20-F 1 f20f2020_colorstartech.htm ANNUAL REPORT

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 20-F

 

☐ REGISTRATION STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OR (g) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

OR

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2020

 

OR

 

☐ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from _________ to _____________.

 

OR

 

☐ SHELL COMPANY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

Date of event requiring this shell company report:

 

Commission file number: 333-226308

 

Color Star Technology Co., Ltd.

(Exact name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)

 

Cayman Islands

(Jurisdiction of Incorporation or Organization)

 

800 3rd Ave, Suite 2800

New York NY 10022

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

 

Biao (Luke) Lu

Chief Executive Officer

(212) 220-3967

800 3rd Ave, Suite 2800

New York NY 10022

(Name, Telephone, E-mail and/or Facsimile Number and Address of Company Contact Person)

 

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class   Trading Symbol(s)   Name of each exchange on
which registered
Ordinary Shares, par value $0.001   CSCW   Nasdaq Capital Market

 

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

 

None

(Title of Class)

 

Securities for which there is a reporting obligation pursuant to Section 15(d) of the Act:

 

None

(Title of Class)

 

The number of outstanding shares of each of the issuer’s classes of capital or ordinary shares as of November 12, 2020 was: 54,861,811 ordinary shares, par value $0.001 per share.

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  No ☒

 

If this report is an annual or transition report, indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.    Yes  No ☒

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes  No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or an emerging growth company. See definition of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer      Accelerated filer ☐     Non-accelerated filer ☒     Emerging growth company 

 

If an emerging growth company that prepares its financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards† provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. 

 

Indicate by check mark which basis of accounting the registrant has used to prepare the financial statements included in this filing:

 

☒ U.S. GAAP  International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the International Accounting  Standards Board  Other ☐

 

If “Other” has been checked in response to the previous question, indicate by check mark which financial statement item the registrant has elected to follow: Item 17  Item 18 ☐

 

If this is an annual report, indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes  No ☒

 

 

 

 

  

COLOR STAR TECHNOLOGY CO., LTD.

FORM 20-F ANNUAL REPORT

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

    Page 
     
PART I
     
Item 1. Identity of Directors, Senior Management and Advisers 3
Item 2. Offer Statistics and Expected Timetable 3
Item 3. Key Information 3
Item 4. Information On The Company 19
Item 4A. Unresolved Staff Comments 35
Item 5. Operating And Financial Review And Prospects 35
Item 6. Directors, Senior Management And Employees 41
Item 7. Major Shareholders And Related Party Transactions 46
Item 8. Financial Information 48
Item 9. The Offer And Listing 48
Item 10. Additional Information 48
Item 11. Quantitative And Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 62
Item 12. Description Of Securities Other Than Equity Securities 62
     
PART II
     
Item 13. Defaults, Dividend Arrearages And Delinquencies 63
Item 14. Material Modifications To The Rights Of Security Holders And Use Of Proceeds 63
Item 15. Controls And Procedures 63
Item 16. [Reserved] 64
Item 16A. Audit Committee Financial Expert 64
Item 16B. Code Of Ethics 64
Item 16C. Principal Accountant Fees and Services 64
Item 16D. Exemptions From The Listing Standards For Audit Committees 65
Item 16E. Purchases Of Equity Securities By The Issuer And Affiliated Purchasers 65
Item 16F. Change In Registrant’s Certifying Accountant 65
Item 16G. Corporate Governance 66
Item 16H. Mine Safety Disclosure 66
     
PART III
     
Item 17. Financial Statements 67
Item 18. Financial Statements 67
Item 19. Exhibits 67

  

i

 

 

PART I

 

CERTAIN INFORMATION

 

In this annual report on Form 20-F, unless otherwise indicated, “we,” “us,” “our,” the “Company”, “Color Star” and “Color Star Technology” refer to Color Star Technology Co., Ltd., a company organized in the Cayman Islands, its predecessor entities and its subsidiaries.

 

Unless the context indicates otherwise, all references to “China” and the “PRC” refer to the People’s Republic of China, all references to “Renminbi” or “RMB” are to the legal currency of the People’s Republic of China, all references to “U.S. dollars,” “dollars” and “$” are to the legal currency of the United States. This annual report contains translations of Renminbi amounts into U.S. dollars at specified rates solely for the convenience of the reader. We make no representation that the Renminbi or U.S. dollar amounts referred to in this report could have been or could be converted into U.S. dollars or Renminbi, as the case may be, at any particular rate or at all. On November 6, 2020, the cash buying rate announced by the People’s Bank of China was RMB6.61 to $1.00.

 

Unless indicated otherwise, references to

 

  “China,” “Chinese” and “PRC,” are references to the People’s Republic of China;
     
  “Color Star,” “Color Star Technology,” “the Company,” “we,” “us,” or “our,” are references to the combined business of Color Star Technology Co., Ltd. and our wholly-owned subsidiaries, CACM and Color China, as well as our 80% owned subsidiary, Baytao;
     
  “CACM” refers to CACM Group NY, Inc.
     
  “Color China” refers to Color China Entertainment Limited;
     
  “Baytao” refers to Baytao LLC.

  

1

 

 

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This report contains “forward-looking statements” for purposes of the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 that represent our beliefs, projections and predictions about future events. All statements other than statements of historical fact are “forward-looking statements,” including any projections of earnings, revenue or other financial items, any statements of the plans, strategies and objectives of management for future operations, any statements concerning proposed new projects or other developments, any statements regarding future economic conditions or performance, any statements of management’s beliefs, goals, strategies, intentions and objectives, and any statements of assumptions underlying any of the foregoing. Words such as “may”, “will”, “should”, “could”, “would”, “predicts”, “potential”, “continue”, “expects”, “anticipates”, “future”, “intends”, “plans”, “believes”, “estimates” and similar expressions, as well as statements in the future tense, identify forward-looking statements.

 

These statements are necessarily subjective and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other important factors that could cause our actual results, performance or achievements, or industry results, to differ materially from any future results, performance or achievements described in or implied by such statements. Actual results may differ materially from expected results described in our forward-looking statements, including with respect to correct measurement and identification of factors affecting our business or the extent of their likely impact, and the accuracy and completeness of the publicly available information with respect to the factors upon which our business strategy is based or the success of our business. Given these uncertainties, you should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements.

 

Forward-looking statements should not be read as a guarantee of future performance or results, and will not necessarily be accurate indications of whether, or the times by which, our performance or results may be achieved. Forward-looking statements are based on information available at the time those statements are made and management’s belief as of that time with respect to future events, and are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual performance or results to differ materially from those expressed in or suggested by the forward-looking statements. Important factors that could cause such differences include, but are not limited to, those factors discussed under the headings “Risk Factors”, “Operating and Financial Review and Prospects,” and elsewhere in this report.

  

2

 

 

ITEM 1. IDENTITY OF DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND ADVISERS

 

Not Applicable.

 

ITEM 2. OFFER STATISTICS AND EXPECTED TIMETABLE

 

Not Applicable.

 

ITEM 3. KEY INFORMATION

 

3.A. Selected Financial Data 

 

The following table presents the selected consolidated financial information of our company. The selected consolidated statements of operations data for the years ended June 30, 2020, 2019 and 2018 and the selected consolidated balance sheets data as of June 30, 2020 and 2019 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements, which are included in this annual report beginning on page F-1. Our audited consolidated financial statements are prepared and presented in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, or U.S. GAAP. Our historical results do not necessarily indicate results expected for any future period. You should read the following selected financial data in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and related notes and “Item 5. Operating and Financial Review and Prospects” included elsewhere in this report.

 

The following table presents our summary consolidated statements of operations data:

 

   For the Years Ended 
   2020   2019   2018 
Selling, general and administrative expenses  $(1,598,984)  $(2,065,829)  $(918,605)
Research and development expenses   (120,000)   -    - 
Stock compensation expense   (3,444,617)   (4,592,200)   (1,388,501)
Loss from operations   (5,163,601)   (6,658,029)   (2,307,106)
Other expense, net   (5,041)   (1,393)   (13)
Loss before provision for income taxes   (5,168,642)   (6,659,422)   (2,307,119)
Provision for income taxes   -    -    - 
Loss from continuing operations   (5,168,642)   (6,659,422)   (2,307,119)
Loss from discontinued operations   (6,457,955)   (7,729,108)   (5,092,846)
Net loss  $(11,626,597)  $(14,388,530)  $(7,399,965)

 

The following table presents our summary consolidated balance sheet data:

 

   As of June 30, 
   2020   2019 
Cash and cash equivalents  $988,696   $319,514 
Other receivables   1,002,300    2,300 
Prepayments and advances   1,170,000    25,000 
Current assets of discontinued operations   -    52,158,699 
Property, plant and equipment, net   3,958,335    - 
Other assets of discontinued operations   -    1,659,520 
Total assets   7,119,331    54,165,033 
Total liabilities   (528,833)   (1,201,381)

Liabilities of discontinued operations

   -    (52,442,854)
Total shareholders’ equity  $6,590,498   $520,798 

  

3

 

 

3.B. Capitalization and Indebtedness

 

Not Applicable.

 

3.C. Reasons For The Offer And Use Of Proceeds

 

Not Applicable.

 

3.D. Risk Factors

 

An investment in our ordinary shares involves a high degree of risk. You should carefully consider the risks and uncertainties described below together with all other information contained in this annual report, including the matters discussed under the headings “Forward-Looking Statements” and “Operating and Financial Review and Prospects” before you decide to invest in our ordinary shares. We are a holding company with substantial operations in China and are subject to a legal and regulatory environment that in many respects differs from the United States. If any of the following risks, or any other risks and uncertainties that are not presently foreseeable to us, actually occur, our business, financial condition, results of operations, liquidity and our future growth prospects could be materially and adversely affected.

 

Risks Related to Our Business and Industry

  

We have a limited operating history with our current business model, which makes it difficult to predict our prospects and our business and financial performance.

 

We have a short operating history with our current business model focusing on providing online entertainment performances and online music education services. We transitioned from a concrete business company to our current business model in 2020. Our limited history of operating under the current business model may not serve as an adequate basis for evaluating our prospect and operating results, including gross billings, net revenues, cash flows and operating margins. We have encountered, and may continue to encounter in the future, risks, challenges and uncertainties associated with operating an internet-based education business and online video streaming service industry, such as building and managing reliable and secure IT systems and infrastructure, addressing regulatory compliance and uncertainty, engaging, training and retaining high quality employees such as our teaching staff and IT support staff, and improving and expanding our education content offering. If we do not manage these risks successfully, our operating and financial results may differ materially from our expectations and our business and financial performance may suffer.

 

We may require additional capital, including to fund potential acquisitions and capital expenditures, which may not be available on terms acceptable to us or at all and which depends on many factors beyond our control.

 

To support our growing business, we must have sufficient capital to continue to make significant investments in our platform and product offerings. If we raise additional funds through the issuance of equity, equity-linked or debt securities, those securities may have rights, preferences or privileges senior to those of our common stock, and our existing stockholders may experience dilution. Any debt financing secured by us in the future could involve restrictive covenants relating to our capital-raising activities and other financial and operational matters, which may make it more difficult for us to obtain additional capital and to pursue business opportunities. Any refinancing of our indebtedness could be at significantly higher interest rates, require additional restrictive financial and operational covenants, or require us to incur significant transaction fees, issue warrants or other equity securities, or issue convertible securities. These restrictions and covenants may restrict our ability to finance our operations and engage in, expand, or otherwise pursue our business activities and strategies. Our ability to comply with these covenants and restrictions may be affected by events beyond our control, and breaches of these covenants and restrictions could result in a default and an acceleration of our obligations under a debt agreement. If we raise additional funds through collaborations and licensing arrangements, we might be required to relinquish significant rights to our technologies or our solutions under development, or grant licenses on terms that are not favorable to us, which could lower the economic value of those programs to us.

 

We evaluate financing opportunities from time to time, and our ability to obtain financing will depend, among other things, on our development efforts, business plans and operating performance and the condition of the capital markets at the time we seek financing and to an extent, subject to general economic, financial, competitive, legislative, regulatory and other factors that are beyond our control. We cannot be certain that additional financing will be available to us on favorable terms, or at all. If we are unable to obtain adequate financing or financing on terms satisfactory to us, when we require it, our ability to continue to support our business growth and to respond to business challenges could be significantly limited, and our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

 

Our business, results of operations and financial condition may be adversely affected by global public health epidemics, including the strain of coronavirus known as COVID-19.

 

In December 2019, a novel strain of coronavirus causing respiratory illness, or COVID-19, has surfaced in Wuhan, China, spreading at a fast rate in January and February of 2020, and has now developed to be a global pandemic. In reaction to this outbreak, an increasing number of countries imposed travel suspensions to and from China following the World Health Organization’s “public health emergency of international concern” (PHEIC) announcement on January 30, 2020. Since this outbreak, business activities in China and many other countries including U.S. have been disrupted by a series of emergency quarantine measures taken by the government.

 

4

 

 

As a result, our operations in China and U.S. have been materially affected. New York, where our U.S. operations are based, is currently significantly affected by COVID-19, which led to measures taken by the New York government trying to contain the spread of COVID-19, such as reduction on the number of people in gathering and travel restrictions. Additional travel and other restrictions may be put in place to further control the outbreak in U.S. Accordingly, our operation and business have been and will continue to be adversely affected as the results of the wide-spread pandemic. Management may have to adjust or change our business plan in response to the prolonged pandemic and change of social behavior.

 

The extent to which COVID-19 negatively impacts our business is highly uncertain and cannot be accurately predicted. We believe that the coronavirus outbreak and the measures taken to control it may have a significant negative impact on not only our business, but economic activities globally. The magnitude of this negative effect on the continuity of our business operation in China and U.S. remains uncertain. These uncertainties impede our ability to conduct our daily operations and could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations, and as a result affect our stock price and create more volatility.

 

We may not be able to oversee the new joint venture efficiently. 

We may not be able to oversee Baytao, our new joint venture, efficiently, realize anticipated profits or effectively implement our growth and operating strategies. We will need to transition from a company with our primary operations in China to a company capable of supporting operations in both China and the United States. We might not be successful in such a transition. There can be no guarantee that the addition of the new joint venture will not cause us to incur additional debt and increase our exposure to market and other risks. Our failure to successfully pursue our strategies or effectively operate the joint venture entity could also have a material adverse effect on our rate of growth and operating performance.

 

5

 

 

If we are unable to operate the “Color World” platform as planned, our results of operation will be significantly impacted.

 

We launched the “Color World” platform on October 15, 2020. The attractiveness of our platform to our prospective “Star Teachers” and student subscribers depends on our ability to innovate. To remain competitive, we must continue to develop and expand our platform and education services. We must also continue to enhance and improve our technology infrastructure. These efforts may require us to develop or license increasingly complex technologies. In addition, new education services and technologies developed and introduced by competitors could render our education services and technologies obsolete if we are unable to update or modify our own technology. Developing and integrating new education services and technologies into our existing platform and infrastructure could be expensive and time-consuming. Furthermore, any new features and functions may not achieve market acceptance. We may not succeed in implementing new technologies, or may incur substantial costs in doing so. Our platform and education services must achieve high levels of market acceptance in order for us to recoup our investments. Our platform and education services could fail to attain sufficient market acceptance for many reasons, including:

 

we may fail to predict market demand accurately and to provide education services that meet this demand in a timely fashion;

 

  our marketing efforts may be inefficient and fail to attract the potential users;

 

  Star Teachers that we recruit on our platforms may not like, find useful or agree with any changes;

 

  there may be defects, errors or failures on our platform;

 

  there may be negative publicity about our platforms’ performance or effectiveness; and

 

  there may be competing services or technologies introduced or anticipated to be introduced by our competitors.

 

If our platform and education services or technologies do not achieve adequate acceptance in the market, our competitive position, results of operations and financial condition could be materially and adversely affected.

 

Our success relies on the continuing efforts of our senior management team and qualified key personnel, and our business may be harmed if we are unable to retain or motivate them.

 

Our business operations depend on the continued services of our senior management team and qualified key personnel, particularly our executive officers and the senior management of Color China, our wholly owned subsidiary.

 

Although we have provided different incentives to our senior management team, we cannot assure you that we can continue to retain their services. One or more of our key executives may be unable or unwilling to continue in their present positions. Meanwhile, we have also provided attractive compensation packages to our qualified key personnel. However, we may not be able to hire and retain these personnel at compensation levels consistent with our existing compensation and salary structure. Some of the companies with which we compete for qualified and skilled personnel have greater resources than we have and may be able to offer more attractive terms of employment. In addition, we invest significant time and resources in training our employees, which increases their value to competitors who may seek to recruit them.

 

If we are unable to retain the services of our senior management team or qualified key personnel, we may not be able to find suitable replacements or may incur significant expenses in finding such replacements, thus our future growth may be constrained, our business may be severely disrupted and our results of operations and financial condition may be materially and adversely affected. In addition, although we have entered into confidentiality and non-competition agreements with our senior management team and qualified key personnel, there is no assurance that any member of our senior management team or any of our qualified key personnel will not join a competitor. In the event that any dispute arises between us, on one hand, and any of our senior management and qualified key personnel, on the other hand, we may have to incur substantial costs and expenses in order to enforce such agreements, or we may be unable to enforce them at all.

 

6

 

 

If we are unable to recruit “Star Teachers” as planned or if these instructors do not perform according to the agreements we have with them, the operation of our performance support and music education business will be negatively impacted.

 

Professional artists and producers that we have begun recruiting as our Star Teachers help us build and maintain the quality of our education and services, as well as our brand and reputation. Our ability to continue to attract recruit the instructors with the necessary experience and qualifications is a key factor in the success of our operations. We seek to continue hiring experienced and successful professionals in music, film, sports, animation, television, presentations, dance, art and other entertainment industries whom are able to follow our education service protocols and deliver effective instructions based on the agreements we have with them. The market for the recruitment of these professionals is competitive, and we must also provide continued training to ensure that our instructors stay abreast of changes in student demands, teaching methodologies and other necessary changes.

 

In order to recruit these industry professionals as instructors on our platform, we must provide candidates with competitive compensation packages. Although we have not experienced major difficulties in recruiting or training qualified instructors thus far, we cannot guarantee we will be able to continue to recruit, train and retain a sufficient number of qualified instructors in the future, which may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

If we are unable to reach a critical mass of subscribers, our revenues may not be sufficient to cover the costs of our recruitment of Star Teachers.

 

We are obligated to pay each of our Star Teachers on a case-by-case basis depending on the results of our negotiations. Some Star Teachers will accept fixed payments following a predefined schedule, whereas others may instead request a revenue sharing payment model whereby we will need to distribute to the Star Teachers a percentage of the net income earned from generated sales, licensing or other revenue from their courses on our platform, including a pro rata share of our subscription fees, or a hybrid of the two. If we are unable to generate enough revenue from our subscription fees from our users to cover our Star Teachers’ recruitment costs, our results of operations and financial condition could be materially and adversely affected.

 

Our education service revenue model depends on developing a subscriber base of users. If we fail to reach a critical mass of subscribers, our net revenues may not be sufficient, and we may not be able to implement our business plan.

 

We expect to generate revenue primarily from the fees we collect from our users. It is critical for us to enroll subscribers in a cost-effective manner. Some of the factors, many of which are largely beyond our control, could prevent us from successfully increasing subscriptions in a cost-effective manner, or at all. These factors include, among other things, (i) reduced interest in the products and services we offer; (ii) negative publicity or perceptions regarding us, or electronic education services in general; (iii) the emergence of alternative technologies not offered by us; (iv) the inability of subscribers to pay the fees; (v) increasing market competition, particularly price reductions by competitors that we are unable or unwilling to match; and (vi) adverse changes in relevant government policies or general economic conditions. If one or more of these factors reduce market demand for our services, our subscriber base may not materialize as anticipated or our costs associated with subscriber acquisition and retention could increase, or both, any of which could materially affect our ability to grow our gross billings and net revenues. These developments could also harm our brand and reputation, which would negatively impact our ability to establish or expand our business.

 

7

 

 

We expect to rely heavily on information and technology to operate our existing and future education products and services, and any cybersecurity incident or other disruption to our technology infrastructure could result in the loss of critical confidential information or adversely impact our reputation, business or results of operations.

 

Our ability to attract and retain customers and to compete effectively depends in part upon the satisfactory performance and reliability of our technology network, including the ability to provide features of services that are important to our customers and to protect our confidential business information and the information provided by our customers. We also rely on our technology to maintain and process various operating and financial data that are essential to the day-to-day operation of our business and formulation of our development strategies. Our business operations and growth prospects depend on our ability to maintain and make timely and cost-effective enhancements and upgrades to our technology system and to introduce innovative additions that can meet changing operational needs in future. Therefore, we expect to continue to invest in advanced information technology and any equipment to enhance operational efficiency and reliability as we grow. Accordingly, any errors, defects, disruptions or other performance problems with our IT infrastructure could damage our reputation, decrease user satisfaction and retention, adversely impact our ability to attract new users and expand our service and product offerings, and materially disrupt our operations. If any of these occur, our business operations, reputation and prospects could be harmed.

 

If our security measures are breached or fail and result in unauthorized disclosure of data by our employees or our third-party agents, we could lose existing subscribers, fail to attract new subscribers and be exposed to protracted and costly litigation.

 

Maintaining platform security is of critical importance to our subscribers because the platform stores and transmits proprietary and confidential information, which may include sensitive personally identifiable information that may be subject to stringent legal and regulatory obligations. As an electronic education service provider, we face an increasing number of threats to our IT infrastructure, including unauthorized activity and access by our employees or third-party agents, system viruses, worms, malicious code and organized cyber-attacks, which could breach our security and disrupt our business. We hope to introduce data security and confidentiality protocols into the cooperation agreements we enter into with third-party sales agents with whom we share prospective subscribers’ contact information. As we expand, we hope to invest in improving our technology security initiatives, information technology risk management and disaster recovery plans to prevent unauthorized access of confidential or sensitive personal information by our employees and third-party sales agents in the process of engaging prospective subscribers.

 

These measures, however, may not be as effective as we anticipate. In addition, there is no assurance that our third-party sales agents will comply with contractual and legal requirements with respect to data privacy when they collect data from our prospective customers. If our security measures are breached or fail as a result of third-party action, employee error, malfeasance or otherwise, we could be subject to liability or our business could be interrupted, potentially over an extended period of time. Any or all of these issues could harm our reputation, adversely affect our ability to attract and enroll prospective subscribers, cause prospective subscribers not to enroll or stay enrolled, or subject us to third-party lawsuits, regulatory fines or other action or liability. Further, any reputational damage resulting from breach of our security measures could create distrust of our company by prospective subscribers or investors. We may be required to expend significant management time and additional resources to protect against the threat of these disruptions and security breaches or to alleviate problems caused by such disruptions or breaches.

 

8

 

 

Privacy concerns could limit our ability to collect and leverage our user data and disclosure of user data could adversely impact our business and reputation.

 

In the ordinary course of our business and in particular in connection with conducting sales and marketing activities with our existing and prospective subscribers as well as the utilization of our AI-powered platform programs, we collect and utilize data supplied by our users. We currently face certain legal obligations regarding the manner in which we treat such information. Increased regulation of data utilization practices, including self-regulation or findings under existing laws that limit our ability to collect, transfer and use data, could have an adverse effect on our business. In addition, if we were to disclose data about our users in a manner that was objectionable to them, our business reputation could be adversely affected, and we could face potential legal claims that could impact our operating results.

 

Internationally, we may become subject to additional and/or more stringent legal obligations concerning our treatment of customer and other personal information, such as laws regarding data localization and/or restrictions on data export. Failure to comply with these obligations could subject us to liability, and to the extent that we need to alter our business model or practices to adapt to these obligations, we could incur additional expenses.

 

We face regulatory risks and uncertainties with respect to the licensing requirement for the online transmission of internet audio-visual programs in China.

 

On December 20, 2007, the National Radio and Television Administration f/k/a known as the State Administration of Press Publication Radio Film and Television, or SAPPRFT, and the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, or the MIIT, jointly promulgated the Administrative Provisions on Internet Audio Visual Program Services, or the Audio Visual Program Provisions, which became effective on January 31, 2008 and were amended on August 28, 2015. Among other things, the Audio Visual Program Provisions stipulate that no entities or individuals may provide Internet audio-visual program services without a License for Online Transmission of Audio-Visual Programs issued by SAPPRFT or completing the relevant filing with SAPPRFT or its local bureaus, and only state-owned or state-controlled entities are eligible to apply for a License for Online Transmission of Audio Visual Programs. On April 1, 2010, SAPPRFT promulgated the Provisional Implementations of Tentative Categories of Internet Audio Visual Program Services, or the Categories, which clarified the scope of Internet audio-visual programs services, which was amended on March 10, 2017. According to the Categories, there are four categories of Internet audio-visual program services which are further divided into seventeen sub-categories. Sub-category No. 3 to the second category covers the making and editing of certain specialized audio-visual programs concerning, among other things, educational content, and broadcasting such content to the general public online. Sub-category No. 5 of the first category and sub-category No. 7 of the second category cover the live broadcasting of important political, martial, economic, social, cultural, sports activities or events or general social or community cultural activities, sports games and other organized activities. However, there are still significant uncertainties relating to the interpretation and implementation of the Audio Visual Program Provisions, in particular, the scope of “internet audio-visual programs.” See “Regulations Relating to Online Transmission of Audio-Visual Programs.”

  

We plan to deliver our courses in live streaming format worldwide. Our teachers and students communicate and interact live with each other via our virtual learning community. The audio and video data will likely be transmitted through the platforms between specific recipients instantly without any further redaction. We believe the nature of the raw data we transmit will distinguish us from general providers of internet audio-visual program services, such as the operator of online video websites, and the provision of the Audio-Visual Program Provisions are not applicable with regard to our offering of the courses. However, we cannot assure you that the competent PRC government authorities will not ultimately take a view contrary to our opinion. In addition, we also plan to offer video recordings of live streaming courses and certain other audio-video contents on our electronic platforms to our students as supplementary course materials on our platforms. If the government authorities determine that our offering of the courses fall within the relevant category of Internet audio-visual program services under the Categories, we may be required to obtain the License for Online Transmission of Audio Visual Programs.

 

9

 

 

The Categories describe “Internet audio-visual program services” in a very broad, vague manner and are unclear as to whether electronic courses, whether delivered in a live streaming format or through video recordings, fall into the definition of audio-visual programs. We have made inquiries to the relevant bureaus of SAPPRFT and were informed that online educational content provided through live streaming or recorded courses does not fall within the scope of internet audio-visual programs, the transmission of which does not require a License for Online Transmission of Audio-Visual Programs. We cannot assure you that the PRC government will not ultimately take a view that live streaming or recorded courses or any other content offered on our platforms are subject to the Audio Visual Program Provisions. We currently do not hold a license for Online Transmission of Audio Visual Programs, and since we are not a state-owned or state-controlled entity, we are not eligible to apply for such license. If the PRC government determines that our content should be considered as “internet audio- visual programs” for the purpose of the Audio-Visual Program Provisions, we may be required to obtain a license for Online Transmission of Audio Visual Programs. We are, however, not eligible apply for such license since we are not a state-owned or state-controlled entity. If this were to occur, we may be subject to penalties, fines, legal sanctions or an order to suspend the provision of our live streaming courses. As of the date of this annual report, we have not received any notice of warning or been subject to penalties or other disciplinary action from the relevant governmental authorities regarding the lack of a License for Online Transmission of Audio Visual Programs in conducting of our business.

 

Our failure to obtain and maintain approvals, licenses or permits in China applicable to our business could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial conditions and results of operations in the future.

 

As we plan to deliver our courses in live streaming format worldwide, including in China, we may be subject to various regulations by a number of PRC regulatory authorities, such as the SAIC, the Cyberspace Administration of China, the MITT, the National Radio and Television Administration, and the State Council Information Office, the Ministry of Civil Affairs, and the Ministry of Human Resources and Social Welfare. We may be required in the future to obtain additional government approvals, licenses and permits in connection with our operations.

 

By way of example, depending upon regulatory interpretation, under the current PRC laws and regulations, the provision of our educational content through our electronic platform may be considered “online publishing” and may require us to obtain an Internet Publishing License, which we currently do not have.

 

As of the date of this report, we have not received any notice of warning or been subject to penalties or other disciplinary action from the relevant governmental authorities regarding the lack of any the above-mentioned approvals, licenses or permits. However, we cannot guarantee that the government authorities will not impose any penalties or sanctions on us in the future, which may include warnings, fines, mandates to remedy any violations, confiscation of the gains derived from the services for which approvals, licenses or permits are required, and/or an order to cease to provide such services. In addition, we cannot guarantee that the government will not promulgate new laws and regulations that require additional licenses, permits and/or approvals for the operation of any of our existing or future business. If we are unable to obtain such licenses, permits, or approvals in a timely fashion, we could be subject to penalties and operational disruption and our financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

 

We face intense competition which could adversely affect our results of operations and market share.

 

We operate in a highly competitive and fragmented industry that is sensitive to price, content (i.e., curriculum) and quality of service. Some of our competitors may have more financial resources, longer operating histories, larger customer bases and greater brand recognition than we do, or they are controlled or subsidized by foreign governments, which enables them to obtain or raise capital and enter into strategic relationships more easily. We also compete with leading domestic supplier companies based on a number of factors including business model, operational capabilities, cost control and service quality, as well as in-house delivery capabilities to serve their logistics needs and compete with us.

