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Filed Pursuant to Rule 424(b)(4)
Registration Number: 333-248309

PROSPECTUS

41,222,222 Shares

 

LOGO

Class A Common Stock

 

 

We are offering 41,222,222 shares of our Class A common stock. Prior to this initial public offering, there has been no public market for our Class A common stock. The initial public offering price is $18.00 per share. Our Class A common stock has been approved for listing on the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) under the symbol “AMWL”.

Upon completion of this offering, we will have three classes of common stock, Class A, Class B and Class C common stock. Our Class B common stock, which will be held by our founders, Ido Schoenberg and Roy Schoenberg, will at all times hold 51% of our voting power so long as it is outstanding. Holders of our Class A, Class B and Class C common stock vote together as a single class on all matters, except as otherwise set forth in this prospectus (including that Class C shares will not vote on director elections), our amended and restated certificate of incorporation or as required by applicable law. Each outstanding share of Class B common stock will convert automatically into one share of Class A common stock upon any transfer, except for certain exceptions and upon permitted transfers described in our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and in certain other circumstances. Each share of Class C common stock will be convertible into Class A common stock at any time, subject to necessary regulatory approvals. After completion of this offering, we will be a “controlled company” within the meaning of the corporate governance standards of NYSE.

Google LLC has agreed to purchase $100 million of our Class C common stock in a private placement concurrent with the consummation of this offering, with the price per share to be equal to the purchase price to the public in this offering. See “Prospectus Summary—Recent Developments—Google Investment and Commercial Relationship.”

 

 

We are an “emerging growth company” as defined under the U.S. federal securities laws and, as such, we have elected to comply with certain reduced public company reporting requirements for this prospectus and future filings. See “Prospectus Summary—Implications of Being an Emerging Growth Company.”

 

 

Investing in our Class A common stock involves a high degree of risk. See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 24 of this prospectus.

 

 

Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 

 

 

     Per Share      Total  

Initial public offering price

   $ 18.00      $ 741,999,996  

Underwriting discounts and commissions(1)

   $ 1.08      $ 44,520,000  

Proceeds, before expenses, to us

   $ 16.92      $ 697,479,996  

 

(1)

We have agreed to reimburse the underwriters for certain FINRA-related expenses. See “Underwriters” for additional information regarding the underwriters’ compensation.

The underwriters have an option for a period of 30 days to purchase up to 4,459,277 additional shares of Class A common stock from us and 1,724,056 shares of Class A common stock from certain selling stockholders at the initial public offering price less the underwriting discounts and commissions.

The underwriters expect to deliver the shares of Class A common stock to purchasers on September 21, 2020.

 

 

 

MORGAN STANLEY   GOLDMAN SACHS & CO. LLC   PIPER SANDLER
UBS INVESTMENT BANK       CREDIT SUISSE           COWEN       BERENBERG

Prospectus dated September 16, 2020


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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

     Page  

Prospectus Summary

     1  

Risk Factors

     24  

Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

     67  

Use of Proceeds

     69  

Dividend Policy

     70  

Capitalization

     71  

Dilution

     73  

Selected Historical Consolidated Financial Data

     76  

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

     80  

Business

     109  

Management

     150  

Executive and Director Compensation

     158  

Certain Relationships and Related Person Transactions

     172  

Principal and Selling Stockholders

     175  

Description of Capital Stock

     179  

Shares Eligible for Future Sale

     187  

Material U.S. Federal Tax Consequences to Non-U.S. Holders of Our Class A Common Stock

     189  

Underwriters

     192  

Legal Matters

     200  

Experts

     200  

Where You Can Find More Information

     200  

Index to Financial Statements

     F-1  

 

 

Neither we, the selling stockholders nor the underwriters have authorized anyone to provide any information or to make any representations other than those contained in this prospectus or in any free writing prospectuses we have prepared. Neither we, the selling stockholders nor the underwriters take responsibility for, and can provide no assurance as to the reliability of, any other information that others may provide you. We are offering to sell, and seeking offers to buy, shares of Class A common stock only in jurisdictions where offers and sales are permitted. The information contained in this prospectus is accurate only as of the date of this prospectus, regardless of the time of delivery of this prospectus or of any sale of the Class A common stock. Our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may have changed since that date.

Until October 11, 2020 (the 25th day after the date of this prospectus), all dealers that buy, sell or trade our Class A common stock, whether or not participating in this offering, may be required to deliver a prospectus. This is in addition to the dealers’ obligation to deliver a prospectus when acting as underwriters and with respect to their unsold allotments or subscriptions.

