following table discloses the breakdown of research and development expenses:

 

   Year ended
December 31,
 
(in thousands of U.S dollars)  2019   2020 
Payroll   4,834    6,531 
Subcontractors   82    258 
Patent registration   144    160 
Materials   1,001    940 
Rental fees and maintenance   197    173 
Depreciation   1,534    1,588 
Other expenses   339    249 
Grants   (49)   (21)
Total   8,082    9,878 

 

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Subcontractor expenses include expenses for development consultants and service providers, which are not employees. The services provided by these consultants and service providers include, but are not limited to, chemistry consulting, software and electronics subcontractors and consulting and chip processing consulting.

 

Our development expenses are presented net of government grants.

 

Sales and Marketing Expenses

 

Sales and marketing expenses consist primarily of salaries, marketing, commissions and advertising services, depreciation, rental fees, and travel.

 

The following table discloses the breakdown of sales and marketing expenses:

 

   Year ended
December 31,
 
(in thousands of U.S dollars)  2019   2020 
Payroll   2,873    5,326 
Marketing, commissions and advertising   1,808    577 
Depreciation   212    223 
Travel abroad   317    235 
Rental fees and maintenance   114    201 
Other expenses   145    35 
Total   5,469    6,597 

 

General and Administrative Expenses

 

General and administrative expenses consist primarily of salaries, professional service fees, director fees, office expenses, depreciation, taxes and fees, and other general and administrative expenses.

 

The following table discloses the breakdown of general and administrative expenses:

 

   Year ended
December 31,
 
(in thousands of U.S dollars)  2019   2020 
Payroll   872    1,377 
Share-based payments   155    16,837 
Professional services   1,358    1,064 
Directors pay   187    - 
Office expenses   359    386 
Depreciation   78    76 
Fees   22    22 
Travel abroad   37    44 
Rental fees and maintenance   43    46 
Other expenses   159    435 
Total   3,270    20,287 

 

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Comparison of the year ended December 31, 2020 to the year ended December 31, 2019

 

Results of Operations

 

   Year ended
December 31,
 
U.S. dollars in thousands  2019   2020 
Consolidated Statements of Operations Data        
Revenues   7,070    3,399 
Cost of revenues   4,312    1,563 
Cost of revenues- amortization of intangible   772    771 
Gross profit   1,986    1,065 
Research and development expenses, net   8,082    9,878 
Sales and marketing expenses   5,469    6,597 
General and administrative expenses   3,270    20,287 
Operating loss   14,835    35,697 
Finance expense (income), net   (6,482)   12,797 
Total comprehensive loss   8,353    48,494 
Loss attributable to holders of Ordinary Shares   8,353    48,494 

 

Revenues

 

Our revenues for the year ended December 31, 2020 amounted to $3,399,000, representing a decrease of $3,671,000 or 52%, compared to $7,070,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019. The decrease is attributed to fewer sales of DragonFly systems in 2020, which the Company primarily attributes to the impact of COVID-19, which caused many entities to hold-off on capital expenditures. Our revenues are derived mainly from sales of our systems, consumables and support services to our customers. In 2020, we sold 4 systems, and in 2019, we sold 27 systems.

 

Cost of Revenues

 

Our cost of revenues for the year ended December 31, 2020 amounted to $2,334,000, representing a decrease of $2,750,000 or 54%, compared to $5,084,000, for the year ended December 31, 2019. Cost of revenues consists of $764,000 in respect of the cost of printers and DragonFly LDM system upgrades sold, $629,000 in respect of service cost, $168,000 for ink and other consumables, and an additional $771,000 in respect of amortization of intangible assets. The decrease resulted primarily from the above-mentioned decrease in revenues.

 

Gross Profit

 

Our gross profit for the year ended December 31, 2020, amounted to $1,065,000, compared to a gross profit of $1,986,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

Research and Development Expenses, net

 

Our research and development expenses for the year ended December 31, 2020 amounted to $9,878,000, representing an increase of $1,796,000 or 22%, compared to $8,082,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019. The increase resulted primarily from an increase in payroll and related expenses due to more research and development resources, as well as an increase in share-based payments expenses.

 

Our research and development expenses for the year ended December 31, 2020 are presented net of government grants in the amount of $21,000. Our research and development expenses for the year ended December 31, 2019 are presented net of government grants in the amount of $49,000.

 

Sales and marketing Expenses

 

Our sales and marketing expenses totaled $6,597,000 for the year ended December 31, 2020, an increase of $1,128,000 or 21%, compared to $5,469,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019. The increase resulted primarily from an increase of $2,453,000 in payroll and related expenses, less a decrease of $1,231,000 in marketing, commissions and advertising expenses. During 2020, we decided to invest increased resources in sales and marketing activities, thus we increased the number of our sales and marketing personnel.

 

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General and Administrative Expenses

 

Our general and administrative expenses totaled $20,287,000 for the year ended December 31, 2020, an increase of $17,017,000 or 520%, compared to $3,270,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019. The increase resulted primarily from an increase of $16,939,000 in payroll and related share-based payment expenses, mainly as a result of the issuance of warrants to our President and Chief Executive Officer.

 

Operating Loss

 

As a result of the foregoing, our operating loss for the year ended December 31, 2020 was $35,697,000, as compared to an operating loss of $14,835,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019, an increase of $20,862,000 or 141%.

 

Finance Expense and Income

 

Finance expense and income mainly consist of revaluation of financial liabilities and lease liabilities, fundraising expenses, revaluation of liability in respect of government grants, bank fees, and exchange rate differences.

 

We recognized net financial expenses of $12,797,000 for the year ended December 31, 2020, compared to net financial income of $6,482,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019. The increase in expenses is primarily due to a revaluation of financial liabilities with respect to warrants issued in the offerings we did in 2019, measured at fair value, mainly due to the increase in our ADS price.

 

Total Comprehensive Loss

 

As a result of the foregoing, our loss for the year ended December 31, 2020 was $48,494,000, as compared to $8,353,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019, an increase of $40,141,000 or 481%.

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimate

 

We describe our significant accounting policies more fully in Note 2 to our financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2020, included elsewhere in this annual report on Form 20-F. We believe that the accounting policies below are critical in order to fully understand and evaluate our financial condition and results of operations.

 

We prepare our financial statements in accordance with IFRS as issued by the IASB. At the time of the preparation of the financial statements, our management is required to use estimates, evaluations, and assumptions which affect the application of the accounting policy and the amounts reported for assets, obligations, income, and expenses. Any estimates and assumptions are continually reviewed. The changes to the accounting estimates are credited during the period in which the change to the estimate is made.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company recognizes revenue pursuant to IFRS 15 when the customer obtains control over the promised goods or services. The revenue is measured according to the amount of the consideration to which the Company expects to be entitled in exchange for the goods or services promised to the customer, other than amounts collected for third parties. On the contract’s inception date the Company assesses the goods or services promised in the contract with the customer and identifies as a performance obligation any promise to transfer to the customer goods or services (or a bundle of goods or services) that are distinct. The Company identifies goods or services promised to the customer as being distinct when the customer can benefit from the goods or services on their own or in conjunction with other readily available resources and the Company’s promise to transfer the goods or services to the customer is separately identifiable from other promises in the contract. The Company’s identified performance obligations include printer, ink, maintenance, which is generally provided for a period of up to one year, training and installation. Revenue is allocated among performance obligations in a manner that reflects the consideration that the Company expects to be entitled to for the promised goods based on the standalone selling prices of the goods or services of each performance obligation. The Company allocates the transaction price to the identified performance obligations based on the residual approach, while allocating the estimated standalone selling prices for performance obligations relating to maintenance, training and installation services, and the residual is allocated to the printer. Revenues allocated to the printers, installation and training, and ink and other consumables are recognized when the control is passed at a point in time. Maintenance revenue is recognized ratably, on a straight-line basis, over the period of the services. Revenue from training and installation is recognized during the time of performance.

 

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Fair value measurement of financial instruments

 

We account for financial liabilities relating to warrants and financial derivatives at fair value through profit or loss. The fair value of these instruments are determined by using the Monte Carlo simulation method and the Black-Scholes model and assumptions regarding unobservable inputs used in the valuation model including the probability of meeting revenue targets, and weighted average cost of capital, all of which can lead to profit or loss from a change in the fair value of these instruments.

 

5.B Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Overview

 

Since our inception through December 31, 2020, we have funded our operations principally with $745,145,000 from the issuance of Ordinary Shares, warrants and convertible notes. As of December 31 2020, we had $585,338,000 in cash and additional $85,596,000 in bank deposits.

 

The table below presents our cash flows:

 

   December 31, 
   2019   2020 
   (in thousands of U.S. dollars) 
Operating activities   (12,684)   (9,646)
           
Investing activities   (641)   (86,763)
           
Financing activities   13,441    677,726 
           
Net increase in cash   116    581,317 

 

Operating Activities

 

Net cash used in operating activities of $9,646,000 during the year ended December 31, 2020 was primarily used for payment of salaries and related personnel expenses, payments for materials, rent, travel, professional services and other miscellaneous expenses.

 

Net cash used in operating activities of $12,684,000 during the year ended December 31, 2019 was primarily used for payment of salaries and related personnel expenses, payments for materials, rent, travel, professional services and other miscellaneous expenses.

 

Investing Activities

 

Net cash used in investing activities of $86,763,000 during 2020 was primarily used for investments of our cash in bank deposits and fixed assets.

 

Net cash used in investing activities of $641,000 during 2019 was primarily used for investments of our cash in fixed assets.

 

Financing Activities

 

Net cash provided by financing activities of $677,726,000 in the year ended December 31, 2020 was mainly from the issuance of Ordinary Shares.

 

Net cash provided by financing activities of $13,441,000 in the year ended December 31, 2019 was mainly from the issuance of Ordinary Shares, warrants and convertible notes.

 

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On February 5, 2019, pursuant to an underwriting agreement with A.G.P./Alliance Global Partners, as the underwriter for a public offering of our ADSs, rights to purchase and warrants that were offered pursuant to a registration statement on Form F-1 (Registration No. 333-228521), we issued 1,600,000 units, each consisting of one ADS, one warrant to purchase one ADS, and one right to purchase 0.75 of an ADS, at a price of $7.50 per Unit. The net proceeds to us from the sale of the units was approximately $10,600,000.

 

On September 4, 2019, pursuant to a securities purchase agreement, we issued to certain accredited investors convertible promissory notes with an aggregate original principal amount of $4,276,000 and an additional approximately $2,700,000 to be received in two subsequent closings. In February 2020, we and the holders of approximately 86% of the convertible promissory notes agreed to terminate substantially all remaining obligations arising under the private placement, including the two subsequent closings.

 

On February 7, 2020, pursuant to an underwriting agreement with ThinkEquity, a Division of Fordham Financial Management, Inc., or ThinkEquity, as the underwriter for a public offering of our ADSs that were offered pursuant to a shelf takedown under a registration statement on Form F-3 (Registration No. 333-228521), we issued 2,588,318 ADS, at a price per ADS of $1.50. The gross proceeds to us from the sale of the ADSs were approximately $3,882,477.

 

On April 28, 2020, pursuant to an underwriting agreement with ThinkEquity, as the underwriter for a public offering of our ADSs that were offered pursuant to a registration statement on Form F-1 (Registration No. 333-237222), we issued 17,858,000 ADS or pre-funded ADS purchase warrants, or the Pre-Funded Warrants, each to purchase one ADS in lieu thereof. Additionally, 1,204,114 ADSs were sold pursuant to a partial exercise of the underwriter’s over-allotment option. Each ADS was sold to the public at a price per ADS of $0.70. Each Pre-Funded Warrant was sold to the public at a price per Pre-Funded Warrant of $0.6999, exercisable at any time after the date of issuance upon payment of the exercise price of $0.0001 per ADS. All of the Pre-Funded Warrants were exercised in May 2020. The gross proceeds to us from the sale of the ADSs were approximately $13,343,000.

 

Between May 2020 and February 2021, we entered into several securities purchase agreements, or the Purchase Agreements, with certain investors for the purchase and sale of an aggregate of 216,422,015 ADS, in several registered direct offerings, or the RD Offerings, offered pursuant to several shelf takedowns under certain registration statements on Form F-3 (Registration Nos. 333-237668, 333-249184, 333-249559, 333-251004 and 333-251155). The aggregate gross proceeds to us from the sale of the ADSs in the RD Offerings were approximately $1,525,766,803. With each RD Offering we also entered into an agreement, or the Placement Agency Agreement, with ThinkEquity, as sole placement agent, or the Placement Agent, pursuant to which the Placement Agent agreed to serve as the placement agent for us in connection with that RD Offering. We agreed to pay the Placement Agent a cash placement fee that ranged between 3.00% to 7.00% of the gross proceeds received for the ADSs in that specific RD Offering. In addition, pursuant to the Placement Agency Agreement in certain of the RD Offerings, we agreed to issue to the Placement Agent or its designees warrants to purchase designated percentages of the ADSs sold such RD Offerings.

 

Current Outlook

 

To date, we have not achieved profitability and have sustained net losses in every fiscal year since our inception, and we have financed our operations primarily through proceeds from issuance of our Ordinary Shares. Our primary requirements for liquidity and capital resources are to finance working capital, capital expenditures, general corporate purposes and to advance our M&A strategy. We believe that our current resources will be sufficient to meet our business needs for at least the next 12 months.

 

In addition, our operating plans may change as a result of many factors that may currently be unknown to us, and we may need to seek additional funds sooner than planned. Our future capital requirements will depend on many factors, including:

 

  the progress and costs of our research and development activities;
     
  the progress in the launch of the commercial DragonFly LDM system;
     
  the costs of manufacturing our DragonFly LDM system and ink products;
     
  the costs of filing, prosecuting, enforcing and defending patent claims and other intellectual property rights;
     
  the potential costs of contracting with third parties to provide marketing and distribution services for us or for building such capacities internally; and
     
  the magnitude of our general and administrative expenses.

 

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5.C Research and development, patents and licenses, etc.

 

For a description of our research and development programs and the amounts that we have incurred over the last two years pursuant to those programs, please see “Item 5. Operating and Financial Review and Prospects— A. Operating Results— Operating Expenses— Research and Development Expenses, net” and “Item 5. Operating and Financial Review and Prospects— A. Operating Results— Comparison of the year ended December 31, 2020 to the year ended December 31, 2019— Research and Development Expenses, net.”

 

5.D Trend Information

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted companies in Israel and around the world, and as its trajectory remains highly uncertain, we cannot predict the duration and severity of the outbreak and its containment measures. Further, we cannot predict impacts, trends and uncertainties involving the pandemic’s effects on economic activity, the size of our labor force, our third-party partners, our investments in marketable securities, and the extent to which our revenue, income, profitability, liquidity, or capital resources may be materially and adversely affected. See also “Item 3.D. – Risk Factors– We face business disruption and related risks resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, which has had a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.”

 

5.E Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We currently do not have any off-balance sheet arrangements.

 

5.F Tabular Disclosure of Contractual Obligations

 

The following table summarizes our significant contractual obligations at December 31, 2020:

 

   Total   Less than 1 year   1-3 years   3-5 years   More than 5 years 
   (in thousands of U.S. dollars) 
Lease Liability  $3,766    1,148    1,046    1,572      
Liability in respect of warrants (*)   11,986    11,986                
Liability in respect of government grants (**)   1,076    226    850           

 

 

(*)The term of the liability in respect of warrants is not determined, thus there is no certainty that the liability will be settled in less than 1 year as stated above.
(**)The contractual obligation in respect of government grants presented above is based on our estimation regarding expected revenues, thus there is no certainty that the liability will be settled in 1-3 years as stated above.

 

Other financial and operating data:

 

  Year Ended
December 31,
 
(in thousands of U.S. dollars)  2020 
EBITDA   (46,084)
Adjusted EBITDA   (12,566)

 

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EBITDA is a non-IFRS measure and is defined as earnings before interest expense (income), income tax, depreciation and amortization. We believe that EBITDA, as described above, should be considered in evaluating the company’s operations. EBITDA facilitates operating performance comparisons from period to period and company to company by backing out potential differences caused by variations in capital structures (affecting interest expenses (income), net), and the age and depreciation charges and amortization of fixed and intangible assets, respectively (affecting relative depreciation and amortization expense, respectively) and EBITDA is useful to an investor in evaluating our operating performance because it is widely used by investors, securities analysts and other interested parties to measure a company’s operating performance without regard to the items mentioned above.