 

We are also subject to other risks and uncertainties that affect many other businesses, including but not limited to:

 

  (1) Increasing costs, the volatility of costs and funding requirements and other legal mandates for employee benefits, especially pension and healthcare benefits;

 

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  (2) The increasing costs of compliance with federal, state and foreign governmental agency mandates;

 

  (3) Any impacts on our business resulting from new domestic and international government laws and regulation;

 

  (4) Market conditions in the childhood education industry or the economy as a whole;

 

  (5) Market acceptance of our new service and growth initiatives;

 

  (6) Announcements of the introduction of new products and services by our competitors;

 

  (7) The impact of technology developments on our operations and on demand for our products and services;

 

  (8) Developments concerning current or future strategic collaborations; and

 

  (9) Widespread outbreak of an illness or any other communicable disease, or any other public health crisis such as we are currently experiencing with the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

If we are unable to respond to these changing market conditions, our business and financial results may be materially affected.

 

We may be unable to fund any significant up-front and/or guaranteed payment cash requirements associated with our live music streaming rights, which could result in the inability to secure and retain such streaming rights and may limit our operating flexibility, which may adversely affect our business, operating results and financial condition.

 

In order to secure event and festival live music streaming rights or hold concerts, we may be required to fund significant up-front and/or guaranteed payment cash requirements to artists or festival or event promoters prior to the event or festival taking place. If we do not have sufficient cash on hand or available capacity to advance the necessary cash for any given artist, event or festival, we would not be able to retain the rights for that artist, festival or event, such counter parties may be able to terminate their content acquisition agreements with us, and as a result our business, financial condition and results of operations may be adversely affected.

 

We may be unsuccessful in developing our original content.

 

We plan to continue to produce original classes, covering various areas such as singing and dancing, etc. We believe that a positive reputation with users concerning our original content is important in attracting and retaining users. To the extent our content is perceived as low quality, offensive or otherwise not compelling to users, our ability to establish and maintain a positive reputation may be adversely impacted. If the original content we produce does not attract new users, we may not be able to cover our expenses to produce such programs, and our business, financial condition and results of operations may be adversely affected.

  

As we continue to develop our original content, we will become responsible for higher production costs and other expenses. We may also take on risks associated with production, such as completion and key talent risk. To the extent we do not accurately anticipate costs or mitigate risks, or if we become liable for content we acquire, produce, license and/or distribute, our business may suffer. Litigation to defend these claims could be costly and the expenses and damages arising from any liability or unforeseen production risks could harm our results of operations. We may not be indemnified against claims or costs of these types and we may not have insurance coverage for these types of claims.

 

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We face competition for users’ attention and time.

 

The market for entertainment video content is intensively competitive and subject to rapid change. We compete against other entertainment video providers, such as (i) interactive on-demand audio content and pre-recorded entertainment, (ii) broadcast radio providers, including terrestrial and Internet radio providers, (iii) cable, satellite and Internet television and movie content providers, (iv) video gaming providers and (v) other sources of entertainment for our users’ attention and time. These content and service providers pose a competitive threat to the extent existing or potential users choose to consume their content or use their services rather than our content or our services. The online marketplace for live music and music-related content may rapidly evolve and provide users with a number of alternatives or new access models, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our services and software are highly technical and may contain undetected software bugs or vulnerabilities, which could manifest in ways that could seriously harm our reputation and our business.

 

Our services and software are highly technical and complex. Our services or any other products we may introduce in the future, may contain undetected software bugs, hardware errors, and other vulnerabilities. These bugs and errors can manifest in any number of ways in our products, including through diminished performance, security vulnerabilities, malfunctions, or even permanently disabled products. We have a practice of regularly updating our products and some errors in our products may be discovered only after a product has been used by users, and may in some cases be detected only under certain circumstances or after extended use. Any errors, bugs or other vulnerabilities discovered in our code or backend after release could damage our reputation, drive away users, allow third parties to manipulate or exploit our software (including, for example, providing mobile device users a means to suppress advertisements without payment and gain access to features only available to the ad-supported service), lower revenue and expose us to claims for damages, any of which could seriously harm our business. Additionally, errors, bugs, or other vulnerabilities may—either directly or if exploited by third parties—affect our ability to make accurate royalty payments.

 

We also could face claims for product liability, tort or breach of warranty. Defending a lawsuit, regardless of its merit, is costly and may divert management’s attention and seriously harm our reputation and our business. In addition, if our liability insurance coverage proves inadequate or future coverage is unavailable on acceptable terms or at all, our business could be seriously harmed.

     

Our business depends on a strong developing brand, and any failure to create, maintain, protect and enhance our brand would hurt our ability to attract and/ or expand our base of users.

 

Maintaining, protecting and enhancing our brand is critical to expanding our base of users and star teachers, and will depend largely on our ability to continue to develop and provide an innovative and high-quality experience for our users and to attract more celebrities to work with us, which we may not do successfully. Our brands may be impaired by a number of other factors, including any failure to keep pace with technological advances on our platform or with our services, slower load times for our services, a decline in the quality or quantity of the content available on our services, a failure to protect our intellectual property rights or any alleged violations of law, regulations, or public policy. If we do not successfully maintain a strong brand, our business could be harmed.

     

We are at risk of attempts at unauthorized access to our services, and failure to effectively prevent and remediate such attempts could have an adverse impact on our business, operating results, and financial condition. Unauthorized access to our services may cause us to misstate key performance indicators, which once discovered, corrected, and disclosed, could undermine investor confidence in the integrity of our key performance indicators and could cause our stock price to drop significantly.

 

We may be impacted by attempts by third parties to manipulate and exploit our software for the purpose of gaining unauthorized access to our service. For example, there might be instances of third parties seeking to provide mobile device users a means to suppress advertisements without payment and gain access to features only available to the ad-supported services. If in the future we fail to successfully detect and address such issues, it may have artificial effects on our key performance indicators, such as content hours, content hours per MAU, and MAUs, which underlie, among other things, our contractual obligations with advertisers, as well as harm our relationship with them. This may impact our results of operations, particularly with respect to margins on our ad-supported segment, by increasing our ad-supported cost of revenue without a corresponding increase to our ad-supported revenue, which could seriously harm our business. Additionally, unlike our ad-supported users, individuals using unauthorized versions of our application are unlikely to convert to premium subscribers. Moreover, once we detect and correct such unauthorized access and any key performance indicators it affects, investor confidence in the integrity of our key performance indicators could be undermined. These could have a material adverse impact on our business, operating results and financial condition. 

 

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If we are forced to cancel or postpone all or part of a scheduled concert, our business may be adversely impacted, and our reputation may be harmed.

 

We incur a significant amount of up-front costs when we plan and prepare for an online concert. Accordingly, if a planned concert is canceled, we would lose a substantial amount of sunk costs, fail to generate the anticipated revenue and may be forced to issue refunds for tickets sold. If we are forced to postpone a concert or event, we would incur substantial additional costs in connection with our having to stage the event on a new date, may have reduced attendance and revenue and may have to refund money to ticketholders. In addition, any cancellation or postponement could harm both our reputation and the reputation of the particular concert or event. We could be compelled to cancel or postpone all or part of an event or concert for many reasons, including such things as low attendance, adverse weather conditions, technical problems, issues with permitting or government regulation, incidents, injuries or deaths at that event or concert, as well as extraordinary incidents, such as pandemics, terrorist attacks, mass-casualty incidents and natural disasters or similar events.

 

A deterioration in general economic conditions and its impact on consumer and business spending, particularly by customers in our targeted millennial generation demographic, could adversely affect our revenue and financial results.

 

Our business and financial results are influenced significantly by general economic conditions, in particular, those conditions affecting discretionary consumer spending and corporate spending. During economic slowdowns and recessions, many consumers could reduce their discretionary spending. An economic downturn can result in reduced ticket revenue and lower customer spending.

 

We depend on relationships with key event promoters, sponsor and marketing partners, executives, managers and artists, and adverse changes in these relationships could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our business is particularly dependent upon personal relationships, as promoters and executives within entertainment companies such as ours leverage their network of relationships with artists, agents, managers and sponsor and marketing partners to secure the rights to the performers and events that are critical to our success. Due to the importance of those industry contacts, the loss of any of our officers or other key personnel who have relationships with these artists, agents or managers could adversely affect our venue management and event promotion businesses. While we have hiring policies and procedures and conduct background checks of our promoters, executives, managers and artists, they may engage in or may have in the past engaged in conduct we do not endorse or that is otherwise improper, which may result in reputational harm to us. Also, to the extent artists, agents and managers we have relationships with are replaced with individuals with whom our officers or other key personnel do not have relationships, our competitive position and financial condition could be adversely affected.

 

We may be accused of infringing upon intellectual property rights of third parties.

 

From time to time, we may be in the future subject to legal proceedings and claims in the ordinary course of business, including claims of alleged infringement and other violations of the trademarks, copyrights, patents and other intellectual property or proprietary rights of third parties.

  

We may not be able to successfully defend against such claims, which may result in a limitation on our ability to use the intellectual property subject to these claims and also might require us to enter into settlement or license agreements, pay costly damage awards or face an injunction prohibiting us from using the affected intellectual property in connection with our services. Defending ourselves against intellectual property claims, whether they are with or without merit or are determined in our favor, results in costly litigation and may divert the attention of our management and technical personnel from the rest of our business. 

 

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In addition, music, Internet, technology, and media companies are frequently subject to litigation based on allegations of infringement, misappropriation, or other violations of intellectual property rights. Many companies in these industries, including many of our competitors, have substantially larger patent and intellectual property portfolios than we do, which could make us a target for litigation as we may not be able to assert counterclaims against parties that sue us for patent, or other intellectual property infringement. In addition, various “non-practicing entities” that own patents and other intellectual property rights often attempt to aggressively assert claims in order to extract value from technology companies. Further, from time to time we may introduce new products and services, including in territories where we currently do not have an offering, which could increase our exposure to patent and other intellectual property claims from competitors and non-practicing entities. It is difficult to predict whether assertions of third-party intellectual property rights or any infringement or misappropriation claims arising from such assertions will substantially harm our business, operating results, and financial condition. If we are forced to defend against any infringement or misappropriation claims, whether they are with or without merit, are settled out of court, or are determined in our favor, we may be required to expend significant time and financial resources on the defense of such claims. Furthermore, an adverse outcome of a dispute may require us to pay significant damages, which may be even greater if we are found to have willfully infringed upon a party’s intellectual property; cease exploiting copyrighted content that we have previously had the ability to exploit; cease using solutions that are alleged to infringe or misappropriate the intellectual property of others; expend additional development resources to redesign our solutions; enter into potentially unfavorable royalty or license agreements in order to obtain the right to use necessary technologies, content, or materials; indemnify our partners and other third parties; and/or take other actions that may have material effects on our business, operating results, and financial condition.

  

Changes in how network operators handle and charge for access to data that travel across their networks could adversely impact our business.

 

We will rely upon the ability of consumers to access our service through the Internet. Changes in laws or regulations that adversely affect the growth, popularity or use of the Internet, including laws impacting net neutrality, could decrease the demand for our service and increase our cost of doing business. To the extent that network operators implement usage-based pricing, including meaningful bandwidth caps, or otherwise try to monetize access to their networks by data providers, we could incur greater operating expenses and our subscriber acquisition and retention could be negatively impacted.

    

The success of our business and operations depends, in part, on the integrity of our systems and infrastructures, as well as affiliate and third-party computer systems, Wi-Fi and other communication systems. System interruption and the lack of integration and redundancy in these systems and infrastructures may have an adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

System interruption and the lack of integration and redundancy in the information systems and infrastructures, both of our own systems and other computer systems and of affiliate and third-party software, Wi-Fi and other communications systems service providers on which we rely, may adversely affect our ability to operate websites, process and fulfill transactions, respond to user inquiries and generally maintain cost-efficient operations. Such interruptions could occur by virtue of natural disaster, malicious actions such as hacking or acts of terrorism or war, or human error. In addition, the loss of some or all of certain key personnel could require us to expend additional resources to continue to maintain our software and systems and could subject us to systems interruptions.

 

Although we maintain up to date information technology systems and network infrastructures for the operation of our businesses, techniques used to gain unauthorized access to private networks are constantly evolving, and we may be unable to anticipate or prevent unauthorized access to our systems and data. 

 

Privacy concerns could limit our ability to leverage our subscriber data and compliance with privacy regulations could result in significant expense.

 

In the ordinary course of business and in particular in connection with merchandising our service to our users, we collect and utilize data supplied by our users. We may face certain legal obligations regarding the manner in which we treat such information. Other businesses have been criticized by privacy groups and governmental bodies for attempts to link personal identities and other information to data collected on the Internet regarding users’ browsing and other habits. Increased regulation of data utilization practices, including self-regulation or findings under existing laws, that limit our ability to use collected data, could have an adverse effect on our business. As our business evolves and as we expand internationally, we may become subject to additional and/or more stringent legal obligations concerning our treatment of user information, and to the extent that we need to alter our business model or practices to adapt to these obligations, we could incur significant expenses.

 

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In addition, we cannot fully control the actions of third parties who may have access to the user data we collect and the user data collected by our third-party vendors. We may be unable to monitor or control such third parties and the third parties having access to our website in their compliance with the terms of our privacy policies, terms of use, and other applicable contracts, and we may be unable to prevent unauthorized access to, or use or disclosure of, user information. Any such misuse could hinder or prevent our efforts with respect to growth opportunities and could expose us to liability or otherwise adversely affect our business. In addition, these third parties may become the victim of security breaches or have practices that may result in a breach, and we could be responsible for those third-party acts or failures to act.

 

Any failure, or perceived failure, by us or the prior owners of acquired businesses to maintain the privacy of data relating to our users (including disclosing data in a manner that was objectionable to our users), to comply with our posted privacy policies, our predecessors’ posted policies, laws and regulations, rules of self-regulatory organizations, industry standards and contractual provisions to which we or they may be bound, could result in the loss of confidence in us, or result in actions against us by governmental entities or others, all of which could result in litigation and financial losses, and could potentially cause us to lose users, advertisers, revenue and employees.

 

We do not have insurance coverage that is customary and standard for companies of comparable size in comparable industries

 

As of the date of this report, we have not obtained sufficient insurance coverage that is customary and standard for companies of comparable size in comparable industries, such as any liability insurance and insurance for losses and interruptions caused by terrorist attacks, military conflicts, and wars, which could subject us to significant financial losses. The realization of any of these risks could cause a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows.

 

Risks Related to the Ownership of Our ordinary shares

 

If we fail to comply with the continued listing requirements of NASDAQ, we would face possible delisting, which would result in a limited public market for our shares and make obtaining future debt or equity financing more difficult for us.

 

On November 18, 2019, we received a notification letter from the Nasdaq Listing Qualifications Staff of The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC (“Nasdaq”) notifying us that we are no longer in compliance with the minimum stockholders’ equity requirement for continued listing on the Nasdaq Capital Market set forth in Nasdaq Listing Rule 5550(b)(1) (the “Stockholder Equity Requirement”). The notification received had no immediate effect on the listing of the Company’s ordinary shares on Nasdaq. Nasdaq has provided us with 45 calendar days, or until January 2, 2020, to submit a plan to regain compliance with the minimum stockholders’ equity standard. If our plan to regain compliance is accepted, Nasdaq may grant an extension of up to 180 calendar days from the date of the notification letter, or until May 16, 2019, to evidence compliance. On January 2, 2020, we submitted our plan of compliance to Nasdaq.

 

On January 24, 2020, we received a notice (the “Notice”) from Nasdaq stating that we were not able to regain compliance with the Stockholder Equity Requirement or the alternative criteria set forth in Nasdaq Listing Rule 5550(b) and that the Staff had determined to seek to delist the Company’s securities from Nasdaq unless the Company requests a hearing before the Nasdaq Hearings Panel (the “Panel”). On January 28, 2020 we requested a hearing before the Panel. Such request will stay any suspension or delisting action by Nasdaq pending the completion of the hearing process. On January 30, 2020, we received a hearing instruction letter from Nasdaq stating that the delisting action referenced in the Notice has been stayed, pending a final written decision by the Panel.

  

On March 12, 2020, the Company appeared before the Panel to demonstrate its ability to regain compliance with the Stockholder Equity Requirement and subsequently submitted supplemental information to the Panel on March 23, 2020 pursuant to the Panel’s request. By a letter dated April 16, 2020, the Company was notified by Nasdaq that the Panel had determined to continue the listing of the Company’s ordinary shares based upon the Company’s compliance with the Stockholder Equity Requirement. Additionally, the Panel advised in such letter that is has placed the Company under a Panel Monitor (the “Monitor”) that shall last through April 15, 2021. Pursuant to that Monitor and as provided in the Nasdaq Rules, if at any time during the monitor period the Company fails to maintain compliance with any listing standard, Nasdaq will issue a Staff Delisting Determination and the Hearings Department will promptly schedule a new hearing.

 

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Separately, on March 5, 2020, we received a notification letter from Nasdaq notifying us that we are no longer in compliance with the minimum bid price requirement for continued listing on the Nasdaq Capital Market set forth in Nasdaq Listing Rule 5550(a)(2) (the “Bid Price Requirement”). The notification received has no immediate effect on the listing of the Company’s ordinary shares on Nasdaq. Under the Nasdaq Listing Rules, the Company had until September 1, 2020 to regain compliance. If at any time during such 180-day period the closing bid price of the Company’s ordinary shares is at least $1 for a minimum of 10 consecutive business days, Nasdaq will provide the Company written confirmation of compliance.

 

On August 10, 2020, we received a letter from Nasdaq notifying the Company that it had regained compliance with Nasdaq Listing Rules 5550(a)(2), as the Company maintained a closing bid price of $1.00 per share or greater for twenty (20) consecutive days from July 13, 2020 through August 7, 2020. On October 18, 2020, we received a notification letter from Nasdaq notifying us that we are no longer in compliance with the Bid Price Requirement again and were granted 180 days or until April 13, 2021 to regain compliance.

  

Nasdaq Listing Rule 5550(a)(2) requires listed securities to maintain a minimum bid price of $1.00 per share, and Nasdaq Listing Rule 5810(c)(3)(A) provides that a failure to meet the minimum bid price requirement exists if the deficiency continues for a period of 30 consecutive business days. There can be no assurance that the Company will be able to maintain the compliance with the Nasdaq rules. If we fail to comply with the Bid Price Requirement or any other listing rules when required in the future, we could be subject to suspension and delisting proceedings. If our securities lose their status on The NASDAQ Capital Market, our securities would likely trade in the over-the-counter market. If our securities were to trade on the over-the-counter market, selling our securities could be more difficult because smaller quantities of securities would likely be bought and sold, transactions could be delayed, and security analysts’ coverage of us may be reduced. In addition, in the event our securities are delisted, broker-dealers have certain regulatory burdens imposed upon them, which may discourage broker-dealers from effecting transactions in our securities, further limiting the liquidity of our securities. These factors could result in lower prices and larger spreads in the bid and ask prices for our securities. Such delisting from The NASDAQ Capital Market and continued or further declines in our share price could also greatly impair our ability to raise additional necessary capital through equity or debt financing, and could significantly increase the ownership dilution to shareholders caused by our issuing equity in financing or other transactions. 

 

The price of our ordinary shares historically has been volatile, which may affect the price at which you could sell the ordinary shares.

 

Our ordinary shares are listed on the Nasdaq Capital Market under the symbol “CSCW.” The market price for the ordinary shares has varied between a high bid price of $3.00 on September 17, 2019 and a low bid price of $0.31 on June 4, 2020 in the 12-month period ended on October 15, 2020. This volatility may affect the price at which you could sell the ordinary shares. The ordinary share price are likely to continue to be volatile and subject to significant price and volume fluctuations in response to market and other factors, including the following:

  

  variations in our revenues, earnings and cash flows;
     
  announcements of new investments, acquisitions, strategic partnerships or joint ventures by us or our competitors;
     
  announcements of new offerings, solutions and expansions by us or our competitors;
     
  changes in financial estimates by securities analysts;
     
  detrimental adverse publicity about us, our services or our industry;
     
  announcements of new regulations, rules or policies relevant for our business;
     
  additions or departures of key personnel;
     
  release of lockup or other transfer restrictions on our outstanding equity securities or sales of additional equity securities; and
     
  potential litigation or regulatory investigations.

 

Any of these factors may result in large and sudden changes in the volume and price at which our ordinary shares will trade.

 

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In the past, shareholders of public companies have often brought securities class action suits against those companies following periods of instability in the market price of their securities. If we were to be involved in a class action suit, it could divert a significant amount of our management’s attention and other resources from our business and operations and require us to incur significant expenses to defend the suit, which could harm our results of operations. Any such class action suit, whether or not successful, could harm our reputation and restrict our ability to raise capital in the future. In addition, if a claim is successfully made against us, we may be required to pay significant damages, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

 

We do not intend to pay dividends on our ordinary shares for the foreseeable future, but if we intend to do so our holding company structure may limit the payment of dividends to our stockholders. 

 

While we have no current intention of paying dividends, should we decide in the future to do so, as a holding company, our ability to pay dividends and meet other obligations depends upon the receipt of dividends or other payments from our operating subsidiaries and other holdings and investments. In addition, our operating subsidiaries, from time to time, may be subject to restrictions on their ability to make distributions to us, including as a result of restrictive covenants in loan agreements, restrictions on the conversion of local currency into U.S. dollars or other hard currency and other regulatory restrictions as discussed below. If future dividends are paid in RMB, fluctuations in the exchange rate for the conversion of RMB into U.S. dollars may reduce the amount received by U.S. stockholders upon conversion of the dividend payment into U.S. dollars.

 

Chinese regulations currently permit the payment of dividends only out of accumulated profits as determined in accordance with Chinese accounting standards and regulations. Our subsidiaries in China are also required to set aside a portion of their after tax profits according to Chinese accounting standards and regulations to fund certain reserve funds. Currently, our subsidiaries in China are the only sources of revenues or investment holdings for the payment of dividends. If they do not accumulate sufficient profits under Chinese accounting standards and regulations to first fund certain reserve funds as required by Chinese accounting standards, we will be unable to pay any dividends.

  

We may be subject to penny stock regulations and restrictions and you may have difficulty selling our ordinary shares.

 

The SEC has adopted regulations which generally define so-called “penny stocks” to be an equity security that has a market price less than $5.00 per share or an exercise price of less than $5.00 per share, subject to certain exemptions. If our ordinary shares becomes a “penny stock”, we may become subject to Rule 15g-9 under the Exchange Act, or the “Penny Stock Rule”. This rule imposes additional sales practice requirements on broker-dealers that sell such securities to persons other than established customers and “accredited investors” (generally, individuals with a net worth in excess of $1,000,000 or annual incomes exceeding $200,000, or $300,000 together with their spouses). For transactions covered by Rule 15g-9, a broker-dealer must make a special suitability determination for the purchaser and have received the purchaser’s written consent to the transaction prior to sale. As a result, this rule may affect the ability of broker-dealers to sell our securities and may affect the ability of purchasers to sell any of our securities in the secondary market.

 

For any transaction involving a penny stock, unless exempt, the rules require delivery, prior to any transaction in a penny stock, of a disclosure schedule prepared by the SEC relating to the penny stock market. Disclosure is also required to be made about sales commissions payable to both the broker-dealer and the registered representative and current quotations for the securities. Finally, monthly statements are required to be sent disclosing recent price information for the penny stock held in the account and information on the limited market in penny stock.

 

There can be no assurance that our ordinary shares will qualify for exemption from the Penny Stock Rule. In any event, even if our ordinary shares were exempt from the Penny Stock Rule, we would remain subject to Section 15(b)(6) of the Exchange Act, which gives the SEC the authority to restrict any person from participating in a distribution of penny stock, if the SEC finds that such a restriction would be in the public interest. 

 

If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or reports about our business, or if they adversely change their recommendations regarding the ordinary shares, the market price for the ordinary shares and trading volume could decline.

 

The trading market for our ordinary shares will be influenced by research or reports that industry or securities analysts publish about our business. If industry or securities analysts decide to cover us and in the future downgrade our ordinary shares, the market price for our ordinary shares would likely decline. If one or more of these analysts cease to cover us or fail to regularly publish reports on us, we could lose visibility in the financial markets, which in turn could cause the market price or trading volume for our ordinary shares to decline.

 

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Techniques employed by short sellers may drive down the market price of our ordinary shares.

 

Short selling is the practice of selling securities that the seller does not own but rather has borrowed from a third party with the intention of buying identical securities back at a later date to return to the lender. The short seller hopes to profit from a decline in the value of the securities between the sale of the borrowed securities and the purchase of the replacement shares, as the short seller expects to pay less in that purchase than it received in the sale. As it is in the short seller’s interest for the price of the security to decline, many short sellers publish, or arrange for the publication of, negative opinions regarding the relevant issuer and its business prospects in order to create negative market momentum and generate profits for themselves after selling a security short. These short attacks have, in the past, led to selling of shares in the market.

 

Public companies that have substantially all of their operations in the PRC have been the subject of short selling. Much of the scrutiny and negative publicity has centered on allegations of a lack of effective internal control over financial reporting resulting in financial and accounting irregularities and mistakes, inadequate corporate governance policies or a lack of adherence thereto and, in many cases, allegations of fraud. As a result, many of these companies are now conducting internal and external investigations into the allegations and, in the interim, are subject to shareholder lawsuits and/or SEC enforcement actions.

 

It is not clear what effect such negative publicity could have on us. If we were to become the subject of any unfavorable allegations, whether such allegations are proven to be true or untrue, we could have to expend a significant amount of resources to investigate such allegations and/or defend ourselves. While we would strongly defend against any such short seller attacks, we may be constrained in the manner in which we can proceed against the relevant short seller by principles of freedom of speech, applicable law or issues of commercial confidentiality. Such a situation could be costly and time-consuming, and could distract our management from growing our business. Even if such allegations are ultimately proven to be groundless, allegations against us could severely impact our business operations, and any investment in our ordinary shares could be greatly reduced or even rendered worthless.

 

We are a foreign private issuer within the meaning of the rules under the Exchange Act, and as such we are exempt from certain provisions applicable to U.S. domestic public companies.

 

Because we qualify as a foreign private issuer under the Exchange Act, we are exempt from certain provisions of the securities rules and regulations in the United States that are applicable to U.S. domestic issuers, including:

 

  the rules under the Exchange Act requiring the filing with the SEC of quarterly reports on Form 10-Q or current reports on Form 8-K;
     
  the sections of the Exchange Act regulating the solicitation of proxies, consents or authorizations in respect of a security registered under the Exchange Act;
     
  the sections of the Exchange Act requiring insiders to file public reports of their stock ownership and trading activities and liability for insiders who profit from trades made in a short period of time; and
     
  the selective disclosure rules by issuers of material nonpublic information under Regulation FD.

   

We are required to file an annual report on Form 20-F within four months of the end of each fiscal year. In addition, we intend to publish our results on a quarterly basis as press releases, distributed pursuant to the rules and regulations of NASDAQ. Press releases relating to financial results and material events will also be furnished to the SEC on Form 6-K. However, the information we are required to file with or furnish to the SEC will be less extensive and less timely compared to that required to be filed with the SEC by U.S. domestic issuers. As a result, you may not be afforded the same protections or information that would be made available to you were you investing in a U.S. domestic issuer.

 

Because we are a foreign private issuer and are exempt from certain Nasdaq corporate governance standards applicable to U.S. issuers, you will have less protection than you would have if we were a domestic issuer.

 

Nasdaq Listing Rules require listed companies to have, among other things, a majority of its board members be independent. As a foreign private issuer, however, we are permitted to, and we may, follow home country practice in lieu of the above requirements, or we may choose to comply with the Nasdaq requirement within one year of listing. The corporate governance practice in our home country, the Cayman Islands, does not require a majority of our board to consist of independent directors. Since a majority of our board of directors will not consist of independent directors, fewer board members will be exercising independent judgment and the level of board oversight on the management of our company may decrease as a result. In addition, the Nasdaq listing rules also require U.S. domestic issuers to have a compensation committee, a nominating/corporate governance committee composed entirely of independent directors, and an audit committee with a minimum of three members. We, as a foreign private issuer, are not subject to these requirements. The Nasdaq listing rules may require shareholder approval for certain corporate matters, such as requiring that shareholders be given the opportunity to vote on all equity compensation plans and material revisions to those plans, certain ordinary share issuances. We intend to comply with the requirements of Nasdaq Listing Rules in determining whether shareholder approval is required on such matters and to appoint a nominating and corporate governance committee. However, we may consider following home country practice in lieu of the requirements under Nasdaq listing rules with respect to certain corporate governance standards which may afford less protection to investors.

 

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ITEM 4. INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY

 

History and Development of the Company

 

We are an entertainment and education company which provides online entertainment performances and online music education services via our wholly-owned subsidiary, Color China Entertainment Limited (“Color China”), education service carried out via our wholly-owned subsidiary CACM Group NY, Inc. (“CACM”) and our joint venture entity, Baytao LLC.

 

Color Star Technology Co., Ltd. (formerly known as Huitao Technology Co., Ltd.) was founded as an unincorporated business on September 1, 2005, under the name TJS Wood Flooring, Inc., and became a C-corporation in the State of Delaware on February 15, 2007. On April 29, 2008, we changed our name to China Advanced Construction Materials Group, Inc.

 

On August 20, 2018, CACM Group NY, Inc. (“CACM”) was incorporated in the State of New York and is wholly owned by us. The establishment of CACM was to expand the Company’s business in the U.S. CACM has not commenced operations. 