For investors outside of the United States: Neither we, the selling stockholders nor any of the underwriters have done anything that would permit this offering or possession or distribution of this prospectus in any jurisdiction where action for that purposes is required, other than in the United States. Persons who come into possession of this prospectus and any applicable free writing prospectus in jurisdictions outside the United States are required to inform themselves about and to observe any restrictions as to this offering and the distribution of this prospectus and any such free writing prospectus applicable to that jurisdiction.

 

 

Market, Industry and Other Data

This prospectus includes estimates regarding market and industry data and forecasts, which are based on publicly available information, industry publications and surveys, reports from government agencies, reports by

 

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market research firms or other independent sources and our own estimates based on our management’s knowledge of and experience in the market sectors in which we compete.

Certain monetary amounts, percentages and other figures included in this prospectus have been subject to rounding adjustments. Accordingly, figures shown as totals in certain tables or charts may not be the arithmetic aggregation of the figures that precede them, and figures expressed as percentages in the text may not total 100% or, as applicable, when aggregated may not be the arithmetic aggregation of the percentages that precede them.

Trademarks

We own or otherwise have rights to the trademarks and service marks, including those mentioned in this prospectus, used in conjunction with the marketing and sale of our products and services. This prospectus includes trademarks, such as American Well and Amwell, which are protected under applicable intellectual property laws and are our property and the property of our subsidiaries. This prospectus also contains trademarks, service marks, copyrights and trade names of other companies, which are the property of their respective owners. We do not intend our use or display of other companies’ trademarks, copyrights or trade names to imply a relationship with, or endorsement or sponsorship of us by any other companies. Solely for convenience, our trademarks and trade names referred to in this prospectus may appear without the ® or symbols, but such references are not intended to indicate, in any way, that we will not assert, to the fullest extent under applicable law, our rights or the right of the applicable licensor to these trademarks and trade names.

 

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PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

Our Mission

Amwell connects and enables providers, insurers, patients and innovators to deliver greater access to more affordable, higher quality care.

Overview

We are a leading telehealth company enabling digital delivery of care for healthcare’s key stakeholders. We empower our clients at the enterprise level with the core technology and services necessary to successfully develop and distribute telehealth programs that meet their strategic, operational, and social objectives under their own brands. The Amwell Platform is a complete digital care delivery solution that equips our health system, health plan and innovator, including government, clients with the tools to enable new models of care for their patients and members. Our scalable technology embeds with our clients’ existing offerings and clinical workflows, spanning the continuum of care and enabling care delivery across a wide variety of clinical, retail, school and home settings. Our client-focused approach drives our success as one of the largest telehealth companies. As of June 30, 2020, we powered the digital care programs of 55 health plans, which support over 36,000 employers and collectively represent more than 80 million covered lives, as well as 150 of the nation’s largest health systems, encompassing more than 2,000 hospitals. Since inception, we have powered over 5.6 million telehealth visits for our clients, including more than 2.9 million in the six months ended June 30, 2020.

Healthcare today faces many challenges. Choice and access can be limited, care delivery is fragmented and inefficient, and costs continue to rise and shift to consumers while health outcomes have not improved. The healthcare industry is evolving to meet these challenges with innovative care models and new regulatory frameworks to promote more effective outcomes. As healthcare’s key stakeholders demand innovative technology solutions that streamline care delivery, lower costs, expand access and improve outcomes, we believe there is significant opportunity for transformation.

We believe Amwell makes this digital care transformation possible for the healthcare ecosystem. The Amwell Platform enables care delivery across the full healthcare continuum – from primary and urgent care in the home to high acuity specialty consults, such as telestroke and telepsychiatry, in the hospital. We support both on-demand and scheduled consultations and offer 40 pre-packaged care modules and programs that today power over 100 unique applications of our technology to different medical fact patterns, which we call use cases. Our platform can be fully embedded into our clients’ patient/member portals and provider workflows. Providers can launch telehealth directly from their native Electronic Health Records (“EHRs”), with seamless integration to their payer eligibility and claims systems. Providers, patients and members can access this care through a full range of Carepoints, including via mobile, web, phone and our proprietary kiosks and carts that support multi-way video, phone or secure messaging interactions. As of June 30, 2020, over 50,000 of our clients’ providers use the Amwell Platform to serve their patients and members. When needed, we augment and extend our clients’ clinical capabilities with the Online Care Group and Asana Medical Technologies (collectively, the “Amwell Medical Group” or “AMG”), a nationwide clinical network of over 5,000 multi-disciplinary providers covering 50 states with 24/7/365 coverage.