 

Adjusted EBITDA is a non-IFRS measure and is defined as earnings before other financial expense (income), income tax, depreciation and amortization and share-based payments. Other financial expense (income), net includes exchange rate differences, finance income for revaluation of liability in respect of government grants, finance expense for revaluation of liability in respect of warrants, as well as changes in lease liability. We believe that Adjusted EBITDA, as described above, should also be considered in evaluating the company’s operations. Like EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA facilitates operating performance comparisons from period to period and company to company by backing out potential differences caused by variations in capital structures (affecting other financial expenses (income), net), and the age and depreciation charges and amortization of fixed and intangible assets, respectively (affecting relative depreciation and amortization expense, respectively), as well as from share-based payment expenses, and Adjusted EBITDA is useful to an investor in evaluating our operating performance because it is widely used by investors, securities analysts and other interested parties to measure a company’s operating performance without regard to non-cash items, such as expenses related to share-based payments.

 

The following is a reconciliation of net loss to EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA:

 

  Year Ended
December 31,
 
(in thousands of U.S. dollars)  2020 
Net loss   (48,494)
Interest income   (248)
Depreciation and amortization   2,658 
EBITDA   (46,084)
Exchange rate differences   (123)
Finance income for revaluation of liability in respect of government grants   (75)
Finance expense for revaluation of liability in respect of warrants   12,825 
Finance expense for revaluation of changes in lease liability   390 
Share-based payments   20,501 
Adjusted EBITDA   (12,566)

 

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ITEM 6. DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND EMPLOYEES

 

A. Directors and Senior Management

 

The following table sets forth information regarding our executive officers, key employees and directors as of March 10, 2021:

 

Name   Age   Position
Yoav Stern   67   President and Chief Executive Officer, Director
         
Yael Sandler   34   Chief Financial Officer
         
Amit Dror   45   Customer Success Officer, Director
         
Dr. Jaim Nulman   65   Chief Technology Officer and Executive Vice President, Products
         
Zvi Peled   72   Chief Operating Officer and Chief Revenue Officer
         
Simon Anthony-Fried   47   Director
         
Eli David (1)   39   Director
         
Yaron Eitan (1) (2) (3)   65   Director
         
Roni Kleinfeld (1) (3)   64   Director
         
J. Christopher Moran (1) (2)   61   Director
         
Nira Poran (1) (2) (3)   64   Director

 

 

(1) Indicates independent director under Nasdaq Stock Market rules.
(2) Member of our Audit Committee.
(3) Member of our Compensation Committee.

 

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Yoav Stern, President and Chief Executive Officer, Director

 

Mr. Yoav Stern has served as our President and Chief Executive Officer since January 2020. Mr. Stern has been an investor, chief executive officer and/or chairman of hi-tech companies. Mr. Stern has led companies in the fields of software and IT, video surveillance, audio and voice over IP, semiconductors equipment, fiber optics, defense-technologies, communication solutions, aerospace, and homeland security. Mr. Stern spent most of his business career in the United States, running both public and private companies with global operations including in United Kingdom, Germany, Australia, India and Singapore. Since 1997, Mr. Stern has also served as the Co-Chairman of Bogen Communication International and Bogen Corporation, and prior to joining Nano Dimension, from 2011 to 2016, Mr. Stern was the president and chief executive officer of DVTEL Inc., headquartered in New Jersey, USA. Mr. Stern has a B.Sc. in Mathematics and Computer Science, a Diploma in Automation and Mechanical Engineering and an M.A. in International Relations from New York University. Mr. Stern is a graduate of the Israeli Air Force Academy and served as an F-15 Pilot and D. Squadron Commander, as well as the Commander of the Combat Operational Training Unit of the Israeli Air Force.

 

Yael Sandler, Chief Financial Officer

 

Ms. Yael Sandler has served as our Chief Financial Officer since June 2015. From 2014 until 2015, Ms. Sandler served as the Group Controller of RealMatch Ltd. From 2011 through December 2014, Ms. Sandler held various positions at Somekh-Chaikin (KPMG Israel), where she gained valuable experience working with public companies and companies pursuing initial public offerings. Ms. Sandler completed the professional course of the Israeli Navy in 2005 and served as a submarine simulator instructor and commander until 2007. Ms. Sandler is a Certified Public Accountant in Israel. Ms. Sandler earned a B.A. with honors in Accounting and Economics from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and a M.B.T. with honors from the College of Management in Rishon LeZion.

 

Amit Dror, Customer Success Officer, Director

 

Mr. Amit Dror has served as our Chief Customer Satisfaction Officer since January 2020. Prior to that, Mr. Dror served as our Chief Executive Officer from August 2014 until January 2020. Mr. Dror has also served on our board of directors since August 2014. Mr. Dror co-founded Eternegy Ltd. in 2010 and served as its chief executive officer and a director from 2010 to 2013. Mr. Dror also co-founded the Milk & Honey Distillery Ltd. in 2012. He developed vast experience in project, account and sales management across a range of roles at ECI Telecom Ltd., Comverse Technology, Inc., Eternegy Ltd. and Milk & Honey Distillery Ltd. Mr. Dror has a background that covers technology management, software, business development, fundraising and complex project execution. Mr. Dror is a Merage Institute Graduate.

 

Dr. Jaim Nulman, Chief Technology Officer and Executive Vice President, Products

 

Dr. Jaim Nulman has served as our Chief Technology Officer and Executive Vice President Products since May 2018. Dr. Nulman was a vice president with Applied Materials, Inc. in Santa Clara, California, where he served for 15 years in a variety of positions at both the product divisions and corporate levels developing and driving commercialization of semiconductor manufacturing technology, applications, and equipment. While at Applied Materials he drove the development of ionized metal physical vapor deposition for enhance step coverage. Dr. Nulman pioneered rapid thermal processing technologies for ultra-thin gate dielectrics in semiconductors. Dr. Nulman is also co-founder and chairman of Yali Pharmaceuticals Group, LLC., a company developing medicines for treatment of pathogen induced inflammation of the body. Dr. Nulman also founded eTe Solutions, LLC, a company engaged in consulting services for commercialization of high tech technology. He holds several patents in the area of semiconductor processing and equipment. Dr. Nulman is a Senior member of the Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE). He holds a B.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering from the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering with focus on semiconductor devices and technology from Cornell University, and an Executive M.B.A. from Stanford University. Dr. Nulman also served as instructor for NATO’s Advanced Technology summer programs and the University of Berkeley Extension in the area of Rapid Thermal Processing.

 

Zvi Peled, Chief Operating Officer and Chief Revenue Officer

 

Mr. Zvi Peled has served as our Chief Operating Officer and Chief Revenue Officer since May 2020. From 2015 to 2020, Mr. Peled was the VP Sales-Americas, of the Security Business Unit in FLIR Systems Inc., a public company focused on intelligent sensing solutions for defense, industrial, and commercial applications. Previously, Mr. Peled was the chief operating officer and chief revenues officer of DVTEL Inc., a video surveillance and artificial intelligence software and hardware high-tech company, which was acquired by FLIR Systems Inc. in 2015. Previously, Mr. Peled was the President and chief executive officer of Apollo Network Services Ltd., a private company that manages large projects in the field of defense, energy and transportation for Finmeccanica. He was also the chief executive officer of Flash Networks Ltd., a technological leader offering mobile data access gateway. Earlier in his career, Mr. Peled spent 20 years with Elbit Systems Ltd., an international defense company engaged in a wide range of electronics related programs worldwide.

 

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Simon Anthony-Fried, Director

 

Mr. Simon Fried has served on our board of directors since August 2014. Mr. Anthony-Fried is one of our co-founders and served as our Chief Business Officer from August 2014 until December 2017. In January 2018, Mr. Anthony-Fried relocated to California, and was appointed as the President of our wholly-owned subsidiary, Nano Dimension USA Inc. In June 2019, Mr. Anthony-Fried returned to Israel and served as our Chief Business Officer until December 2019. Mr. Anthony-Fried was a co-founder of Diesse Solutions Ltd., a project management, risk and marketing consultancy, and served as its chief executive officer from 2004 to 2014. He has worked as a risk management and corporate governance consultant to the Financial Services Authority in the United Kingdom and as a senior strategy consultant at Monitor Company, a Boston based boutique strategy consulting firm from 2000 to 2002. Mr. Anthony-Fried has a background that covers marketing and sales strategy, management, business development, financial services regulation, fundraising and c-suite consulting. Mr. Anthony-Fried has worked extensively on global projects in both the B2B and B2C markets driving significant strategic change to global marketing organizations. He also currently serves as a director of the Milk & Honey Distillery Ltd. Mr. Anthony-Fried holds a B.Sc. in Experimental Psychology from University College London, an M.Sc. in Judgment and Risk from Oxford University and an M.B.A. from SDA Bocconi in Milan.

 

Eli David, Director

 

Dr. Eli David has served on our board of directors since January 2021. Dr. David is a leading AI expert specializing in deep learning and evolutionary computation. He has published over fifty papers in leading artificial intelligence journals and conferences, primarily focusing on applications of deep learning and genetic algorithms in various real-world domains. Since 2005, he has been teaching courses on deep learning and evolutionary computation at Bar-Ilan University and supervising the research of graduate students in these fields. Dr. David has co-founded several successful deep learning-based companies, and also serves as an AI consultant to several Fortune 500 companies, and major venture capital and private equity firms. Mr. David holds a B.Sc., M.Sc. and Ph.D in Computer Science from Bar-Ilan University.

 

Yaron Eitan, Director

 

Mr. Yaron Eitan has served on our board of directors since February 2020. Mr. Eitan is a technology entrepreneur, founder and investor with over 30 years of experience building and running privately held and publicly traded companies in the United States and Israel. Since January 2018, Mr. Eitan has served as the chief executive officer and co-founder of DeepCube Ltd., a deep learning software accelerator for inference. Mr. Eitan is also the co-founder and since December 2018 has served as the Chairman of both Emporus Technologies Ltd., which deploys deep learning in capital markets, and Marpai Health Inc., a company utilizing advanced analytics in healthcare. Mr. Eitan is also a co-founder and since April 2014 has served as the co-Chairman of 340Basics Technologies, Inc., a healthcare IT company. Previously, Mr. Eitan founded and from 1998 until today was the chief executive officer of Selway Capital, a venture capital incubator for high tech start-up companies. Mr. Eitan founded and from 2002 until 2015 acted as a Chairman and/or chief executive officer for DVTEL, Inc., Magnolia Broadband, Inc., and Geotek Communications Inc., a publicly traded company in wireless communications. From 2013 until April 2018, Mr. Eitan was also a partner at CNTP, a $300 million technology venture fund. Mr. Eitan has a B.A. in Economics from Haifa University and an M.B.A. from the Wharton School of Business of the University of Pennsylvania.

 

Roni Kleinfeld, Director

 

Mr. Roni Kleinfeld has served on our board of directors since November 2012. He has over 25 year experience as a chief executive officer in public and private companies. He was the chief executive officer of Maariv Holdings Ltd. from 1993 to 2002, the chief executive officer of Hed Artzi Records Ltd. from 2002 to 2007, the chief executive officer of Maariv- Modiin Publishing House Ltd. from 2007 to 2010, and the chief executive officer of OMI Ltd. from 2010 to 2011. Mr. Kleinfeld has also served as director of many companies over the past ten years, including: Excite Ltd. from 2007 to 2011, Makpel Ltd. from 2007 to 2010, Elbit Imaging Ltd. (Nasdaq: EMITF) since 2010, Elran Ltd. from 2010 to 2016, Dancher Ltd. from 2012 to 2014, Mendelson Ltd. from 2012 to 2016, White Smoke Ltd. since 2012, Edri – El Ltd. since 2015, Cofix Group Ltd. since 2015, and Luzon Group since 2017. Mr. Kleinfeld has a B.A. in economics from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.

 

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J.Christopher Moran, Director

 

Mr. J. Christopher Moran has served on our board of directors since February 2020. Mr. Moran is a Vice-President of Lockheed Martin Corporation and the Executive Director and General Manager of Lockheed Martin Ventures, the venture capital investment arm of Lockheed Martin Corporation. Mr. Moran is responsible for leading the corporation’s investments in small technology companies, which support Lockheed Martin’s strategic business objectives. Prior to joining Lockheed Martin in 2016, and from 1984 to 2016, Mr. Moran served in a variety of increasingly responsible positions at Applied Materials, Inc. Most recently, Mr. Moran was the head of the Business Systems and Analytics group in the Applied Global Services Organization. Mr. Moran was with Applied for over 32 years, including as the head of Corporate Strategy and the General Manager of Applied Ventures LLC, the strategic investing arm of Applied Materials. Mr. Moran is a graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where he obtained both his Bachelor and Master degrees in Mechanical Engineering.

 

Nira Poran, Director

 

Ms. Nira Poran has served on our board of directors since February 2020. Ms. Poran has extensive experience in managing content-technology-companies, international business initiatives and corporate and communal business development efforts. From 1992 to 1994, Ms. Poran served as an Adviser of Public Affairs for the Prime Minister of Israel where she supervised the Status of Women portfolio. In this role, she was involved in various committees and activities, including different parliament committees. She also represented the State of Israel in UN conferences in Vienna and New York. Ms. Poran is the Executive Director of the Association of Corporate Counselors, Israel Chapter. From 2012 to 2014, she was a legal adviser in the firm ZAG/JUN ZEJUN, a cooperation between an Israeli and Chinese law firm. Prior to that, from 2005 to 2013, Ms. Poran was the co-founder and chief executive officer and later the Chairperson of the Board of Mars Interactive Games Ltd. Ms. Poran earned a MA with honors in Gender Studies and an LLM, International and Public Law, from Tel Aviv University and Northwestern University in Chicago, IL.

 

Family Relationships

 

There are no family relationships between any members of our executive management and our directors.

 

Arrangements for Election of Directors and Members of Management

 

There are no arrangements or understandings with major shareholders, customers, suppliers or others pursuant to which any of our executive management or our directors were selected.

 

B. Compensation

 

Compensation

 

The following table presents in the aggregate all compensation we paid to all of our directors and senior management as a group for the year ended December 31, 2020. The table does not include any amounts we paid to reimburse any of such persons for costs incurred in providing us with services during this period.

 

All amounts reported in the tables below reflect the cost to the Company, in thousands of U.S. dollars, for the year ended December 31, 2020. Amounts paid in NIS are translated into U.S. dollars at the rate of NIS 3.215 = U.S.$1.00, based on the average representative rate of exchange between the NIS and the U.S. dollar as reported by the Bank of Israel in the year ended December 31, 2020.

 

   Salary and
Related Benefits,
including Pension,
Retirement and Other
Similar Benefits
   Share-Based
Compensation
 
All directors and senior management as a group, consisting of 12 persons (1)  $1,587,000   $18,870,000 

 

(1)Includes Ofir Baharav. Mr. Baharav resigned from our board of directors on March 10, 2021.

  

In accordance with the Companies Law, the table below reflects the compensation granted to our five most highly compensated officers and directors during or with respect to the year ended December 31, 2020.

 

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Annual Compensation- in thousands of U.S. dollars - Convenience Translation

 

Executive Officer and Directors 

Salary and
Related Benefits,
including Pension,
Retirement and Other
Similar Benefits

   Share-Based
Compensation
   Total 
Yoav Stern  $588   $14,032   $14,590 
                
Amit Dror  $255   $1,129   $1,384 
                
Zvi Peled  $226   $772   $998 
                
Yael Sandler  $257   $493   $750 
                
Dr. Jaim Nulman  $291   $240   $531 

 

Employment Agreements with Executive Officers

 

We have entered into written employment or services agreements with each of our executive officers. All of these agreements contain customary provisions regarding noncompetition, confidentiality of information and assignment of inventions. However, the enforceability of the noncompetition provisions may be limited under applicable law. In addition, we have entered into agreements with each executive officer and director pursuant to which we have agreed to indemnify each of them up to a certain amount and to the extent that these liabilities are not covered by directors and officers insurance. Members of our senior management are eligible for bonuses each year. The bonuses are payable upon meeting objectives and targets that are set by our chief executive officer and approved annually by our board of directors that also set the bonus targets for our chief executive officer.

 

For a description of the terms of our options and option plans, see “Item 6.E. Share Ownershipbelow.

 

Directors’ Service Contracts

 

Other than with respect to our directors that are also executive officers, we do not have written agreements with any director providing for benefits upon the termination of his employment with our company.