 

On December 27, 2018, we consummated a re-domicile merger pursuant to which we merged with and into our wholly-owned subsidiary, China Advanced Construction Materials Group, Inc., a newly formed Cayman Islands company and the surviving entity in the merger, pursuant to the terms and conditions of an Agreement and Plan of Merger adopted in July 2018. As a result of the reincorporation, the Company is now governed by the laws of the Cayman Islands.

 

On July 16, 2019, upon effectiveness of the Company’s amendment and restatement of the Company’s memorandum and articles of association which was approved by the Company’s shareholders, the Company’s name was changed from China Advanced Construction Materials Group, Inc. to Huitao Technology Co., Ltd.

  

On December 31, 2019, we entered into a share exchange agreement with Sunway Kids International Education Group Ltd. (“Sunway Kids”) and its shareholders. On February 14, 2020, the Company consummated the acquisition of Sunway Kids whereby we issued 1,989,262 ordinary shares and $2 million of cash to be paid in exchange for all of the issued and outstanding capital stock of Sunway Kids. The $2 million cash consideration is payable in five installments over five years according to an earn-out schedule. Sunway Kids thereby became our wholly-owned subsidiary. Sunway Kids was established on February 29, 2012, under the laws of the British Virgin Islands as an offshore holding company. On August 23, 2018, Sunway Kids established its wholly-owned subsidiary, Brave Millenium Limited (“Brave Millenium”) under the laws of Hong Kong. On December 4, 2019, Brave Millenium established Chengdu Hengshanghui Intelligent Technology Co., Ltd. (“Chengdu Hengshanghui”) in China as a wholly foreign owned limited liability company (the “WFOE”). On December 9, 2019, Chengdu Hengshanghui entered into a series of variable interest entity agreements with Chengdu Hengshanghui Education Consulting Co., Ltd. (“Hengshanghui Education”). Through Sunway Kids and its variable interest entity Hengshanghui Education, we were engaged in providing education and health services to day-care and preschools in China.

 

On March 10, 2020, CACM entered into a certain joint venture agreement (the “JV Agreement”) with Baydolphin, Inc., a company organized under the laws of New York (“Baydolphin”). Pursuant to the JV Agreement, CACM and Baydolphin have established a limited liability company under the laws of New York, Baytao LLC (“Baytao”), which will intended to be the 100% owner of one or more operating entities in the U.S. to engage in the business of online and offline after-school education.

 

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Prior to acquisition of Sunway Kids in February 2020, our core business has been the concrete business in China. Our concrete business was negatively affected by the economic cycle and government policies. The concrete industry was influenced by the decline in the macro economy in recent years. The entire concrete industry in the PRC’s Beijing area experienced a slowdown in industry production and economic growth in the last few years as the Beijing government continues to enforce concrete production reformation and tightened environmental laws from late 2017 to date. The reformation causes great uncertainties for local enterprises in the construction market. Since 2017, the pressure on small concrete companies has further increased and many have been shut down. Also, the Beijing government ordered the suspension of construction jobsites during winters to reduce air pollution since 2017. The operations of Xin Ao were also severely affected. As a result of the Company’s deteriorating cash position, we defaulted on bank loans and experienced a substantial increase in contingent liabilities. As of December 31, 2019, there was a default on a bank loan of $24,345,129. As of December 31, 2019, Xin Ao is subject to several civil lawsuits for which the Company estimated that it is more than likely to pay judgments in the amount of approximately $6.8 million (including interest and penalties of $1.6 million). During the six months ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, there were additional estimated claims of approximately $0.3 million and $1.1 million, respectively. The Company believed it would be very difficult, if not impossible, to turn around the concrete business. As such, the Company had been actively seeking to dispose of the concrete business after the acquisition of Sunway Kids.

 

On May 6, 2020, the Company completed the disposition (the “Xin Ao Disposition”) of Xin Ao Construction Materials, Inc. (“BVI-ACM”), after obtaining its shareholders’ approval on April 27, 2020 and satisfaction or waiver of all other closing conditions. Upon the closing of the Xin Ao Disposition, Mr. Xianfu Han and Mr. Weili He became the sole shareholders of BVI-ACM and assumed all assets and liabilities of all the subsidiaries and variable interest entities owned or controlled by BVI-ACM. The proceeds of $600,000 from the Xin Ao Disposition have been used for the Company’s working capital and general corporate purposes.

 

On April 27, 2020, upon effectiveness of the Company’s amendment and restatement of its memorandum and articles of association (which was approved by the Company’s shareholders), the Company’s name was changed to Color Star Technology Co., Ltd.

 

On May 7, 2020, we entered into a Share Exchange Agreement (“Exchange Agreement”) with Color China Entertainment Limited (“Color China”), a Hong Kong limited company, and shareholders of Color China (the “Sellers”), pursuant to which, among other things and subject to the terms and conditions contained therein, the Company shall acquire all of the outstanding issued shares and other equity interests in Color China from the sellers (the “Acquisition”). Pursuant to the Exchange Agreement, in exchange for all of the outstanding shares of Color China, the Company shall issue 4,633,333 ordinary shares of the Company and pay an aggregate of $2,000,000 to the sellers. The Company plans to make Color China an emerging online performance and online music education provider with a significant collection of performance specific assets -- leveraging professional experience of the Company’s new Chief Executive Officer (“CEO”) who has established good relationships with major record companies, renowned artists and entertainment agencies around the world. Immediately after the Acquisition, Color Star will own 100% of Color China. On June 3, 2020, the transaction contemplated by the Exchange Agreement was consummated when the Company issued 4,633,333 ordinary shares of the Company to the Sellers and the Sellers transferred all of Color China’s issued and outstanding shares to the Company.

 

On June 25, 2020, the Company and the former shareholders of Sunway Kids entered into an Amendment No. 2 (“Amendment”) to the Share Exchange Agreement dated December 31, 2019, as amended. Pursuant to the Amendment, the Company shall not make any Earn-out Payment to the former shareholders of Sunway Kids since Sunway Kids has been unable to conduct its normal operations due to the COVID-19 pandemic and management of Sunway Kids believes it will be very difficult to achieve its projected financial results. On the same day, Sunway Kids and Yanliang Han (the “Purchaser”), an unrelated third party, entered into certain share purchase agreement (the “Disposition SPA”). Pursuant to the Disposition SPA, the Purchaser agreed to purchase Sunway Kids for cash consideration of $2.4 million consisting of $400,000 which shall be paid within a month of closing, and $2,000,000 to be paid in monthly installments of $200,000 over 10 months. Upon the closing of the transaction contemplated by the Disposition SPA on June 25, 2020, the Purchaser became the sole shareholder of Sunway Kids and as a result, assumed all assets and liabilities of all the subsidiaries and variable interest entities owned or controlled by Sunway Kids.

 

Effective October 1, 2020, the Company changed the ticker symbol of its ordinary shares traded on the Nasdaq Capital Market from “HHT” to “CSCW”, representing the abbreviation of “Color Star Color World.”  This is the new focus of the Company’s business.

 

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Organizational structure

 

Below is the Company’s corporate structure chart as of the date of this report.

 

 

 

Business Overview 

 

We are an entertainment and education company providing online and offline innovative music education through our wholly-owned subsidiaries Color China and CACM. We strive to offer students professional artist training platform featured by exclusive content and live interaction, with the mission of delivering world-class entertainment learning experiences and promoting entertainment exchange between U.S. and China with our strong resources and deep connections in industry. We launched our online platform Color World on September 10, 2020 and it is currently operating in China. The curriculum development created by us includes music, sports, animation, painting and calligraphy, film and television, life skills, etc., covering plenty of aspects of entertainment, sports and culture. At present, we have signed contracts with well-known international artists and more than 50 celebrity teachers have been retained to launch online lectures. The Color World platform not only has celebrity lectures, but also celebrity concert videos, celebrity peripheral products, such as celebrity branded merchandise, and artist interactive communication. We strive to build an all-star cultural and entertainment industry chain. To establish a new entertainment industry chain combining online and offline, we also plan to establish offline education institutions. The offline education base will train during the day and perform at night to make the training base a commercial operation. However, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, our plan to establish the offline education base has been delayed. The management of the Company will adjust our plan of development in accordance with the development of COVID-19.

 

The management believes that we, along with our alliance, have strong industry resources and influence to become a comprehensive online academy for global “future stars”. The Company was formerly known as Huitao Technology Co., Ltd., and changed its name to Color Star Technology Co., Ltd. in May 2020. Prior to acquisition of Sunway Kids in February 2020, the Company’s core business had been focusing on the concrete business in China.

 

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Our Competition

 

The online education market is rapidly expanding and estimated to reach $320 billion by 20254. With the acceleration of online learning due to social distancing, this industry is experiencing huge growth. We operate in a highly competitive and fragmented industry that is sensitive to price, content (i.e. curriculum) and quality of service. With online learning adoption accelerating and creating new opportunities, competition is heating up for companies actively competing to capture market share, with the presence of a large number of service and content providers in the market bringing huge volumes of educational content online.

 

We face intense competition in our online business and compete primarily with online education providers and content sharing platforms who are already established and who are beginning to target entertainment education, with a trend of “fan culture” and “idol economies” in Asia where talent shows are popular and have launched a large number of amateur stars. We are uniquely positioned, as a comprehensive online and offline entertainment education services provider with all-star teacher lineup, as well as the strong resources and wide connections in industry. Below are a few of our closest competitors below and the unique ways we are differentiated in our view.

 

MasterClass is an American online education platform on which students can access tutorials and lectures pre-recorded by experts in various fields. Unlike us who offer students a professional artists training platform featured by exclusive content and live interaction, MasterClass’ classes are typically not interactive, though at least one course included “interactive assignments” where the student acted with other students, either in person or over Skype. Classes cover topics like writing, sports, and cooking, with 33 artist instructors focused on entertainment and music teaching. MasterClass’ member subscription fee is $15/month, a little more expensive than us.

 

LearnWorlds is a stand-alone online course platform for instructors to create, sell and promote their online courses. Users will be charged at least $79 per month to either sell courses or get access to free courses, which means that everyone who is qualified (not just experts and celebrities) could create and sell their courses on the platform. Users are not offered abundant tools for marketing their courses.

 

Vimeo is an American video hosting, sharing, and services platform headquartered in New York City. Vimeo operates on an ad-free basis, and instead derives revenue by providing subscription plans for video content producers and offering software as a service (SaaS) with video creation, editing, and broadcasting tools, enterprise software solutions, as well as the means for video professionals to connect with clients and other professionals.

 

Our Competitive Strengths

 

We differ from various other competitors in our core content of “star online + entertainment teaching” and the combination of online and offline teaching. We are set to break past the boundaries between celebrity entertainment and online knowledge-sharing, and offers students a professional artists training platform featured by exclusive content and live interaction by top artists and celebrities globally, as the first online platform to bring western artists to attract Asian students and meanwhile enabling Asian artists to enter the Western markets. The Company is well connected with artists from Asian to Western, and is able to group many international superstars into its proprietary platform “Color World”. As more international stars join in, coupled with our international version App to be launched in the near future, we expect the Company will continue to expand its subscriber base and gain market share, and bring innovative changes to the current state of music education and entertainment industry. We believe we are as well positioned in the industry with our all-star instructor lineup, excellent combination of online and offline learning, as well as the strong resources and extensive connections, which we believe most competitors lack.

 

 

4Research and Markets. April 16, 2020. https://www.globenewswire.com/news-release/2020/04/16/2017102/0/en/Global-Online-Education-Market-Worth-319-Billion-by-2025-North-America-Anticipated-to-Provide-the-Highest-Revenue-Generating-Opportunities.html

 

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Our Growth Strategy

 

We are committed to enhancing profitability and cash flows through the following strategies:

 

We are targeting the enormous online education market, which is experiencing rapid growth, as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. According to Research and Markets, the global online education market size is projected to reach over $319.17 billion by 2025, growing at a CAGR of 9.23%5. The continued shift of education from in person to virtual is driving higher demand and significant revenue for market vendors in the industry. We target a large addressable market driven by the rapid expansion of global online education, and the rise of the “fan economies” in Asia where the younger generation is more willing to attend their idol’s livestream and spend money on their idols. Meanwhile, the popularity of talent competition shows in Asia has also inspired more ordinary people to enter the entertainment industry and pursue their dreams of being a star. We as a comprehensive entertainment education services provider, could address the growing demand from both fans and talents, and provide professional entertainment education to more than 2 billion people worldwide; and

 

We are well positioned to capture market share with an experienced management team, all-star instructor lineup, and the combination of online and in-person training. We strive to offer students professional artists training platform featured by exclusive content and live interaction and are well connected with artists from Asia and U.S., establishing strategic partnerships with top record companies and entertainment agencies.

  

Our Operations

 

We are growing to become combination of creating the world’s top online and offline celebrity entertainment sharing platform. We provide online and offline innovative music education through our wholly-owned subsidiaries Color China and CACM. We currently cooperate with a non-affiliate company and utilize their relevant licenses and permits that allow us to conduct our business in China through a two-year authorization agreement, pursuant to which the we shall pay an annual fee of RMB100,000 (approximately $15,101). We strive to offer students professional artist training platform featured by exclusive content and live interaction, with the mission of delivering world-class entertainment learning experiences and promoting entertainment exchange between U.S. and China with its strong resources and deep connections in industry. Prior to acquisition of Sunway Kids in February 2020, the Company’s core business had been focusing on the concrete business in China. We used to provide materials through our ready-mixed concrete plant in Beijing.

 

Online Business

 

Online Education Academy

 

The core content of “star online + entertainment teaching” offers a variety of stars and a relatively rich entertainment teaching experience. By registering online, students can select their favorite tutors to conduct accurate and efficient learning, and access to exclusive online video classes and tutorials by top artists globally.

 

As of the date of this report, our online platform Color World has been launched and is operating in China. The curriculum development created by us includes music, sports, animation, painting and calligraphy, film and television, life skills, etc., covering plenty of aspects of entertainment, sports and culture. At present, we have signed contracts with well-known international artists and more than 50 celebrity teachers have been launched. The Color World platform not only has celebrity lectures, but also celebrity concert videos, celebrity peripheral products, and artist interactive communication. The platform focuses on the interactive participation of members and fans, making the platform more entertaining. Fans can interact with their idols, and they can also upload their own works for celebrity tutors and audiences across the network to watch comments. The celebrity live streaming section, which was launched on October 15, 2020, allows more celebrities to communicate and interact with our users through the Internet.

 

The Color World platform generates revenue primarily through paid membership subscriptions priced at $9.90 per user per month. Members can access most video courses on the platform for free and will be charged the tuition fee of $30/hour for taking classes of tier 1 artists and $15/hour for learning from Tier 2 artists. First three months of launch costs only $1.5/hour to attract downloads and there have been over 500,000 registered users as of the date of this report.

 

 

5Research and Markets. April 16, 2020. https://www.globenewswire.com/news-release/2020/04/16/2017102/0/en/Global-Online-Education-Market-Worth-319-Billion-by-2025-North-America-Anticipated-to-Provide-the-Highest-Revenue-Generating-Opportunities.html

 

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We are well connected with artists from Asia to the U.S., and have built strategic partnerships with globally renowned record companies and entertainment agencies, such as Universal Music Group and Sony Music, which enable us to group a number of artists into its Color World platform and secure the rights to the exclusive streaming of online lessons taught by the star teachers. Currently, we have entered into educational licensing and performance agreements with approximately over 40 global artists and professionals in industry for their services as instructors on the Color World platform, and are seeking out and contracting more star teachers in a variety of fields such as music, film, sports, animation, television, presentations, dance, and art to provide its prospective student subscribers with a large repertoire of first-hand exposure to and lessons from professionals in their desired fields.

 

Online Concert

 

The Company established its own music festival brand “Color International Music Festival” and its CEO has the experiences of holding more than 100 star concerts with its partners every year. On September 9, 2020, we broadcasted the Color World Online Concert with ten Eastern and ten Western top artists/celebrities including Grammy-winning jazz guitarist Larry Carlton, R&B singer-songwriter Ashanti, and “Pop Music Queen” Na Ying from mainland China to global audiences via its official platform “Color World” and attracted over half a million viewers from mainland China and all over the world to watch online, reaching over 10 million hits on global social media networks, which we believe is a milestone to the Company.

 

Online Store

 

Our Color World App is expected to add an online store feature on October 25, 2020, mainly selling celebrity co-branded peripheral products including clothing, shoes, hats, watches, digital products, wine, and other categories. An increased number of active users can also be expected, as more fans join and use the App, allowing us in a more competitive position to provide complete experience for global users.

 

Offline Business

 

Music Festival

 

We are currently in discussion with multiple well-established music festival brands to co-organize up to 30 music festivals with different genres over the next five years in different cities across Asia and beyond. The management of the Company will closely monitor the development of the COVID-19 pandemic and adjust our plans of co-organizing the music festivals to protect the safety of our customers and employees and to comply with the applicable laws and regulations.

 

Our Customers  

 

We had no sales during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2020 from our continuing operations and we had no accounts receivable as of June 30, 2020. 

 

For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2019, we had two customers, whose sales accounted for more than 10% of our total sales from discontinued operations. Five customers accounted for approximately 52.1% of the Company’s sales for the year ended June 30, 2019 from discontinued operations. The total accounts receivable from these customers from discontinued operations amounted to approximately $13.4 million as of June 30, 2019.  

 

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Sales and Marketing

 

Marketing Channels

 

We market our course offerings and enhance brand awareness through various online and mobile channels. We place advertisements and conduct marketing on mainstream social media platforms in China. At the same time, we also generate sales leads from word-of-mouth referrals by our students and parents of students. We believe our high quality course offerings and satisfactory student experience will continue to contribute word-of-mouth referrals.

 

A unique approach for the online concert promotions was adopted by the Company where ticket prices were initially set very low with additional opportunities for purchasers to take part in the distribution of ticket sales in order to receive referral rewards. This indirect ticket sales model, and a large amount of resulting passive income, promises more diversified marketing strategies for online music.

 

Research and Development

 

Technology and Infrastructure

 

Technology is the backbone of our highly scalable business model. Our strong technological capabilities enable us to deliver a superior student experience and improve operational efficiency. Our technology team, coupled with our proprietary artificial intelligence technology and the growing volume of data generated from our operations, has continued to identify opportunities for improvements in our technology infrastructure and applications.

 

Live Broadcasting Technology

 

Live broadcasting technology development has been our main focus since our inception. Currently, our proprietary live broadcasting technology makes it possible for as many as 200,000 students to join a live broadcasting class simultaneously, without compromising video quality.

 

Intellectual Property  

 

As of the date of this report, we have two domain names: www.colorstarinternational.com and www.color-star.cn.

 

Our Labor Force

 

As of October 30, 2020, we employed 40 full-time employees and 2 part-time employees. As required by applicable PRC law, we have entered into employment contracts with all our officers, managers and employees. We believe that we maintain a satisfactory working relationship with our employees and we have not experienced any significant labor disputes or any difficulty in recruiting staff.

    

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Restatement and Independent Investigation

  

On October 6, 2018, the Audit Committee of the Board of Directors of the Company, after consultation with the Company’s then independent registered public accounting firm, Friedman LLP (“Friedman”) concluded, that the Company’s audited financial statements at and for the period ended June 30, 2017 contained in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K originally filed with the SEC on September 28, 2018 as well as the unaudited financial statements at and for the periods ended March 31, 2018, December 31, 2017 and September 30, 2017 contained in the Company’s Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q originally filed on November 15, 2017, February 13, 2018 and May 15, 2018, respectively, should no longer be relied upon. The Company’s review of the above mentioned filings revealed that the financial statements in such filings contained errors primarily as a result of omission of certain contingencies.

 

As a result of such review, the Company has restated the financial statements for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2017 as well as those for the fiscal quarters ended March 31, 2018, December 31, 2017 and September 30, 2017.

 

As a result of the errors described above, management has concluded that the Company’s internal control over financial reporting and its disclosure controls and procedures were not effective as of the ends of each of the applicable restatement periods.

 

In connection with above finding, the Audit Committee commenced an independent investigation into the reasons that led to the Company’s conclusion that the previously filed financials should no longer be relied upon. Specially, the Audit Committee engaged an independent investigation team to investigate the circumstances surrounding errors in Company’s financial statements, which primarily resulted from the omission of certain actual and contingent legal liabilities. The investigation concluded in mid-November 2018. The investigation team found several reasons that appear to have caused, or contributed to, the failures to promptly identify and disclose the legal proceedings and contingencies, including, 1) the Head of the Legal Department’s significant lack of understanding of the important of timely disclosure of legal proceedings and the Legal Department’s problematic decision-making process with regard to reporting of legal proceedings; 2) the Company’s lack of accounting personnel trained in U.S. GAAP; 3) the Company’s need for a full-time CFO; 4) the ongoing lack of communication and coordination between executive management and the various departments within the Company; and 5) the Company’s failures to timely address significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

As of the date of this Annual Report, the Company has completed its process of conducting a comprehensive review of the issues identified by the investigation team and has taken all remedial measures recommended by the Audit Committee within its resources to cure the majority of its material weaknesses in its internal and disclosure control procedures.   

 

Matters relating to or arising from the Audit Committee investigation and the associated material weaknesses identified in our internal control over financial reporting, including adverse publicity, have caused us to incur significant legal, accounting and other professional fees and other costs, have exposed us to greater risks associated with other civil litigation, regulatory proceedings and government enforcement actions, have diverted resources and attention that would otherwise be directed toward our operations and implementation of our business strategy and may have impacted our ability to attract and retain customers, employees and vendors.

   

Regulations 

 

This section sets forth a summary of the most significant rules and regulations that affect our business activities in China.

 

Regulation Related to Value-added Telecommunications Services

 

On September 25, 2000, the State Council issued the PRC Regulations on Telecommunications, or the Telecommunications Regulations, as last amended on February 6, 2016, to regulate telecommunications activities in China. The Telecommunications Regulations divided the telecommunications services into two categories, namely “infrastructure telecommunications services” and “value-added telecommunications services.” Pursuant to the Telecommunications Regulations, operators of value-added telecommunications services, or VATS, must first obtain a Value-added Telecommunications Business Operating License, or VATS License, from the MIIT, or its provincial level counterparts. On July 3, 2017, the MIIT promulgated the Administrative Measures on Telecommunications Business Operating Licenses, which set forth more specific provisions regarding the types of licenses required to operate VATS, the qualifications and procedures for obtaining such licenses and the administration and supervision of such licenses.

 

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The Amended Classified Catalog of Telecommunications Services (2015 Version), or the Amended 2016 MIIT Catalog, which took effect on June 6, 2019, defines information services as “the information services provided for users through public communications networks or internet by means of information gathering, development, processing and the construction of the information platform.” Moreover, information services continue to be classified as a category of VATS and are clarified to include information release and delivery services, information search and query services, information community platform services, information real-time interactive services, and information protection and processing services under the Amended 2016 MIIT Catalog. The Administrative Measures on Internet Information Services, or ICP Measures, promulgated by the PRC State Council on September 25, 2000 and most recently amended on January 8, 2011, set forth more specific rules on the provision of internet information services. According to ICP Measures, any company that engages in the provision of commercial internet information services shall obtain a sub-category VATS License for Internet Information Services, or ICP License, from the relevant government authorities before providing any commercial internet information services within the PRC. Pursuant to the above-mentioned regulations, “commercial internet information services” generally refer to provision of specific information content, online advertising, web page construction and other online application services through internet for profit making purpose.

 

In addition to the Telecommunications Regulations and the other regulations discussed above, the provision of commercial internet information services on mobile internet applications is regulated by the Administrative Provisions on Mobile Internet Applications Information Services, which was promulgated by Cyberspace Administration of China, or the CAC, on June 28, 2016 and came into effect on August 1, 2016. The providers of mobile internet applications are subject to requirements under these provisions, including acquiring the qualifications and complying with other requirements provided by laws and regulations and being responsible for information security.

 

Regulation Related to Online Transmission of Audio-Visual Programs

 

To regulate the provision of audio-visual program services to the public via the internet, including through mobile networks, within the territory of the PRC, the State Administration of Press Publication Radio Film and Television, or the SAPPRFT (currently known as National Radio and Television Administration), and the MIIT jointly promulgated the Administrative Provisions on Internet Audio-Visual Program Service, or the Audio-Visual Program Provisions, on December 20, 2007, which came into effect on January 31, 2008 and was last amended on August 28, 2015. Under the Audio-Visual Program Provisions, “online audio-visual program services” is defined as activities of producing, redacting and integrating audio-visual programs, providing them to the general public via internet, and providing service for other people to upload and transmit audio-visual programs, and providers of online audio-visual program services are required to obtain a License for Online Transmission of Audio-Visual Programs issued by the SAPPRFT, or complete certain registration procedures with the SAPPRFT. In general, providers of online audio-visual program services must be either state-owned or state-controlled entities, and the business to be carried out by such providers must satisfy the overall planning and guidance catalog for internet audio-visual program service determined by the SAPPRFT.

 

On May 21, 2008, SAPPRFT issued a Notice on Relevant Issues Concerning Application and Approval of License for the Online Transmission of Audio-Visual Programs, as amended on August 28, 2015, which sets out detailed provisions concerning the application and approval process regarding the License for Online Transmission of Audio-Visual Programs. According to the above regulations, providers of internet audio-visual program services that engaged in such services prior to the promulgation of the Audio-Visual Program Provisions are eligible to apply for the license so long as those providers did not violate the relevant laws and regulations in the past or their violation of the laws and regulations is minor in scope and can be rectified in a timely manner and they have no records of violation during the last three months prior to the promulgation of the Audio-Visual Program Provisions.

 

On March 30, 2009, SAPPRFT promulgated the Notice on Strengthening the Administration of the Content of Internet Audio-Visual Programs, which reiterates the pre-approval requirements for the audio-visual programs transmitted via the internet, including through mobile networks, where applicable, and prohibits certain types of internet audio-visual programs containing violence, pornography, gambling, terrorism, superstition or other similarly prohibited elements.

 

On March 10, 2017, SAPPRFT issued the Provisional Implementation of the Tentative Categories of Internet Audio-Visual Program Services, or the Categories, which revised the previous version issued on March 17, 2010. According to the Categories, there are four categories of internet audio and video programs services which are further divided into seventeen sub-categories. The third sub-category to the second category covers the making and editing of certain specialized audio-visual programs concerning, among other things, educational content, and broadcasting such content to the general public online.

 

On March 16, 2018, the SAPPRFT promulgated the Notice on Further Regulating the Transmission Order of Internet Audio-Visual Program Services, providing that the classic literary works, radio, film and television programs, internet original audio-visual programs shall not be re-edited, re-dubbed, re-subtitled or partly captured and consolidated as a new program without authorizations and providers of internet audio-visual program services shall strictly manage and supervise such re-edited programs uploaded by the internet users and shall not provide any transmission channel for those internet audio-visual programs which have political orientation issues, copyright issues or content issues.

 

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Regulation Related to Internet Live Streaming Services

 

On September 2, 2016, the SAPPRFT promulgated the Notice on Strengthening the Administration of Live Streaming Services of Internet Audio-Visual Program, which provides that any entity that intends to engage in live audio-visual broadcasting of major political, military, economic, social, cultural or sport events or activities, or live audio-visual broadcasting of general social or cultural group activities, general sporting events or other organizational events, must obtain a License for Online Transmission of Audio-Visual Programs with a permitted operation scope covering the above business activities. Any entity or individual without qualification is prohibited from broadcasting live audio-visual programs involving news, variety shows, sports, interviews, commentary or other forms of programs through any online live-streaming platform or online live broadcasting booth, nor are they permitted to start a live broadcasting channel for any audio-visual programs. In addition, any entity without such license shall not operate audio-visual live streaming business and the live streaming programs provided by the qualified company shall not contain any content forbidden by laws and regulations.

 

On November 4, 2016, the CAC promulgated the Provisions on the Administration of Internet Live Streaming Services, or the Internet Live Streaming Provisions, effective from December 1, 2016. Under the Internet Live Stream Provisions, “internet live streaming service” is defined as the activities of continuously releasing real-time information to the public on internet in such forms as videos, audios, images and texts and the “internet live streaming service provider” is defined thereunder as an operator of the platform providing internet live streaming platform services. The Internet Live Streaming Provisions provide that internet live streaming service providers shall examine and verify the identity information of internet live-streaming issuers and file the identity information of the issuers with local counterparts of the CAC.

 

On July 12, 2017, the CAC issued a Notice on Development of the Filing Work for Enterprises Providing Internet Live Streaming Services, which provides that all the companies providing internet live streaming services shall file with the local authority since July 15, 2017, otherwise the CAC or its local counterparts may impose administrative sanctions on such companies.

 

Pursuant to the Circular on Tightening the Administration of Internet Live-Streaming Services jointly issued by the MIIT, the Ministry of Culture and Tourism, or the MCOT, and several other government agencies on August 1, 2018, live streaming services providers are required to file with the local public security authority within 30 days after it commences the service online.

 

Regulation Related to Production and Distribution of Radio and Television Programs

 

On 19 July 2004, SAPPRFT promulgated the Administrative Measures on the Production and Operation of Radio and Television Programs, or the Radio and TV Programs Measures, which became effective on 20 August 2004 and were amended on August 28, 2015 and October 31, 2018. The Radio and TV Programs Measures are applicable for establishing institutions that produce and distribute radio and television programs or for the production of radio and television programs like programs with a special topic, column programs, variety shows, animated cartoons, radio plays and television dramas and for activities like transactions and agency transactions of program copyrights. Pursuant to the Radio and TV Programs Measures, any entity that intends to produce or operate radio or television programs must first obtain the Permit for Production and Operation of Radio and TV Programs from SAPPRFT or its local branches.