 

C. Board Practices

 

Introduction

 

Our board of directors presently consists of eight members. We believe that Ms. Poran and Messrs. Baharav, David, Eitan, Kleinfeld and Moran are “independent” for purposes of Nasdaq Stock Market rules. Our amended and restated articles of association provides that the number of board of directors’ members shall be set by the general meeting of the shareholders provided that it will consist of not less than three and not more than twelve members. Pursuant to the Companies Law, the management of our business is vested in our board of directors. Our board of directors may exercise all powers and may take all actions that are not specifically granted to our shareholders or to management. Our executive officers are responsible for our day-to-day management and have individual responsibilities established by our board of directors. Our Chief Executive Officer is appointed by, and serves at the discretion of, our board of directors, subject to the employment agreement that we have entered into with him. All other executive officers are appointed by our Chief Executive Officer. Their terms of employment are subject to the approval of the board of directors’ compensation committee and of the board of directors, and if such terms of employment are not consistent with our compensation policy, then such terms require the approval of our shareholders, and are subject to the terms of any applicable employment agreements that we may enter into with them.

 

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Our directors (other than the external directors, when applicable) are divided into three classes that are each elected at the third annual general meeting of our shareholders, in a staggered fashion (such that one class is elected each annual general meeting), and serve on our board of directors unless they are removed by a vote of 70% of the total voting power of our shareholders at a general meeting of our shareholders or upon the occurrence of certain events, in accordance with the Companies Law and our amended and restated articles of association.

 

In addition, our amended and restated articles of association allow our board of directors to appoint directors to fill vacancies on our board of directors or in addition to the acting directors (subject to the limitation on the number of directors), until the next annual general meeting or special general meeting in which directors may be appointed or terminated.

 

Under the Companies Law, nominations for directors may be made by any shareholder holding at least one percent of our outstanding voting power. However, any such shareholder may make such a nomination only if a written notice of such shareholder’s intent to make such nomination has been given to our board of directors. Any such notice must include certain information, the consent of the proposed director nominee(s) to serve as our director(s) if elected and a declaration signed by the nominee(s) declaring that there is no limitation under the Companies Law preventing their election and that all of the information that is required to be provided to us in connection with such election under the Companies Law has been provided.

 

Under the Companies Law, our board of directors must determine the minimum number of directors who are required to have accounting and financial expertise. In determining the number of directors required to have such expertise, our board of directors must consider, among other things, the type and size of the company and the scope and complexity of its operations. Our board of directors has determined that the minimum number of directors of our company who are required to have accounting and financial expertise is two.

 

The board of directors may elect one director to serve as the chairman of the board of directors to preside at the meetings of the board of directors, and may also remove that director as chairman. Pursuant to the Companies Law, neither the chief executive officer nor any of his or her relatives is permitted to serve as the chairman of the board of directors, and a company may not vest the chairman or any of his or her relatives with the chief executive officer’s authorities. In addition, a person who reports, directly or indirectly, to the chief executive officer may not serve as the chairman of the board of directors; the chairman may not be vested with authorities of a person who reports, directly or indirectly, to the chief executive officer; and the chairman may not serve in any other position in the company or a controlled company, but he or she may serve as a director or chairman of a controlled company. However, the Companies Law permits a company’s shareholders to determine, for a period not exceeding three years from each such determination, that the chairman or his or her relative may serve as chief executive officer or be vested with the chief executive officer’s authorities, and that the chief executive officer or his or her relative may serve as chairman or be vested with the chairman’s authorities. Such determination of a company’s shareholders requires either: (1) the approval of at least two-thirds of the shares of those shareholders present and voting on the matter (other than controlling shareholders and those having a personal interest in the determination); or (2) that the total number of shares opposing such determination does not exceed 2% of the total voting power in the company. Currently, we have a separate chairman and chief executive officer.

 

The board of directors may, subject to the provisions of the Companies Law, delegate any or all of its powers to committees of the board, and it may, from time to time, revoke such delegation or alter the composition of any such committees, subject to certain limitations. Unless otherwise expressly provided by the board of directors, the committees shall not be empowered to further delegate such powers. The composition and duties of our audit committee, financial statement examination committee and compensation committee are described below.

 

The board of directors oversees how management monitors compliance with our risk management policies and procedures, and reviews the adequacy of the risk management framework in relation to the risks faced by us. The board of directors is assisted in its oversight role by an internal auditor. The internal auditor undertakes both regular and ad hoc reviews of risk management controls and procedures, the results of which are reported to our audit committee.

 

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External Directors

 

Under the Companies Law, except as provided below, companies incorporated under the laws of the State of Israel that are publicly traded, including Israeli companies with shares listed on the Nasdaq, are required to appoint at least two external directors who meet the qualification requirements set forth in the Companies Law. The definitions of an external director under the Companies Law and independent director under Nasdaq Stock Market rules are similar such that it would generally be expected that our two external directors will also comply with the independence requirement under Nasdaq Stock Market rules.

 

Pursuant to regulations under the Companies Law, the board of directors of a company such as us is not required to have external directors if: (i) the company does not have a controlling shareholder (as such term is defined in the Companies Law); (ii) a majority of the directors serving on the board of directors are “independent,” as defined under Nasdaq Rule 5605(a)(2); and (iii) the company follows Nasdaq Rule 5605(e)(1), which requires that the nomination of directors be made, or recommended to the board of directors, by a Nominating Committee of the board of directors consisting solely of independent directors, or by a majority of independent directors. The Company meets all these requirements. On November 20, 2017, our board of directors resolved to adopt the corporate governance exemption set forth above, and accordingly we no longer have external directors as members of our board of directors.

 

Fiduciary Duties of Office Holders

 

The Companies Law imposes a duty of care and a duty of loyalty on all office holders of a company.

 

The term “office holder” is defined in the Companies Law as a general manager, chief business manager, deputy general manager, vice general manager, any other person assuming the responsibilities of any of these positions regardless of that person’s title, a director and any other manager directly subordinate to the general manager.

 

The duty of care requires an office holder to act with the level of skill with which a reasonable office holder in the same position would have acted under the same circumstances. The duty of care of an office holder includes a duty to use reasonable means to obtain:

 

  information on the advisability of a given action brought for his or her approval or performed by him or her by virtue of his or her position; and
     
  all other important information pertaining to these actions.

 

The duty of loyalty of an office holder requires an office holder to act in good faith and for the benefit of the company, and includes a duty to:

 

  refrain from any conflict of interest between the performance of his or her duties in the company and his performance of his other duties or personal affairs;
     
  refrain from any action that constitutes competition with the company’s business;
     
  refrain from exploiting any business opportunity of the company to receive a personal gain for himself or herself or others; and
     
  disclose to the company any information or documents relating to the company’s affairs which the office holder has received due to his or her position as an office holder.

 

Approval of Related Party Transactions under Israeli Law

 

General

 

Under the Companies Law, we may approve an action by an office holder from which the office holder would otherwise have to refrain, as described above, if:

 

  the office holder acts in good faith and the act or its approval does not cause harm to the company; and
     
  the office holder disclosed the nature of his or her interest in the transaction (including any significant fact or document) to the company at a reasonable time before the company’s approval of such matter.

 

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Disclosure of Personal Interests of an Office Holder

 

The Companies Law requires that an office holder disclose to the company, promptly, and, in any event, not later than the board meeting at which the transaction is first discussed, any direct or indirect personal interest that he or she may have and all related material information known to him or her relating to any existing or proposed transaction by the company. If the transaction is an extraordinary transaction, the office holder must also disclose any personal interest held by:

 

  the office holder’s relatives; or
     
  any corporation in which the office holder or his or her relatives holds 5% or more of the shares or voting rights, serves as a director or general manager or has the right to appoint at least one director or the general manager.

 

Under the Companies Law, an extraordinary transaction is a transaction:

 

  not in the ordinary course of business;
     
  not on market terms; or
     
  that is likely to have a material effect on the company’s profitability, assets or liabilities.

 

The Companies Law does not specify to whom within us nor the manner in which required disclosures are to be made. We require our office holders to make such disclosures to our board of directors.

 

Under the Companies Law, once an office holder complies with the above disclosure requirement, the board of directors may approve a transaction between the company and an office holder, or a third party in which an office holder has a personal interest, unless the articles of association provide otherwise and provided that the transaction is not detrimental to the company’s interest. If the transaction is an extraordinary transaction, first the audit committee and then the board of directors, in that order, must approve the transaction. Under specific circumstances, shareholder approval may also be required. A director who has a personal interest in an extraordinary transaction, which is considered at a meeting of the board of directors or the audit committee, may not be present at this meeting or vote on this matter, unless a majority of the board of directors or the audit committee, as the case may be, has a personal interest. If a majority of the board of directors has a personal interest, then shareholder approval is generally also required.

 

Under the Companies Law, all arrangements as to compensation of office holders require approval of the compensation committee and board of directors, and compensation of office holders who are directors must be also approved, subject to certain exceptions, by the shareholders, in that order.

 

Disclosure of Personal Interests of a Controlling Shareholder

 

Under the Companies Law, the disclosure requirements that apply to an office holder also apply to a controlling shareholder of a public company. Extraordinary transactions with a controlling shareholder or in which a controlling shareholder has a personal interest, including a private placement in which a controlling shareholder has a personal interest, as well as transactions for the provision of services whether directly or indirectly by a controlling shareholder or his or her relative, or a company such controlling shareholder controls, and transactions concerning the terms of engagement of a controlling shareholder or a controlling shareholder’s relative, whether as an office holder or an employee, require the approval of the audit committee or the compensation committee, as the case may be, the board of directors and a majority of the shares voted by the shareholders of the company participating and voting on the matter in a shareholders’ meeting. In addition, the shareholder approval must fulfill one of the following requirements:

 

  at least a majority of the shares held by shareholders who have no personal interest in the transaction and are voting at the meeting must be voted in favor of approving the transaction, excluding abstentions; or
     
  the shares voted by shareholders who have no personal interest in the transaction who vote against the transaction represent no more than 2% of the voting rights in the company.

 

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In addition, any extraordinary transaction with a controlling shareholder or in which a controlling shareholder has a personal interest with a term of more than three years requires the abovementioned approval every three years; however, such transactions not involving the receipt of services or compensation can be approved for a longer term, provided that the audit committee determines that such longer term is reasonable under the circumstances.

 

The Companies Law requires that every shareholder that participates, in person, by proxy or by voting instrument, in a vote regarding a transaction with a controlling shareholder, must indicate in advance or in the ballot whether or not that shareholder has a personal interest in the vote in question. Failure to so indicate will result in the invalidation of that shareholder’s vote.

 

The term “controlling shareholder” is defined in the Companies Law as a shareholder with the ability to direct the activities of the company, other than by virtue of being an office holder. A shareholder is presumed to be a controlling shareholder if the shareholder holds 50% or more of the voting rights in a company or has the right to appoint the majority of the directors of the company or its general manager.

 

Duties of Shareholders

 

Under the Companies Law, a shareholder has a duty to refrain from abusing its power in the company and to act in good faith and in an acceptable manner in exercising its rights and performing its obligations to the company and other shareholders, including, among other things, voting at general meetings of shareholders on the following matters:

 

  amendment of the articles of association;
     
  increase in the company’s authorized share capital;
     
  merger; and
     
  the approval of related party transactions and acts of office holders that require shareholder approval.

 

A shareholder also has a general duty to refrain from oppressing other shareholders.

 

The remedies generally available upon a breach of contract will also apply to a breach of the above mentioned duties, and in the event of oppression of other shareholders, additional remedies are available to the injured shareholder.

 

In addition, any controlling shareholder, any shareholder that knows that its vote can determine the outcome of a shareholder vote and any shareholder that, under a company’s articles of association, has the power to appoint or prevent the appointment of an office holder, or has another power with respect to a company, is under a duty to act with fairness towards the company. The Companies Law does not describe the substance of this duty except to state that the remedies generally available upon a breach of contract will also apply in the event of a breach of the duty to act with fairness, taking the shareholder’s position in the company into account.

 

Committees of the Board of Directors

 

Our board of directors has established three standing committees, the audit committee, the compensation committee and the financial statement examination committee.

 

Audit Committee

 

Under the Companies Law, we are required to appoint an audit committee. Our audit committee, acting pursuant to a written charter, is comprised of Ms. Poran and Messrs. Baharav, Eitan and Moran.

 

Our audit committee acts as a committee for review of our financial statements as required under the Companies Law, and in such capacity oversees and monitors our accounting; financial reporting processes and controls; audits of the financial statements; compliance with legal and regulatory requirements as they relate to financial statements or accounting matters; the independent registered public accounting firm’s qualifications, independence and performance; and provides the board of directors with reports on the foregoing.

 

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Under the Companies Law, our audit committee is responsible for:

 

(i) determining whether there are deficiencies in the business management practices of our company, and making recommendations to the board of directors to improve such practices;
   
(ii) determining whether to approve certain related party transactions (including transactions in which an office holder has a personal interest and whether such transaction is extraordinary or material under Companies Law) (see “Item 7.B. Approval of Related Party Transactions under Israeli Law”);
   
(iii) examining our internal controls and internal auditor’s performance, including whether the internal auditor has sufficient resources and tools to dispose of its responsibilities;
   
(iv) examining the scope of our auditor’s work and compensation and submitting a recommendation with respect thereto to our board of directors or shareholders, depending on which of them is considering the appointment of our auditor; and
   
(v) establishing procedures for the handling of employees’ complaints as to the management of our business and the protection to be provided to such employees.

 

Our audit committee may not conduct any discussions or approve any actions requiring its approval (see “Item 7.B. Approval of Related Party Transactions under Israeli Law”), unless at the time of the approval a majority of the committee’s members are present.

 

Nasdaq Stock Market Requirements for Audit Committee

 

Under the Nasdaq Stock Market rules, we are required to maintain an audit committee consisting of at least three members, all of whom are independent and are financially literate and one of whom has accounting or related financial management expertise.

 

As noted above, the members of our audit committee include Mr. Yaron Eitan, Mr. Christopher Moran and Ms. Nira Poran, each of whom is “independent,” as such term is defined in under Nasdaq Stock Market rules. Mr. Kleinfeld serves as the chairman of our audit committee. All members of our audit committee meet the requirements for financial literacy under the Nasdaq Stock Market rules. Our board of directors has determined that each member of our audit committee is an audit committee financial expert as defined by the SEC rules and has the requisite financial experience as defined by the Nasdaq Stock Market rules.

 

Financial Statement Examination Committee

 

Under the Companies Law, the board of directors of a public company in Israel must appoint a financial statement examination committee, which consists of members with accounting and financial expertise or the ability to read and understand financial statements. According to a resolution of our board of directors, the audit committee has been assigned the responsibilities and duties of a financial statement examination committee, as permitted under relevant regulations promulgated under the Companies Law. From time to time as necessary and required to approve our financial statements, the audit committee holds separate meetings, prior to the scheduled meetings of the entire board of directors regarding financial statement approval. The function of a financial statement examination committee is to discuss and provide recommendations to its board of directors (including the report of any deficiency found) with respect to the following issues: (1) estimations and assessments made in connection with the preparation of financial statements; (2) internal controls related to the financial statements; (3) completeness and propriety of the disclosure in the financial statements; (4) the accounting policies adopted and the accounting treatments implemented in material matters of the company; and (5) value evaluations, including the assumptions and assessments on which evaluations are based and the supporting data in the financial statements. Our independent registered public accounting firm and our internal auditor are invited to attend all meetings of the audit committee when it is acting in the role of the financial statement examination committee.

 

Compensation Committee

 

Under the Companies Law, the board of directors of any public company must establish a compensation committee. Under the Nasdaq rules, we are required to maintain a Compensation Committee consisting entirely of independent directors (or the determination of such compensation solely by the independent members of our board of directors).

 

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Our compensation committee is acting pursuant to a written charter, and consists of Mr. Yaron Eitan, Mr. Roni Kleinfeld and Ms. Nira Poran, each of whom is “independent,” as such term is defined under Nasdaq rules. Our compensation committee complies with the provisions of the Companies Law, the regulations promulgated thereunder, and our amended and restated articles of association. Our compensation committee also complies with committee membership and charter requirements prescribed under the Nasdaq Stock Market rules.

 

Our compensation committee reviews and recommends to our board of directors: (1) the annual base compensation of our executive officers and directors; (2) annual incentive bonus, including the specific goals and amount; (3) equity compensation; (4) employment agreements, severance arrangements, and change in control agreements/provisions; (5) retirement grants and/or retirement bonuses; and (6) any other benefits, compensation, compensation policies or arrangements.

 

The duties of the compensation committee include the recommendation to the company’s board of directors of a policy regarding the terms of engagement of office holders, to which we refer as a compensation policy. That policy must be adopted by the company’s board of directors, after considering the recommendations of the compensation committee. The compensation policy is then brought for approval by our shareholders. On December 26, 2018, our shareholders approved our compensation policy.

 

The compensation policy must serve as the basis for decisions concerning the financial terms of employment or engagement of executive officers and directors, including exculpation, insurance, indemnification or any monetary payment or obligation of payment in respect of employment or engagement. The compensation policy must relate to certain factors, including advancement of the company’s objectives, the company’s business and its long-term strategy, and creation of appropriate incentives for executives. It must also consider, among other things, the company’s risk management, size and the nature of its operations. The compensation policy must furthermore consider the following additional factors:

 

  the knowledge, skills, expertise and accomplishments of the relevant director or executive;
     
  the director’s or executive’s roles and responsibilities and prior compensation agreements with him or her;
     
  the relationship between the terms offered and the average and median compensation of the other employees of the company;
     
  the impact of disparities in salary upon work relationships in the company;
     
  the possibility of reducing variable compensation at the discretion of the board of directors; and the possibility of setting a limit on the exercise value of non-cash variable compensation; and
     
  as to severance compensation, the period of service of the director or executive, the terms of his or her compensation during such service period, the company’s performance during that period of service, the person’s contribution towards the company’s achievement of its goals and the maximization of its profits, and the circumstances under which the person is leaving the company.

 

The compensation policy must also include the following principles:

 

  the link between variable compensation and long-term performance and measurable criteria;
     
  the relationship between variable and fixed compensation, and the ceiling for the value of variable compensation;
     
  the conditions under which a director or executive would be required to repay compensation paid to him or her if it was later shown that the data upon which such compensation was based was inaccurate and was required to be restated in the company’s financial statements;
     
  the minimum holding or vesting period for variable, equity-based compensation; and
     
  maximum limits for severance compensation.

 

The compensation policy must also consider appropriate incentives from a long-term perspective and maximum limits for severance compensation.

 

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The compensation committee is responsible for (1) recommending the compensation policy to a company’s board of directors for its approval (and subsequent approval by our shareholders) and (2) duties related to the compensation policy and to the compensation of a company’s office holders as well as functions previously fulfilled by a company’s audit committee with respect to matters related to approval of the terms of engagement of office holders, including:

 

  recommending whether a compensation policy should continue in effect, if the then-current policy has a term of greater than three years (approval of either a new compensation policy or the continuation of an existing compensation policy must in any case occur every three years);
     
  recommending to the board of directors periodic updates to the compensation policy;
     
  assessing implementation of the compensation policy; and
     
  determining whether the compensation terms of the chief executive officer of the company need not be brought to approval of the shareholders.

 

Nasdaq Stock Market Requirements for Compensation Committee

 

Under Nasdaq rules, we are required to maintain a compensation committee consisting of at least two members, all of whom are independent. In addition, in affirmatively determining the independence of any director who will serve on the compensation committee of a board of directors, the board of directors must consider all factors specifically relevant to determining whether a director has a relationship to the company which is material to that director’s ability to be independent from management in connection with the duties of a compensation committee member.

 

As noted above, the members of our compensation committee include Messrs. Baharav, Eitan and Kleinfeld, each of whom is “independent,” as such term is defined under Nasdaq rules. Mr. Roni Kleinfeld serves as the chairman of our compensation committee.

 

Internal Auditor

 

Under the Companies Law, the board of directors must also appoint an internal auditor nominated by the audit committee. Our internal auditor is Daniel Spira. The role of the internal auditor is to examine whether a company’s actions comply with the law and proper business procedure. The internal auditor may not be an interested party or office holder, or a relative of any interested party or office holder, and may not be a member of the company’s independent accounting firm or its representative. The Companies Law defines an interested party as a holder of 5% or more of the shares or voting rights of a company, any person or entity that has the right to nominate or appoint at least one director or the general manager of the company or any person who serves as a director or as the general manager of a company. Our internal auditor is not our employee, but the managing partner of a firm which specializes in internal auditing.

 

Remuneration of Directors

 

Under the Companies Law, remuneration of directors is subject to the approval of the compensation committee, thereafter by the board of directors and thereafter by the general meeting of the shareholders. If the remuneration of the directors is in accordance with the regulations applicable to remuneration of the external directors then such remuneration shall be exempt from the approval of the general meeting of the shareholders.

 

Insurance

 

Under the Companies Law, a company may obtain insurance for any of its office holders for:

 

  a breach of his or her duty of care to the company or to another person;
     
  a breach of his or her duty of loyalty to the company, provided that the office holder acted in good faith and had reasonable cause to assume that his or her act would not prejudice the company’s interests; and
     
  a financial liability imposed upon him or her in favor of another person concerning an act performed by such office holder in his or her capacity as an officer holder.

 

We currently have directors’ and officers’ liability insurance, providing total coverage of $12 million for the benefit of all of our directors and officers, in respect of which we paid a twelve-month premium of approximately $700,000, which expires on October 4, 2021.

 

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Indemnification

 

The Companies Law provides that a company may indemnify an office holder against:

 

  a financial liability imposed on him or her in favor of another person by any judgment concerning an act performed in his or her capacity as an office holder;

 

  reasonable litigation expenses, including attorneys’ fees, expended by the office holder as a result of an investigation or proceeding instituted against him or her by an authority authorized to conduct such investigation or proceeding, provided that (1) no indictment (as defined in the Companies Law) was filed against such office holder as a result of such investigation or proceeding; and (2) no financial liability as a substitute for the criminal proceeding (as defined in the Companies Law) was imposed upon him or her as a result of such investigation or proceeding, or, if such financial liability was imposed, it was imposed with respect to an offense that does not require proof of criminal intent; and

 

  reasonable litigation expenses, including attorneys’ fees, expended by the office holder or charged to him or her by a court relating to an act performed in his or her capacity as an office holder, in connection with: (1) proceedings that the company institutes, or that another person institutes on the company’s behalf, against him or her; (2) a criminal charge of which he or she was acquitted; or (3) a criminal charge for which he or she was convicted for a criminal offense that does not require proof of criminal thought.

 

Our amended and restated articles of association allow us to indemnify our office holders up to a certain amount. The Companies Law also permits a company to undertake in advance to indemnify an office holder, provided that if such indemnification relates to financial liability imposed on him or her, as described above, then the undertaking should be limited:

 

  to categories of events that the board of directors determines are likely to occur in light of the operations of the company at the time that the undertaking to indemnify is made; and
     
  in amount or criterion determined by the board of directors, at the time of the giving of such undertaking to indemnify, to be reasonable under the circumstances.

 

We have entered into indemnification agreements with certain of our directors and with certain members of our senior management. Each such indemnification agreement provides the office holder with indemnification permitted under applicable law and up to a certain amount, and to the extent that these liabilities are not covered by directors and officers insurance.

 

Exculpation

 

Under the Companies Law, an Israeli company may not exculpate an office holder from liability for a breach of his or her duty of loyalty, but may exculpate in advance an office holder from his or her liability to the company, in whole or in part, for a breach of his or her duty of care (other than in relation to distributions). Our amended and restated articles of association provide that we may exculpate any office holder from liability to us to the fullest extent permitted by law. Under the indemnification agreements, we exculpate and release our office holders from any and all liability to us related to any breach by them of their duty of care to us to the fullest extent permitted by law.

 

Limitations

 

The Companies Law provides that we may not exculpate or indemnify an office holder nor enter into an insurance contract that would provide coverage for any liability incurred as a result of any of the following: (1) a breach by the office holder of his or her duty of loyalty unless (in the case of indemnity or insurance only, but not exculpation) the office holder acted in good faith and had a reasonable basis to believe that the act would not prejudice us; (2) a breach by the office holder of his or her duty of care if the breach was carried out intentionally or recklessly (as opposed to merely negligently); (3) any action taken with the intent to derive an illegal personal benefit; or (4) any fine levied against the office holder.

 

The foregoing descriptions summarize the material aspects and practices of our board of directors. For additional details, we also refer you to the full text of the Companies Law, as well as of our amended and restated articles of association, which are exhibits to this annual report on Form 20-F and are incorporated herein by reference.

 

There are no service contracts between us or our subsidiaries, on the one hand, and our directors in their capacity as directors, on the other hand, providing for benefits upon termination of service.

 

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D. Employees.

 

As of December 31, 2018, we had four senior management, full-time employees, two of whom also serve as directors in our Company. In addition, we had 91 full-time employees and eight part-time employees. Four employees are located in Hong Kong, 11 employees were located in the United States and the rest were located in Israel.

 

As of December 31, 2019, we had three senior management, full-time employees, one of whom also serves as a director in our Company. In addition, we had 65 full-time employees. Six employees are located in Hong Kong, Four employees were located in the United States and the rest were located in Israel.

 

As of December 31, 2020, we had five senior management, full-time employees, one of whom also serves as a director in our Company. In addition, we had 87 full-time employees. Four employees are located in Hong Kong, three employees were located in Europe, nine employees were located in the United States and the rest were located in Israel.

 

None of our employees are represented by labor unions or covered by collective bargaining agreements. We believe that we maintain good relations with all of our employees. However, in Israel, we are subject to certain Israeli labor laws, regulations and national labor court precedent rulings, as well as certain provisions of collective bargaining agreements applicable to us by virtue of extension orders issued in accordance with relevant labor laws by the Israeli Ministry of Economy and which apply such agreement provisions to our employees even though they are not part of a union that has signed a collective bargaining agreement.

 

E. Share Ownership.

 

The following table lists as of March 8, 2021, the number of our shares beneficially owned by each of our directors, our executive officers and our directors and executive officers as a group:

 

  

Number of

Ordinary Shares

Beneficially

Owned (1)

   Percent of
Class (2)
 
Executive Officers and Directors          
Ofir Baharav (former Chairman of the Board of Directors)   3,180(3)    * 
Amit Dror   30,282(4)    * 
Eli David   -      
Yaron Eitan   250,050(5)    * 
Simon Anthony-Fried   69,436(6)    * 
Roni Kleinfeld   3,180(7)    * 
Christopher Moran   -(8)      
Dr. Jaim Nulman   18,412(9)    * 
Zvi Peled   -(10)      
Nira Poran   -(11)      
Yael Sandler   17,142(12)    * 
Yoav Stern   2,642,775(13)    1.1%
           
All directors and executive officers as a group (12 persons)   3,034,457    1.2%

 

 

* Less than 1%.

 

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(1) Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with the rules of the SEC and generally includes voting or investment power with respect to securities. Ordinary Shares relating to options currently exercisable or exercisable within 60 days of the date of this table are deemed outstanding for computing the percentage of the person holding such securities but are not deemed outstanding for computing the percentage of any other person. Except as indicated by footnote, and subject to community property laws where applicable, the persons named in the table above have sole voting and investment power with respect to all shares shown as beneficially owned by them.
(2) The percentages shown are based on 248,833,035 Ordinary Shares issued and outstanding as of March 8, 2021 plus Ordinary Shares relating to options currently exercisable or exercisable within 60 days of the date of this table, which are deemed outstanding for computing the percentage of the person holding such securities but are not deemed outstanding for computing the percentage of any other person.
(3) Consists of options to purchase 3,180 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of NIS 27.55 per share that are exercisable within 60 days. In addition, Mr. Baharav holds options to purchase 3,180 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of NIS 27.55 and options to purchase 200,000 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of $0.70 per share that are not exercisable within 60 days. Mr. Baharav’s options have expiration dates ranging from July 2025 to July 2027.
(4) Includes options to purchase 5,500 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of NIS 275 per share, and options to purchase 11,460 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of NIS 27.55 per share that are exercisable within 60 days. In addition, Mr. Dror holds options to purchase 11,460 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of NIS 27.55 per share that are not exercisable within 60 days. In addition, Mr. Dror holds options to purchase 500,000 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of $0.70 per share that are not exercisable within 60 days. Mr. Dror’s options have expiration dates ranging from July 2024 to July 2027.
(5) Consists of warrants to purchase 250,050 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of $2.25 per share that are exercisable within 60 days. In addition, Mr. Eitan holds warrants to purchase 1,249,950 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of $2.25 per share that are not exercisable within 60 days. Mr. Eitan’s warrants have expiration date of September 2027. In addition, Mr. Eitan holds options to purchase 100,000 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of $0.70 per share that are not exercisable within 60 days. Mr. Eitan’s options have expiration dates ranging from July 2025 to July 2027.
(6) Includes options to purchase 5,000 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of NIS 275.00 per share, options to purchase 3,180 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of NIS 27.55 per share and options to purchase 17,500 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of $0.70 per share that are exercisable within 60 days. In addition, Mr. Anthony-Fried holds options to purchase 3,180 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of NIS 27.55 that are not exercisable within 60 days. In addition, Mr. Anthony-Fried holds options to purchase 17,500 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of $0.70 per share that are not exercisable within 60 days. Mr. Anthony-Fried’s options have expiration dates ranging from July 2024 to July 2027.
(7) Consists of options to purchase 3,180 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of NIS 27.55 per share that are exercisable within 60 days. In addition, Mr. Kleinfeld holds options to purchase 3,180 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of NIS 27.55 per share and options to purchase 35,000 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of $0.70 per share that are not exercisable within 60 days. Mr. Kleinfeld’s options have expiration dates ranging from July 2024 to July 2027.
(8) Mr. Moran holds options to purchase 35,000 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of $0.70 per share that are not exercisable within 60 days. Mr. Moran’s options have expiration dates ranging from July 2025 to July 2027.
(9) Includes options to purchase 5,042 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of NIS 50.70 per share and options to purchase 13,370 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of NIS 25.80 per share that are exercisable within 60 days. In addition, Mr. Nulman holds options to purchase 458 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of NIS 50.70 per share, options to purchase 9,550 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of NIS 25.80 per share, and options to purchase 900,000 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of $0.70 per share that are not exercisable within 60 days. Mr. Nulman’s options have expiration dates ranging from May 2023 to May 2027.
(10) Mr. Peled holds options to purchase 900,000 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of $0.70 per share and options to purchase 50,000 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of $7.50 per share that are not exercisable within 60 days. Mr. Peled’s options have expiration dates ranging from May 2025 to January 2028.
(11) Ms. Poran holds options to purchase 35,000 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of $0.70 per share that are not exercisable within 60 days. Ms. Poran’s options have expiration dates ranging from July 2025 to July 2027.
(12) Includes options to purchase 1,000 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of NIS 83.07 per share, options to purchase 5,000 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of NIS 275 per share, and options to purchase 11,142 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of NIS 27.55 per share that are exercisable within 60 days. In addition, Ms. Sandler holds options to purchase 7,958 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of NIS 27.55, options to purchase 500,000 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of $0.70 per share, options to purchase 100,000 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of $1.58 per share and options to purchase 50,000 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of $7.50 per share that are not exercisable within 60 days. Ms. Sandler’s options have expiration dates ranging from May 2021 to January 2028.
(13) Includes warrants to purchase 688,040 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of $0.75 per share that are exercisable within 60 days. In addition, Mr. Stern holds warrants to purchase 4,128,242 Ordinary Shares at an exercise price of $0.75 per share that are not exercisable within 60 days. Mr. Stern’s warrants have an expiration date in August 2027. This amount does not include Series B warrants that may be purchased by Mr. Stern. Mr. Stern may invest an additional amount up to $50,000 to buy Series B Warrants, in an amount equal to 10% of the Company’s fully diluted capital. The exercise price per ADS under the Series B Warrants will be the average of the daily volume weighted average price of the ADSs for the 10 consecutive trading days ending on the trading day that is immediately prior to the date of the applicable notice to purchase the Series B Warrants.

 

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2015 Stock Option Plan

 

We maintain one equity incentive plan – our Employee Stock Option Plan (2015), or the 2015 Plan. As of March 8, 2021, the number of Ordinary Shares reserved for the exercise of options granted under the plan was 12,000,000. In addition, options to purchase 6,724,873 Ordinary Shares were issued and outstanding as of such date.

 

Our 2015 Plan was adopted by our board of directors in February 2015, and expires on February 2025. Our employees, directors, officer, consultants, advisors, suppliers and any other person or entity whose services are considered valuable to us are eligible to participate in this plan.