 

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Regulation Related to Internet Culture Activities

 

On May 10, 2003, the Ministry of Culture, or MOC (currently known as the MCOT), promulgated the Interim Administrative Provisions on Internet Culture, or the Internet Culture Provisions, which became effective on July 1, 2003 and was amended on February 17, 2011 and December 15, 2017. The Internet Culture Provisions require internet information services providers engaging in commercial “internet culture activities” to obtain an Internet Culture Business Operating License from the MOC. “Internet cultural activity” is defined under the Internet Culture Provisions as an act of provision of internet cultural products and related services, which includes (i) the production, duplication, importation, and broadcasting of the internet cultural products; (ii) the online dissemination whereby cultural products are posted on the internet or transmitted via the internet to end-users, such as computers, fixed-line telephones, mobile phones, television sets and games machines, for online users’ browsing, use or downloading; and (iii) the exhibition and competition of the internet cultural products. In addition, “internet cultural products” is defined under the Internet Culture Provisions as cultural products produced, broadcast and disseminated via the internet, which mainly include internet cultural products especially produced for the internet, such as online music entertainment, online games, online shows and plays (programs), online performances, online works of art and online cartoons, and internet cultural products produced from cultural products such as music entertainment, games, shows and plays (programs), performances, works of art, and cartoons through certain techniques and duplicating those to internet for dissemination.

 

On May 14, 2019, the General Office of MOC promulgated the Notice on Adjusting the Scope of Internet Culture Business Operating License and Further Standardize the Approval Work, which provides that online music, online shows and plays, online performances, online works of art, online cartoons, displays and games are the activities that fall in the scope of Internet Culture Business Operating License, and further clarifies that educational live streaming activities are not online performances.

 

Regulation Related to Online Publishing

 

On February 4, 2016, the SAPPRFT (currently reformed into the State Administration of Press and Publication (National Copyright Bureau) under the Propaganda Department of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China) and the MIIT jointly issued the Administrative Provisions on Online Publishing Services, or the Online Publishing Provisions, which came into effect on March 10, 2016. Under the Online Publishing Provisions, any entity providing online publishing services shall obtain an Online Publishing Services Permit. “Online publishing services” refer to the provision of online publications to the public through information networks; and “online publications” refer to digital works with publishing features such as having been edited, produced or processed and are available to the public through information networks, including: (i) written works, pictures, maps, games, cartoons, audio/video reading materials and other original digital works containing useful knowledge or ideas in the field of literature, art, science or other fields; (ii) digital works of which the content is identical to that of any published book, newspaper, periodical, audio/video product, electronic publication or the like; (iii) network literature databases or other digital works, derived from any of the aforesaid works by selection, arrangement, collection or other means; and (iv) other types of digital works as may be determined by the SAPPRFT.

 

As of the date of this annual report, there are no explicit interpretation from the governmental authorities or prevailing enforcement practice deeming the provision of our educational content to our students through our online platform as “online publishing” which requires an Online Publishing Service Permit. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether the local PRC authorities would adopt a different practice. In addition, it remains uncertain whether the PRC governmental authorities would issue more explicit interpretation and rules or promulgate new laws and regulations.

 

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Regulation Related to Internet Information Security and Privacy Protection

 

The PRC Constitution states that the PRC laws protect the freedom and privacy of communications of citizens and prohibit infringement of such rights. PRC governmental authorities have enacted laws and regulations on internet information security and protection of personal information from any abuse or unauthorized disclosure. The Decisions on Maintaining Internet Security which was enacted by the Standing Committee of the PRC National People’s Congress, or the SCNPC on December 28, 2000 and amended on August 27, 2009, may subject violators to criminal punishment in the PRC for any effort to: (i) gain improper entry into a computer or system of strategic importance; (ii) disseminate politically disruptive information; (iii) leak state secrets; (iv) spread false commercial information; or (v) infringe intellectual property rights. The Ministry of Public Security has promulgated measures that prohibit use of the internet in ways which, among other things, result in a leakage of state secrets or a spread of socially destabilizing content. If an information service provider violates these measures, the Ministry of Public Security and the local security bureaus may revoke its operating license and shut down its websites.

 

Pursuant to the Decision on Strengthening the Protection of Online Information issued by the SCNPC on December 28, 2012, and the Order for the Protection of Telecommunication and Internet User Personal Information issued by the MIIT on July 16, 2013, any collection and use of user personal information must be subject to the consent of the user, abide by the principles of legality, rationality and necessity and be within the specified purposes, methods and scopes. “Personal information” is defined as information that identifies a citizen, the time or location for his/her use of telecommunication and internet services or involves privacy of any citizen such as his/her birth date, ID card number, and address. An internet information service provider must also keep information collected strictly confidential, and is further prohibited from divulging, tampering or destroying of any such information, or selling or providing such information to other parties. Any violation of the above decision or order may subject the internet information service provider to warnings, fines, confiscation of illegal gains, revocation of licenses, cancelation of filings, closedown of websites or even criminal liabilities.

 

Pursuant to the Notice of the Supreme People’s Court, the Supreme People’s Procuratorate and the Ministry of Public Security on Legally Punishing Criminal Activities Infringing upon the Personal Information of Citizens, issued in 2013, and the Interpretation of the Supreme People’s Court and the Supreme People’s Procuratorate on Several Issues regarding Legal Application in Criminal Cases Infringing upon the Personal Information of Citizens, which was issued on May 8, 2017 and took effect on June 1, 2017, the following activities may constitute the crime of infringing upon a citizen’s personal information:(i) providing a citizen’s personal information to specified persons or releasing a citizen’s personal information online or through other methods in violation of relevant national provisions; (ii) providing legitimately collected information relating to a citizen to others without such citizen’s consent (unless the information is processed, not traceable to a specific person and not recoverable); (iii) collecting a citizen’s personal information in violation of applicable rules and regulations when performing a duty or providing services; or (iv) collecting a citizen’s personal information by purchasing, accepting or exchanging such information in violation of applicable rules and regulations.

 

Pursuant to the Ninth Amendment to the Criminal Law issued by the SCNPC in August 2015, which became effective in November 2015, any person or entity that fails to fulfill the obligations related to internet information security administration as required by applicable laws and refuses to rectify upon orders is subject to criminal penalty for the result of (i) any dissemination of illegal information in large scale; (ii) any severe effect due to the leakage of the client’s information; (iii) any serious loss of criminal evidence; or (iv) other severe situation, and any individual or entity that (i) sells or provides personal information to others in a way violating the applicable law, or (ii) steals or illegally obtain any personal information is subject to criminal penalty in severe situation.

 

Pursuant to the PRC Cyber Security Law issued by the SCNPC on November 7, 2016, effective as of June 1, 2017, “personal information” refers to all kinds of information recorded by electronic or otherwise that can be used to independently identify or be combined with other information to identify individuals’ personal information including but not limited to: individuals’ names, dates of birth, ID numbers, biologically identified personal information, addresses and telephone numbers, etc. The Cyber Security Law also provides that: (i) to collect and use personal information, network operators shall follow the principles of legitimacy, rightfulness and necessity, disclose rules of data collection and use, clearly express the purposes, means and scope of collecting and using the information, and obtain the consent of the persons whose data is gathered; (ii) network operators shall neither gather personal information unrelated to the services they provide, nor gather or use personal information in violation of the provisions of laws and administrative regulations or the scopes of consent given by the persons whose data is gathered; and shall dispose of personal information they have saved in accordance with the provisions of laws and administrative regulations and agreements reached with users; (iii) network operators shall not divulge, tamper with or damage the personal information they have collected, and shall not provide the personal information to others without the consent of the persons whose data is collected. However, if the information has been processed and cannot be recovered and thus it is impossible to match such information with specific persons, such circumstance is an exception.

 

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Pursuant to the Provisions on Internet Security Supervision and Inspection by Public Security Organs, which was promulgated by the Ministry of Public Security on September 15, 2018 and became effective on November 1, 2018, the public security departments are authorized to carry out internet security supervision and inspection of the internet service providers from the following aspects, among others: (i) whether the service providers have completed the recordation formalities for online entities, and filed the basic information on and the changes of the accessing entities and users; (ii) whether they have established and implemented the cybersecurity management system and protocols, and appointed the persons responsible for cybersecurity; (iii) whether the technical measures for recording and retaining users’ registration information and weblog data are in place according to the law; (iv) whether they have taken technical measures to prevent computer viruses, network attacks and network intrusion; (v) whether they have adopted preventive measures to tackle the information that is prohibited to be issued or transmitted by the laws and administrative regulations in the public information services; (vi) whether they provide technical support and assistance as required by laws to public security departments to safeguard national security and prevent and investigate on terrorist activities and criminal activities; and (vii) whether they have fulfilled the obligations of the grade-based cybersecurity protection and other obligations prescribed by the laws and administrative regulations. In particular, public security departments shall also carry out supervision and inspection on whether an internet service provider has taken required measures to manage information published by users, adopted proper measures to handle the published or transmitted information that is prohibited to be published or transmitted, and kept the relevant records.

 

In addition, the Office of the Central Cyberspace Affairs Commission, the MIIT, the Ministry of Public Security, and the SAMR jointly issued an Announcement of Launching Special Crackdown Against Illegal Collection and Use of Personal Information by Apps on January 23, 2019 to implement special rectification works against mobile Apps that collect and use personal information in violation of applicable laws and regulations, where business operators are prohibited from collecting personal information irrelevant to their services, or forcing users to give authorization in disguised manner. On November 28, 2019, the National Internet Information Office, the MIIT, the Ministry of Public Security and the SAMR further jointly issued a notice to classify and identify illegal collection and use of personal information.

 

On August 22, 2019, the Office of the Central Cyberspace Affairs Commission issued the Provisions on the Cyber Protection of Children’s Personal Information, which took effect on October 1, 2019. The Provisions on the Cyber Protection of Children’s Personal Information apply to the collection, storage, use, transfer and disclosure of the personal information of children under the age of 14 via the internet. The Provisions on the Cyber Protection of Children’s Personal Information require that network operators shall establish special rules and user agreements for protection of personal information for children under the age of 14, inform their guardians in a noticeable and clear manner, and shall obtain the consent of their guardians. When obtaining the consent of their guardians, network operators shall explicitly disclose several matters, including, without limitation, the purpose, method and scope of collection, storage, use, transfer and disclosure of such personal information, and methods for correcting and deleting such personal information. Provisions on the Cyber Protection of Children’s Personal Information also require that when collecting, storing, using, transferring and disclosing such personal information, network operators shall comply with certain regulatory requirements, including, without limitation, that network operators shall designate specific personnel to take charge of the protection of such personal information and shall strictly grant information access authorization for their staff to such personal information under the principle of minimal authorization.

 

Property, Plants and Equipment

 

Our U.S. executive offices are located at 800 3rd Ave, Suite 2800, New York NY 10022, where we lease premises of a share office, with lease term of one year until May 2021. We lease offices in Shenzhen, China, with an aggregate of approximately 2,153 square feet, to support our daily operations, with lease term of two years until August 2022. We lease all of the facilities that we currently occupy from independent third parties. 

  

Legal Proceedings  

 

From time to time, the Company may become a party to various legal actions. These claims and proceedings listed below relate to or arise from, commercial disputes, labor contract complaints and sales contract complaints in connection with the Company’s former officers, Mr. Xianfu Han, and Mr. Weili He, and former Variable Interest Entity, Beijing XinAo Concrete Group ("Xin Ao”). Mr. Han and Mr. He resigned on March 28, 2019. In addition, on May 6, 2020, the Company completed the disposition of Xin Ao and consequently, Mr. Han and Mr. He assumed all of the assets and liabilities of Xin Ao. As a result, the Company believes that it currently does not face any material pending legal proceedings.

 

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ITEM 4A. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

Not Applicable

 

ITEM 5. OPERATING AND FINANCIAL REVIEW AND PROSPECTS

  

The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements that appear in this annual report. In addition to historical consolidated financial information, the following discussion contains forward-looking statements that reflect our plans, estimates, and beliefs. Our actual results could differ materially from those discussed in the forward-looking statements. Factors that could cause or contribute to these differences include those discussed below and elsewhere in this annual report, particularly in “Risk Factors.” All amounts in included in the fiscal years ended June 30, 2020, 2019 and 2018 (“Annual Financial Statements”) are derived from our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this annual report. These Annual Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, or U.S. GAAP.

 

5A. Operating Results

 

Overview

 

Summary of Business

 

We are an entertainment and education company which provides online entertainment performance and online music education services via our wholly-owned subsidiary, Color China Entertainment Limited (“Color China”). Our core business used to be concrete business. In February 2020, the Company acquired Sunway Kids International Education Group Ltd. (“Sunway Kids”) and consequently shifted its business from concrete business to online education service, targeting preschool children. In May and June 2020, the Company completed the disposition of its former subsidiary, Xin Ao Construction Materials, Inc. (along with its subsidiary and the variable interest entity in China) and Sunway Kids, respectively, and exited the concrete business and preschool children online education service. In June 2020, the Company acquired Color China and thereafter became engaged in the businesses of providing online and offline paid knowledge services for the media, entertainment and culture industries globally. 

 

Color China is an emerging company in the performance support and music education business with a significant collection of music performance specific equipment. The hiring of our management team has extensive experience in large-scale entertainment performance, music equipment leasing and intellectual property (“IP”) licensing. Our newly appointed CEO, Mr. Biao Lu, has unique experience in working with many renowned artists and has established good relationships with major record companies and entertainment agencies around the world. Leveraging its unique resources, Color China was in the process of building an online entertainment and music education platform featuring artists and professional producers as its lead instructors. The online cultural entertainment platform, Color World, was officially launched globally on September 10, 2020. We will be producing and streaming celebrity-taught online lessons and celebrity generated content videos on this platform. The platform will also create a live-streaming and audio community and serve as an e-commerce channel for commercialized celebrity IP products.

 

CACM collaborates with Baydolphin, Inc. (“Baydolphin”) and together established a joint venture company, Baytao, a limited liability company focusing on the online after-school tutoring program for students in New York. The Company plans to use Baytao as a platform to extend its online education/music education programs. The online after-school tutoring program, Baydolphin Education, is still in the developing stage.

 

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Management’s Plan for the Business

 

We believe that the online entertainment and music education platform built by Color China will bring innovative changes to the current state of music education and entertainment industry, with the goal to eliminate the boundaries of nationality, region, and cultural differences in the entertainment and music areas. Through the Internet, Color China can provide professional entertainment and music education globally. We aim to recruit an All-Star Crew to be coaches on the Color Star program, including top-notch professional vocalists, producers, musicians and more.

 

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has claimed hundreds of thousands of lives and caused massive global health and economic crisis, while also causing large-scale social and behavioral changes in societies. Online entertainment and education are experiencing enormous growth which we believe will last long after the pandemic. We believe that these market conditions have created tremendous opportunities for our business plans, and therefore we expect to focus on the expansion of Color China’s and Baytao’s business in light of their great potential for revenue generation and profitability.

 

Principal Factors Affecting Our Financial Performance

 

We believe that the following factors will continue to affect our financial performance:

 

Experienced Management. Management’s technical knowledge and business relationships give us the ability to collaborate with major record companies, entertainment agencies and teaching experts, which provides us with leverage to expand our recognition, promote our products and attract more students rapidly. If there were to be any significant turnover in our senior management, it could deplete the expertise and knowledge held by our existing senior management team.

 

Innovation Efforts. We strive to produce the most innovative advanced products to the users of our platforms. We entered into technical service contracts with platform developers and program licensees to further improve our products and to better user experience. If our research and development efforts were not sufficient to adapt to the change in technology in the industries, our products might not compete effectively.

  

Results of Operations

 

The tables in the following discussion summarize our consolidated statements of operations for the periods indicated.

 

For the Years Ended June 30, 2020 vs. June 30, 2019

 

  

For the Years ended

 
   June 30, 
               Percentage 
   2020   2019   Change   Change 
Selling, general and administrative expenses  $(1,598,984)  $(2,065,829)  $(466,845)   (23)%
Research and development expenses   (120,000)   -    120,000    100%
Stock compensation expense   (3,444,617)   (4,592,200)   (1,147,583)   (25)%
Loss from operations   (5,163,601)   (6,658,029)   (1,494,428)   (22)%

Total other expense, net

   (5,041)   (1,393)   3,648    262%
Loss before provision for income taxes   (5,168,642)   (6,659,422)   (1,490,780)   (22)%
Provision for income taxes   -    -    -    -%
Net loss from continuing operations   (5,168,642)   (6,659,422)   (1,490,780)   (22)%
Loss from discontinued operations   (6,457,955)   (7,729,108)   (1,271,153)   (16)%
Net loss  $(11,626,597)  $(14,388,530)  $(2,761,933)   (19)%

 

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Selling, General and Administrative Expenses. Selling, general and administrative expenses consist of advertising and marketing costs, office rent and expenses, costs associated with staff and support personnel who manage our business activities, and professional fees paid to third parties. We incurred selling, general and administrative expenses of approximately $1.6 million for the year ended June 30, 2020 as compared to approximately $2.1 million for the year ended June 30, 2019, a decrease of approximately $0.5 million. The decrease was primarily due to approximately $0.3 million decrease in salary expenses, approximately $0.1 million decrease in audit fees and approximately $0.2 million decrease in repair costs and consulting services. The decrease was offset by approximately $0.1 million increase in legal fees as we performed various acquisitions and disposals during the year ended June 30, 2020.

 

Research and Development Expenses. Research and development expenses consist of costs associated with development of our online platforms. We spent approximately $0.1 million on the online after-school tutoring program of Baytao during the year ended June 30, 2020.

 

Stock Compensation Expenses. Stock compensation expenses were approximately $3.4 million for the year ended June 30, 2020 as compared to approximately $4.6 million for the year ended June 30, 2019. The decrease was mainly due to lower amortization expenses in 2020 as a result a decline in deferred stock compensation.

 

Loss from Operations. We incurred a loss from operations of approximately $5.2 million and approximately $6.7 million for the years ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, respectively. The decrease of approximately $1.5 million was primarily due to the reasons previously discussed.

 

Total Other Expense, Net. Our total other expense, net consists of interest income and finance expense. We had total other expense, net of $5,041 and $1,393 during the years ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, respectively. The increase was mainly due to that we had more bank services charges in the year ended June 30, 2020 as compared to the same period in 2019.

 

Provision for Income Taxes. We did not incur income tax expense for the years ended June 30, 2020 and 2019 as we had operating losses.

 

Loss from Continuing Operations. Our loss from continuing operations decreased by approximately $1.5 million, or 22%, to loss from continuing operations of approximately $5.2 million for the year ended June 30, 2020 from a loss from continuing operations of approximately $6.7 million for the year ended June 30, 2019. Such change was the result of the combination of the changes discussed above.

 

Loss from Discontinued Operations. Our loss from discontinued operations decreased by approximately $1.3 million, or 16%, to a loss of approximately $6.4 million for the year ended June 30, 2020, from a loss of approximately $7.7 million for the year ended June 30, 2019. The decrease in loss from discontinued operations was predominantly due to gain on sale of discontinued operations of approximately $6.6 million as we sold BVI-ACM with significant net deficit to our prior shareholders for cash consideration of $600,000. The closing of the disposition was completed on May 6, 2020. The decrease was mainly offset by increased loss from discontinued operations as Xin Ao, a variable interest entity of BVI-ACM, which considered as a major part of discontinued operations generated less revenues and more bad debt expenses during the outbreak of COVID-19 in 2020. In addition, the decrease of net loss from discontinue operations also was offset by the loss on sale of Sunway Kids. We acquired Sunway Kids in February 2020. However, due to the outbreak of COVID-19 in 2020, the Company was unable to start Sunway Kids’ business and therefore decided to sell Sunway Kids at a loss of approximately $0.8 million to minimize any further losses.

 

Net Loss. We incurred a net loss of approximately $11.6 million for the year ended June 30, 2020, as compared to a net loss of approximately $14.4 million for the year ended June 30, 2019. This change was the result of the combination of the changes as discussed above.

 

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For the Years Ended June 30, 2019 vs. June 30, 2018

 

   For the Years ended
   June 30,
            Percentage
   2019  2018  Change  Change
Selling, general and administrative expenses  $(2,065,829)  $(918,605)  $1,147,224    125%
Stock compensation expense   (4,592,200)   (1,388,501)   3,203,699    231%
Loss from operations   (6,658,029)   (2,307,106)   4,350,923    189%
Total other expense, net   (1,393)   (13)   1,380    10,615%
Loss before provision for income taxes   (6,659,422)   (2,307,119)   4,352,303    189%
Provision for income taxes   -    -    -    -%
Loss from continuing operations   (6,659,422)   (2,307,119)   4,352,303    189%
Loss from discontinued operations   (7,729,108)   (5,092,846)   2,636,262    52%
Net loss  $(14,388,530)  $(7,399,965)  $6,988,565    94%

 

Selling, General and Administrative Expenses. Selling, general and administrative expenses consist of marketing costs, office rent and expenses, costs associated with staff and support personnel who manage our business activities, and professional fees paid to third parties. We incurred selling, general and administrative expenses of approximately $2.0 million for the year ended June 30, 2019 as compared to approximately $0.9 million for the year ended June 30, 2018, an increase of approximately $1.1 million. The increase was primarily due to approximately $1.0 million increase in professional expenses, including legal expenses, consulting expenses and audit fees, and approximately $0.1 million increase in repairs and maintenance expense as compared to the year ended June 30, 2018.

 

Stock Compensation Expenses. Stock compensation expenses was approximately $4.6 million for the year ended June 30, 2019 as compared to approximately $1.4 million for the year ended June 30, 2018 for business consulting services and the amortization of stock compensation expenses for our ordinary shares issued to our employees. The increase of stock compensation expenses was mainly due to the issuance of our ordinary shares to two service providers on merger and acquisition consulting services with fair value of compensation of approximately $2.8 million.

 

Loss from Operations. We incurred a loss from operations of approximately $6.7 million and a loss of approximately $2.3 million for the years ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively. The increase of approximately $4.3 million loss was primarily due to the reasons previously discussed.

 

Total Other Expense, Net. Our total other expense, net consists of interest income and finance expense. We had total other expense, net of $1,393 and $13 during the years ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively. The increase was mainly due to we had more bank services charges in the year ended June 30, 2019 as compared to the same period in 2018.

 

Provision for Income Taxes. We did not incur income tax expense for the years ended June 30, 2019 and 2018 as we had net operating losses.

 

Loss from Continuing Operations. Our loss from continuing operations increased by approximately $4.4 million, or 189%, to loss from continuing operations of approximately $6.7 million for the year ended June 30, 2019 from a loss from continuing operations of approximately $2.3 million for the year ended June 30, 2018. Such change was the result of the combination of the changes discussed above.

 

Loss from Discontinued Operations. Our loss from discontinued operations increased by approximately $2.6 million, or 52%, to a loss of approximately $7.7 million for the year ended June 30, 2019, from a net loss of approximately $5.1 million for the year ended June 30, 2018. The increase in loss from discontinued operations was predominantly due to the decrease of gross profit which was driven by the decrease in sales volume and increase of inventory unit price of Xin Ao, our main operation of discontinued operations during the year ended June 30, 2019 as compared to the same period in 2018.

 

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Net Loss. We incurred net loss of approximately $14.4 million for the year ended June 30, 2019, as compared to a net loss of approximately $7.4 million for the year ended June 30, 2018. This change was the result of the combination of the changes as discussed above.

  

5.B. Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

As of June 30, 2020, we had cash and cash equivalents of approximately $1.0 million, which was held by our consolidated entities in the U.S.

 

In assessing our liquidity, we monitor and analyze our cash on-hand and our operating and capital expenditure commitments. Our liquidity needs are to meet our working capital requirements, operating expenses and capital expenditure obligations.

 

We engage in online entertainment performance and online education services. Our business is capital intensive, and equity financing has been utilized to finance our working capital requirements and capital expenditures. Our working capital was approximately $2.6 million as of June 30, 2020 as compared to working deficit approximately $1.1 million as of June 30, 2019.

 

In addition, due to the nature of online entertainment performance and online education industries, we collect payments in advance so we should have minimal liquidity risk. We also completed a few rounds of equity financing and sold approximately $4.5 million of our ordinary shares during the year ended June 30, 2020. Subsequent to June 30, 2020, we completed three more rounds of equity financing and sold approximately $11.8 million of our ordinary shares.

 

Based on the above considerations, management is of the opinion that we have sufficient funds to meet our working capital requirements for the next twelve months from the date of this report.

  

The following table provides summary information about our net cash flow for financial statement periods presented in this report:

 

   For the Years Ended June 30, 
   2020   2019   2018 
             
Net cash used in operating activities from continuing operations  $(2,738,989)  $(1,002,383)  $(239,376)
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities from discontinued operations   203,854    (73,759)   2,689,394 
Net cash used in investing activities from continuing operations   (1,394,728)   -    - 
Net cash used in investing activities from discontinued operations   -    (135,705)   (138,151)
Net cash provided by financing activities from continuing operations   4,802,901    950,000    600,000 
Net cash used in financing activities from discontinued operations   (7,294)   (427,333)   (6,395,823)
Effect of exchange rate change in cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash   (1,943)   (62,025)   149,203 
Net change in cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash  $863,801   $(751,205)  $(3,334,753)

 

Principal demands for liquidity are for working capital and general corporate purposes. 

 

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Operating Activities

 

Net cash used in operating activities from continuing operations totaled approximately $2.7 million for the year ended June 30, 2020, which was attributable to a net loss of approximately $5.2 million and adjustments to reconcile the net loss to net cash provided by operating activities of approximately $3.4 million of stock compensation expense. Net cash from changes in operating assets and liabilities resulted in a net cash outflow, which mainly included cash inflow for increase of prepayment of $1.1 million as we prepaid service fees for online concert performance, program license fees and vehicle purchase. Net cash outflow was primarily offset by the increase of other payables and accrued liabilities of approximately $0.1 million.

 

Net cash used in operating activities from continuing operations totaled approximately $1.0 for the year ended June 30, 2019, which was attributable to a net loss of approximately $6.7 million and adjustments to reconcile the net loss to net cash provided by operating activities of approximately $4.6 million of stock compensation expense. Net cash from changes in operating assets and liabilities resulted in a net cash inflow, which mainly included cash inflow for the increase of other payables and accrued liabilities of approximately $0.5 million and the increase of other payables – related parties of approximately $0.5 million.

 

Net cash used in operating activities from continuing operations totaled approximately $0.2 million for the year ended June 30, 2018, which was attributable to a net loss of approximately $2.3 million and adjustments to reconcile the net loss to net cash provided by operating activities of approximately $1.4 million of stock compensation expense. Net cash from changes in operating assets and liabilities resulted in a net cash inflow, which mainly included cash inflow for the increase of other payables – related parties of approximately $0.7 million.

 

Investing Activities

 

Net cash used in investing activities from continuing operations was approximately $1.4 million for the year ended June 30, 2020, which was primarily attributable to the purchase of equipment of $2.0 million. Net cash used in investing activities from continuing operations was offset by $0.6 million proceeds received from sales of discontinued operations.

 

We did not have any cash investing activities from continuing operations during the year ended June 30, 2019.

 

We did not have any cash investing activities from continuing operations during the year ended June 30, 2018.

 

Financing Activities

 

Net cash provided by financing activities from continuing operations totaled approximately $4.8 million for the year ended June 30, 2020, which was due to the sale of ordinary shares of $4.5 million and the borrowings from shareholders of $0.3 million to pay for certain operating expenses.

 

Net cash provided by financing activities from continuing operations totaled approximately $1.0 million for the year ended June 30, 2019, which was due to the sale of ordinary shares.

 

Net cash provided by financing activities from continuing operations totaled $0.6 million for the year ended June 30, 2018, which was due to the sale of ordinary shares.

 

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5.C. Research and Development, Patents and Licenses, etc.

 

Research and Development

 

During the year ended June 30, 2020, we spent $120,000 on developing the online after-school tutoring program of Baytao. During the years ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, we did not incur any research and development expenses from our continuing operations.

 

Patents and Licenses, etc.

 

As of June 30, 2020, we prepaid $20,000 for a program license fee.

 

5.D. Trend Information

 

Other than as disclosed elsewhere in this annual report and below, we are not aware of any trends, uncertainties, demands, commitments or events that are reasonably likely to have a material effect on our revenues, income from continuing operations, profitability, liquidity or capital resources, or that would cause reported financial information not necessarily to be indicative of future operating results or financial condition.     

 

5.E. Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

Other than as disclosed elsewhere in this annual report, we have not entered into any financial guarantees or other commitments to guarantee the payment obligations of any third parties. We have not entered into any derivative contracts that are indexed to its shares and classified as shareholder’s equity or that are not reflected in its consolidated financial statements. Furthermore, we do not have any retained or contingent interest in assets transferred to an unconsolidated entity that serves as credit, liquidity or market risk support to such entity. We do not have any variable interest in any unconsolidated entity that provides financing, liquidity, market risk or credit support to us or that engages in leasing, hedging or research and development services with us.

 

5.F. Tabular Disclosure of Contractual Obligations

  

The following table summarizes our contractual obligations as of June 30, 2020:

 

    Payments due by period  
Contractual obligations   Total     Less than 1 year     1 – 3 years     3 – 5 years     More than 5 years  
Operating lease obligations   $ 42,988     $ 42,988     $ -     $ -     $ -  
Total   $ 42,988     $ 42,988     $ -     $ -     $ -  

  

ITEM 6. DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND EMPLOYEES

 

6.A. Directors, Executive Officers and Key Employees

 

The following table sets forth information regarding our executive officers and directors as of the date of this report.