 

Our 2015 Plan is administered by our board of directors, regarding the granting of options and the terms of option grants, including exercise price, method of payment, vesting schedule, acceleration of vesting and the other matters necessary in the administration of these plan. Eligible Israeli employees, officers and directors, would qualify for provisions of Section 102(b)(2) of the Israeli Income Tax Ordinance, or the Tax Ordinance. Pursuant to such Section 102(b)(2), qualifying options and shares issued upon exercise of such options are held in trust and registered in the name of a trustee selected by the board of directors. The trustee may not release these options or shares to the holders thereof for two years from the date of the registration of the options in the name of the trustee. Under Section 102, any tax payable by an employee from the grant or exercise of the options is deferred until the transfer of the options or ordinary shares by the trustee to the employee or upon the sale of the options or ordinary shares, and gains may qualify to be taxed as capital gains at a rate equal to 25%, subject to compliance with specified conditions. Our Israeli non-employee service providers and controlling shareholders may only be granted options under Section 3(9) of the Tax Ordinance, which does not provide for similar tax benefits. The 2015 Plan also permits the grant to Israeli grantees of options that do not qualify under Section 102(b)(2).

 

Upon termination of employment for any other reason, other than in the event of death, disability, all unvested options will expire and all vested options will generally be exercisable for 3 months following termination, or such other period as determined by the plan administrator, subject to the terms of the 2015 Plan and the governing option agreement.

 

Upon termination of employment due to death or disability, all the vested options at the time of termination will be exercisable for 12 months, or such other period as determined by the plan administrator, subject to the terms of the 2015 Plan and the governing option agreement.

 

On March 13, 2019, our board of directors adopted an appendix to the 2015 Plan for U.S. residents. Under this appendix, the 2015 Plan provides for the granting of options to U.S. residents in compliance with the U.S. Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended. On July 3, 2019, our shareholders approved the adoption of the 2015 Plan together with the appendix for U.S. residents.

 

ITEM 7. MAJOR SHAREHOLDERS AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

A. Major Shareholders

 

We are not aware of any beneficial owner of 5% or more of our outstanding Ordinary Shares.

 

Changes in Percentage Ownership by Major Shareholders

 

Over the course of 2020, there were decreases in the percentage ownership of some of our former significant shareholders: (i) Laurence W. Lytton (from 9.3% to 0%) and (ii) AIGH Capital Management, LLC, AIGH Investment Partners, L.L.C. and Mr. Orin Hirschman, or AIGH (from 6.9% to 2.5%).

 

Over the course of 2019, there were decreases in the percentage ownership of some of our former significant shareholders: entities affiliated with AIGH (from 9.6% to 6.9%); (ii) Iroquois Capital Management L.L.C., Richard Abbe and Kimberly Page (from 13.2% to 0.1%) and (iii) Itshak Sharon (Tshuva), Delek Group Ltd. and Phoenix Holdings Ltd., or Hapheonix Group (from 10.1% to 4.5%).

 

Over the course of 2018, there were increases in the percentage ownership of entities affiliated with Hapheonix Group (from 5.6% to 10.1%), while there were decreases in the percentage ownership of our former significant shareholders and executive officers: (i) Amit Dror (from 5.1% to 1.6%); (ii) Sharon Fima (from 5.1% to 2.7%); (iii) Dagi Shahar Ben-Noon (from 5.1% to 2.7%); (iv) Simon Anthony-Fried (from 5.1% to 2.7%); and (v) Michael Ilan Management and Investments Ltd. (from 6.9% to 0.7%).

 

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Record Holders

 

Based upon a review of the information provided to us by The Bank of New York Mellon, the depository of the ADSs, as of March 1, 2021, there were 45 holders of record of the ADSs on record with the Depository Trust Company.

 

These numbers are not representative of the number of beneficial holders of our shares nor is it representative of where such beneficial holders reside, since many of these shares were held of record by brokers or other nominees.

 

The Company is not controlled by another corporation, by any foreign government or by any natural or legal persons except as set forth herein, and there are no arrangements known to the Company which would result in a change in control of the Company at a subsequent date.

 

B. Related Party Transactions

 

Employment Agreements

 

We have entered into written employment agreements with each of our executive officers. All of these agreements contain customary provisions regarding noncompetition, confidentiality of information and assignment of inventions. However, the enforceability of the noncompetition provisions may be limited under applicable law. In addition, we have entered into agreements with each executive officer and director pursuant to which we have agreed to indemnify each of them up to a certain amount and to the extent that these liabilities are not covered by directors’ and officers’ insurance.

 

Options

 

Since our inception we have granted options to purchase our Ordinary Shares to our officers and certain of our directors. Such option agreements may contain acceleration provisions upon certain merger, acquisition, or change of control transactions. We describe our option plans under “Share Ownership—2015 Stock Option Plan.” If the relationship between us and an executive officer or a director is terminated, except for cause (as defined in the various option plan agreements), options that are vested will generally remain exercisable for 90 days after such termination.

 

Warrants

 

In August 2020, following the approval of our shareholders, in consideration for his services as our President and Chief Executive Officer, and as appropriate incentive, we entered into a private placement of warrants, or the Stern Transaction, with our President and Chief Executive Officer, Mr. Yoav Stern. In consideration of $150,000, we issued to Mr. Stern warrants to purchase 6,880,402 ADSs of the Company. The warrants have an exercise price of $0.75 per ADS, will vest over a period of two and a half years and will expire after 7 years. Simultaneously with the issuance of the warrants, Mr. Stern forfeited options to purchase 581,000 ADSs, previously granted to him. In addition, as long as Mr. Stern is employed by the Company or is a member of the Company’s board of directors, Mr. Stern may invest an additional amount up to $50,000 to buy Series B Warrants, in an amount equal to 10% of the Company’s fully diluted capital. The exercise price per ADS under the Series B Warrants will be the average of the daily volume weighted average price of the ADSs for the 10 consecutive trading days ending on the trading day that is immediately prior to the date of the applicable notice to purchase the Series B Warrants. In the same general meeting of shareholders that approved the Stern Transaction, the Company’s shareholders approved the amended terms of compensation of the Company’s President and Chief Executive Officer.

 

In September 2020, the Company issued 1,500,000 warrants to purchase 1,500,000 ADSs to the Company’s director, Mr. Yaron Eitan, in consideration of $150,000. The warrants have an exercise price of $2.25 per ADS, will vest over a period of three years and will expire after 7 years.

 

C. Interests of Experts and Counsel

 

Not applicable.

 

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ITEM 8. FINANCIAL INFORMATION.

 

A. Consolidated Statements and Other Financial Information.

 

See “Item 18. Financial Statements.”

 

Legal Proceedings

 

From time to time, we are involved in various routine legal proceedings incidental to the ordinary course of our business. We do not believe that the outcomes of these legal proceedings have had in the recent past, or will have (with respect to any pending proceedings), significant effects on our financial position or profitability.

 

Dividends

 

We have never declared or paid any cash dividends on our Ordinary Shares and do not anticipate paying any cash dividends in the foreseeable future. Payment of cash dividends, if any, in the future will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend on then-existing conditions, including our financial condition, operating results, contractual restrictions, capital requirements, business prospects and other factors our board of directors may deem relevant.

 

Payment of dividends may be subject to Israeli withholding taxes. See “Item 10.E. Taxation”, for additional information.

 

B. Significant Changes

 

No significant change, other than as otherwise described in this annual report on Form 20-F, has occurred in our operations since the date of our consolidated financial statements included in this annual report on Form 20-F.

 

ITEM 9. THE OFFER AND LISTING

 

A. Offer and Listing Details

 

On March 7, 2016, our ADSs, which represent our Ordinary Shares, commenced trading on the Nasdaq Capital Market under the symbol “NNDM.” Each ADS currently represents one Ordinary Share.

 

B. Plan of Distribution

 

Not applicable.

 

C. Markets

 

Our ADSs are listed on the Nasdaq Capital Market.

 

D. Selling Shareholders

 

Not applicable.

 

E. Dilution

 

Not applicable.

 

F. Expenses of the Issue

 

Not applicable.

 

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ITEM 10. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

 

A. Share Capital

 

Not applicable.

 

B. Memorandum and Articles of Association

 

A copy of our amended and restated articles of association is attached as Exhibit 1.1 to this annual report on Form 20-F. The information called for by this Item is set forth in Exhibit 2(d) to this annual report on Form 20-F and is incorporated by reference into this annual report on Form 20-F.

 

C. Material Contracts

 

The following is a summary of each material contract, other than material contracts entered into in the ordinary course of business, to which we are or have been a party, for the two years immediately preceding the date of this annual report on Form 20-F:

 

Amended and Restated License Agreement, dated April 2, 2015, by and between the Company and Yissum Research Development Company of The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Ltd., filed as Exhibit 4.1 to Form 20-F/A filed on February 29, 2016. See Item 4.A “Business Overview—Intellectual Property” for more information about this document.

 

Nano Dimension Ltd. Employee Stock Option Plan (2015), filed as Exhibit 99.1 to Form 6-K filed on June 10, 2019. See Item 6 “Directors, Senior Management and Employees” for more information about this document.

 

Nano Dimension Ltd. Amended and Restated Executive Officers Compensation Policy, filed as Exhibit A to Exhibit 99.1 to Form 6-K filed on June 2, 2020. See Item 6 “Directors, Senior Management and Employees” for more information about this document.

 

Form of Warrant to purchase Ordinary Shares Represented by American Depositary Shares, dated January 30, 2019, filed as Exhibit 4.2 to Form F-1 (File No. 001-228521) filed on January 30, 2019.

 

Form of Securities Purchase Agreement, dated August 30, 2019, filed as Exhibit 99.2 to Form 6-K, filed on September 3, 2019.

 

Form of Convertible Promissory Note, dated September 4, 2019, filed as Exhibit 99.3 to Form 6-K, filed on September 3, 2019.

 

Form of Warrant to purchase Ordinary Shares Represented by American Depositary Shares, dated September 4, 2019, filed as Exhibit 99.4 to Form 6-K.

 

Form of Registration Rights Agreement, dated August 30, 2019, filed as Exhibit 99.5 to Form 6-K, filed on September 3, 2019.

 

Securities Purchase Agreement, dated August 5, 2020, between Nano Dimension Ltd. and Stern YOI Ltd. Partnership, filed as Exhibit 4.4 to Form F-3 (File No. 333-252848), filed on February 8, 2021.

 

Form of Series A Warrant to purchase Ordinary Shares Represented by American Depositary Shares, dated August 5, 2020, between Nano Dimension Ltd. and Stern YOI Ltd. Partnership, filed as Exhibit 4.5 to Form F-3 (File No. 333-252848), filed on February 8, 2021.

 

Securities Purchase Agreement, dated September 6, 2020, between Nano Dimension Ltd. and YEDNE LLC, filed as Exhibit 4.6 to Form F-3 (File No. 333-252848), filed on February 8, 2021.

 

Form of Warrant to purchase Ordinary Shares Represented by American Depositary Shares, dated September 6, 2020, between Nano Dimension Ltd. and YEDNE LLC, filed as Exhibit 4.7 to Form F-3 (File No. 333-252848), filed on February 8, 2021.

 

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D. Exchange Controls

 

There are currently no Israeli currency control restrictions on payments of dividends or other distributions with respect to our Ordinary Shares or the proceeds from the sale of the shares, except for the obligation of Israeli residents to file reports with the Bank of Israel regarding certain transactions. However, legislation remains in effect pursuant to which currency controls can be imposed by administrative action at any time.

 

The ownership or voting of our Ordinary Shares by non-residents of Israel, except with respect to citizens of countries that are in a state of war with Israel, is not restricted in any way by our memorandum of association or amended and restated articles of association or by the laws of the State of Israel.

 

E. Taxation.

 

Israeli Tax Considerations and Government Programs

 

The following is a description of the material Israeli income tax consequences of the ownership of our Ordinary Shares. The following also contains a description of material relevant provisions of the current Israeli income tax structure applicable to companies in Israel, with reference to its effect on us. To the extent that the discussion is based on new tax legislation which has not been subject to judicial or administrative interpretation, there can be no assurance that the tax authorities will accept the views expressed in the discussion in question. The discussion is not intended, and should not be taken, as legal or professional tax advice and is not exhaustive of all possible tax considerations.

 

The following description is not intended to constitute a complete analysis of all tax consequences relating to the ownership or disposition of our Ordinary Shares and ADSs. Shareholders should consult their own tax advisors concerning the tax consequences of their particular situation, as well as any tax consequences that may arise under the laws of any state, local, foreign or other taxing jurisdiction.

 

General Corporate Tax Structure in Israel

 

Israeli companies are generally subject to corporate tax. As of January 2016, the corporate tax rate was 25%. As of January 1, 2017, the corporate tax rate was reduced to 24% and as of January 1, 2018, the corporate tax rate was further reduced to 23%. However, the effective tax rate payable by a company that derives income from a Preferred Enterprise (as discussed below) may be considerably less. Capital gains derived by an Israeli company are generally subject to the prevailing corporate tax rate.

 

Law for the Encouragement of Industry (Taxes), 5729-1969

 

The Law for the Encouragement of Industry (Taxes), 5729-1969, generally referred to as the Industry Encouragement Law, provides several tax benefits for “Industrial Companies.”

 

The Industry Encouragement Law defines an “Industrial Company” as an Israeli resident-company, of which 90% or more of its income in any tax year, other than income from defense loans, is derived from an “Industrial Enterprise” owned by it. An “Industrial Enterprise” is defined as an enterprise whose principal activity in a given tax year is industrial production.

 

The following corporate tax benefits, among others, are available to Industrial Companies:

 

  amortization of the cost of purchased a patent, rights to use a patent, and know-how, which are used for the development or advancement of the company, over an eight-year period, commencing on the year in which such rights were first exercised;

 

  under limited conditions, an election to file consolidated tax returns with related Israeli companies; and

 

  expenses related to a public offering are deductible in equal amounts over three years.

 

Eligibility for benefits under the Industry Encouragement Law is not contingent upon approval of any governmental authority.

 

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Tax Benefits and Grants for Research and Development

 

Under the Research Law, programs which meet specified criteria and are approved by the IIA are eligible for grants of up to 50% of the project’s expenditure, as determined by the research committee, in exchange for the payment of royalties from the revenues generated from the sale of products and related services developed, in whole or in part pursuant to, or as a result of, a research and development program funded by the IIA. The royalties are generally at a range of 3.0% to 5.0% of revenues until the entire IIA grant is repaid, together with an annual interest generally equal to the 12 month LIBOR applicable to dollar deposits that is published on the first business day of each calendar year.

 

The terms of the Research Law also require that the manufacture of products developed with government grants be performed in Israel. The transfer of manufacturing activity outside Israel may be subject to the prior approval of the IIA. Under the regulations of the Research Law, assuming we receive approval from the IIA to manufacture our IIA funded products outside Israel, we may be required to pay increased royalties. The increase in royalties depends upon the manufacturing volume that is performed outside of Israel as follows:

 

Manufacturing Volume Outside of Israel  Royalties
to the IIA as
a Percentage
of Grant
 
Up to 50%   120%
between 50% and 90%   150%
90% and more   300%

 

If the manufacturing is performed outside of Israel by us, the rate of royalties payable by us on revenues from the sale of products manufactured outside of Israel will increase by 1% over the regular rates. If the manufacturing is performed outside of Israel by a third party, the rate of royalties payable by us on those revenues will be equal to the ratio obtained by dividing the amount of the grants received from the IIA and our total investment in the project that was funded by these grants. The transfer of no more than 10% of the manufacturing capacity in the aggregate outside of Israel is exempt under the Research Law from obtaining the prior approval of the IIA. A company requesting funds from the IIA also has the option of declaring in its IIA grant application an intention to perform part of its manufacturing outside Israel, thus avoiding the need to obtain additional approval. On January 6, 2011, the Research Law was amended to clarify that the potential increased royalties specified in the table above will apply even in those cases where the IIA approval for transfer of manufacturing outside of Israel is not required, namely when the volume of the transferred manufacturing capacity is less than 10% of total capacity or when the company received an advance approval to manufacture abroad in the framework of its IIA grant application.

 

The know-how developed within the framework of the IIA plan may not be transferred to third parties outside Israel without the prior approval of a governmental committee charted under the Research Law. The approval, however, is not required for the export of any products developed using grants received from the IIA. The IIA approval to transfer know-how created, in whole or in part, in connection with an IIA-funded project to third party outside Israel where the transferring company remains an operating Israeli entity is subject to payment of a redemption fee to the IIA calculated according to a formula provided under the Research Law that is based, in general, on the ratio between the aggregate IIA grants to the company’s aggregate investments in the project that was funded by these IIA grants, multiplied by the transaction consideration. The transfer of such know-how to a party outside Israel where the transferring company ceases to exist as an Israeli entity is subject to a redemption fee formula that is based, in general, on the ratio between the aggregate IIA grants to the total financial investments in the company, multiplied by the transaction consideration. According to the January 2011 amendment, the redemption fee in case of transfer of know-how to a party outside Israel will be based on the ratio between the aggregate IIA grants received by the company and the company’s aggregate R&D expenses, multiplied by the transaction consideration. According to regulations promulgated following the 2011 amendment, the maximum amount payable to the IIA in case of transfer of know how outside Israel shall not exceed 6 times the value of the grants received plus interest, and in the event that the receiver of the grants ceases to be an Israeli corporation such payment shall not exceed 6 times the value of the grants received plus interest, with a possibility to reduce such payment to up to 3 times the value of the grants received plus interest if the R&D activity remains in Israel for a period of three years after payment to the IIA.

 

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Transfer of know-how within Israel is subject to an undertaking of the recipient Israeli entity to comply with the provisions of the Research Law and related regulations, including the restrictions on the transfer of know-how and the obligation to pay royalties, as further described in the Research Law and related regulations.

 

These restrictions may impair our ability to outsource manufacturing, engage in change of control transactions or otherwise transfer our know-how outside Israel and may require us to obtain the approval or the IIA for certain actions and transactions and pay additional royalties to the IIA. In particular, any change of control and any change of ownership of our Ordinary Shares that would make a non-Israeli citizen or resident an “interested party,” as defined in the Research Law, requires a prior written notice to the IIA in addition to any payment that may be required of us for transfer of manufacturing or know-how outside Israel. If we fail to comply with the Research Law, we may be subject to criminal charges.

 

Tax Benefits for Research and Development

 

Israeli tax law allows, under certain conditions, a tax deduction for expenditures, including capital expenditures, for the year in which they are incurred. Expenditures are deemed related to scientific research and development projects, if:

 

  The expenditures are approved by the relevant Israeli government ministry, determined by the field of research;

 

  The research and development must be for the promotion of the company; and

 

  The research and development is carried out by or on behalf of the company seeking such tax deduction.

 

The amount of such deductible expenses is reduced by the sum of any funds received through government grants for the finance of such scientific research and development projects. No deduction under these research and development deduction rules is allowed if such deduction is related to an expense invested in an asset depreciable under the general depreciation rules of the income Tax Ordinance, 1961. Expenditures not so approved are deductible in equal amounts over three years.

 

From time to time we may apply the Office of the IIA for approval to allow a tax deduction for all research and development expenses during the year incurred. There can be no assurance that such application will be accepted.

 

Law for the Encouragement of Capital Investments, 5719-1959

 

The Law for the Encouragement of Capital Investments, 5719-1959, generally referred to as the Investment Law, provides certain incentives for capital investments in production facilities (or other eligible assets).

 

Tax Benefits

 

The Investment Law grants tax benefits for income generated by a “Preferred Company” through its “Preferred Enterprise” (as such terms are defined in the Investment Law) The definition of a Preferred Company includes a company incorporated in Israel that is not fully owned by a governmental entity, and that has, among other things, Preferred Enterprise status and is controlled and managed from Israel. A Preferred Company is entitled to a reduced corporate tax rate of 16% with respect to its income derived by its Preferred Enterprise, unless the Preferred Enterprise is located in a specified development zone, in which case the rate will be 7.5% as of January 1, 2017.

 

Dividends paid out of income attributed to a Preferred Enterprise are generally subject to withholding tax at source at the rate of 20% or such lower rate as may be provided in an applicable tax treaty. However, if such dividends are paid to an Israeli company, no tax is required to be withheld.

 

Taxation of our Shareholders

 

Capital Gains Taxes Applicable to Non-Israeli Resident Shareholders. A non-Israeli resident who derives capital gains from the sale of shares in an Israeli resident company should be exempt from Israeli tax so long as the shares were not held through a permanent establishment that the non-resident maintains in Israel. However, non-Israeli corporations will not be entitled to the foregoing exemption if Israeli residents: (i) have a controlling interest of 25% or more in such non-Israeli corporation or (ii) are the beneficiaries of, or are entitled to, 25% or more of the revenues or profits of such non-Israeli corporation, whether directly or indirectly.

 

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Additionally, a sale of securities by a non-Israeli resident may be exempt from Israeli capital gains tax under the provisions of an applicable tax treaty. For example, under Convention Between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the State of Israel with respect to Taxes on Income, as amended, or the United States-Israel Tax Treaty, the sale, exchange or other disposition of shares by a shareholder who is a United States resident (for purposes of the treaty) holding the shares as a capital asset and is entitled to claim the benefits afforded to such a resident by the U.S.-Israel Tax Treaty, or Treaty U.S. Resident, is generally exempt from Israeli capital gains tax unless: (i) the capital gain arising from such sale, exchange or disposition is attributed to real estate located in Israel; (ii) the capital gain arising from such sale, exchange or disposition is attributed to royalties; (iii) the capital gain arising from the such sale, exchange or disposition is attributed to a permanent establishment in Israel, under certain terms; (iv) such Treaty U.S. Resident holds, directly or indirectly, shares representing 10% or more of the voting capital during any part of the 12-month period preceding the disposition, subject to certain conditions; or (v) such Treaty U.S. Resident is an individual and was present in Israel for 183 days or more during the relevant taxable year.

 

In some instances where our shareholders may be liable for Israeli tax on the sale of their ordinary shares, the payment of the consideration may be subject to the withholding of Israeli tax at source. Shareholders may be required to demonstrate that they are exempt from tax on their capital gains in order to avoid withholding at source at the time of sale.

 

Taxation of Non-Israeli Shareholders on Receipt of Dividends. Non-Israeli residents are generally subject to Israeli income tax on the receipt of dividends paid on our Ordinary Shares at the rate of 25%, which tax will be withheld at source, unless relief is provided in a treaty between Israel and the shareholder’s country of residence. With respect to a person who is a “substantial shareholder” at the time of receiving the dividend or on any time during the preceding twelve months, the applicable tax rate is 30%. A “substantial shareholder” is generally a person who alone or together with such person’s relative or another person who collaborates with such person on a permanent basis, holds, directly or indirectly, at least 10% of any of the “means of control” of the corporation. “Means of control” generally include the right to vote, receive profits, nominate a director or an executive officer, receive assets upon liquidation, or order someone who holds any of the aforesaid rights how to act, regardless of the source of such right. However, a distribution of dividends to non-Israeli residents is subject to withholding tax at source at a rate of 20% if the dividend is distributed from income attributed to a Preferred Enterprise, unless a reduced tax rate is provided under an applicable tax treaty. For example, under the United States-Israel Tax Treaty, the maximum rate of tax withheld at source in Israel on dividends paid to a holder of our Ordinary Shares who is a Treaty U.S. Resident is 25%. However, generally, the maximum rate of withholding tax on dividends, not generated by a Preferred Enterprise, that are paid to a United States corporation holding 10% or more of the outstanding voting capital throughout the tax year in which the dividend is distributed as well as during the previous tax year, is 12.5%, provided that not more than 25% of the gross income for such preceding year consists of certain types of dividends and interest. Notwithstanding the foregoing, dividends distributed from income attributed to an Preferred Enterprise are not entitled to such reduction under the tax treaty but are subject to a withholding tax rate of 15% for a shareholder that is a U.S. corporation, provided that the condition related to our gross income for the previous year (as set forth in the previous sentence) is met. If the dividend is attributable partly to income derived from a Preferred Enterprise, and partly to other sources of income, the withholding rate will be a blended rate reflecting the relative portions of the two types of income. We cannot assure you that we will designate the profits that we may distribute in a way that will reduce shareholders’ tax liability.

 

U.S. Tax Considerations

 

U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations

 

THE FOLLOWING SUMMARY IS INCLUDED HEREIN FOR GENERAL INFORMATION AND IS NOT INTENDED TO BE, AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED TO BE, LEGAL OR TAX ADVICE. EACH U.S. HOLDER SHOULD CONSULT WITH HIS OR HER OWN TAX ADVISOR AS TO THE PARTICULAR U.S. FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSEQUENCES OF THE PURCHASE, OWNERSHIP AND SALE OF ORDINARY SHARES AND AMERICAN DEPOSITORY SHARES, INCLUDING THE EFFECTS OF APPLICABLE STATE, LOCAL, FOREIGN OR OTHER TAX LAWS AND POSSIBLE CHANGES IN THE TAX LAWS.

 

Subject to the limitations described in the next paragraph, the following discussion summarizes the material U.S. federal income tax consequences to a “U.S. Holder” arising from the purchase, ownership and sale of the Ordinary Shares and ADSs. For this purpose, a “U.S. Holder” is a holder of Ordinary Shares or ADSs that is: (1) an individual citizen or resident of the United States, including an alien individual who is a lawful permanent resident of the United States or meets the substantial presence residency test under U.S. federal income tax laws; (2) a corporation (or entity treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes) or a partnership (other than a partnership that is not treated as a U.S. person under any applicable U.S. Treasury regulations) created or organized under the laws of the United States or the District of Columbia or any political subdivision thereof; (3) an estate, the income of which is includable in gross income for U.S. federal income tax purposes regardless of source; (4) a trust if a court within the United States is able to exercise primary supervision over the administration of the trust and one or more U.S. persons have authority to control all substantial decisions of the trust; or (5) a trust that has a valid election in effect to be treated as a U.S. person to the extent provided in U.S. Treasury regulations.

 

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This summary is for general information purposes only and does not purport to be a comprehensive description of all of the U.S. federal income tax considerations that may be relevant to a decision to purchase our Ordinary Shares or ADSs. This summary generally considers only U.S. Holders that will own our Ordinary Shares or ADSs as capital assets. Except to the limited extent discussed below, this summary does not consider the U.S. federal tax consequences to a person that is not a U.S. Holder, nor does it describe the rules applicable to determine a taxpayer’s status as a U.S. Holder. This summary is based on the provisions of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or the Code, final, temporary and proposed U.S. Treasury regulations promulgated thereunder, administrative and judicial interpretations thereof, (including with respect to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, or the TCJA, as defined below), and the U.S./Israel Income Tax Treaty, all as in effect as of the date hereof and all of which are subject to change, possibly on a retroactive basis, and all of which are open to differing interpretations. We will not seek a ruling from the IRS with regard to the U.S. federal income tax treatment of an investment in our Ordinary Shares or ADSs by U.S. Holders and, therefore, can provide no assurances that the IRS will agree with the conclusions set forth below.

 

This discussion does not address all of the aspects of U.S. federal income taxation that may be relevant to a particular U.S. holder based on such holder’s particular circumstances and in particular does not discuss any estate, gift, generation-skipping, transfer, state, local, excise or foreign tax considerations. In addition, this discussion does not address the U.S. federal income tax treatment of a U.S. Holder who is: (1) a bank, life insurance company, regulated investment company, or other financial institution or “financial services entity:” (2) a broker or dealer in securities or foreign currency; (3) a person who acquired our Ordinary Shares or ADSs in connection with employment or other performance of services; (4) a U.S. Holder that is subject to the U.S. alternative minimum tax; (5) a U.S. Holder that holds our Ordinary Shares or ADSs as a hedge or as part of a hedging, straddle, conversion or constructive sale transaction or other risk-reduction transaction for U.S. federal income tax purposes; (6) a tax-exempt entity; (7) real estate investment trusts or grantor trusts; (8) a U.S. Holder that expatriates out of the United States or a former long-term resident of the United States; or (9) a person having a functional currency other than the U.S. dollar. This discussion does not address the U.S. federal income tax treatment of a U.S. Holder that owns, directly or constructively, at any time, Ordinary Shares or ADSs representing 10% or more of our voting power. Additionally, the U.S. federal income tax treatment of partnerships (or other pass-through entities) or persons who hold Ordinary Shares or ADSs through a partnership or other pass-through entity are not addressed.

 

In general, for U.S. federal income tax purposes, U.S. Holders of our ADSs will be treated as owning the underlying Ordinary Shares represented by those ADSs. Accordingly, exchanges of Ordinary Shares for ADSs, and ADSs for Ordinary Shares will not be subject to U.S. federal income tax.

 

Each prospective investor is advised to consult his or her own tax adviser for the specific tax consequences to that investor of purchasing, holding or disposing of our Ordinary Shares or ADSs, including the effects of applicable state, local, foreign or other tax laws and possible changes in the tax laws.

 

Taxation of Dividends Paid on Ordinary Shares or ADSs

 

We do not intend to pay dividends in the foreseeable future. In the event that we do pay dividends, and subject to the discussion under the heading “Passive Foreign Investment Companies” below and the discussion of “qualified dividend income” below, a U.S. Holder will be required to include in gross income as ordinary income the amount of any distribution paid on Ordinary Shares or ADSs (including the amount of any Israeli tax withheld on the date of the distribution), to the extent that such distribution does not exceed our current and accumulated earnings and profits, as determined for U.S. federal income tax purposes. The amount of a distribution which exceeds our earnings and profits will be treated first as a non-taxable return of capital, reducing the U.S. Holder’s tax basis for the Ordinary Shares to the extent thereof, and then capital gain. We do not expect to maintain calculations of our earnings and profits under U.S. federal income tax principles and, therefore, U.S. Holders should expect that the entire amount of any distribution generally will be reported as dividend income.

 

In general, preferential tax rates for “qualified dividend income” and long-term capital gains are applicable for U.S. Holders that are individuals, estates or trusts. For this purpose, “qualified dividend income” means, inter alia, dividends received from a “qualified foreign corporation.” A “qualified foreign corporation” is a corporation that is entitled to the benefits of a comprehensive tax treaty with the United States which includes an exchange of information program. The IRS has stated that the Israel/U.S. Tax Treaty satisfies this requirement and we believe we are eligible for the benefits of that treaty.

 

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In addition, our dividends will be qualified dividend income if our Ordinary Shares or ADSs are readily tradable on the Nasdaq Capital Market or another established securities market in the United States. Dividends will not qualify for the preferential rate if we are treated, in the year the dividend is paid or in the prior year, as a PFIC, as described below under “Passive Foreign Investment Companies.” A U.S. Holder will not be entitled to the preferential rate: (1) if the U.S. Holder has not held our Ordinary Shares or ADSs for at least 61 days of the 121 day period beginning on the date which is 60 days before the ex-dividend date, or (2) to the extent the U.S. Holder is under an obligation to make related payments on substantially similar property. Any days during which the U.S. Holder has diminished its risk of loss on our Ordinary Shares or ADSs are not counted towards meeting the 61-day holding period. Finally, U.S. Holders who elect to treat the dividend income as “investment income” pursuant to Code section 163(d)(4) will not be eligible for the preferential rate of taxation.

 

The amount of a distribution with respect to our Ordinary Shares or ADSs will be measured by the amount of the fair market value of any property distributed, and for U.S. federal income tax purposes, the amount of any Israeli taxes withheld therefrom. Cash distributions paid by us in NIS will be included in the income of U.S. Holders at a U.S. dollar amount based upon the spot rate of exchange in effect on the date the dividend is includible in the income of the U.S. Holder, and U.S. Holders will have a tax basis in such NIS for U.S. federal income tax purposes equal to such U.S. dollar value. If the U.S. Holder subsequently converts the NIS into U.S. dollars or otherwise disposes of it, any subsequent gain or loss in respect of such NIS arising from exchange rate fluctuations will be U.S. source ordinary exchange gain or loss.

 

Taxation of the Disposition of Ordinary Shares or ADSs

 

Except as provided under the PFIC rules described below under “Passive Foreign Investment Companies,” upon the sale, exchange or other disposition of our Ordinary Shares or ADSs, a U.S. Holder will recognize capital gain or loss in an amount equal to the difference between such U.S. Holder’s tax basis for the Ordinary Shares or ADSs in U.S. dollars and the amount realized on the disposition in U.S. dollar (or its U.S. dollar equivalent determined by reference to the spot rate of exchange on the date of disposition, if the amount realized is denominated in a foreign currency). The gain or loss realized on the sale, exchange or other disposition of Ordinary Shares or ADSs will be long-term capital gain or loss if the U.S. Holder has a holding period of more than one year at the time of the disposition. Individuals who recognize long-term capital gains may be taxed on such gains at reduced rates of tax. The deduction of capital losses is subject to various limitations.