 

Directors and Executive Officers

 

Age  

 

Position/Title

Biao (Luke) Lu   45   Chief Executive Officer, Chairman of the Board
Lili Jiang   30   Chief Financial Officer and Director
Yingxian  (Elaine) Xiang   46   Independent Director
Hung-Jen Kuo   47   Independent Director
Xiaoyuan Zhang   32   Independent Director

 

Biography

 

Biao (Luke) Lu

 

Mr. Lu joined the Company on July 17, 2020. He is an experienced veteran in the entertainment industry in China. He acted as a producer and a screenwriter for multiple Chinese films and TV series, including “Ocean Paradise,” “Happy Bureau,” “Stalker,” “I want to be Rich,” “Transformation Group,” “Lifetime with You,” etc. Mr. Lu also directed Guilty, his first film, in 2017. He has served as the Chief Executive Officer of Hong Kong War Tiger Pictures since 2017. From 2005 to 2017, Mr. Lu served as the Chief Executive Officer of Dong Xing Time International Culture. Mr. Lu is a certified artists’ agent in China. He received his bachelor’s degree from the Department of Music at Anhui Normal University, and studied Broadcasting & Television Editing and Directing at the Communication University of China.

 

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Lili Jiang

 

Ms. Jiang has been serving as the Chief Financial Officer and Director of the Company since March 28, 2019. She had served as the Manager of the Overseas Medical Business Department of Aolan Health Management Co., Ltd (“Aolan”) from May 2016 to March 28, 2019. Prior to joining Aolan, Ms. Jiang was the Business Executive Assistant at the Australian Embassy in China from July 2011 to April 2016. She is a Certified Public Accountant in Australia. Ms. Jiang has a Bachelor’s degree in Accounting and Finance from Sydney Technical University in Australia, and a Master’s degree in Economics in Finance from University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia.

 

Yingxian (Elaine) Xiang

 

Ms. Xiang became our Board member on September 21, 2020. She is an accomplished business leader with over twenty years of experience in E-business development, strategic marketing, product and project management with various companies, and with a recent focus on offline and online education. She cofounded Skytree Education Association in 2017 and has been serving as the president since then. From 2012 to 2016, Ms. Fang was the cofounder and CEO of DreamBox Education & Technology Corp., one of the most recognizable brands in international education in Shenzhen, China. From 2008 to 2010, Ms. Fang was Director of Strategic Marketing at Official Payments. Ms. Fang’s earlier experience includes her serving as Vice President in E-Business at CitiGroup from 2004 to 2008 and as a senior consultant at Blue Martini Solutions Inc. from 2001 to 2004. Ms. Fang received her Bachelor of Economics, International Business Administration with a second major of Chemical Engineering from East China University of Science and Technology. She also received her MBA (Master of International Business) from University of South Carolina.  

 

Hung-Jen Kuo

 

Mr. Kuo was appointed as our Board member on August 12, 2020. He has nearly more than 25 years of experience in the global securities fund investment & business management industry. He is currently the Executive President CEO of Fosun Capital. Before joining Fosun Group, he was the head general manager and director of the China Securities Services Division of Deutsche Bank, China. Mr. Kuo previously served as the chief investment expert of Noah Group, the managing director of Gopher Assets Management. and the general manager of Gopher Public Fund. At the end of 2010, Mr. Kuo represented American Russell Investments and to participate in establishing Ping An Russell (Shanghai) Investment Management Company, one of the first private equity fund management companies in China. Mr. Kuo successfully introduced Russell’s investment MOM model to China, led investment research team building and business development, and issued China’s first MOM product. Mr. Kuo joined Russell Investment’s global Seattle headquarters in 2001, holding important various positions covering on in core departments such as investment management, research, and operations. In 1996, Mr. Kuo joined Aurora Group in Taipei as the assistant to CEO covering on business strategies and IPO project and jointly managing Russell’s investment global assets. Mr. Kuo holds a master’s degree in finance from the University of Colorado and a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Sun Yat-sen University in Taiwan.

 

Xiaoyuan Zhang

 

Ms. Zhang became a member of our Board of Directors on July 19, 2019. Ms. Zhang has served as the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer of Senmiao Technology Limited (Nasdaq: AIHS) since September 2018. From October 2010 to September 2018, Ms. Zhang served as Senior Auditor and Assurance Manager of Ernst & Young Hua Ming LLP, Chengdu Branch, where she participated in audits of several public companies listed in China, Hong Kong and Singapore, as well as large state-owned and foreign investment enterprises. Ms. Zhang received her dual bachelor’s degrees in accounting and law from Southwestern University of Finance and Economics in Chengdu, China. Ms. Zhang is an intermediate accountant and a Certified Public Accountant of the Chinese Institute of Certified Public Accountants.

 

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6.B. Compensation

 

The following table sets forth information concerning all cash and non-cash compensation awarded to, earned by or paid to our principal executive officer and our other most highly paid executive officer (the “named executive officers”) for services rendered in all capacities during the noted periods. No other executive officers received total annual salary and bonus compensation in excess of $100,000 during the fiscal years ended June 30, 2020 and 2019.

 

                  Non-         
                  Equity  Non-      
                  Incentive  Qualified      
                  Plan  Deferred  All   
Name and  Year        Stock  Option  Compensation  Compensation  Other   
Principal  Ended  Salary  Bonus  Awards  Awards  Earnings  Earnings  Compensation  Total
Position  June 30  ($)  ($)  ($)  ($)  ($)  ($)  ($)  ($)
Xianfu Han,   2020    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    - 
Former Chairman and
CEO (1)
   2019    270,000    -    -    -    -    -    -    270,000 
                                              
Weili He, Former Vice   2020    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    - 
Chairman, interim CFO and COO (2)   2019    270,000    -    -    -    -    -    -    270,000 
                                              
Yang (Sean) Liu,   2020    30,000    -    329,550    -    -    -    -    359,550 
VP of Technology (3)   2019              87,900                        87,900 
                                              
Lili Jiang,   2020    30,000    -    308,400    -    -    -    -    338,400 
Director and CFO (4)   2019              87,900                        87,900 
                                              
Biao Lu   2020    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    - 
Chairman and CEO (5)   2019    -    -    -    -    -    -    -    - 

 

(1) Mr. Han became our Chief Executive Officer on April 29, 2008. He was entitled to an annual salary of $300,000 for service as our Chief Executive Officer from July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2017 and increased to an annual salary of $360,000 from July 1, 2017 to June 30, 2020. Mr. Han resigned from his positions as CEO and Chairman on March 28, 2019.

 

(2) Mr. He became our Chief Operating Officer on April 29, 2008, and became our Interim Chief Financial Officer on September 21, 2012. He was entitled to an annual salary to $300,000 for service as our Interim Chief Financial Officer from July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2017 and increased to $360,000 from July 1, 2017 to June 30, 2020. Mr. He resigned from his positions as Interim Chief Financial Officer, Chief Operating Officer, and Vice Chairman on March 28, 2019.
   
(3) Mr. Liu became our Chief Executive Officer and Chairman on March 28, 2019. He was entitled to an annual compensation of 120,000 ordinary shares of the Company and annual salary of $120,000 beginning in April 1, 2020. On May 5, 2020, the Board amended the CEO compensation to be $120,000 per year plus 300,000 ordinary shares effective April 1, 2020. Mr. Liu resigned from his positions as CEO and Chairman on July 17, 2020.  On the same date, Mr. Liu was appointed as our Vice President of Technology.
   
(4) Ms. Jiang became our Chief Financial Officer and Director on March 28, 2019. She was entitled to an annual compensation of 120,000 ordinary shares of the Company. On May 8, 2020, the Board amended the CFO compensation to be $120,000 per year plus 120,000 ordinary shares effective April 1, 2020.
   
(5) Mr. Lu became our Chief Executive Officer and Chairman on July 17, 2020. He is entitled to an annual compensation of 300,000 ordinary shares of the Company and a monthly salary of $6,000. Mr. Lu’s monthly salary was increased to $10,000 for the period of August 1, 2020 to September 30, 2020 and was then increased to $20,000, effective October 1, 2020.

 

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The executive directors did not to receive any compensation for serving on the Board.  The following table represents compensation earned by our non-executive directors in fiscal year ended June 30, 2020.

 

    Fees
Earned or
Paid in
Cash
  Stock 
Awards
  Option 
Awards
 

Non-equity incentive plan

compensation

 

Nonqualified deferred

compensation earnings 

 

All other

compensation 

  Total
Name   ($)   ($)   ($)   ($)   ($)   ($)   ($)
Yan Zhang (1)     7, 694       -       -       -       -       -       7,694  
Wei Pei (2)     26,619       -       -       -       -       -       26,619  
Jiehui Fan (3)     1,583       -       -       -       -       -       1,583  
Xiaoyuan Zhang (4)     13,828       -       -       -       -       -       13,828  
Wei Fang (5)     8,400       -       -       -       -       -       8,400  
Hung-Jen Kuo (6)     -       -       -       -       -       -       -  
Yingxian (Elaine) Xiang (7)     -       -       -       -       -       -       -  

 

 

(1) On June 28, 2019, we entered into a director agreement with Ms. Yan Zhang, pursuant to which she is entitled to receive annual compensation of $10,000. Mr. Zhang resigned as a director on April 7, 2020.
   
(2) On March 21, 2017, we entered into a director agreement with Mr. Wei Pei, pursuant to which he is entitled to receive annual compensation of $25,000. Mr. Pei salary was increased to $36,000 per annum effective May 8, 2020. Mr. Pei resigned as a director of the Company on August 12, 2020.
   
(3) On June 12, 2018, we entered into a director agreement with Ms. Jiehui Fan, pursuant to which she is entitled to receive annual compensation of $30,000. Ms. Fan resigned as a director of the Company on July 19, 2019.
   
(4) On July 19, 2019, we entered into a director agreement with Ms. Xiaoyuan Zhang, pursuant to which she is entitled to receive annual compensation of $10,000. Ms. Zhang’s salary was increased to $36,000 per annum effective May 8, 2020.
   
(5)  On April 7, 2020, Mr. Fang was appointed as a director of the Company. He is entitled to receive annual compensation of $36,000. Mr. Fang resigned as a director of the Company on September 21, 2020.  
   
(6) On August 12, 2020, we entered into a director agreement with Mr. Hung-Jen Kuo, pursuant to which he shall receive annual compensation of $36,000.
   
(7) On September 21, 2020, we entered into a director agreement with Ms. Xiang, pursuant to which she receive annual compensation of $36,000.

 

6.C. Board Practices

 

Terms of Directors and Officers

 

Our officers are elected by and serve at the discretion of the Board and the shareholders voting by ordinary resolution. Our directors are not subject to a set term of office and hold office until the next general meeting called for the election of directors and until their successor is duly elected or such time as they die, resign or are removed from office by a shareholders’ ordinary resolution or the unanimous written resolution of all shareholders A director will be removed from office automatically if, among other things, the director becomes bankrupt or makes any arrangement or composition with his creditors generally or is found to be or becomes of unsound mind.

 

Audit Committee

 

Xiaoyuan Zhang, Hung-Jen Kuo and Yingxian Xiang are members of our Audit Committee, and Xiaoyuan Zhang serves as the chairwoman. All members of our Audit Committee satisfy the independence standards promulgated by the SEC and by Nasdaq as such standards apply specifically to members of audit committees.

 

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Our Audit Committee performs several functions, including:

 

  selecting our independent auditors and pre-approving all auditing and non-auditing services permitted to be performed by our independent auditors;

 

  reviewing with our independent auditors any audit problems or difficulties and management’s response;

 

  reviewing and approving all proposed related-party transactions, as defined in Item 404 of Regulation S- K under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended;

 

  discussing the annual audited financial statements with management and our independent auditors;

 

  reviewing major issues as to the adequacy of our internal controls and any special audit steps adopted in light of significant internal control deficiencies;

 

  annually reviewing and reassessing the adequacy of our audit committee charter;

 

  meeting separately and periodically with management and our independent auditors;

 

  reporting to the Board; and

 

  such other matters that are specifically delegated to our audit committee by the Board from time to time.

 

Compensation Committee

 

Xiaoyuan Zhang, Hung-Jen Kuo and Yingxian Xiang are members of our Compensation Committee, and Yingxian Xiang serves the chairwoman. All members of our Compensation Committee are qualified as independent under the current definition promulgated by Nasdaq. The Compensation Committee is responsible for, among other things:

 

  reviewing and approving the total compensation package for our senior executives; and

 

  reviewing periodically, and approving, any long-term incentive compensation or equity plans, programs or similar arrangements, annual bonuses, employee pension and welfare benefit plans.

 

Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee

 

Xiaoyuan Zhang, Hung-Jen Kuo and Yingxian Xiang are members of our Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee and Hung-Jen Kuo is the chairman. All members of our Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee are qualified as independent under the current definition promulgated by Nasdaq. The Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee is responsible for, among other things:

 

  identify qualified individuals to become Board members, consistent with criteria approved by the Board, and to recommend that the Board select, the director nominees for the next annual meeting of shareholders;

 

  develop and recommend to the Board a set of corporate governance guidelines applicable to the Company; and

 

  to oversee the evaluation of the Board and management.

 

6.D. Employees

 

See the section entitled “Employees” in Item 4 above.

 

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6.E. Share Ownership

 

The following table sets forth information with respect to the beneficial ownership of our ordinary shares as of November 11, 2020 for:

 

  each beneficial owner of 5% or more of our outstanding ordinary shares;
     
  each of our directors and executive officers; and
     
  all of our directors and executive officers as a group.

 

Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with the rules of the SEC. These rules generally attribute beneficial ownership of securities to persons who possess sole or shared voting power or investment power with respect to those securities and include ordinary shares issuable upon the exercise of options that are immediately exercisable or exercisable within 60 days of the date hereof.

 

Except as otherwise indicated, all of the shares reflected in the table are ordinary shares and all persons listed below have sole voting and investment power with respect to the shares beneficially owned by them, subject to applicable community property laws. The information is not necessarily indicative of beneficial ownership for any other purpose.

 

Except as otherwise indicated in the table below, addresses of our directors, executive officers and named beneficial owners are in care of Color Star Technology Co., Ltd., 800 3rd Ave, Suite 2800, New York NY 10022. 

 

   Ordinary Shares
Beneficially Owned
     
Name of Beneficial Owners  Number   %(1) 
Directors and Executive Officers:    
Biao Lu        
Lili Jiang   240,000     
Xiaoyuan Zhang        
Yingxian Xiang        
Hung-Jen Kuo        
All directors and officers as a group (five individuals)   240,000    *   
5% shareholders:          
Hou Sing International Business Limited   3,825,395    7.06%
Liang Li   4,170,000    7.70%
Jie Yang   3,000,000    5.54%

 

*Less than 1%

 

(1)Applicable percentage of ownership is based on 54,161,811 ordinary shares outstanding as of November 11, 2020, for each shareholder.

  

ITEM 7. MAJOR SHAREHOLDERS AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

7.A. Major Shareholders

 

See Item 6.E., “Share Ownership,” for a description of our major shareholders.

 

7.B. Related Party Transactions

 

Except as discussed below, since the beginning of fiscal year 2018, there have not been any transactions, nor is there any currently proposed transaction, in which we were or are to be a participant and the amount involved exceeded or exceeds $120,000, and in which any related person had or will have a direct or indirect material interest (other than compensation described under “Executive Compensation”).

 

On March 31, 2020, the Company, BVI-ACM, a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company, and Mr. Xianfu Han and Mr. Weili He (the “Purchasers”), two former officers (CEO and CFO) and collectively held less than 5% ordinary shares of the Company currently, entered into a share purchase agreement (the “Disposition SPA”). Pursuant to the Disposition SPA, the Purchasers agreed to purchase BVI-ACM in exchange for cash consideration of $600,000. The closing of the Disposition was completed on May 6, 2020. After disposal of BVI-ACM, the Company had no continuing involvement or commitments with BVI-ACM.

 

 

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Prepayment – related party

 

Mr. Xianfu Han, and Mr. Weili He are holding positions as president and director of Ningbo Lianlv Investment Ltd., respectively. This company owns 99% of the shares of Beijing Lianlv Technical Group Ltd. (“Beijing Lianlv”), the Company’s supplier. As of June 30, 2019 and 2018, the Company’s prepayment – related party of discontinued operations amounted to $456,399 and $3,027,409 for Beijing Lianlv, before any allowance, for inventory purchases, respectively.

 

Other receivables – related party

 

This balance represents litigation against Xin Ao who entered into a capital lease agreement on behalf of Beijing Lianlv, an entity whose shareholders are Mr. Han and Mr. He. The balance was indemnified by Mr. Han and Mr. He in November 2019. As of June 30, 2019 and 2018, other receivable – related party of discontinued operations from Beijing Lianlv was $165,075 and $1,397,042, respectively.

 

Other payables – related parties

 

The balances represent the salary payables to Mr. Xianfu Han, Mr. Weili He, the Company’s former Chief Executive Officer (“CEO”) and Chief Financial Officer (“CFO”) who collectively held less than 5% of the Company ordinary shares currently.

 

Other payables – related parties consisted of the following:

 

   June 30,
2020
   June 30,
2019
   June 30,
2018
 
Xianfu Han  $-   $361,336   $91,336 
Weili He   10,711    396,401    104,428 
Total   10,711    757,737    195,763 
Less: other payables – related parties - discontinued operations   -    (217,737)   (195,763)
Other payables – related parties – continuing operations  $10,711   $540,000   $- 

 

Borrowings from related party

 

During the year ended June 30, 2020, Hou Sing, the Company’s shareholder, lent the Company $300,000 to pay for the Company’s certain operating expenses. In December 2019, the Company issued ordinary shares to Hou Sing to repay the debt the Company owes to him (See Notes to consolidated financial statements - Note 12).

 

Loans payable - employees

  

Na Wang and Wei Zhang, employees of the Company, have settled certain liabilities on behalf of the Company with its vendors and advanced funds to the Company for working capital purposes. The settlement amount and advances are non-interest bearing, unsecured, and are payable in cash on demand.

 

   June 30,
2020
   June 30,
2019
   June 30,
2018
 
Na Wang*  $-   $2,341,932   $- 
Wei Zhang*   -    2,251,942    - 
Total   -    4,593,874    - 
Less: other payables – related parties - discontinued operations      -    (4,285,785)        -
Other payables – related parties – continuing operations  $-   $308,089   $- 

 

*On January 15, 2020, Hou Sing, the Company’s shareholder, entered into certain loan assignment agreements with Na Wang and Wei Zhang in the aggregate amount of RMB 29,429,627 (approximately $4.3 million) (the “Debt”) and delivered the full payment to the two employees. On the same day, the board of directors of the Company approved the conversion of the Debt as well as the conversion of debt in the aggregate amount of $218,519 that the Company owed to Wei Zhang, at a per share conversion price of $1.54. On March 6, 2020, upon Nasdaq’s approval, the Company issued 2,911,000 ordinary shares of the Company to Hou Sing and Wei Zhang in exchange for the debt.

 

7.C. Interests of Experts and Counsel

 

Not applicable. 

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ITEM 8. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Consolidated Statements and Other Financial Information

 

The financial statements required by this item may be found at the end of this Annual Report on 20-F, beginning on page F-1.

 

Legal Proceedings

 

See “Item 4. Information on the Company — B. Business Overview — Legal Proceedings.”

   

Dividends

 

We have never declared or paid any dividend on our ordinary shares and we do not anticipate paying any dividends on our ordinary shares in the future. We currently intend to retain all future earnings to finance our operations and to expand our business.

 

No Significant Changes

 

Except as disclosed elsewhere in this annual report, no other significant changes to our financial condition have occurred since the date of the annual financial statements contained herein.

   

ITEM 9. THE OFFER AND LISTING

 

9.A. Offer and Listing Details

 

Our ordinary shares are listed for trading on the NASDAQ Capital Market under the symbol “CSCW.” The shares began trading on February 25, 2013 on the NASDAQ Capital Market.

        

9.B. Plan of Distribution

 

Not Applicable.

 

9.C. Markets

 

Our ordinary shares are currently traded on the NASDAQ Capital Market.

 

9.D. Selling Shareholders

 

Not Applicable.

 

9.E. Dilution

 

Not Applicable.

 

9.F. Expenses of the Issuer

 

Not Applicable.

 

ITEM 10. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

 

10.A. Share Capital

 

Not Applicable.

 

10.B. Memorandum and Articles of Association

 

We are a Cayman Islands exempted company with limited liability and our affairs are governed by our Memorandum and Articles, the Companies Law, the common law of the Cayman Islands, our corporate governance documents and rules and regulations of the stock exchange on which are shares are traded.

 

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As of the date hereof, the authorized share capital of the Company is $75,000 divided into 75,000,000 Ordinary Shares with a nominal or par value of USD 0.001 each. We have proposed to increase our authorized share capital to 200,000,000 ordinary shares of a par value of US$0.001 each by the creation of an additional 125,000,000 ordinary shares of a par value of US$0.001 each to rank pari passu in all respects with the existing ordinary shares, which proposal shall be considered and voted by the shareholders at the Extraordinary General Meeting of the Shareholders to be held on November 18, 2020. As of November 12, 54,861,811 Ordinary Shares are issued and outstanding. All of our issued and outstanding Ordinary Shares are fully paid.

 

Ordinary Shares

 

The following are summaries of material provisions of our Memorandum and Articles, corporate governance policies and the Companies Law insofar as they relate to the material terms of our Ordinary Shares.

 

Objects of Our Company

 

Under our Memorandum and Articles, the objects of our Company are unrestricted and we have the full power and authority to carry out any object not prohibited by the law of the Cayman Islands.

 

Share Capital

  

The holders of our Ordinary Shares are entitled to one vote for each such share held and shall be entitled to notice of any shareholders’ meeting, and, subject to the terms of Memorandum and Articles, to vote thereat.

  

Dividends

 

The holders of our Ordinary Shares are entitled to such dividends as may be declared by our Board of Directors subject to the Companies Law and to our Memorandum and Articles.

     

Voting Rights

 

In respect of all matters subject to a shareholders’ vote, each Ordinary Share is entitled to one vote. Voting at any shareholders’ meeting is by show of hands unless a poll is demanded by the chairman or persons holding certain amounts of shares as set forth in the Memorandum and Articles. Actions that may be taken at a general meeting also may be taken by a unanimous resolution of the shareholders in writing.

 

No business shall be transacted at any general meeting unless a quorum of members is present at the time when the meeting proceeds to business; two members present in person or by proxy shall be a quorum provided always that if the Company has one member of record the quorum shall be that one member present in person or by proxy. An ordinary resolution to be passed at a general meeting requires the affirmative vote of a simple majority of the votes cast.

 

A special resolution of members is required to change the name of the Company, approve a merger, wind up the Company, amend the Memorandum and Articles and reduce the share capital.

 

Transfer of Ordinary Shares

 

Subject to the restrictions set out below, any of our shareholders may transfer all or any of his, its or her Ordinary Shares by an instrument of transfer in the usual or common form or any other form approved by our Board of Directors or in a form prescribed by the stock exchange on which our shares are then listed.

 

Our Board of Directors may, in its sole discretion, decline to register any transfer of Ordinary Shares whether or not it is fully paid up to the total consideration paid for such shares. Our directors may also decline to register any transfer of Ordinary Shares if (a) the instrument of transfer is not accompanied by the certificate covering the shares to which it relates or any other evidence as our Board of Directors may reasonably require to prove the title of the transferor to, or his/her right to transfer the shares; or (b) the instrument of transfer is in respect of more than one class of shares.

 

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If our directors refuse to register a transfer, they shall, within two months after the date on which the instrument of transfer was lodged, send to the transferee notice of such refusal.

 

The registration of transfers may be suspended and the register closed at such times and for such periods as our Board of Directors may from time to time determine, provided, however, that the registration of transfers shall not be suspended nor the register closed for more than 30 days in any year.

 

Winding-Up/Liquidation

 

On a return of capital on winding up or otherwise (other than on conversion, redemption or purchase of shares), a liquidator may be appointed to determine how to distribute the assets among the holders of the Ordinary Shares. If our assets available for distribution are insufficient to repay all of the paid-up capital, the assets will be distributed so that the losses are borne by our shareholders proportionately; a similar basis will be employed if the assets are more than sufficient to repay the whole of the capital at the commencement of the winding up.

 

Calls on Ordinary Shares and Forfeiture of Ordinary Shares

 

Our Board of Directors may from time to time make calls upon shareholders for any amounts unpaid on their Ordinary Shares in a notice served to such shareholders at least 14 days prior to the specified time and place of payment. The shares that have been called upon and remain unpaid on the specified time are subject to forfeiture.

 

Redemption of Shares

 

We may issue shares on terms that are subject to redemption, at our option or at the option of the holders, on such terms and in such manner as may be determined by our Board of Directors.

 

Inspection of Books and Records

 

Directors shall from time to time determine whether and to what extent and at what times and places and under what conditions or regulations the accounts and books of the Company or any of them shall be open to the inspection of members not being Directors and no member (not being a Director) shall have any right of inspecting any account or book or document of the Company except as conferred by Companies Law or authorized by the Directors or by the Company in a general meeting. However, the Directors shall from time to time cause to be prepared and to be laid before the Company in a general meeting, profit and loss accounts, balance sheets, group accounts (if any) and such other reports and accounts as may be required by Companies Law. (See “Where You Can Find More Information”)

    

Issuance of Additional Shares

 

Our Memorandum and Articles authorize our Board of Directors to issue additional Ordinary Shares from time to time as our Board of Directors shall determine, to the extent there are available authorized but unissued shares.

 

Our Memorandum and Articles also authorizes our Board of Directors to establish from time to time one or more series of preferred shares and to determine, subject to compliance with the variation of rights of shares provision in the Memorandum and Articles, with respect to any series of preferred shares, the terms and rights of that series, including:

 

  the designation of the series;
     
  the number of shares of the series;
     
  the dividend rights, dividend rates, conversion rights, voting rights; and
     
  the rights and terms of redemption and liquidation preferences.

 

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Our Board of Directors may, issue preferred shares without action by our shareholders to the extent there are authorized but unissued shares available.

 

Anti-Takeover Provisions

 

Some provisions of our Memorandum and Articles may discourage, delay or prevent a change of control of our Company or management that shareholders may consider favorable, including provisions that:

 

  authorize our Board of Directors to issue preferred shares in one or more series and to designate the price, rights, preferences, privileges and restrictions of such preferred shares without any further vote or action by our shareholders (subject to variation of rights of shares provisions in our Memorandum and Articles); and
     
  limit the ability of shareholders to requisition and convene general meetings of shareholders. Our Memorandum and Articles allow our shareholders holding shares representing in aggregate not less than twenty percent of our paid up share capital (as to the total consideration paid for such shares) in issue to requisition an extraordinary general meeting of our shareholders, in which case our directors are obliged to call such meeting and to put the resolutions so requisitioned to a vote at such meeting.

 

However, under Cayman Islands law, our directors may only exercise the rights and powers granted to them under our Memorandum and Articles for a proper purpose and for what they believe in good faith to be in the best interests of our Company.

 

General Meetings of Shareholders and Shareholder Proposals

 

Our shareholders’ general meetings may be held in such place within or outside the Cayman Islands as our Board of Directors considers appropriate.

 

As a Cayman Islands exempted company, we are not obliged by the Companies Law to call shareholders’ annual general meetings. The directors may, whenever they think fit, convene an extraordinary general meeting.

 

Shareholders’ general meetings and any other general meetings of our shareholders may be convened by a majority of our Board of Directors. Our Board of Directors shall give not less than seven days’ written notice of a shareholders’ meeting to those persons whose names appear as members in our register of members on the date the notice is given (or on any other date determined by our directors to be the record date for such meeting) and who are entitled to vote at the meeting.

 

Cayman Islands law provides shareholders with only limited rights to requisition a general meeting, and does not provide shareholders with any right to put any proposal before a general meeting. However, these rights may be provided in a company’s articles of association. Our Memorandum and Articles allow our shareholders holding shares representing in aggregate not less than ten percent of our paid up share capital (as to the total consideration paid for such shares) in issue to requisition an extraordinary general meeting of our shareholders, in which case our directors are obliged to call such meeting and to put the resolutions so requisitioned to a vote at such meeting; otherwise, our Memorandum and Articles do not provide our shareholders with any right to put any proposals before annual general meetings or extraordinary general meetings not called by such shareholders.

 

Exempted Company

 

We are an exempted company with limited liability under the Companies Law. The Companies Law distinguishes between ordinary resident companies and exempted companies. A Cayman Islands exempted company:

 

  is a company that conducts its business mainly outside of the Cayman Islands;
     
  is exempted from certain requirements of the Companies Law, including the filing an annual return of its shareholders with the Registrar of Companies or the Immigration Board;
     
  does not have to make its register of members open for inspection;

 

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  does not have to hold an annual general meeting;
     
  may issue negotiable or bearer shares or shares with no par value (subject to the provisions of the Companies Law);
     
  may obtain an undertaking against the imposition of any future taxation (such undertakings are usually given for 20 years in the first instance); and
     
  may register by way of continuation in another jurisdiction and be deregistered in the Cayman Islands.

 

“Limited liability” means that the liability of each shareholder is limited to the amount unpaid by the shareholder on the shares of the company (except in exceptional circumstances, such as involving fraud, the establishment of an agency relationship or an illegal or improper purpose or other circumstances in which a court may be prepared to pierce or lift the corporate veil).

   

Register of Members

 

Under Cayman Islands law, we must keep a register of members and there should be entered therein:

 

  the names and addresses of the members, a statement of the shares held by each member, and of the amount paid or agreed to be considered as paid, on the shares of each member;
     
  the date on which the name of any person was entered on the register as a member; and
     
  the date on which any person ceased to be a member.

 

Under Cayman Islands law, the register of members of our Company is prima facie evidence of the matters set out therein (i.e. the register of members will raise a presumption of fact on the matters referred to above unless rebutted) and a member registered in the register of members is deemed as a matter of Cayman Islands law to have legal title to the shares as set against its name in the register of members. Once our register of members has been updated, the shareholders recorded in the register of members are deemed to have legal title to the shares set against their name.

 

If the name of any person is incorrectly entered in, or omitted from, our register of members, or if there is any default or unnecessary delay in entering on the register the fact of any person having ceased to be a member of our Company, the person or member aggrieved (or any member of our Company or our Company itself) may apply to the Cayman Islands Grand Court for an order that the register be rectified, and the Court may either refuse such application or it may, if satisfied of the justice of the case, make an order for the rectification of the register.

 

Indemnification of Directors and Executive Officers and Limitation of Liability

 

Cayman Islands law does not limit the extent to which a company’s memorandum and articles of association may provide for indemnification of officers and directors, except to the extent any such provision may be held by the Cayman Islands courts to be contrary to public policy, such as to provide indemnification against civil fraud or the consequences of committing a crime. Our Memorandum and Articles require us to indemnify our officers and directors for actions, proceedings, claims, losses, damages, costs, liabilities and expenses (“Indemnified Losses”) incurred in their capacities as such unless such Indemnified Losses arise from dishonesty of such directors or officers. This standard of conduct is generally the same as permitted under the Delaware General Corporation Law for a Delaware corporation.

 

Insofar as indemnification for liabilities arising under the Securities Act may be permitted to our directors, officers or persons controlling us under the foregoing provisions, we have been informed that in the opinion of the SEC, such indemnification is against public policy as expressed in the Securities Act and is therefore unenforceable.

    

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Material Differences between U.S. Corporate Law and Cayman Islands Corporate Law

 

The Companies Law is modeled after that of English law but does not follow many recent English law statutory enactments. In addition, the Companies Law differs from laws applicable to United States corporations and their shareholders. Set forth below is a summary of the significant differences between the provisions of the Companies Law applicable to us and the laws applicable to companies incorporated in the State of Delaware.

 

Mergers and Similar Arrangements. A merger of two or more constituent companies under Cayman Islands law requires a plan of merger or consolidation to be approved by the directors of each constituent company and authorization by (a) a special resolution of the shareholders and (b) such other authorization, if any, as may be specified in such constituent company’s articles of association.

 

A merger between a Cayman Islands parent company and its Cayman Islands subsidiary or subsidiaries does not require authorization by a resolution of shareholders of that Cayman Islands subsidiary if a copy of the plan of merger is given to every member of that Cayman Islands subsidiary to be merged unless that member agrees otherwise. For this purpose a subsidiary is a company of which at least ninety percent (90%) of the issued shares entitled to vote are owned by the parent company.

 

The consent of each holder of a fixed or floating security interest over a constituent company is required unless this requirement is waived by a court in the Cayman Islands.

 

Save in certain circumstances, a dissentient shareholder of a Cayman constituent company is entitled to payment of the fair value of his shares upon dissenting to a merger or consolidation. The exercise of appraisal rights will preclude the exercise of any other rights save for the right to seek relief on the grounds that the merger or consolidation is void or unlawful.

 

In addition, there are statutory provisions that facilitate the reconstruction and amalgamation of companies, provided that the arrangement is approved by a majority in number of each class of shareholders and creditors with whom the arrangement is to be made, and who must in addition represent three-fourths in value of each such class of shareholders or creditors, as the case may be, that are present and voting either in person or by proxy at a meeting, or meetings, convened for that purpose. The convening of the meetings and subsequently the arrangement must be sanctioned by the Grand Court of the Cayman Islands. While a dissenting shareholder has the right to express to the court the view that the transaction ought not to be approved, the court can be expected to approve the arrangement if it determines that:

 

  the statutory provisions as to the required majority vote have been met;

 

  the shareholders have been fairly represented at the meeting in question and the statutory majority are acting bona fide without coercion of the minority to promote interests adverse to those of the class;

 

  the arrangement is such that may be reasonably approved by an intelligent and honest man of that class acting in respect of his interest; and

 

  the arrangement is not one that would more properly be sanctioned under some other provision of the Companies Law.

 

When a takeover offer is made and accepted by holders of 90.0% of the shares within four months, the offeror may, within a two-month period commencing on the expiration of such four month period, require the holders of the remaining shares to transfer such shares on the terms of the offer. An objection can be made to the Grand Court of the Cayman Islands but this is unlikely to succeed in the case of an offer which has been so approved unless there is evidence of fraud, bad faith or collusion.

 

If an arrangement and reconstruction is thus approved, the dissenting shareholder would have no rights comparable to appraisal rights, which would otherwise ordinarily be available to dissenting shareholders of Delaware corporations, providing rights to receive payment in cash for the judicially determined value of the shares.

 

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Shareholders’ Suits. In principle, we will normally be the proper plaintiff and as a general rule a derivative action may not be brought by a minority shareholder. However, based on English authorities, which would in all likelihood be of persuasive authority in the Cayman Islands, there are exceptions to the foregoing principle, including when:

 

  a company acts or proposes to act illegally or ultra vires;

 

  the act complained of, although not ultra vires, could only be effected duly if authorized by more than a simple majority vote that has not been obtained; and

 

  those who control the company are perpetrating a “fraud on the minority.”

   

Indemnification of Directors and Executive Officers and Limitation of Liability. Cayman Islands law does not limit the extent to which a company’s memorandum and articles of association may provide for indemnification of officers and directors, except to the extent any such provision may be held by the Cayman Islands courts to be contrary to public policy, such as to provide indemnification against civil fraud or the consequences of committing a crime. Our current memorandum and articles of association permit indemnification of officers and directors for losses, damages, costs and expenses incurred in their capacities as such unless such losses or damages arise from dishonesty or fraud of such directors or officers. This standard of conduct is generally the same as permitted under the Delaware General Corporation Law for a Delaware corporation. In addition, we have entered into indemnification agreements with our directors and executive officers that provide such persons with additional indemnification beyond that provided in our current memorandum and articles of association.

 

Insofar as indemnification for liabilities arising under the Securities Act may be permitted to our directors, officers or persons controlling us under the foregoing provisions, we have been informed that in the opinion of the SEC, such indemnification is against public policy as expressed in the Securities Act and is therefore unenforceable.

 

Directors’ Fiduciary Duties. Under Delaware corporate law, a director of a Delaware corporation has a fiduciary duty to the corporation and its shareholders. This duty has two components: the duty of care and the duty of loyalty. The duty of care requires that a director act in good faith, with the care that an ordinarily prudent person would exercise under similar circumstances. Under this duty, a director must inform himself of, and disclose to shareholders, all material information reasonably available regarding a significant transaction. The duty of loyalty requires that a director acts in a manner he reasonably believes to be in the best interests of the corporation. He must not use his corporate position for personal gain or advantage. This duty prohibits self-dealing by a director and mandates that the best interest of the corporation and its shareholders take precedence over any interest possessed by a director, officer or controlling shareholder and not shared by the shareholders generally. In general, actions of a director are presumed to have been made on an informed basis, in good faith and in the honest belief that the action taken was in the best interests of the corporation. However, this presumption may be rebutted by evidence of a breach of one of the fiduciary duties. Should such evidence be presented concerning a transaction by a director, the director must prove the procedural fairness of the transaction, and that the transaction was of fair value to the corporation.

 

As a matter of Cayman Islands law, a director of a Cayman Islands company is in the position of a fiduciary with respect to the company and therefore it is considered that he or she owes the following duties to the company — a duty to act bona fide in the best interests of the company, a duty not to make a profit based on his or her position as director (unless the company permits him or her to do so) and a duty not to put himself or herself in a position where the interests of the company conflict with his or her personal interest or his or her duty to a third party. A director of a Cayman Islands company owes to the company a duty to act with skill and care. It was previously considered that a director need not exhibit in the performance of his or her duties a greater degree of skill than may reasonably be expected from a person of his or her knowledge and experience. However, English and Commonwealth courts have moved towards an objective standard with regard to the required skill and care and these authorities are likely to be followed in the Cayman Islands.

 

Shareholder Action by Written Consent. Under the Delaware General Corporation Law, a corporation may eliminate the right of shareholders to act by written consent by amendment to its certificate of incorporation. Cayman Islands law and our current articles of association provide that shareholders may approve corporate matters by way of a unanimous written resolution signed by or on behalf of each shareholder who would have been entitled to vote on such matter at a general meeting without a meeting being held.

 

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Shareholder Proposals. Under the Delaware General Corporation Law, a shareholder has the right to put any proposal before the annual meeting of shareholders, provided it complies with the notice provisions in the governing documents. A special meeting may be called by the board of directors or any other person authorized to do so in the governing documents, but shareholders may be precluded from calling special meetings.

 

Cayman Islands law does not provide shareholders any right to put proposals before a meeting or requisition a general meeting. However, these rights may be provided in articles of association. Our current articles of association allow our shareholders holding not less than one-third of all voting power of our share capital in issue to requisition a shareholder’s meeting. Other than this right to requisition a shareholders’ meeting, our current articles of association do not provide our shareholders other right to put proposal before a meeting. As a Cayman Islands exempted company, we are not obliged by law to call shareholders’ annual general meetings.

   

Cumulative Voting. Under the Delaware General Corporation Law, cumulative voting for elections of directors is not permitted unless the corporation’s certificate of incorporation specifically provides for it. Cumulative voting potentially facilitates the representation of minority shareholders on a board of directors since it permits the minority shareholder to cast all the votes to which the shareholder is entitled on a single director, which increases the shareholder’s voting power with respect to electing such director. There are no prohibitions in relation to cumulative voting under the laws of the Cayman Islands but our current articles of association do not provide for cumulative voting. As a result, our shareholders are not afforded any less protections or rights on this issue than shareholders of a Delaware corporation.

 

Removal of Directors. Under the Delaware General Corporation Law, a director of a corporation with a classified board may be removed only for cause with the approval of a majority of the outstanding shares entitled to vote, unless the certificate of incorporation provides otherwise. Under our current articles of association, directors may be removed with or without cause, by an ordinary resolution of our shareholders.

 

Transactions with Interested Shareholders. The Delaware General Corporation Law contains a business combination statute applicable to Delaware corporations whereby, unless the corporation has specifically elected not to be governed by such statute by amendment to its certificate of incorporation, it is prohibited from engaging in certain business combinations with an “interested shareholder” for three years following the date that such person becomes an interested shareholder. An interested shareholder generally is a person or a group who or which owns or owned 15% or more of the target’s outstanding voting share within the past three years. This has the effect of limiting the ability of a potential acquirer to make a two-tiered bid for the target in which all shareholders would not be treated equally. The statute does not apply if, among other things, prior to the date on which such shareholder becomes an interested shareholder, the board of directors approves either the business combination or the transaction which resulted in the person becoming an interested shareholder. This encourages any potential acquirer of a Delaware corporation to negotiate the terms of any acquisition transaction with the target’s board of directors.

 

Cayman Islands law has no comparable statute. As a result, we cannot avail ourselves of the types of protections afforded by the Delaware business combination statute. However, although Cayman Islands law does not regulate transactions between a company and its significant shareholders, it does provide that such transactions must be entered into bona fide in the best interests of the company and not with the effect of constituting a fraud on the minority shareholders.

 

Dissolution; Winding up. Under the Delaware General Corporation Law, unless the board of directors approves the proposal to dissolve, dissolution must be approved by shareholders holding 100% of the total voting power of the corporation. Only if the dissolution is initiated by the board of directors may it be approved by a simple majority of the corporation’s outstanding shares. Delaware law allows a Delaware corporation to include in its certificate of incorporation a supermajority voting requirement in connection with dissolutions initiated by the board. Under Cayman Islands law, a company may be wound up by either an order of the courts of the Cayman Islands or by a special resolution of its members or, if the company is unable to pay its debts as they fall due, by an ordinary resolution of its members. The court has authority to order winding up in a number of specified circumstances including where it is, in the opinion of the court, just and equitable to do so. Under the Companies Law and our current articles of association, our company may be dissolved, liquidated or wound up by a special resolution of our shareholders.

 

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Variation of Rights of Shares. Under the Delaware General Corporation Law, a corporation may vary the rights of a class of shares with the approval of a majority of the outstanding shares of such class, unless the certificate of incorporation provides otherwise. Under Cayman Islands law and our current articles of association, if our share capital is divided into more than one class of shares, we may vary the rights attached to any class with the written consent of the holders of three-fourths of the issued shares of that class or with the sanction of a resolution passed by not less than three-fourths of such holders of the shares of that class as may be present at a general meeting of the holders of the shares of that class.

   

Amendment of Governing Documents. Under the Delaware General Corporation Law, a corporation’s governing documents may be amended with the approval of a majority of the outstanding shares entitled to vote, unless the certificate of incorporation provides otherwise. As permitted by Cayman Islands law, our current memorandum and articles of association may only be amended with a special resolution of our shareholders.

 

Rights of Non-resident or Foreign Shareholders. There are no limitations imposed by our post-offering amended and restated memorandum and articles of association on the rights of non-resident or foreign shareholders to hold or exercise voting rights on our shares. In addition, there are no provisions in our current memorandum and articles of association governing the ownership threshold above which shareholder ownership must be disclosed.

 

10.C. Material Contracts

 

We have not entered into any material contracts other than in the ordinary course of business and other than those described in this annual report.  

 

10.D. Exchange Controls

 

Cayman Islands

 

There are currently no exchange control regulations in the Cayman Islands applicable to us or our shareholders.

 

The PRC

 

China regulates foreign currency exchanges primarily through the following rules and regulations:

 

  Foreign Currency Administration Rules of 1996, as amended; and

 

  Administrative Rules of the Settlement, Sale and Payment of Foreign Exchange of 1996.

 

Renminbi is not a freely convertible currency at present. Under the current PRC regulations, conversion of Renminbi is permitted in China for routine current-account foreign exchange transactions, including trade and service related foreign exchange transactions, payment of dividends and service of foreign debts. Conversion of Renminbi for most capital-account items, such as direct investments, investments in PRC securities markets and repatriation of investments, however, is still subject to the approval of SAFE.

 

Pursuant to the above-mentioned administrative rules, foreign-invested enterprises may buy, sell and/or remit foreign currencies for current account transactions at banks in China with authority to conduct foreign exchange business by complying with certain procedural requirements, such as presentment of valid commercial documents. For capital-account transactions involving foreign direct investment, foreign debts and outbound investment in securities and derivatives, approval from SAFE is a pre-condition. Capital investments by foreign-invested enterprises outside China are subject to limitations and requirements in China, such as prior approvals from the PRC Ministry of Commerce or SAFE.

 

10.E. Taxation

 

The following summary of the material Cayman Islands, PRC and U.S. tax consequences of an investment in our ordinary shares is based upon laws and relevant interpretations thereof in effect as of the date hereof, all of which are subject to change, possibly with retroactive effect. This summary is not intended to be, nor should it be construed as, legal or tax advice and is not exhaustive of all possible tax considerations. This summary also does not deal with all possible tax consequences relating to an investment in our ordinary shares, such as the tax consequences under state, local, non-U.S., non-PRC, and non-Cayman Islands tax laws. Investors should consult their own tax advisors with respect to the tax consequences of the acquisition, ownership and disposition of our ordinary shares.

 

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Cayman Islands Taxation

 

The Cayman Islands currently levies no taxes on individuals or corporations based upon profits, income, gains or appreciation and there is no taxation in the nature of inheritance tax or estate duty. There are no other taxes levied by the Government of the Cayman Islands that are likely to be material to holders of ordinary shares or ordinary shares. The Cayman Islands is not party to any double tax treaties. There are no exchange control regulations or currency restrictions in the Cayman Islands.

 

People’s Republic of China Taxation

 

Under the EIT Law, an enterprise established outside the PRC with a “de facto management body” within the PRC is considered a PRC resident enterprise for PRC enterprise income tax purposes and is generally subject to a uniform 25% enterprise income tax rate on its worldwide income as well as tax reporting obligations. Under the Implementation Rules, a “de facto management body” is defined as a body that has material and overall management and control over the manufacturing and business operations, personnel and human resources, finances and properties of an enterprise. In addition, SAT Circular 82 issued in April 2009 specifies that certain offshore-incorporated enterprises controlled by PRC enterprises or PRC enterprise groups will be classified as PRC resident enterprises if all of the following conditions are met: (a) senior management personnel and core management departments in charge of the daily operations of the enterprises have their presence mainly in the PRC; (b) their financial and human resources decisions are subject to determination or approval by persons or bodies in the PRC; (c) major assets, accounting books and company seals of the enterprises, and minutes and files of their board’s and shareholders’ meetings are located or kept in the PRC; and (d) half or more of the enterprises’ directors or senior management personnel with voting rights habitually reside in the PRC. Further to SAT Circular 82, the SAT issued SAT Bulletin 45, which took effect in September 2011, to provide more guidance on the implementation of SAT Circular 82. SAT Bulletin 45 provides for procedures and administration details of determination on PRC resident enterprise status and administration on post-determination matters. If the PRC tax authorities determine that Color Star Technology Co., Ltd. is a PRC resident enterprise for PRC enterprise income tax purposes, a number of unfavorable PRC tax consequences could follow. For example, Color China may be subject to enterprise income tax at a rate of 25% with respect to its worldwide taxable income. Also, a 10% withholding tax would be imposed on dividends we pay to our non-PRC enterprise shareholders and with respect to gains derived by our non-PRC enterprise shareholders from transferring our shares or ordinary shares and potentially a 20% of withholding tax would be imposed on dividends we pay to our non-PRC individual shareholders and with respect to gains derived by our non-PRC individual shareholders from transferring our shares or ordinary shares.

 

It is unclear whether, if we are considered a PRC resident enterprise, holders of our shares or ordinary shares would be able to claim the benefit of income tax treaties or agreements entered into between China and other countries or areas. See “Risk Factors — Risk Factors Relating to Doing Business in China —If we are classified as a PRC resident enterprise for PRC income tax purposes, such classification could result in unfavorable tax consequences to us and our non-PRC shareholders”.

 

The SAT issued SAT Circular 59 together with the Ministry of Finance in April 2009 and SAT Circular 698 in December 2009. Both SAT Circular 59 and SAT Circular 698 became effective retroactively as of January 1, 2008. By promulgating and implementing these two circulars, the PRC tax authorities have enhanced their scrutiny over the direct or indirect transfer of equity interests in a PRC resident enterprise by a non-PRC resident enterprise. Under SAT Circular 698, where a non-PRC resident enterprise transfers the equity interests of a PRC resident enterprise indirectly by disposition of the equity interests of an overseas holding company, and the overseas holding company is located in a tax jurisdiction that: (1) has an effective tax rate of less than 12.5% or (2) does not impose tax on foreign income of its residents, the non-PRC resident enterprise, being the transferor, must report to the relevant tax authority of the PRC resident enterprise this Indirect Transfer. Using a “substance over form” principle, the PRC tax authority may disregard the existence of the overseas holding company if it lacks a reasonable commercial purpose and was established for the purpose of reducing, avoiding or deferring PRC tax. As a result, gains derived from such Indirect Transfer may be subject to PRC tax at a rate of up to 10%. Although it appears that SAT Circular 698 was not intended to apply to share transfers of publicly traded companies, there is uncertainty as to the application of SAT Circular 698 and we and our non-PRC resident investors may be at risk of being required to file a return and being taxed under SAT Circular 698 and we may be required to expend valuable resources to comply with SAT Circular 698 or to establish that we should not be taxed under SAT Circular 698.

  

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Pursuant to the Arrangement between the Mainland China and the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region for the Avoidance of Double Taxation and Tax Evasion on Income, or the Tax Arrangement, where a Hong Kong resident enterprise which is considered a non-PRC tax resident enterprise directly holds at least 25% of a PRC enterprise, the withholding tax rate in respect of the payment of dividends by such PRC enterprise to such Hong Kong resident enterprise is reduced to 5% from a standard rate of 10%, subject to approval of the PRC local tax authority. Pursuant to the Notice of the State Administration of Taxation on the Issues concerning the Application of the Dividend Clauses of Tax Agreements, or Circular 81, a resident enterprise of the counter-party to such Tax Arrangement should meet the following conditions, among others, in order to enjoy the reduced withholding tax under the Tax Arrangement: (i) it must directly own the required percentage of equity interests and voting rights in such PRC resident enterprise; and (ii) it should directly own such percentage in the PRC resident enterprise anytime in the 12 months prior to receiving the dividends. Furthermore, the Administrative Measures for Non-Resident Enterprises to Enjoy Treatments under Tax Treaties (For Trial Implementation), or the Administrative Measures, which became effective in October 2009, requires that the non-resident enterprises must obtain the approval from the relevant tax authority in order to enjoy the reduced withholding tax rate under the tax treaties. There are also other conditions for enjoying such reduced withholding tax rate according to other relevant tax rules and regulations. According to Circular 81, if the relevant tax authorities consider the transactions or arrangements we have are for the primary purpose of enjoying a favorable tax treatment, the relevant tax authorities may adjust the favorable withholding tax in the future.

 

United States Federal Income Taxation 

 

The following is a discussion of United States federal income tax considerations relating to the acquisition, ownership, and disposition of our ordinary shares by a U.S. Holder, as defined below, that acquires our ordinary shares and holds our ordinary shares as “capital assets” (generally, property held for investment) under the United States Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”). This discussion is based upon existing United States federal income tax law, which is subject to differing interpretations or change, possibly with retroactive effect. No ruling has been sought from the Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) with respect to any United States federal income tax consequences described below, and there can be no assurance that the IRS or a court will not take a contrary position. This discussion does not address all aspects of United States federal income taxation that may be important to particular investors in light of their individual circumstances, including investors subject to special tax rules (such as, for example, certain financial institutions, insurance companies, regulated investment companies, real estate investment trusts, broker-dealers, traders in securities that elect mark-to-market treatment, partnerships and their partners, tax-exempt organizations (including private foundations)), investors who are not U.S. Holders, investors that own (directly, indirectly, or constructively) 10% or more of our voting stock, investors that hold their ordinary shares as part of a straddle, hedge, conversion, constructive sale or other integrated transaction), or investors that have a functional currency other than the U.S. dollar, all of whom may be subject to tax rules that differ significantly from those summarized below. In addition, this discussion does not address any tax laws other than the United States federal income tax laws, including any state, local, alternative minimum tax or non-United States tax considerations, or the Medicare tax. Each potential investor is urged to consult its tax advisor regarding the United States federal, state, local and non-United States income and other tax considerations of an investment in our ordinary shares.

 

General

 

For purposes of this discussion, a “U.S. Holder” is a beneficial owner of our ordinary shares that is, for United States federal income tax purposes, (i) an individual who is a citizen or resident of the United States, (ii) a corporation (or other entity treated as a corporation for United States federal income tax purposes) created in, or organized under the laws of, the United States or any state thereof or the District of Columbia, (iii) an estate the income of which is includible in gross income for United States federal income tax purposes regardless of its source, or (iv) a trust (A) the administration of which is subject to the primary supervision of a United States court and which has one or more United States persons who have the authority to control all substantial decisions of the trust or (B) that has otherwise elected to be treated as a United States person under the Code.

 

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If a partnership (or other entity treated as a partnership for United States federal income tax purposes) is a beneficial owner of our ordinary shares, the tax treatment of a partner in the partnership will depend upon the status of the partner and the activities of the partnership. Partnerships and partners of a partnership holding our ordinary shares are urged to consult their tax advisors regarding an investment in our ordinary shares.

   

The discussion set forth below is addressed only to U.S. Holders that purchase ordinary shares. Prospective purchasers are urged to consult their own tax advisors about the application of the U.S. federal income tax rules to their particular circumstances as well as the state, local, foreign and other tax consequences to them of the purchase, ownership and disposition of our ordinary shares.

 

Taxation of Dividends and Other Distributions on our Ordinary Shares

 

Subject to the passive foreign investment company rules discussed below, the gross amount of distributions made by us to you with respect to the ordinary shares (including the amount of any taxes withheld therefrom) will generally be includable in your gross income as dividend income on the date of receipt by you, but only to the extent that the distribution is paid out of our current or accumulated earnings and profits (as determined under U.S. federal income tax principles). With respect to corporate U.S. Holders, the dividends will not be eligible for the dividends-received deduction allowed to corporations in respect of dividends received from other U.S. corporations.

 

With respect to non-corporate U.S. Holders, including individual U.S. Holders, dividends will be taxed at the lower capital gains rate applicable to qualified dividend income, provided that (1) the ordinary shares are readily tradable on an established securities market in the United States, or we are eligible for the benefits of an approved qualifying income tax treaty with the United States that includes an exchange of information program, (2) we are not a passive foreign investment company (as discussed below) for either our taxable year in which the dividend is paid or the preceding taxable year, and (3) certain holding period requirements are met. Because there is no income tax treaty between the United States and the Cayman Islands, clause (1) above can be satisfied only if the ordinary shares are readily tradable on an established securities market in the United States. Under U.S. Internal Revenue Service authority, ordinary shares are considered for purpose of clause (1) above to be readily tradable on an established securities market in the United States if they are listed on Nasdaq. You are urged to consult your tax advisors regarding the availability of the lower rate for dividends paid with respect to our ordinary shares, including the effects of any change in law after the date of this report.

 

To the extent that the amount of the distribution exceeds our current and accumulated earnings and profits (as determined under U.S. federal income tax principles), it will be treated first as a tax-free return of your tax basis in your ordinary shares, and to the extent the amount of the distribution exceeds your tax basis, the excess will be taxed as capital gain. We do not intend to calculate our earnings and profits under U.S. federal income tax principles. Therefore, a U.S. Holder should expect that a distribution will be treated as a dividend even if that distribution would otherwise be treated as a non-taxable return of capital or as capital gain under the rules described above.

 

Taxation of Dispositions of Ordinary Shares

 

Subject to the passive foreign investment company rules discussed below, you will recognize taxable gain or loss on any sale, exchange or other taxable disposition of a share equal to the difference between the amount realized (in U.S. dollars) for the share and your tax basis (in U.S. dollars) in the ordinary shares. The gain or loss will be capital gain or loss. If you are a non-corporate U.S. Holder, including an individual U.S. Holder, who has held the ordinary shares for more than one year, you may be eligible for reduced tax rates on any such capital gains. The deductibility of capital losses is subject to limitations.

 

Passive Foreign Investment Company

 

A non-U.S. corporation is considered a PFIC for any taxable year if either:

 

  at least 75% of its gross income for such taxable year is passive income; or

 

  at least 50% of the value of its assets (based on an average of the quarterly values of the assets during a taxable year) is attributable to assets that produce or are held for the production of passive income (the “asset test”).

 

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Passive income generally includes dividends, interest, rents and royalties (other than rents or royalties derived from the active conduct of a trade or business) and gains from the disposition of passive assets. We will be treated as owning our proportionate share of the assets and earning our proportionate share of the income of any other corporation in which we own, directly or indirectly, at least 25% (by value) of the stock. In determining the value and composition of our assets for purposes of the PFIC asset test, (1) the cash we hold will generally be considered to be held for the production of passive income and (2) the value of our assets must be determined based on the market value of our ordinary shares from time to time, which could cause the value of our non-passive assets to be less than 50% of the value of all of our assets (including the cash raised in any offering) on any particular quarterly testing date for purposes of the asset test.

   

We must make a separate determination each year as to whether we are a PFIC. Depending on the amount of cash we hold, together with any other assets held for the production of passive income, it is possible that, for our 2018 taxable year or for any subsequent taxable year, more than 50% of our assets may be assets held for the production of passive income. We will make this determination following the end of any particular tax year. Although the law in this regard is unclear, we treat our consolidated affiliated entities, as being owned by us for United States federal income tax purposes, not only because we exercise effective control over the operation of such entities but also because we are entitled to substantially all of their economic benefits, and, as a result, we consolidate their operating results in our consolidated financial statements. In particular, because the value of our assets for purposes of the asset test will generally be determined based on the market price of our ordinary shares and because cash is generally considered to be an asset held for the production of passive income, our PFIC status will depend in large part on the market price of our ordinary shares and the amount of cash we hold. Accordingly, fluctuations in the market price of the ordinary shares may cause us to become a PFIC. In addition, the application of the PFIC rules is subject to uncertainty in several respects. We are under no obligation to take steps to reduce the risk of our being classified as a PFIC, and as stated above, the determination of the value of our assets will depend upon material facts (including the market price of our ordinary shares from time to time that may not be within our control. If we are a PFIC for any year during which you hold ordinary shares, we will continue to be treated as a PFIC for all succeeding years during which you hold ordinary shares. However, if we cease to be a PFIC and you did not previously make a timely “mark-to-market” election as described below, you may avoid some of the adverse effects of the PFIC regime by making a “purging election” (as described below) with respect to the ordinary shares.