 

Gain realized by a U.S. Holder on a sale, exchange or other disposition of Ordinary Shares or ADSs will generally be treated as U.S. source income for U.S. foreign tax credit purposes. A loss realized by a U.S. Holder on the sale, exchange or other disposition of Ordinary Shares or ADSs is generally allocated to U.S. source income. The deductibility of a loss realized on the sale, exchange or other disposition of Ordinary Shares or ADSs is subject to limitations. An additional 3.8% net investment income tax (described below) may apply to gains recognized upon the sale, exchange or other taxable disposition of our Ordinary Shares or ADS by certain U.S. Holders who meet certain income thresholds.

 

Passive Foreign Investment Companies

 

Special U.S. federal income tax laws apply to U.S. taxpayers who own shares of a corporation that is a PFIC. We will be treated as a PFIC for U.S. federal income tax purposes for any taxable year that either:

 

  75% or more of our gross income (including our pro rata share of gross income for any company, in which we are considered to own 25% or more of the shares by value), in a taxable year is passive; or

 

  At least 50% of our assets, averaged over the year and generally determined based upon fair market value (including our pro rata share of the assets of any company in which we are considered to own 25% or more of the shares by value) are held for the production of, or produce, passive income.

 

For this purpose, passive income generally consists of dividends, interest, rents, royalties, annuities and income from certain commodities transactions and from notional principal contracts. Cash is treated as generating passive income.

 

We do not expect that we will be treated as a PFIC for the current taxable year. The tests for determining PFIC status are applied annually, and it is difficult to make accurate projections of future income and assets which are relevant to this determination. In addition, our PFIC status may depend in part on the market value of our Ordinary Shares or ADSs. Accordingly, there can be no assurance that we currently are not or will not become a PFIC.

 

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If we currently are or become a PFIC, each U.S. Holder who has not elected to mark the shares to market (as discussed below), would, upon receipt of certain distributions by us and upon disposition of our Ordinary Shares or ADSs at a gain: (1) have such distribution or gain allocated ratably over the U.S. Holder’s holding period for the Ordinary Shares or ADSs, as the case may be; (2) the amount allocated to the current taxable year and any period prior to the first day of the first taxable year in which we were a PFIC would be taxed as ordinary income; and (3) the amount allocated to each of the other taxable years would be subject to tax at the highest rate of tax in effect for the applicable class of taxpayer for that year, and an interest charge for the deemed deferral benefit would be imposed with respect to the resulting tax attributable to each such other taxable year. In addition, when shares of a PFIC are acquired by reason of death from a decedent that was a U.S. Holder, the tax basis of such shares would not receive a step-up to fair market value as of the date of the decedent’s death, but instead would be equal to the decedent’s basis if lower, unless all gain were recognized by the decedent. Indirect investments in a PFIC may also be subject to these special U.S. federal income tax rules.

 

The PFIC rules described above would not apply to a U.S. Holder who makes a QEF election for all taxable years that such U.S. Holder has held the Ordinary Shares or ADSs while we are a PFIC, provided that we comply with specified reporting requirements. Instead, each U.S. Holder who has made such a QEF election is required for each taxable year that we are a PFIC to include in income such U.S. Holder’s pro rata share of our ordinary earnings as ordinary income and such U.S. Holder’s pro rata share of our net capital gains as long-term capital gain, regardless of whether we make any distributions of such earnings or gain. In general, a QEF election is effective only if we make available certain required information. The QEF election is made on a shareholder-by-shareholder basis and generally may be revoked only with the consent of the IRS. We do not intend to furnish U.S. Holders annually with information needed in order to complete IRS Form 8621 and to make and maintain a valid QEF election for any year in which we or any of our subsidiaries are a PFIC. Therefore, the QEF election will not be available with respect to our Ordinary Shares or ADSs.

 

In addition, the PFIC rules described above would not apply if we were a PFIC and a U.S. Holder made a mark-to-market election. A U.S. Holder of our Ordinary Shares or ADSs which are regularly traded on a qualifying exchange, including the Nasdaq Capital Market, can elect to mark the Ordinary Shares or ADSs to market annually, recognizing as ordinary income or loss each year an amount equal to the difference as of the close of the taxable year between the fair market value of the Ordinary Shares or ADSs and the U.S. Holder’s adjusted tax basis in the Ordinary Shares or ADSs. Losses are allowed only to the extent of net mark-to-market gain previously included income by the U.S. Holder under the election for prior taxable years.

 

U.S. Holders who hold our Ordinary Shares or ADSs during a period when we are a PFIC will be subject to the foregoing rules, even if we cease to be a PFIC. U.S. Holders are strongly urged to consult their tax advisors about the PFIC rules.

 

Tax on Net Investment Income

 

Subject to certain adjustments under the PFIC rules, U.S. Holders who are individuals, estates or trusts will generally be required to pay a 3.8% Medicare tax on their net investment income (including dividends on and gains from the sale or other disposition of our Ordinary Shares or ADSs), or in the case of estates and trusts on their net investment income that is not distributed. In each case, the 3.8% Medicare tax applies only to the extent the U.S. Holder’s total adjusted income exceeds applicable thresholds.

 

Tax Consequences for Non-U.S. Holders of Ordinary Shares or ADSs

 

Except as provided below, an individual, corporation, estate or trust that is not a U.S. Holder referred to below as a non-U.S. Holder, generally will not be subject to U.S. federal income or withholding tax on the payment of dividends on, and the proceeds from the disposition of, our Ordinary Shares or ADSs.

 

A non-U.S. Holder may be subject to U.S. federal income tax on a dividend paid on our Ordinary Shares or ADSs or gain from the disposition of our Ordinary Shares or ADSs if: (1) such item is effectively connected with the conduct by the non-U.S. Holder of a trade or business in the United States and, if required by an applicable income tax treaty is attributable to a permanent establishment or fixed place of business in the United States; or (2) in the case of a disposition of our Ordinary Shares or ADSs, the individual non-U.S. Holder is present in the United States for 183 days or more in the taxable year of the disposition and other specified conditions are met. Any dividend income or gain described in clause (1) above will be subject to U.S. federal income tax on a net income tax basis in the same manner as a U.S. Holder and, with respect to corporate holders, a branch profits tax imposed at a rate of 30% (or such lower rate as may be specified by an applicable income tax treaty) may also apply to its effectively connected earnings and profits (subject to adjustments). Any dividend income or gain described in clause (2) above that is not effectively connected with the conduct by a Non-U.S. Holder of a trade or business within the U.S. generally will be subject to 30% withholding tax (or such lower rate as may be specified by an applicable income tax treaty) net of certain U.S. source capital losses.

 

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In general, non-U.S. Holders will not be subject to backup withholding with respect to the payment of dividends on our Ordinary Shares or ADSs if payment is made through a paying agent, or office of a foreign broker outside the United States. However, if payment is made in the United States or by a U.S. related person, non-U.S. Holders may be subject to backup withholding, unless the non-U.S. Holder provides an applicable IRS Form W-8 (or a substantially similar form) certifying its foreign status, or otherwise establishes an exemption.

 

The amount of any backup withholding from a payment to a non-U.S. Holder will be allowed as a credit against such holder’s U.S. federal income tax liability and may entitle such holder to a refund, provided that the required information is timely furnished to the IRS.

 

Information Reporting and Withholding

 

A U.S. Holder may be subject to backup withholding at a rate of 24% with respect to cash dividends and proceeds from a disposition of Ordinary Shares or ADSs. In general, backup withholding will apply only if a U.S. Holder fails to comply with specified identification procedures. Backup withholding will not apply with respect to payments made to designated exempt recipients, such as corporations and tax-exempt organizations. Backup withholding is not an additional tax and may be claimed as a credit against the U.S. federal income tax liability of a U.S. Holder, provided that the required information is timely furnished to the IRS.

 

F. Dividends and Paying Agents

 

Not applicable.

 

G. Statement by Experts

 

Not applicable.

 

H. Documents on Display

 

We are subject to certain information reporting requirements of the Exchange Act, applicable to foreign private issuers and under those requirements will file reports with the SEC. The SEC maintains an Internet website that contains reports and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC. Our filings with the SEC will also available to the public through the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov.

 

As a foreign private issuer, we are exempt from the rules under the Exchange Act related to the furnishing and content of proxy statements, and our officers, directors and principal shareholders will be exempt from the reporting and short-swing profit recovery provisions contained in Section 16 of the Exchange Act. In addition, we are not required under the Exchange Act to file annual, quarterly and current reports and financial statements with the SEC as frequently or as promptly as U.S. domestic companies whose securities are registered under the Exchange Act. However, we will file with the SEC, within 120 days after the end of each fiscal year, or such applicable time as required by the SEC, an annual report on Form 20-F containing financial statements audited by an independent registered public accounting firm, and may submit to the SEC, on a Form 6-K, unaudited quarterly financial information.

 

We maintain a corporate website http://www.nano-di.com. Information contained on, or that can be accessed through, our website and the other websites referenced above do not constitute a part of this annual report on Form 20-F. We have included these website addresses in this annual report on Form 20-F solely as inactive textual references.

 

I. Subsidiary Information.

 

Not applicable.

 

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ITEM 11. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

In the ordinary course of our operations, we are exposed to certain market risks, primarily changes in foreign currency exchange rates and interest rates.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosure About Market Risk

 

We are exposed to market risks in the ordinary course of our business. Market risk represents the risk of loss that may impact our financial position due to adverse changes in financial market prices and rates. Our current investment policy is to invest available cash in bank deposits with banks that have a credit rating of at least A-minus. Accordingly, a substantial majority of our cash is held in deposits that bear interest. Given the current low rates of interest we receive, we will not be adversely affected if such rates are reduced. Our market risk exposure is primarily a result of NIS/U.S. dollar exchange rates, which is discussed in the following paragraph.

 

Foreign Currency Exchange Risk

 

Our results of operations and cash flow are subject to fluctuations due to changes in NIS/U.S. dollar currency exchange rates. The vast majority of our liquid assets is held in U.S. dollars, and a certain portion of our expenses is denominated in NIS. Changes of 5% and 10% in the U.S. Dollar/NIS exchange rate would increase/decrease our loss for 2020 by 0.7% and 1.3%, respectively. However, these historical figures may not be indicative of future exposure, as we expect that the percentage of our NIS denominated expenses will materially decrease in the near future, therefore reducing our exposure to exchange rate fluctuations. Our functional and presentation currency is the U.S. dollar.

 

We hedge our foreign currency exchange risk to decrease the risk of financial exposure from fluctuations in the exchange rates of our principal operating currencies. These measures, however, may not adequately protect us from the material adverse effects of such fluctuations.

 

ITEM 12. DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES OTHER THAN EQUITY SECURITIES

 

A. Debt Securities.

 

Not applicable.

 

B. Warrants and rights.

 

Not applicable.

 

C. Other Securities.

 

Not applicable.

 

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D. American Depositary Shares

 

Fees and Expenses

 

Persons depositing or withdrawing shares or ADS holders must pay:  For:
$5.00 (or less) per 100 ADSs (or portion of 100 ADSs).  Issuance of ADSs, including issuances resulting from a distribution of shares or rights or other property. Cancellation of ADSs for the purpose of withdrawal, including if the deposit agreement terminates.
    
$.05 (or less) per ADS.  Any cash distribution to ADS holders.
    
A fee equivalent to the fee that would be payable if securities distributed to you had been shares and the shares had been deposited for issuance of ADSs.  Distribution of securities distributed to holders of deposited securities (including rights) that are distributed by the depositary to ADS holders.
    
$.05 (or less) per ADS per calendar year.  Depositary services.
    
Registration or transfer fees.  Transfer and registration of shares on our share register to or from the name of the depositary or its agent when you deposit or withdraw shares.
    
Expenses of the depositary.  Cable, telex and facsimile transmissions (when expressly provided in the deposit agreement). Converting foreign currency to U.S. dollars.
    
Taxes and other governmental charges the depositary or the custodian has to pay on any ADSs or shares underlying ADSs, such as stock transfer taxes, stamp duty or withholding taxes.  As necessary.
    
Any charges incurred by the depositary or its agents for servicing the deposited securities.  As necessary.

 

The depositary collects its fees for delivery and surrender of ADSs directly from investors depositing shares or surrendering ADSs for the purpose of withdrawal or from intermediaries acting for them. The depositary collects fees for making distributions to investors by deducting those fees from the amounts distributed or by selling a portion of distributable property to pay the fees. The depositary may collect its annual fee for depositary services by deduction from cash distributions or by directly billing investors or by charging the book-entry system accounts of participants acting for them. The depositary may collect any of its fees by deduction from any cash distribution payable (or by selling a portion of securities or other property distributable) to ADS holders that are obligated to pay those fees. The depositary may generally refuse to provide fee-attracting services until its fees for those services are paid.

 

From time to time, the depositary may make payments to us to reimburse us for costs and expenses generally arising out of establishment and maintenance of the ADS program, waive fees and expenses for services provided to us by the depositary or share revenue from the fees collected from ADS holders. In performing its duties under the deposit agreement, the depositary may use brokers, dealers, foreign currency or other service providers that are owned by or affiliated with the depositary and that may earn or share fees, spreads or commissions.

 

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PART II

 

ITEM 13. DEFAULTS, DIVIDEND ARREARAGES AND DELINQUENCIES

 

None.

 

ITEM 14. MATERIAL MODIFICATIONS TO THE RIGHTS OF SECURITY HOLDERS AND USE OF PROCEEDS

 

None.

 

ITEM 15. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

(a) Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

Our management, with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, has evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as such term is defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act) as of December 31, 2020, or the Evaluation Date. Based on such evaluation, those officers have concluded that, as of the Evaluation Date, our disclosure controls and procedures are effective in recording, processing, summarizing and reporting, on a timely basis, information required to be included in periodic filings under the Exchange Act and that such information is accumulated and communicated to management, including our principal executive and financial officers, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

(b) Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as such term is defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Exchange Act. Under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, we conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting based principally on the framework and criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission as of the end of the period covered by this report. Based on that evaluation, our management has concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was effective as of December 31, 2020 at providing reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.

 

(c) Attestation Report of the Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

This annual report does not include an attestation report of our independent registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting due to an exemption for emerging growth companies provided in the JOBS Act.

 

(d) Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

During the year ended December 31, 2020, there were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

ITEM 16A. AUDIT COMMITTEE FINANCIAL EXPERT

 

Our board of directors has determined that each member of our audit committee is an audit committee financial expert, as defined under the rules under the Exchange Act, and is independent in accordance with applicable Exchange Act rules and Nasdaq Stock Market rules.

 

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ITEM 16B. CODE OF ETHICS

 

We have adopted a written code of ethics that applies to our officers and employees, including our principal executive officer, principal financial officer, principal controller and persons performing similar functions as well as our directors. Our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics is posted on our website at www.nano-di.com. Information contained on, or that can be accessed through, our website does not constitute a part of this annual report on Form 20-F and is not incorporated by reference herein. If we make any amendment to the Code of Business Conduct and Ethics or grant any waivers, including any implicit waiver, from a provision of the code, we will disclose the nature of such amendment or waiver on our website to the extent required by the rules and regulations of the SEC including the instructions to Item 16B of Form 20-F. We have not granted any waivers under our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics.

 

ITEM 16C. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES

 

Somekh Chaikin, a member firm of KPMG International, has served as our principal independent registered public accounting firm for each of the two years ended December 31, 2019 and 2020.

 

The following table provides information regarding fees paid by us to Somekh Chaikin and/or other member firms of KPMG International for all services, including audit services, for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2020:

 

   Year Ended
December 31,
 
   2019   2020 
Audit fees (1)  $190,000   $250,000 
Audit-related fees   -    - 
Tax fees (2)   44,000    15,000 
All other fees   -    - 
           
Total  $234,000   $265,000 

 

 

(1) Includes professional services rendered in connection with the audit of our annual financial statements, review of our interim financial statements, and fees relating to fundraising.
(2) Tax fees are the aggregate fees billed (in the year) for professional services rendered for tax compliance and tax advice other than in connection with the audit.