 

If we are a PFIC for your taxable year(s) during which you hold ordinary shares, you will be subject to special tax rules with respect to any “excess distribution” that you receive and any gain you realize from a sale or other disposition (including a pledge) of the ordinary shares, unless you make a “mark-to-market” election as discussed below. Distributions you receive in a taxable year that are greater than 125% of the average annual distributions you received during the shorter of the three preceding taxable years or your holding period for the ordinary shares will be treated as an excess distribution. Under these special tax rules:

 

the excess distribution or gain will be allocated ratably over your holding period for the ordinary shares;

 

the amount allocated to your current taxable year, and any amount allocated to any of your taxable year(s) prior to the first taxable year in which we were a PFIC, will be treated as ordinary income, and

 

the amount allocated to each of your other taxable year(s) will be subject to the highest tax rate in effect for that year and the interest charge generally applicable to underpayments of tax will be imposed on the resulting tax attributable to each such year.

 

The tax liability for amounts allocated to years prior to the year of disposition or “excess distribution” cannot be offset by any net operating losses for such years, and gains (but not losses) realized on the sale of the ordinary shares cannot be treated as capital, even if you hold the ordinary shares as capital assets.

 

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A U.S. Holder of “marketable stock” (as defined below) in a PFIC may make a mark-to-market election for such stock to elect out of the tax treatment discussed above. If you make a mark-to-market election for first taxable year which you hold (or are deemed to hold) ordinary shares and for which we are determined to be a PFIC, you will include in your income each year an amount equal to the excess, if any, of the fair market value of the ordinary shares as of the close of such taxable year over your adjusted basis in such ordinary shares, which excess will be treated as ordinary income and not capital gain. You are allowed an ordinary loss for the excess, if any, of the adjusted basis of the ordinary shares over their fair market value as of the close of the taxable year. However, such ordinary loss is allowable only to the extent of any net mark-to-market gains on the ordinary shares included in your income for prior taxable years. Amounts included in your income under a mark-to-market election, as well as gain on the actual sale or other disposition of the ordinary shares, are treated as ordinary income. Ordinary loss treatment also applies to any loss realized on the actual sale or disposition of the ordinary shares, to the extent that the amount of such loss does not exceed the net mark-to-market gains previously included for such ordinary shares. Your basis in the ordinary shares will be adjusted to reflect any such income or loss amounts. If you make a valid mark-to-market election, the tax rules that apply to distributions by corporations which are not PFICs would apply to distributions by us, except that the lower applicable capital gains rate for qualified dividend income discussed above under “— Taxation of Dividends and Other Distributions on our ordinary shares” generally would not apply.

   

The mark-to-market election is available only for “marketable stock”, which is stock that is traded in other than de minimis quantities on at least 15 days during each calendar quarter (“regularly traded”) on a qualified exchange or other market (as defined in applicable U.S. Treasury regulations), including Nasdaq. If the ordinary shares are regularly traded on Nasdaq and if you are a holder of ordinary shares, the mark-to-market election would be available to you were we to be or become a PFIC.

 

Alternatively, a U.S. Holder of stock in a PFIC may make a “qualified electing fund” election with respect to such PFIC to elect out of the tax treatment discussed above. A U.S. Holder who makes a valid qualified electing fund election with respect to a PFIC will generally include in gross income for a taxable year such holder’s pro rata share of the corporation’s earnings and profits for the taxable year. However, the qualified electing fund election is available only if such PFIC provides such U.S. Holder with certain information regarding its earnings and profits as required under applicable U.S. Treasury regulations. We do not currently intend to prepare or provide the information that would enable you to make a qualified electing fund election. If you hold ordinary shares in any taxable year in which we are a PFIC, you will be required to file U.S. Internal Revenue Service Form 8621 in each such year and provide certain annual information regarding such ordinary shares, including regarding distributions received on the ordinary shares and any gain realized on the disposition of the ordinary shares.

 

If you do not make a timely “mark-to-market” election (as described above), and if we were a PFIC at any time during the period you hold our ordinary shares, then such ordinary shares will continue to be treated as stock of a PFIC with respect to you even if we cease to be a PFIC in a future year, unless you make a “purging election” for the year we cease to be a PFIC. A “purging election” creates a deemed sale of such ordinary shares at their fair market value on the last day of the last year in which we are treated as a PFIC. The gain recognized by the purging election will be subject to the special tax and interest charge rules treating the gain as an excess distribution, as described above. As a result of the purging election, you will have a new basis (equal to the fair market value of the ordinary shares on the last day of the last year in which we are treated as a PFIC) and holding period (which new holding period will begin the day after such last day) in your ordinary shares for tax purposes.

 

You are urged to consult your tax advisors regarding the application of the PFIC rules to your investment in our ordinary shares and the elections discussed above.

 

Information Reporting and Backup Withholding

 

Dividend payments with respect to our ordinary shares and proceeds from the sale, exchange or redemption of our ordinary shares may be subject to information reporting to the U.S. Internal Revenue Service and possible U.S. backup withholding at a current rate of 24%. Backup withholding will not apply, however, to a U.S. Holder who furnishes a correct taxpayer identification number and makes any other required certification on U.S. Internal Revenue Service Form W-9 or who is otherwise exempt from backup withholding. U.S. Holders who are required to establish their exempt status generally must provide such certification on U.S. Internal Revenue Service Form W-9. U.S. Holders are urged to consult their tax advisors regarding the application of the U.S. information reporting and backup withholding rules.

 

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Backup withholding is not an additional tax. Amounts withheld as backup withholding may be credited against your U.S. federal income tax liability, and you may obtain a refund of any excess amounts withheld under the backup withholding rules by filing the appropriate claim for refund with the U.S. Internal Revenue Service and furnishing any required information. We do not intend to withhold taxes for individual shareholders. However, transactions effected through certain brokers or other intermediaries may be subject to withholding taxes (including backup withholding), and such brokers or intermediaries may be required by law to withhold such taxes.

   

Under the Hiring Incentives to Restore Employment Act of 2010, certain U.S. Holders are required to report information relating to our ordinary shares, subject to certain exceptions (including an exception for ordinary shares held in accounts maintained by certain financial institutions), by attaching a complete Internal Revenue Service Form 8938, Statement of Specified Foreign Financial Assets, with their tax return for each year in which they hold ordinary shares.

 

10.F. Dividends and Paying Agents

 

Not Applicable.

 

10.G. Statement by Experts

 

Not Applicable.

 

10.H. Documents on Display

 

The Company is subject to the informational requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and will file reports, registration statements and other information with the SEC. The Company’s reports, registration statements and other information can be inspected on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov and such information can also be inspected and copies ordered at the public reference facilities maintained by the SEC at the following location: 100 F Street NE, Washington, D.C. 20549. You may also visit us on the World Wide Web at http://www.China-ACM.com. However, information contained on our website does not constitute a part of this annual report.

 

10.I. Subsidiary Information

 

Not Applicable.

 

ITEM 11. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

Not Applicable.

 

ITEM 12. DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES OTHER THAN EQUITY SECURITIES

 

Not Applicable. 

 

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PART II

 

ITEM 13. DEFAULTS, DIVIDEND ARREARAGES AND DELINQUENCIES

 

Not Applicable. 

 

ITEM 14. MATERIAL MODIFICATIONS TO THE RIGHTS OF SECURITY HOLDERS AND USE OF PROCEEDS

 

On September 26, 2018, we filed a definitive proxy statement to change our place of incorporation from Nevada to the Cayman Islands. The re-domicile involved the Company’s merger with a newly formed subsidiary, as a result of which we became a wholly owned subsidiary of a Cayman Islands holding company (“CADC Cayman”). Each outstanding share of common stock of the Company was converted into the right to receive one ordinary share of CADC Cayman, which was issued by CADC Cayman in connection with the merger pursuant to a registered offering. There were no material modifications to the rights of our shareholders during the year ended June 30, 2020.

 

ITEM 15. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

(a)Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

Our management, with the participation of our chief executive officer and chief financial officer, has performed an evaluation of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rule 13a-15(e) under the Exchange Act) as of the end of the period covered by this report, as required by Rule 13a-15(b) under the Exchange Act.

 

Based on that evaluation, we concluded that as of June 30, 2020, due to the material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting discussed below, our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective.   

 

(b)Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as such term is defined in Exchange Act Rule 13a-15(f). Our internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements or external purposes in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) in the United States of America. Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions or because the degree of compliance with policies or procedures may deteriorate. Under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our chief executive officer and chief financial officer, we conducted an assessment of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of June 30, 2020. The assessment was based on criteria established in the framework Internal Control—Integrated Framework (2013), issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. Based on this assessment, management determined that, as of June 30, 2020, we did not maintain effective internal control over financial reporting due to the existence of the following significant deficiencies and material weaknesses: 

 

The personnel primarily responsible for the preparation of our financial statements do not have requisite levels of knowledge, experience and training in the application of U.S. GAAP commensurate with our financial reporting requirements;

 

Ineffective supervision of the Company’s internal and disclosure controls over financial reporting;

  

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Management is in the process of re-assessing the design of certain control activities and developing its remediation plan for the above identified weaknesses. The Company’s actions are subject to ongoing senior management review, as well as Audit Committee oversight. The Company has implemented or will implement following remedial measures within its resources as soon as practicable:

 

Establishing an internal audit function or engage an external consulting firm, to assist with assessment of Sarbanes-Oxley compliance requirements and improvement of overall internal controls;

 

(c)Attestation Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

Not applicable.

 

(d)Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

The management is committed to improving the internal controls over financial reporting and will undertake consistent improvements or enhancements on an ongoing basis. Except as described above, there were no changes in our internal controls over financial reporting during our fiscal year ended June 30, 2020 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.   

     

ITEM 16. RESERVED

 

ITEM 16A. AUDIT COMMITTEE FINANCIAL EXPERT

 

Our audit committee consists of Xiaoyuan Zhang, Yingxian Xiang and Hung-Jen Kuo. Our board of directors has determined Xiaoyuan Zhang, Yingxian Xiang and Hung-Jen Kuo are “independent directors” within the meaning of NASDAQ Stock Market Rule 5605(a)(2) and meet the criteria for independence set forth in Rule 10A−3(b) of the Exchange Act. Xiaoyuan Zhang meets the criteria of an audit committee financial expert as set forth under the applicable rules of the SEC.

 

ITEM 16B. CODE OF ETHICS

 

The Board has adopted a Code of Conduct and Ethics that applies to the Company’s directors, officers and employees. A copy of this policy is available via our website at www.colorstarinternational.com. Printed copies of our Code of Ethics may be obtained, without charge, by contacting the Corporate Secretary, Color Star Technology Co., Ltd., located at 800 3rd Ave, Suite 2800, New York NY 10022.

 

ITEM 16C. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES

 

The following table sets forth the aggregate fees by categories specified below in connection with certain professional services rendered by our principal external auditors, for the periods indicated.

 

   Year Ended
June 30, 
2020
   Year  Ended
June 30, 
2019
 
         
Audit fees(1)  $165,000   $387,529 
Audit related fees(2)   -    - 
Tax fees(3)   -    - 
All other fees(4)   14,500    6,000 
TOTAL  $179,500   $393,529 

 

(1) “Audit fees” means the aggregate fees billed for each of the fiscal years for professional services rendered by our principal accountant for the audit of our annual financial statements or services that are normally provided by the accountant in connection with statutory and regulatory filings or engagements for those fiscal years.

 

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(2) “Audit related fees” means the aggregate fees billed for each of the fiscal years for assurance and related services by our principal accountant that are reasonably related to the performance of the audit or review of our financial statements and are not reported under paragraph (1).

 

(3) “Tax Fees” represents the aggregate fees billed in each of the fiscal years listed for the professional tax services rendered by our principal auditors.

 

(4) “All Other Fees” represents the aggregate fees billed in each of the fiscal years listed for services rendered by our principal auditors other than services reported under “Audit fees,” “Audit-related fees” and “Tax fees.” 

 

The policy of our audit committee and our board of directors is to pre-approve all audit and non-audit services provided by our principal auditors, including audit services, audit-related services, and other services as described above, other than those for de minimis services which are approved by the audit committee or our board of directors prior to the completion of the services.

 

ITEM 16D. EXEMPTIONS FROM THE LISTING STANDARDS FOR AUDIT COMMITTEES

 

Not Applicable.

 

ITEM 16E. PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES BY THE ISSUER AND AFFILIATED PURCHASERS

 

Not Applicable.

  

ITEM 16F. CHANGE IN REGISTRANT’S CERTIFYING ACCOUNTANT

 

(a) Resignation of Previous Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

  

By letter dated (and received) October 11, 2018, our independent registered public accounting firm, Friedman LLP (“Friedman”) notified the Audit Committee of the Board of Directors of China Advanced Construction Materials Group, Inc. (the “Company”, “we”, or “us”) of its resignation as the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm. On October 11, 2018, the Board of Directors accepted such resignation. The auditor’s report of Friedman on the Company’s consolidated financial statements as of and for the year ended June 30, 2016 did not contain an adverse opinion or a disclaimer of opinion, and was not qualified or modified as to uncertainty, audit scope or accounting principles.

 

On October 6, 2018, the Audit Committee of the Board of Directors, after consultation with the Company’s then independent registered public accounting firm, Friedman LLP (“Friedman”) concluded, that the Company’s audited financial statements at and for the year ended June 30, 2017 contained in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K originally filed with the SEC on as well the unaudited financial statements at and for the periods ended March 31, 2018, December 31, 2017 and September 30, 2017 contained in the Company’s Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q originally filed on November 15, 2017, February 13, 2018 and May 15, 2018, respectively, should no longer be relied upon.

 

During the two most recent fiscal years and through the subsequent interim period preceding Friedman’s resignation, there were no (i) “disagreements” (as that term is defined in Item 304(a)(1)(iv) of Regulation S-K) between the Company and Friedman on any matter of accounting principles or practices, financial statement disclosure, or auditing scope or procedures, which disagreements, if not resolved to the satisfaction of Friedman would have caused Friedman to make reference to the subject matter thereof in its reports for such fiscal years and interim periods, or (ii) “reportable events” as that term is described in Item 304(a)(1)(v) of Regulation S-K.

 

We furnished a copy of this disclosure to Friedman and have requested that Friedman furnish us with a letter addressed to the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) stating whether such firm agrees with the above statements or, if not, stating the respects in which it does not agree. We have received the requested letter from Friedman, and a copy of their letter is filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on October 16, 2018 in our Current Report on Form 8-K as Exhibit 16.1.

 

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(b) Engagement of New Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

On October 13, 2018, the Board of Directors approved the engagement of Wei, Wei & Co., LLP (“WWC”) as the Company’s new independent registered public accounting firm.

 

During the two most recent fiscal years and through the subsequent interim period preceding WWC’s engagement, the Company has not consulted with WWC regarding (i) the application of accounting principles to a specified transaction, either completed or proposed; or the type of audit opinion that might be rendered on the Company’s financial statements, and neither a written report was provided to the Company nor oral advice was provided that WWC concluded was an important factor considered by the Company in reaching a decision as to the accounting, auditing or financial reporting issue, or (ii) any matter that was either the subject of a disagreement (as defined in Item 304(a)(1)(iv) of Regulation S-K and the related instructions to Item 304 of Regulation S-K) or a reportable event (as described in Item 304(a)(1)(v) of Regulation S-K). 

 

ITEM 16G. CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 

Other than as described in this section, our corporate governance practices do not differ from those followed by domestic companies listed on the NASDAQ Capital Market. NASDAQ Listing Rule 5635 generally provides that shareholder approval is required of U.S. domestic companies listed on the NASDAQ Capital Market prior to issuance (or potential issuance) of securities (i) equaling 20% or more of the company’s common stock or voting power for less than the greater of market or book value (ii) resulting in a change of control of the company; and (iii) which is being issued pursuant to a stock option or purchase plan to be established or materially amended or other equity compensation arrangement made or materially amended. Notwithstanding this general requirement, NASDAQ Listing Rule 5615(a)(3)(A) permits foreign private issuers to follow their home country practice rather than these shareholder approval requirements. The Cayman Islands do not require shareholder approval prior to any of the foregoing types of issuances. The Company, therefore, is not required to obtain such shareholder approval prior to entering into a transaction with the potential to issue securities as described above. The Board of Directors of the Company has elected to follow the Company’s home country rules as to such issuances and will not be required to seek shareholder approval prior to entering into such a transaction. 

 

ITEM 16H. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURE

 

Not applicable.

  

63

 

 

PART III

 

ITEM 17. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

We have elected to provide financial statements pursuant to Item 18.

 

ITEM 18. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

The consolidated financial statements and related notes required by this item are contained on pages F-1 through F-33.

 

ITEM 19. EXHIBITS 

  

Exhibit

Number

  Description of Documents
     
1.1   Amended and Restated Memorandum and Articles of Association, dated May 1, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on May 5, 2020)
     
1.2   Amended and Restated Memorandum and Articles of Association, dated June 28, 2019 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on July 17, 2019)
     
1.3   Certificate of Incorporation on Change of Name, dated July 12, 2019 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on July 17, 2019)
     
1.4   Certificate of Incorporation on Change of Name, dated May 1, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on May 5, 2020)
     
4.1   Form of Employment Agreement (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 of the Company’s Report on Form 20-F filed with the SEC on November 15, 2019)
     
4.2   Form of Director Agreement (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.2 of the Company’s Report on Form 20-F filed with the SEC on November 15, 2019)
     
4.3   2019 Equity Incentive Plan (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on June 5, 2019)
     
4.4   Employment Agreement by and between Sean (Yang) Liu and the Company, dated March 28, 2019 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on March 28, 2019)
     
4.5   Amended and Restated Employment Agreement by and between Sean (Yang) Liu and the Company, dated May 5, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.3 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on March 28, 2019)
     
4.6   Employment Agreement by and between Lili Jiang and the Company, dated March 28, 2019 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on March 28, 2019)
     
4.7   Director Agreement by and between Xiaoyuan Zhang and the Company, dated July 19, 2019 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on July 24, 2019)

 

64

 

 

4.8   Director Agreement by and between Yingxian (Elaine) Xiang and the Company, dated September 21, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on September 25, 2020)
     
4.9   Form of Placement Agency Agreement, between Color Star Technology Co., Ltd. and Maxim Group LLC (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on September 17, 2020)
     
4.10   Form of Securities Purchase Agreement between the Company and the Purchasers in connection with the September 2020 Offering (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on September 17, 2020)
     
4.11   Form of Warrants in connection with the September 2020 Offering (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.3 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on September 17, 2020)
     
4.12   Form of Lock-Up Agreement in connection with the September 2020 Offering (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.4 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on September 17, 2020)
     
4.13   Securities Purchase Agreement between the Company and  GPL Ventures LLC dated September 4, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on September 9, 2020)
     
4.14   Asset Purchase Agreement by and between the Company and Qiaoli Lin dated August 21, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on August 28, 2020)
     
4.15   Director Agreement by and between Hung-Jen Kuo and the Company, dated August 12, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on August 13, 2020)
     
4.16   Placement Agency Agreement, dated July 20, 2020, between Color Star Technology Co., Ltd. and Maxim Group LLC (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on July 22, 2020)
     
4.17   Form of Securities Purchase Agreement between the Company and the Purchasers in connection with the July 2020 Offering (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on July 22, 2020)
     
4.18   Form of Warrants in connection with the July 2020 Offering (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.3 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on July 22, 2020)
     
4.19   Form of Lock-Up Agreement in connection with the July 2020 Offering (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.4 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on July 22, 2020)
     
4.20   Employment Agreement by and between Biao (Luke) Lu and the Company dated July 17, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on July 17, 2020)
     
4.21   Amendment No. 2 to the Share Exchange Agreement by and among the Company, Yang (Sean) Liu Sunway Kids International Education Group Ltd. and its shareholders dated June 25, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on June 26, 2020)

 

65

 

 

4.22   Share Purchase Agreement by and among the Company and Yanliang Han dated June 25, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on June 26, 2020)
     
4.23   Placement Agency Agreement, dated May 11, 2020, between Color Star Technology Co., Ltd. and Maxim Group LLC (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on May 13, 2020)
     
4.24   Form of Securities Purchase Agreement between the Company and the Purchasers in connection with the May 2020 Offering (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on May 13, 2020)
     
4.25   Form of Warrants in connection with the May 2020 Offering (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.3 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on May 13, 2020)
     
4.26   Form of Lock-Up Agreement in connection with the May 2020 Offering (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.4 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on May 13, 2020)
     
4.27   Share Exchange Agreement by and among the Company, Yang (Sean) Liu, Color China Entertainment Limited and its shareholders, dated May 7, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on May 11, 2020)
     
4.28   Share Purchase Agreement by and among Xianfu Han and Weili He, Xin Ao Construction Materials, Inc. and Huitao Technology Co., Ltd., dated March 31, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on April 8, 2020)
     
4.29   Placement Agency Agreement, dated March 31, 2020, between Huitao Technology Co., Ltd. and Maxim Group LLC (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on April 2, 2020)
     
4.30   Form of Securities Purchase Agreement, dated March 31, 2020, between the Company and the Purchasers in connection with the March 2020 Offering (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on April 2, 2020)
     
4.31   Form of Warrants in connection with the March 2020 Offering (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.3 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on April 2, 2020)
     
4.32   Form of Lock-Up Agreement in connection with the March 2020 Offering (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.4 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on April 2, 2020)
     
4.33   Joint Venture Agreement by and between CACM Group NY, Inc. and Baydolphin, Inc. (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on March 16, 2020)
     
4.34   Share Exchange Agreement by and among Huitao Technology Co., Ltd., Yang (Sean) Liu, Sunway Kids International Education Group Ltd. and its shareholders (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on January 3, 2020)
     
4.35   Amendment No. 1 to the Share Exchange Agreement by and among Huitao Technology Co., Ltd., Yang (Sean) Liu, Sunway Kids International Education Group Ltd. and its shareholders (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on February 14, 2020)

 

66

 

 

4.36   Securities Purchase Agreement by and between Huitao Technology Co., Ltd. and Hou Sing International Business Limited (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 of the Company’s Report on Form 6-K filed with the SEC on January 23, 2020)
     
4.37*   Office Service Agreement, dated June 24, 2020, by and between Quest Workspaces 800 3rd, LLC and CACM Group NY, Inc.
     
8.1*   List of Subsidiaries
     
11.1   Code of Business Conduct and Ethics (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 11.1 of the Company’s Report on Form 20-F filed with the SEC on November 15, 2019)
     
12.1*   CEO Certification pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
     
12.2*   CFO Certification pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
     
13.1*   CEO Certification pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
     
13.2*   CFO Certification pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
     
101.INS   XBRL Instance Document *
     
101.SCH   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document *
     
101.CAL   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document *
     
101.DEF   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document *
     
101.LAB   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document *
     
101.PRE   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document *

 

*Filed as an exhibit hereto.

 

67

 

 

SIGNATURES

 

The registrant hereby certifies that it meets all of the requirements for filing on Form 20-F and that it has duly caused and authorized the undersigned to sign this annual report on its behalf.

 

  COLOR STAR TECHNOLOGY CO., LTD.
   
  /s/ Biao (Luke) Lu
  Name: Biao (Luke) Lu
  Title: Chief Executive Officer
   
Date: November 13, 2020  

 

68

 

 

COLOR STAR TECHNOLOGY CO., LTD. AND SUBSIDIARIES

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  

Consolidated Financial Statements  
   
Reports of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm F-2
   
Consolidated Balance Sheets as of June 30, 2020 and 2019 F-3
   
Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Loss for the years ended June 30, 2020, 2019 and 2018 F-4
   
Consolidated Statements of Changes in Shareholders’ Equity for the years ended June 30, 2020, 2019 and 2018 F-5
   
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended June 30, 2020, 2019 and 2018 F-6
   
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements F-7 – F-33

 

F-1

 

 

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Board of Directors and Shareholders of

Color Star Technology Co., Ltd.

 

Opinion on the Consolidated Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Color Star Technology Co., Ltd. (formerly known as Huitao Technology Co., Ltd.) and Subsidiaries (collectively, the “Company”) as of June 30, 2020 and 2019, and the related consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss, changes in shareholders’ equity, and cash flows for each of the years in the three-year period ended June 30, 2020, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the consolidated financial statements). In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of June 30, 2020 and 2019, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the years in the three-year period ended June 30, 2020, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits, we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the consolidated financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the consolidated financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

/s/ Wei, Wei & Co. LLP

 

Flushing, New York

November 13, 2020

 

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2018.

 

 

F-2

 

 

COLOR STAR TECHNOLOGY CO., LTD. AND SUBSIDIARIES

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS HUITAO TECHNOLOGY CO., INC.)

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

   June 30,   June 30, 
   2020   2019 
ASSETS    
CURRENT ASSETS:        
Cash and cash equivalents  $988,696   $319,514 
Other receivables   1,002,300    2,300 
Prepayments and advances   1,170,000    25,000 
Current assets of discontinued operations   -    52,158,699 
Total current assets   3,160,996    52,505,513 
           
OTHER ASSETS          
Property, plant and equipment, net   3,958,335    - 
Other assets of discontinued operations   -    1,659,520 
Total other assets   3,958,335    1,659,520 
           
Total assets  $7,119,331   $54,165,033 
           
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY          
           
CURRENT LIABILITIES:          
Other payables and accrued liabilities  $518,122   $353,292 
Other payables - related parties   10,711    540,000 
Loans payable - employee   -    308,089 
Current liabilities of discontinued operations   -    52,442,854 
Total current liabilities   528,833    53,644,235 
           
Total liabilities   528,833    53,644,235 
           
COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES          
           
SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY:          
           
Preferred shares, $0.001 par value, 1,000,000 shares authorized, no shares issued or outstanding   -    - 
Ordinary shares, $0.001 par value, 74,000,000 shares authorized, 25,623,822 and 7,174,626 shares issued and outstanding as of June 30, 2020 and 2019, respectively   25,624    7,175 
Additional paid-in-capital   69,689,789    54,237,082 
Deferred stock compensation   (1,201,183)   (3,161,200)
Deficit   (61,923,732)   (64,031,446)
Statutory reserves   -    6,248,092 
Accumulated other comprehensive income   -    7,221,095 
Total shareholders’ equity   6,590,498    520,798 
           
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity  $7,119,331   $54,165,033 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-3

 

 

COLOR STAR TECHNOLOGY CO., LTD. AND SUBSIDIARIES

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS HUITAO TECHNOLOGY CO., INC.)

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS AND COMPREHENSIVE LOSS

 

   For the Years ended June 30, 
   2020   2019   2018 
SELLING, GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES  $(1,598,984)  $(2,065,829)  $(918,605)
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT EXPENSES   (120,000)   -    - 
STOCK COMPENSATION EXPENSE   (3,444,617)   (4,592,200)   (1,388,501)
                
LOSS FROM OPERATIONS   (5,163,601)   (6,658,029)   (2,307,106)
                
OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE), NET               
Interest income   -    84    13 
Finance expense   (5,041)   (1,477)   (26)
TOTAL OTHER EXPENSE, NET   (5,041)   (1,393)   (13)
                
LOSS BEFORE PROVISION FOR INCOME TAXES   (5,168,642)   (6,659,422)   (2,307,119)
                
PROVISION FOR INCOME TAXES   -    -    - 
                
LOSS FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS   (5,168,642)   (6,659,422)   (2,307,119)
                
DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS:               
Loss from discontinued operations, net of applicable income taxes   (12,245,168)   (7,729,108)   (5,092,846)
Net gain on sale of discontinued operations, net of applicable income taxes   5,787,213    -    - 
LOSS FROM DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS   (6,457,955)   (7,729,108)   (5,092,846)
                
NET LOSS  $(11,626,597)  $(14,388,530)  $(7,399,965)
                
COMPREHENSIVE LOSS               
Net loss  $(11,626,597)  $(14,388,530)  $(7,399,965)
Other comprehensive (loss) income - foreign currency translation (loss) gain   -    (335,080)   347,097 
                
COMPREHENSIVE LOSS  $(11,626,597)  $(14,723,610)  $(7,052,868)
                
LOSS PER ORDINARY SHARE               
Weighted average number of shares:               
Basic   11,640,018    5,841,614    2,942,945 
Diluted   11,640,018    5,841,614    2,942,945 
                
Loss per share - basic and diluted               
Continuing operations  $(0.44)  $(1.14)  $(0.78)
Discontinued operations  $(0.55)  $(1.32)  $(1.73)
Total  $(0.99)  $(2.46)  $(2.51)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-4

 

 

COLOR STAR TECHNOLOGY CO., LTD. AND SUBSIDIARIES

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS HUITAO TECHNOLOGY CO., INC.)