 

Pre-Approval of Auditors’ Compensation

 

Our audit committee has a pre-approval policy for the engagement of our independent registered public accounting firm to perform certain audit and non-audit services. Pursuant to this policy, which is designed to assure that such engagements do not impair the independence of our auditors, the audit committee pre-approves annually a catalog of specific audit and non-audit services in the categories of audit services, audit-related services and tax services that may be performed by our independent registered public accounting firm. If a type of service, that is to be provided by our auditors, has not received such general pre-approval, it will require specific pre-approval by our audit committee. The policy prohibits retention of the independent registered public accounting firm to perform the prohibited non-audit functions defined in applicable SEC rules.

 

ITEM 16D. EXEMPTIONS FROM THE LISTING STANDARDS FOR AUDIT COMMITTEES

 

Not applicable.

 

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ITEM 16E. PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES BY THE ISSUER AND AFFILIATED PURCHASERS

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 16F. CHANGE IN REGISTRANT’S CERTIFYING ACCOUNTANT

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 16G. CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 

Under Nasdaq rules, we may elect to follow certain corporate governance practices permitted under the Companies Law in lieu of compliance with corresponding corporate governance requirements otherwise imposed by the Nasdaq Stock Market rules for U.S. domestic issuers.

 

In accordance with Israeli law and practice and subject to the exemption set forth in Rule 5615 of the Nasdaq Stock Market rules, we have elected to follow the provisions of the Companies Law, rather than the Nasdaq Stock Market rules, with respect to the following requirements:

 

  Distribution of periodic reports to shareholders; proxy solicitation. As opposed to the Nasdaq Stock Market rules, which require listed issuers to make such reports available to shareholders in one of a number of specific manners, Israeli law does not require us to distribute periodic reports directly to shareholders, and the generally accepted business practice in Israel is not to distribute such reports to shareholders but to make such reports available through a public website. In addition to making such reports available on a public website, we currently make our audited financial statements available to our shareholders at our offices and will only mail such reports to shareholders upon request. As a foreign private issuer, we are generally exempt from the SEC’s proxy solicitation rules.

 

  Quorum. While the Nasdaq Stock Market rules require that the quorum for purposes of any meeting of the holders of a listed company’s common voting stock, as specified in the company’s bylaws, be no less than 33 1/3% of the company’s outstanding common voting stock, under Israeli law, a company is entitled to determine in its articles of association the number of shareholders and percentage of holdings required for a quorum at a shareholders meeting. Our amended and restated articles of association provide that a quorum of two or more shareholders holding at least 25% of the voting rights in person or by proxy is required for commencement of business at a general meeting. However, the quorum set forth in our amended and restated articles of association with respect to an adjourned meeting consists of any number of shareholders present in person or by proxy.

 

  Compensation of officers. Israeli law and our amended and restated articles of association do not require that the independent members of our board of directors (or a compensation committee composed solely of independent members of our board of directors) determine an executive officer’s compensation, as is generally required under the Nasdaq Stock Market rules with respect to the chief executive officer and all other executive officers. Instead, compensation of executive officers is determined and approved by our compensation committee and our board of directors, and in certain circumstances by our shareholders, either in consistency with our office holder compensation policy or, in special circumstances in deviation therefrom, taking into account certain considerations stated in the Companies Law.

 

Shareholder approval is generally required for officer compensation in the event (i) approval by our board of directors and our compensation committee is not consistent with our office holder compensation policy, or (ii) compensation required to be approved is that of our chief executive officer who is not a director or an executive officer who is also the controlling shareholder of our company (including an affiliate thereof). Such shareholder approval shall require a special majority vote of the shares present and voting at a shareholders meeting, provided either (i) such majority includes a majority of the shares held by non-controlling shareholders who do not otherwise have a personal interest in the compensation arrangement that are voted at the meeting, excluding for such purpose any abstentions disinterested majority, or (ii) the total shares held by non-controlling and disinterested shareholders voted against the arrangement does not exceed 2% of the voting rights in our company.

 

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Additionally, approval of the compensation of an executive officer who is also a director requires a simple majority vote of the shares present and voting at a shareholders meeting, if consistent with our office holder compensation policy. Our compensation committee and board of directors may, in special circumstances, approve the compensation of an executive officer (other than a director, a chief executive officer or a controlling shareholder) or approve the compensation policy despite shareholders’ objection, based on specified arguments and taking shareholders’ objection into account. Our compensation committee may further exempt an engagement with a nominee for the position of chief executive officer, who meets the non-affiliation requirements set forth for an external director, from requiring shareholder approval, if such engagement is consistent with our office holder compensation policy and our compensation committee determines based on specified arguments that presentation of such engagement to shareholder approval is likely to prevent such engagement. To the extent that any such transaction with a controlling shareholder is for a period exceeding three years, approval is required once every three years.

 

A director or executive officer may not be present when the board of directors of a company discusses or votes upon a transaction in which he or she has a personal interest, except in case of ordinary transactions, unless the chairman of the board of directors determines that he or she should be present to present the transaction that is subject to approval.

 

  Shareholder approval. We will seek shareholder approval for all corporate actions requiring such approval under the requirements of the Companies Law, rather than seeking approval for corporation actions in accordance with Nasdaq Listing Rule 5635. In particular, under this Nasdaq Stock Market rule, shareholder approval is generally required for: (i) an acquisition of shares/assets of another company that involves the issuance of 20% or more of the acquirer’s shares or voting rights or if a director, officer or 5% shareholder has greater than a 5% interest in the target company or the consideration to be received; (ii) the issuance of shares leading to a change of control; (iii) adoption/amendment of equity compensation arrangements (although under the provisions of the Companies Law there is no requirement for shareholder approval for the adoption/amendment of the equity compensation plan); and (iv) issuances of 20% or more of the shares or voting rights (including securities convertible into, or exercisable for, equity) of a listed company via a private placement (and/or via sales by directors/officers/5% shareholders) if such equity is issued (or sold) below a specified minimum price. By contrast, under the Companies Law, shareholder approval is required for, among other things: (i) transactions with directors concerning the terms of their service or indemnification, exemption and insurance for their service (or for any other position that they may hold at a company), for which approvals of the compensation committee, board of directors and shareholders are all required, (ii) extraordinary transactions with controlling shareholders of publicly held companies, which require the special majority, and (iii) terms of employment or other engagement of the controlling shareholder of us or such controlling shareholder’s relative, which require the special majority. In addition, under the Companies Law, a merger requires approval of the shareholders of each of the merging companies.

 

  Approval of Related Party Transactions. All related party transactions are approved in accordance with the requirements and procedures for approval of interested party acts and transaction as set forth in the Companies Law, which requires the approval of the audit committee, or the compensation committee, as the case may be, the board of directors and shareholders, as may be applicable, for specified transactions, rather than approval by the audit committee or other independent body of our board of directors as required under the Nasdaq Stock Market rules.

 

  Annual Shareholders Meeting. As opposed to the Nasdaq Stock Market Rule 5620(a), which mandates that a listed company hold its annual shareholders meeting within one year of the company’s fiscal year-end, we are required, under the Companies Law, to hold an annual shareholders meeting each calendar year and within 15 months of the last annual shareholders meeting.

 

ITEM 16H. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURE

 

Not applicable.

 

70

 

 

PART III

 

ITEM 17. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

We have elected to provide financial statements and related information pursuant to Item 18.

 

ITEM 18. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

The consolidated financial statements and the related notes required by this Item are included in this annual report on Form 20-F beginning on page F-1.

 

ITEM 19. EXHIBITS.

 

Exhibit   Description
1.1   Amended and Restated Articles of Association of Nano Dimension Ltd., filed as exhibit 99.1 to Form 6-K filed on February 16, 2021, and incorporated herein by reference.
     
2.1   Amended and Restated Form of Depositary Agreement, dated as of April 15, 2019, among Nano Dimension Ltd., The Bank of New York Mellon as Depositary, and owners and holders from time to time of ADSs issued thereunder, including the Form of American Depositary Shares, filed as Exhibit 1 to the Form F-6 (File No. 333-252477) filed on January 27, 2021, and incorporated herein by reference.
     
2(d)   Description of Securities, filed herewith.
     
4.1^   Amended and Restated License Agreement, dated April 2, 2015, by and between the Company and Yissum Research Development Company of The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Ltd., filed as Exhibit 4.1 to Form 20-F/A filed on February 29, 2016, and incorporated herein by reference.
     
4.2   Nano Dimension Ltd. Employee Stock Option Plan (2015), filed as Exhibit 99.1 to Form 6-K filed on June 10, 2019, and incorporated herein by reference.
     
4.3   Nano Dimension Ltd. Amended and Restated Executive Officers Compensation Policy, filed as Exhibit A to Exhibit 99.1 to Form 6-K filed on June 2, 2020, and incorporated herein by reference.
     
4.4   Form of Warrant to purchase Ordinary Shares Represented by American Depositary Shares, dated January 30, 2019, filed as Exhibit 4.2 to Form F-1 (File No. 001-228521) filed on January 30, 2019, and incorporated herein by reference.
     
4.5   Form of Warrant to purchase Ordinary Shares Represented by American Depositary Shares, dated September 4, 2019, filed as Exhibit 99.4 to Form 6-K, filed on September 3, 2019, and incorporated herein by reference.
     
4.6   Securities Purchase Agreement, dated August 5, 2020, between Nano Dimension Ltd. and Stern YOI Ltd. Partnership, filed as Exhibit 4.4 to Form F-3 (File No. 333-252848), filed on February 8, 2021, and incorporated herein by reference.
     
4.7   Form of Series A Warrant to purchase Ordinary Shares Represented by American Depositary Shares, dated August 5, 2020, between Nano Dimension Ltd. and Stern YOI Ltd. Partnership, filed as Exhibit 4.5 to Form F-3 (File No. 333-252848), filed on February 8, 2021, and incorporated herein by reference.
     
4.8   Securities Purchase Agreement, dated September 6, 2020, between Nano Dimension Ltd. and YEDNE LLC, filed as Exhibit 4.6 to Form F-3 (File No. 333-252848), filed on February 8, 2021, and incorporated herein by reference.
     
4.9   Form of Warrant to purchase Ordinary Shares Represented by American Depositary Shares, dated September 6, 2020, between Nano Dimension Ltd. and YEDNE LLC, filed as Exhibit 4.7 to Form F-3 (File No. 333-252848), filed on February 8, 2021, and incorporated herein by reference.

 

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4.10   Form of Indemnification Agreement, filed as Exhibit 10.10 to Form F-1 (File No. 333- 213372) filed on August 30, 2016, and incorporated herein by reference.
     
8.1   List of Subsidiaries, filed as Exhibit 8.1 to Form 20-F, filed on March 15, 2018, and incorporated herein by reference.
     
12.1   Certification of the Chief Executive Officer pursuant to rule 13a-14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, filed herewith.
     
12.2   Certification of the Chief Financial Officer pursuant to rule 13a-14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, filed herewith.
     
13.1   Certification of the Chief Executive Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. 1350, furnished herewith.
     
13.2   Certification of the Chief Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. 1350, furnished herewith.
     
15.1   Consent of Somekh Chaikin (Member firm of KPMG International), filed herewith.
     
101   The following financial information from the Registrant’s Annual Report on Form 20-F for the year ended December 31, 2020, formatted in XBRL (eXtensible Business Reporting Language): (i) Consolidated Statements of Financial Position; (ii) Consolidated Statements of Profit or Loss; (iii) Consolidated Statements of Changes in Equity; (iv) Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows; and (v) Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, tagged as blocks of text and in detail.

  

 

^ Confidential treatment was granted with respect to certain portions of this exhibit pursuant to 17.C.F.R. §240.24b-2. Omitted portions were filed separately with the SEC.

 

72

 

 

SIGNATURES

 

The registrant hereby certifies that it meets all of the requirements for filing on Form 20-F and that it has duly caused and authorized the undersigned to sign this annual report on Form 20-F filed on its behalf.

 

  NANO DIMENSION LTD.
     
Date: March 11, 2021 By: /s/ Yoav Stern
    Yoav Stern
    President and Chief Executive Officer

  

73

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nano Dimension Ltd.

 

 

Consolidated Financial Statements as of December 31, 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

F-1

 

 

Table of Contents

 

    Page
     
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm   F-3
     
Consolidated Financial Statements as of December 31, 2020    
     
Consolidated Statements of Financial Position   F-4
     
Consolidated Statements of Profit or Loss and Other Comprehensive Income   F-5
     
Consolidated Statements of Changes in Equity   F-6
     
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows   F-7
     
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements   F-8 - F-36

 

F-2

 

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

To the Shareholders and Board of Directors

Nano Dimension Ltd.:

 

Opinion on the Consolidated Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated statements of financial position of Nano Dimension Ltd. and subsidiaries (the “Company”) as of December 31, 2019 and 2020, the related consolidated statements of profit or loss and other comprehensive income, changes in equity, and cash flows for each of the years in the three-year period ended December 31, 2020, and the related notes (collectively, the “consolidated financial statements”). In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2019 and 2020, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the years in the three-year period ended December 31, 2020, in conformity with International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board.

 

Change in Accounting Principle

 

As discussed in Note 2O to the consolidated financial statements, the Company has changed its method of accounting for leases as of January 1, 2019, due to the adoption of International Financial Reporting Standard 16, Leases. 

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits, we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the consolidated financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the consolidated financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

/s/ Somekh Chaikin  
Somekh Chaikin  
Member Firm of KPMG International  
   
We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2015.  
Tel-Aviv, Israel  
March 10, 2021  

 

F-3

 

 

Nano Dimension Ltd.

Consolidated Statements of Financial Position as at

 

        December 31, 
   Note    2019   2020 
        Thousands
USD
   Thousands
USD
 
Assets             
Cash  3.A     3,894    585,338 
Bank deposits        -    85,596 
Restricted deposits  3.B     31    62 
Trade receivables  4.A     1,816    713 
Other receivables  4.B     570    1,126 
Inventory  5     3,543    3,314 
Total current assets        9,854    676,149 
                
Restricted deposits  3.B     377    406 
Property plant and equipment, net  6     4,743    5,092 
Right of use assets  19     2,673    3,169 
Intangible assets  7     5,211    4,440 
Total non-current assets        13,004    13,107 
Total assets        22,858    689,256 
                
Liabilities               
Trade payables        850    776 
Other payables  9     3,575    5,910 
Total current liabilities        4,425    6,686 
                
Liability in respect of government grants  10     1,044    850 
Lease liability  19     2,089    2,618 
Liability in respect of warrants  18     3,698    11,986 
Total non-current liabilities        6,831    15,454 
Total liabilities        11,256    22,140 
                
Equity               
Share capital  11     6,441    257,225 
Share premium and capital reserves        65,202    518,426 
Treasury shares        (1,509)   (1,509)
Presentation currency translation reserve        1,431    1,431 
Accumulated loss        (59,963)   (108,457)
Total equity        11,602    667,116 
Total liabilities and equity        22,858    689,256 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-4

 

 

Nano Dimension Ltd.

Consolidated Statements of Profit or Loss and Other Comprehensive Income 

 

      For the Year Ended
December 31,
 
   Note  2018   2019   2020 
      Thousands
USD
   Thousands
USD
   Thousands
USD
 
Revenues  12   5,100    7,070    3,399 
                   
Cost of revenues  13   3,594    4,312    1,563 
                   
Cost of revenues - amortization of intangible  7   772    772    771 
                   
Total cost of revenues      4,366    5,084    2,334 
                   
Gross profit      734    1,986    1,065 
                   
Research and development expenses, net  14.A   8,623    8,082    9,878 
                   
Sales and marketing expenses  14.B   4,259    5,469    6,597 
                   
General and administrative expenses  14.C   3,002    3,270    20,287 
                   
Operating loss      (15,150)   (14,835)   (35,697)
                   
Finance income  14.D   54    8,765    446 
                   
Finance expense  14.D   392    2,283    13,243 
                   
Total comprehensive loss      (15,488)   (8,353)   (48,494)
                   
Basic and diluted loss per share (USD) (after 1:50 reverse split effective June 29, 2020, see also note 11A)  16   (8.40)   (2.38)   (1.13)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-5

 

 

Nano Dimension Ltd.

Consolidated Statements of Changes in Equity

 

   Share
capital
   Share
premium and
capital
reserves
   Treasury
shares
   Presentation
currency
translation
reserve
   Accumulated loss   Total
equity
 
For the year ended December 31, 2020:  Thousands
USD
   Thousands
USD