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

   Ordinary shares   Additional   Deferred       Accumulated other     
   Number of   Par   paid-in   share       Statutory   comprehensive     
   shares   amount   capital   Compensation   Deficit   reserves   income   Total 
BALANCE, June 30, 2017   2,387,658   $2,388   $38,662,377   $-   $(42,242,951)  $6,248,092   $7,209,078   $9,878,984 
                                         
Cancellation of ordinary shares issued for services   (56,859)   (57)   57    -    -    -    -    - 
Ordinary shares issued for services   -    -    144,500    -    -    -    -    144,500 
Ordinary shares issued for compensation   475,195    475    1,243,526    -    -    -    -    1,244,001 
Ordinary shares issued for debt repayment   1,882,655    1,883    3,857,560    -    -    -    -    3,859,443 
Sale of ordinary shares   300,000    300    599,700    -    -    -    -    600,000 
Ordinary shares issued for services   500,000    500    2,824,500    (2,825,000)   -    -    -    - 
Payments made by major shareholders for litigation   -    -    1,028,148    -    -    -    -    1,028,148 
Net loss   -    -    -    -    (7,399,965)   -    -    (7,399,965)
Foreign currency translation gain   -    -    -    -    -    -    347,097    347,097 
                                         
BALANCE, June 30, 2018   5,488,649   $5,489   $48,360,368   $(2,825,000)  $(49,642,916)  $6,248,092   $7,556,175   $9,702,208 
                                         
Sale of ordinary shares   295,977    296    949,704    -    -    -    -    950,000 
Ordinary shares issued for compensation   550,000    550    1,319,450    -    -    -    -    1,320,000 
Ordinary shares issued for services   600,000    600    1,757,400    (1,758,000)   -    -    -    - 
Unvested restricted ordinary shares issued to officers   240,000    240    1,850,160    (1,850,400)   -    -    -    - 
Stock compensation expense   -    -    -    3,272,200    -    -    -    3,272,200 
Net loss   -    -    -    -    (14,388,530)   -    -    (14,388,530)
Foreign currency translation loss   -    -    -    -    -    -    (335,080)   (335,080)
                                         
BALANCE, June 30, 2019   7,174,626   $7,175   $54,237,082   $(3,161,200)  $(64,031,446)  $6,248,092   $7,221,095   $520,798 
                                         
Sale of ordinary shares   7,327,274    7,327    4,495,574    -    -    -    -    4,502,901 
Ordinary shares issued for services   400,000    400    1,399,600    (1,400,000)   -    -    -    - 
Ordinary shares issued for debt conversion   3,679,327    3,679    5,626,570    -    -    -    -    5,630,249 
Ordinary shares issued for acquisition of subsidiary   1,989,262    1,989    1,887,810    -    -    -    -    1,889,799 
Ordinary shares issued for acquisition of equipment   4,633,333    4,634    1,958,973    -    -    -    -    1,963,607 
Unvested restricted ordinary shares issued to officers   420,000    420    84,180    (84,600)   -    -    -    - 
Stock compensation expense   -    -    -    3,444,617    -    -    -    3,444,617 
Net loss   -    -    -    -    (11,626,597)   -    -    (11,626,597)
Foreign currency translation gain   -    -    -    -    -    -    265,124    265,124 
Deconsolidation of discontinued operations   -    -    -    -    13,734,311    (6,248,092)   (7,486,219)   - 
                                         
BALANCE, June 30, 2020   25,623,822   $25,624   $69,689,789   $(1,201,183)  $(61,923,732)  $-   $-   $6,590,498 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-5

 

 

COLOR STAR TECHNOLOGY CO., LTD. AND SUBSIDIARIES

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS HUITAO TECHNOLOGY CO., INC.)

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 

   For the years ended June 30, 
   2020   2019   2018 
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:               
Net loss  $(11,626,597)  $(14,388,530)  $(7,399,965)
Net loss from discontinued operations   (6,457,955)   (7,729,108)   (5,092,846)
Net loss from continuing operations   (5,168,642)   (6,659,422)   (2,307,119)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash (used in) provided by operating activities:               
Stock compensation expense   3,444,617    4,592,200    1,388,501 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities               
Other receivables   -    -    (2,300)
Prepayments and advances   (1,145,000)   15,458    (40,458)
Other payables and accrued liabilities   130,036    509,381    2,000 
Other payables - related parties   -    540,000    720,000 
Net cash used in operating activities from continuing operations   (2,738,989)   (1,002,383)   (239,376)
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities from discontinued operations   203,854    (73,759)   2,689,394 
Net cash (used in) provided by operating activities   (2,535,135)   (1,076,142)   2,450,018 
                
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:               
Purchase of equipment   (2,000,000)   -    - 
Cash acquired through acquisition of Color China   5,272    -    - 
Proceeds from sales of discontinued operations   600,000    -    - 
Net cash used in investing activities from continuing operations   (1,394,728)   -    - 
Net cash used in investing activities from discontinued operations   -    (135,705)   (138,151)
Net cash used in investing activities   (1,394,728)   (135,705)   (138,151)
                
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:               
Borrowings from shareholders   300,000    -    - 
Proceeds from sale of ordinary shares, net of offering costs   4,502,901    950,000    600,000 
Net cash provided by financing activities from continuing operations   4,802,901    950,000    600,000 
Net cash used in financing activities from discontinued operations   (7,294)   (427,333)   (6,395,823)
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities   4,795,607    522,667    (5,795,823)
                
EFFECTS OF EXCHANGE RATE CHANGE IN CASH, CASH EQUIVALENTS AND RESTRICTED CASH   (1,943)   (62,025)   149,203 
                
NET CHANGE IN CASH, CASH EQUIVALENTS AND RESTRICTED CASH   863,801    (751,205)   (3,334,753)
                
CASH, CASH EQUIVALENTS AND RESTRICTED CASH, beginning of year   347,486    1,098,691    4,433,444 
                
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, end of year  $1,211,287   $347,486   $1,098,691 
                
RECONCILIATION OF CASH, CASH EQUIVALENTS AND RESTRICTED CASH               
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year  $347,486   $1,098,691   $224,679 
Restricted cash at beginning of year   -    -    4,208,765 
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash at beginning of year  $347,486   $1,098,691   $4,433,444 
                
SUPPLEMENTAL CASH FLOW INFORMATION:               
Cash paid for interest expense  $-   $2,038,291   $1,360,608 
Cash paid for income tax  $-   $-   $- 
                
NON-CASH TRANSACTIONS OF INVESTING AND FINANCING ACTIVITIES:               
Property, plant and equipment additions accrued  $-   $-   $99,125 
Customer deposits reclassified to other payables - shareholders upon execution of tri-party agreements  $-   $-   $692,387 
Accrued liabilities reclassified to other payables - shareholders upon execution of tri-party agreements  $-   $-   $259,105 
Accrued liabilities reclassified to loans payable - employees upon execution of tri-party agreements  $-   $308,089   $- 
Forgiveness of payable to shareholder as a capital contribution  $-   $-   $691,731 
Litigation liability paid by related party  $-   $-   $354,921 
Accrued related party’s litigation liabilities  $-   $-   $1,422,186 
Ordinary shares issued to repay other payables - related parties and service providers  $5,630,249   $4,928,400   $3,859,443 
Ordinary shares issued for acquisition of subsidiary  $1,889,799   $-   $- 
Ordinary shares issued for acquisition of equipment  $1,963,607   $-   $- 
Other receivables from disposal of subsidiary  $1,000,000   $-   $- 
Other receivables - related party offset with contingent liabilities upon litigation payments made by related party  $-   $1,189,285   $- 
                
OTHER NON-CASH TRANSACTIONS:               
Reconciliation of operating lease right-of-use assets and lease liabilities  $1,375,181   $-   $- 
Accounts receivable offset with accounts payable upon execution of debt obligation transfer agreements  $7,029,929   $3,221,736   $6,945,445 
Accounts receivable assigned to prepayments and advances upon execution of accounts receivable assignment agreements  $-   $5,008,417   $- 
Reclassification from accounts payable to loans payable upon payment made by employees of the Company on its behalf  $-   $4,311,234   $- 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-6

 

 

COLOR STAR TECHNOLOGY CO., LTD. AND SUBSIDIARIES

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS HUITAO TECHNOLOGY, INC.)

 

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

Note 1 – Organization and description of business

 

Color Star Technology Co., Ltd. (the “Company” or “Color Star”) is an entertainment and education company which provides online entertainment performances and online music education services via its wholly-owned subsidiary, Color China Entertainment Limited (“Color China”).

 

The Company (formerly known as Huitao Technology Co., Ltd.) was founded as an unincorporated business on September 1, 2005, under the name TJS Wood Flooring, Inc., and became a C-corporation in the State of Delaware on February 15, 2007. On April 29, 2008, TJS Wood Flooring, Inc. changed its name to China Advanced Construction Materials Group, Inc. (“CADC Delaware”). On August 1, 2013, CADC Delaware consummated a reincorporation merger with its newly formed wholly-owned subsidiary, China Advanced Construction Materials Group, Inc. (“CADC Nevada”), a Nevada corporation, with CADC Delaware merging into CADC Nevada and CADC Nevada being the surviving company, for the purpose of changing CADC Delaware’s state of incorporation from Delaware to Nevada. On December 27, 2018, CADC Nevada was merged with and into China Advanced Construction Materials Group, Inc. (“CADC Cayman”), a Cayman Islands corporation, whereupon the separate existence of CADC Nevada ceased and CADC Cayman continued as the surviving entity. As a result of the reincorporation, the Company is governed by the laws of the Cayman Islands.

 

On July 16, 2019, CADC Cayman changed its name from “China Advanced Construction Materials Group, Inc.” to “Huitao Technology Co., Ltd.” On April 27, 2020, Huitao Technology Co., Ltd. changed its name to “Color Star Technology Co., Ltd.”

 

CACM Group NY, Inc.

 

On August 20, 2018, CACM Group NY, Inc. (“CACM”) was incorporated in the State of New York and is 100% owned by the Company. As of the date of this report, CACM has not commenced any business operations and the Company is currently using CACM as its headquarters in the United States of America.

 

Baytao LLC (“Baytao”)

 

On March 10, 2020, CACM entered into a joint venture agreement (the “JV Agreement”) with Baydolphin, Inc. (“Baydolphin”), a company organized under the laws of New York. Pursuant to the JV Agreement,

 

CACM and Baydolphin established a limited liability company under the laws of New York, Baytao, which will be the 100% owner of one or more operating entities in the U.S. to engage in the business of online and offline after-school education.

 

The business of Baytao shall be managed by the Board of Managers of Baytao.

 

CACM shall appoint three designees to the Board of Managers of Baytao and Baydolphin shall appoint two designees. The General Manager of Baytao shall be appointed by CACM and report to the Board of Managers.

 

CACM shall contribute necessary capital for the operating entities to fund their operations and obtain the right to use the software platform and other technologies from Color Star, which will be provided to the JV and its operating entities for no charge to facilitate their operations and provide online classes to their registered students, and Baydolphin shall be responsible for managing these entities with its expertise in after-school education, including but not limited to recruiting and training personnel and implementing all promotional and marketing activities.

 

Eighty percent (80%) of the net profits or net loss of the joint venture will be distributed to or assigned to CACM and the remaining twenty percent (20%) to Baydolphin.

 

As of the date of this report, Baytao has no business operations as it is still in the process of developing its online and offline after-school education business.

 

F-7

 

 

COLOR STAR TECHNOLOGY CO., LTD. AND SUBSIDIARIES

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS HUITAO TECHNOLOGY, INC.)

 

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

Color China

 

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has claimed hundreds of thousands of lives and caused massive global health and economic crisis, while also causing large-scale social and behavioral changes in societies. Online entertainment and online education are experiencing enormous growth which the Company believes will last long after the pandemic. In order to expand the Company’s global reach and to enter into an online business, on May 7, 2020, the Company entered into a Share Exchange Agreement (“Exchange Agreement”) with Color China, a Hong Kong limited company, and shareholders of Color China (the “Sellers”), pursuant to which, among other things and subject to the terms and conditions contained therein, the Company acquired all of the outstanding issued shares in Color China from the sellers (the “Acquisition”). Pursuant to the Exchange Agreement, in exchange for all of the outstanding shares of Color China, the Company agreed to issue 4,633,333 ordinary shares of the Company and pay an aggregate of $2,000,000 to the Sellers. On June 3, 2020, the Acquisition was consummated and the Company issued 4,633,333 ordinary shares of the Company to the Sellers and closed on the same date. Since Color China had no business operations other than holding a significant collection of music performance specific equipment, the transaction has been treated as an acquisition of assets, as it did not meet the definition of a business. The Company plans to make Color China an emerging online performance and online music education provider with a significant collection of performance specific assets -- leveraging professional experience of the Company’s new Chief Executive Officer (“CEO”) who has established good relationships with major record companies, renowned artists and entertainment agencies around the world. Color China is in the process of building an online entertainment and music education platform featuring artists and professional producers as its lead instructors. Color China officially launched its online cultural entertainment platform, Color World, globally on September 10, 2020.

 

Sunway Kids International Education Group Ltd. (“Sunway Kids”)

 

Sunway Kids is an education and health service provider to day-care and preschools in China. Sunway Kids has a highly skilled professional team experienced in early childhood development. It provides a well-structured system for early childhood education, including artificial intelligence and robotic technologies, intellectual campus administration software as a service system (“SAAS system”) and online education courses for kids and parents. With the introduction of the national two-child policy in China since 2015, birth rate in China has been increasing and thus provides an increase in service opportunities for the preschool education industry. With the deepening of China’s economic reforms, the disposable income of urban residents has continued to increase. With the improvement of living standards of urban residents, families are more willing to invest in education, training, and other services for their children starting at a young age.

 

In order to expand the Company’s revenue capacity, on December 31, 2019, the Company entered into a Share Exchange Agreement (“Share Exchange Agreement”) with Sunway Kids International Education Group Ltd. (“Sunway Kids”), a British Virgin Islands company, and the shareholders of Sunway Kids (the “Sellers of SK”), pursuant to which the Company will acquire all of the outstanding issued shares of Sunway Kids (the “SK Acquisition”). Pursuant to the Share Exchange Agreement, in exchange for all of the outstanding shares of Sunway Kids, the Company will issue 1,989,262 ordinary shares of the Company and pay two million U.S. dollars. On February 11, 2020, the Company, Sunway Kids and the Sellers of SK entered into an Amendment No. 1 (“Amendment 1”) to the Share Exchange Agreement. Pursuant to Amendment 1, the cash consideration will be payable to the Sellers of SK according to an earn-out schedule. On February 14, 2020, the SK Acquisition was closed and the Company issued 1,989,262 ordinary shares to the Sellers of SK. The shares had a fair value of approximately $1.9 million based on the closing market price of $0.95 per share on February, 14, 2020, the acquisition date. The total consideration was valued at approximately $3.6 million, which include approximately $1.7 million based upon a 5.8% discount rate of the $2.0 million earn-out payment schedule, and approximately $1.9 million for the shares issued.

 

On June 25, 2020, the Company and the former shareholders of Sunway Kids entered into an Amendment No. 2 (“Amendment 2”) to the Share Exchange Agreement dated December 31, 2019. Pursuant to Amendment 2, the Company shall not make any the earn-out payment to the former shareholders of Sunway Kids since Sunway Kids has been unable to conduct its normal operations due to the COVID-19 pandemic and management of Sunway Kids believes it will be very difficult to achieve its projected financial results. On the same day, Sunway Kids and Yanliang Han (the “SK Purchaser”), an unrelated third party, entered into certain share purchase agreement (the “Disposition SPA”). Pursuant to the Disposition SPA, the SK Purchaser agreed to purchase Sunway Kids for cash consideration of $2.4 million consisting of $400,000 which shall be paid within a month of closing, and $2,000,000 to be paid in monthly installments of $200,000 over 10 months. On June 25, 2020, the transaction closed and as a result, the SK Purchaser acquired Sunway Kids and all the subsidiaries and variable interest entities owned or controlled them. Sunway Kids had no operations from February 14, 2020 to June 25, 2020 as management had been unable to conduct its normal operations due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The SK Purchaser subsequently settled $1.0 million of the total $2.4 million payment obligation. Although the SK Purchaser is current with its installment payment, the Company will recognize the installment payment on a cash basis as collectability of the remaining $1.4 million cannot be reasonably assured. The disposition of Sunway Kids resulted in the recognition of a loss of approximately $0.8 million that is recorded in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive income (loss) in the caption of “loss from discontinued operations.” The disposition of Sunway Kids was classified as a discontinued operation because it represented a strategic shift that had a major effect on the Company’s operation on artificial intelligence education for preschool kids and financial results in accordance with ASC 205-20-45.

 

F-8

 

 

COLOR STAR TECHNOLOGY CO., LTD. AND SUBSIDIARIES

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS HUITAO TECHNOLOGY, INC.)

 

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

BVI-ACM

 

Prior to acquisition of Sunway Kids in February 2020, the Company’s core business had been the concrete business in China. The Company had a wholly-owned subsidiary in the British Virgin Islands, Xin Ao Construction Materials, Inc. (“BVI-ACM”), which was a holding company with no operations. BVI-ACM had a wholly-owned foreign subsidiary, Beijing Ao Hang Construction Material Technology Co., Ltd. (“China-ACMH”), and China-ACMH had contractual agreements with Beijing XinAo Concrete Group (“Xin Ao”) and therefore Xin Ao was considered a variable interest entity of China-ACMH. The Company, through BVI-ACM and its variable interest entities (“VIEs”), was engaged in producing general ready-mix concrete, customized mechanical refining concrete, and other concrete-related products that are only sold in the People’s Republic of China (the “PRC”). The Company’s concrete business was negatively affected by the economic cycle and government policies. The concrete industry was influenced by the decline in the macro economy in recent years. The entire concrete industry in the PRC’s Beijing area experienced a slowdown in industry production and economic growth in the last few years as the Beijing government continues to enforce concrete production reformation and tightened environmental laws from late 2017 to date. The reformation causes great uncertainties for local enterprises in the construction market. Since 2017, the pressure on small concrete companies has further increased and many have been shut down. Also, the Beijing government ordered the suspension of construction job sites during winters to reduce air pollution since 2017. The operations of Xin Ao were also severely affected. As a result of Xin Ao’s deteriorating cash position, it defaulted on bank loans and experienced a substantial increase in contingent liabilities. The Company believed it would be very difficult, if not impossible, to turn around the concrete business. As such, the Company had been actively seeking to dispose of the concrete business after the acquisition of Sunway Kids.

 

On March 31, 2020, the Company, BVI-ACM, and Mr. Xianfu Han and Mr. Weili He (the “XA Purchasers”) who collectively held less than 5% ordinary shares of the Company currently), entered into a share purchase agreement (the “XA Disposition SPA”). Pursuant to the XA Disposition SPA, the XA Purchasers agreed to purchase BVI-ACM for cash consideration of $600,000. Upon the closing of the transaction (the “XA Disposition”) contemplated by the XA Disposition SPA, the XA Purchasers will become the sole shareholders of BVI-ACM and assume all assets and liabilities of all the subsidiaries and VIE entities owned or controlled by BVI-ACM. The closing of the XA Disposition was subject to certain closing conditions including the payment of the $600,000, the receipt of a fairness opinion from ViewTrade Securities Inc. and the approval of the Company’s shareholders. On May 6, 2020, the Company completed the disposition of BVI-ACM after obtaining its shareholders’ approval on April 27, 2020 and satisfaction or waiver of all other closing conditions. Upon the closing of the XA Disposition, the XA Purchases became the sole shareholders of BVI-ACM and assumed all assets and liabilities of all the subsidiaries and variable interest entities owned or controlled by BVI-ACM. The assets and liabilities and the results of operations of BVI-ACM had been presented as discontinued operations in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets and the statements of operations and comprehensive income (loss). The disposal of BVI-ACM resulted in a gain of approximately $6.6 million that is recognized in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive income (loss) under the caption of “loss from discontinued operations”.

 

Note 2 – Summary of significant accounting policies

 

Liquidity

 

In assessing the Company’s liquidity, the Company monitors and analyzes its cash on-hand and its operating and capital expenditure commitments. The Company’s liquidity needs are to meet its working capital requirements, operating expenses and capital expenditure obligations. As of June 30, 2020, the Company’s working capital was approximately $2.6 million with cash on-hand of approximately $1.0 million.

 

Subsequent to June 30, 2020, the Company completed a series of equity financing transactions follows:

 

On July 20, 2020, the Company sold 3,225,000 ordinary shares at the offering price of $1.30 per share for gross proceeds of approximately $4.2 million.

 

In August and September 2020, the Company’s Warrant holders converted a total of 5,227,274 warrants into a total of 5,227,274 ordinary shares at a weighted exercise price of $0.11 per share for gross proceeds of approximately $0.6 million.

  

  On September 8, 2020, the Company sold 793,651 ordinary shares at the offering price of $0.63 per share for gross proceeds of approximately $0.5 million.  The Company also agreed to issue 31,746 ordinary shares as additional consideration for the purchase of these shares.

 

On September 15, 2020, the Company issued and sold 13,200,000 ordinary shares at the offering price of $0.50 per share for gross proceeds of approximately $6.6 million.

 

  Sales from July 1, 2020 to the date of this report of approximately $2.0 million.

 

F-9

 

 

COLOR STAR TECHNOLOGY CO., LTD. AND SUBSIDIARIES

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS HUITAO TECHNOLOGY, INC.)

 

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

Subsequent to June 30, 2020, the Company has entered into a number of contractual and business arrangements as follows::

 

On August 21, 2020, the Company entered into an Asset Purchase Agreement with a non-affiliated third party (“Asset Seller”) pursuant to which the Company purchased certain machinery and equipment for stage performance for a total purchase price of $6,818,000, of which $3,000,000 shall be paid in cash and the remaining $3,818,000 shall be paid in the form of 6,060,318 ordinary shares. $2,000,000 of the cash consideration was paid in August 2020 and the remaining $1,000,000 was settled in November 2020 through a tri-party settlement agreement executed on September 29, 2020 among the Company, SK Purchaser and the Asset Seller.

 

  Payments of approximately $2.1 million to the online concert agent and performing artists for the Company’s “Color World Online Concert” held on September 10, 2020.

 

  Payments of approximately $3.8 million to the star agent and participating celebrities for contracting those celebrities to teach on Color World app.

 

  Payments of approximately $1.4 million for capital expenditure and other generated and administrative expenses.

 

As a result of the aforementioned transactions, the Company’s management is of the opinion that it has sufficient funds to meet the Company’s working capital requirements and contractual commitments and related obligations as they become due starting from one year from the date of this report.

 

Basis of presentation

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“US GAAP”) and pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). These consolidated financial statements include the accounts of all the directly and indirectly owned subsidiaries and VIEs listed below.

 

Principles of consolidation

 

The consolidated financial statements reflect the activities of the following subsidiaries and VIEs. All material intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated.

 

Subsidiaries and VIEs  Place incorporated  Ownership
percentage
 
CACM  New York, USA   100%
Baytao  New York, USA   80%
Color China  Hong Kong   100%
BVI-ACM(1)  British Virgin Island   100%
China-ACMH(1)  Beijing, China   100%
Xin Ao(1)  Beijing, China   VIE 
Sunway Kids(2)  British Virgin Island   100%

 

(1)The Company sold BVI-ACM and its subsidiaries to two former officers (CEO and CFO) who collectively held less than 5% ordinary shares of the Company currently for $600,000. See Note 4 – Discontinued operations for details.
(2)The Company sold Sunway Kids and its subsidiaries to a third party for $2.4 million in June 2020. See Note 4 – Discontinued operations for details.

 

F-10

 

 

COLOR STAR TECHNOLOGY CO., LTD. AND SUBSIDIARIES

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS HUITAO TECHNOLOGY, INC.)

 

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

Use of estimates and assumptions

 

The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting periods. The significant estimates and assumptions made in the preparation of the Company’s consolidated financial statements include the allowance for doubtful accounts of other receivables, prepayments and advances and deferred income taxes, stock-based compensation, and fair value and useful lives of property, plant and equipment. Actual results could be materially different from those estimates. 

 

Foreign currency translation

 

The reporting currency of the Company, CACM, Baytao, and Color China is the U.S. dollar (“US$”). The functional currency of BVI-ACM is the U.S. dollar. China-ACMH and Xin Ao use their local currency, the Chinese Renminbi (“RMB”) as their functional currency. In accordance with U.S. GAAP guidance on Foreign Currency Translation, the Company’s results of discontinued operations and cash flows are translated at the average exchange rates during the period, assets and liabilities of discontinued operations are translated at the exchange rates at the balance sheet date, and equity is translated at historical exchange rates.

 

Asset and liability accounts of discontinued operations at May 6, 2020 and June 30, 2019 were translated at RMB 7.06 and RMB 6.87 to US$1.00. Equity accounts are translated at their historical rate. The average translation rates applied to the consolidated statements of discontinued operations and comprehensive loss and cash flows from July 1, 2019 to May 6, 2020 and for the year ended June 30, 2019 were RMB 7.02 and RMB 6.83 to US$1.00, respectively.

 

Translation gains (losses) that arise from exchange rate fluctuations on transactions denominated in a currency other than the functional currency are included in the results of operations. There were no foreign currency transaction gains or losses for the years ended June 30, 2020 and 2019. The effects of foreign currency translation adjustments are included in shareholders’ equity as a component of accumulated other comprehensive income (loss).

 

Discontinued operations

 

In accordance with ASU No. 2014-08, Reporting Discontinued Operations and Disclosures of Disposals of Components of an Entity, a disposal of a component of an entity or a group of components of an entity is required to be reported as discontinued operations if the disposal represents a strategic shift that has (or will have) a major effect on an entity’s operations and financial results when the components of an entity meet the criteria in paragraph 205-20-45-1E to be classified as discontinued operations. When all of the criteria to be classified as discontinued operations are met, including management having the authority to approve the action and committing to a plan to sell the entity or the components, the major current assets, other assets, current liabilities, and noncurrent liabilities shall be reported as components of total assets and liabilities separate from the balances of the continuing operations. At the same time, the results of discontinued operations, less applicable income taxes (benefit), shall be reported as components of net income (loss) separate from the net income (loss) of continuing operations in accordance with ASC 205-20-45. See Note 4 – Discontinued operations.

 

Revenue recognition

 

On July 1, 2018, the Company adopted the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2014-09 Revenue from Contracts with Customers (ASC 606) using the modified retrospective method for contracts that were not completed as of July 1, 2018. The core principle underlying this ASU is that the Company recognizes its revenue to represent the transfer of goods and services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the Company expects to be entitled in such exchange. This requires the Company to identify contractual performance obligations and determine whether revenue should be recognized at a point in time or over time, based on when control of goods and services transfers to a customer. The Company’s revenue streams are primarily recognized at a point in time, principally upon music performance performed or education services provided.

 

The ASU requires the use of a five-step model to recognize revenue from customer contracts. The five-step model requires that the Company (i) identify the contract with the customer, (ii) identify the performance obligations in the contract, (iii) determine the transaction price, including variable consideration to the extent that it is probable that a significant future reversal will not occur, (iv) allocate the transaction price to the respective performance obligations in the contract, and (v) recognize revenue when (or as) the Company satisfies the performance obligation. The application of the five-step model to the revenue streams compared to the prior guidance did not result in significant changes in the way the Company records its revenue. Upon adoption, the Company evaluated its revenue recognition policy for all revenue streams within the scope of the ASU under previous standards and using the five-step model under the new guidance and confirmed that there were no material differences in the pattern of revenue recognition.

 

F-11

 

 

COLOR STAR TECHNOLOGY CO., LTD. AND SUBSIDIARIES

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS HUITAO TECHNOLOGY, INC.)

 

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

The Company accounts for a contract with a customer when the contract is committed in writing, the rights of the parties, including payment terms, are identified, the contract has commercial substance and consideration to collect is substantially probable.

 

With the acquisition of Color China, the Company plans to offer the following services:

 

(a)Online education academy

 

The Company plans to earn revenue from its customers for subscription and tuition fees in connection with online courses to be instructed by individuals with extensive experience in the entertainment and/or music industries.

 

(b)Online concert

 

The Company holds online concerts with its star partners. Sale of online concert via subscription fee is accounted for as a single performance obligation which is satisfied at a point in time on the day of the event. Online concert subscription fees are generally collected in advance and are initially recorded as deferred revenue. All ticket sales are final upon payment.

 

(c)Online store

 

The Company plans to hold an online marketplace for merchants to sell celebrity licensed or cobranded merchandise such as fashions, cosmetics, souvenirs, among others. The Company plans to charge commission fees to e-commerce merchants for selling in the Company’s online marketplace platform when the sales transaction is completed. The Company serves as an agent and its performance obligation is to arrange for the provision of the specified goods by those e-commerce merchants, and is not responsible for fulfilling the promise to provide the specified goods or services, and it does not have the ability to control the related shipping services. Upon completion of the sales transaction, the Company will charge the e-commerce merchants a fixed rate commission fee based on the sales amount. Commission fee revenues are recognized on a net basis at the point of delivery of products, net of a return allowance, if applicable.

 

For the year ended June 30, 2020, the Company did not earn any revenues from the aforementioned services.

 

As a practical expedient, the Company elects to record the incremental costs of obtaining a contract as an expense when incurred if the amortization period of the asset that the entity otherwise would have recognized is one year or less.

  

Financial instruments

 

US GAAP specifies a hierarchy of valuation techniques for determining the fair value of financial instruments and related fair value measurements based upon whether the inputs to those valuation techniques reflect assumptions other market participants would use based upon market data obtained from independent sources (observable inputs). The valuation hierarchy requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. In accordance with FASB ASC 820, the following summarizes the fair value hierarchy:

 

 The three levels of inputs are defined as follows:

 

  Level 1 inputs to the valuation methodology are quoted prices (unadjusted) for identical assets or liabilities in active markets;

 

  Level 2 inputs to the valuation methodology include quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets, and inputs that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly, for substantially the full term of the financial instrument;

 

  Level 3 inputs to the valuation methodology are unobservable.

 

Financial instruments included in current assets and current liabilities are reported in the consolidated balance sheets at face value or cost, which approximate fair value because of the short period of time between the origination of such instruments and their expected realization and their current market rates of interest.

 

F-12

 

 

COLOR STAR TECHNOLOGY CO., LTD. AND SUBSIDIARIES

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS HUITAO TECHNOLOGY, INC.)

 

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

Cash and cash equivalents