Amwell exists to empower healthcare’s leading players, who have earned the deep trust of their patients and members over decades, and does not aim to compete with or replace them. We help our clients white-label and embed telehealth within their existing healthcare offerings for their patients and members. Thus we enable our provider customers to offer a seamless experience that blends online convenience when needed with in-person care by known, trusted providers as part of a complete care program that offers patients continuity of care. In this way, providers can use our telehealth platform as an effective augmentation and not a replacement of their traditional care delivery.



 

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Our digital care solution delivers value across the healthcare ecosystem, including the following examples:

 

   

Patients needing treatment for minor conditions can be seen same day and save an average of 2.5 hours compared to office visits, while those with acute or chronic conditions can be treated in clinics or in their homes while their physicians receive expert care guidance from specialists.

 

   

Physicians can practice medicine from home offices as well as from clinical locations, enabling them to work on flexible schedules.

 

   

We believe health systems are able to improve clinical pathways, more effectively manage resources across their network and improve provider quality of life by allowing remote treatments. Telehealth can offer significant protection to healthcare workers through online triage and efficient patient transfers, as well as help mitigate the impact of infectious disease. Health systems are better equipped to acquire and retain customers in an increasingly competitive marketplace that demands convenient care.

 

   

Health plans and their employer clients utilize our platform to manage healthcare costs and deliver better health outcomes by expanding their care networks to fill gaps in care, shifting care to lower-cost settings and coordinating care more effectively across underutilized resources.

 

   

Healthcare innovator companies such as Philips, Apple, and Cerner, have used our platform to develop and deliver novel telehealth services and products. Our platform allows this ecosystem of companies to create differentiated healthcare offerings by forming unique partnerships together, further increasing the reach and integration of their products and services.

We have experienced significant growth since our inception. We derive our revenue from multiple stakeholders, including health systems, health plans, government clients and healthcare innovators. We monetize the value of our platform and services in the form of recurring platform subscription fees, usage-based clinical fees and related hardware and services fees. In 2019, 84.0% of our revenue was on a recurring basis.

Our revenue was $114.0 million and $148.9 million for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2019, respectively, representing a year-over-year growth rate of 30.6%. We incurred net losses of $52.3 million and $88.4 million for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2019, respectively.

Our revenue was $69.1 million and $122.3 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2020, respectively, representing a year-over-year growth rate of 77%. We incurred net losses of $41.6 million and $113.4 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2020, respectively.

Recent Developments

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a massive impact on our clients and, as a result, created significant needs and opportunities for Amwell to partner with them to help solve their most critical challenges. Key among these developments have been:

 

   

Significant reduction of regulatory and reimbursement barriers for telehealth;

 

   

Rapid demand increase for on-demand remote access to providers for COVID-19 symptom assessment and referral as needed to hospital or testing facilities; and

 

   

A surge in scheduled visit volume, especially among health systems, as administrators seek to protect healthcare workers from patients who may be infected with coronavirus and to enable patients to receive ongoing care for conditions not related to COVID-19.

As a result of these developments, for the three months ended June 30, 2020, Amwell has seen average monthly visit volumes and average monthly active providers delivering healthcare on our platform increase over 300% and 400%, respectively, versus the averages for these metrics only three months earlier for the same period ended March 31, 2020.



 

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Moreover, utilization of our platform to deliver care during the COVID-19 crisis increased dramatically, evident by our clients’ own providers accounting for 77% of the 2.2 million total visits performed on the Amwell Platform during the three months ended June 30, 2020, versus 50% of the over 700 thousand visits for the three month period ended March 31, 2020. We view this rapid embrace of healthcare delivery by a patient’s own doctor as evidence that doctors are increasingly using telemedicine to reach their patient population, patients are amenable to receiving care by their doctor virtually, and overall, providers and patients within the Amwell ecosystem are increasingly receiving care virtually on the Amwell Platform. While the COVID-19 crisis is a unique event, we believe that utilization of the Amwell Platform will remain at higher levels after the crisis versus levels previously forecasted before the crisis.

Visits in April 2020 were as high as over 40,000 per day, versus approximately 2,900 visits per day in April 2019 and the highest daily levels only two months earlier of 5,500 in January and February 2020. In spite of average daily visits in April 2020 at 10x the volume and the number of active providers delivering care at 9x, in both cases versus April 2019, average wait times remained under 10 minutes. For additional information, see “Business—Case Studies.”

 

LOGO



 

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LOGO

Although the COVID-19 pandemic has led to the relaxation of certain regulatory and reimbursement barriers, it is uncertain how long the relaxed policies will remain in effect, and there can be no guarantee that once the COVID-19 pandemic is over that such restrictions will not be reinstated or changed in a way that adversely affects our business. For many health care companies engaging in telehealth, the most significant potential concern about returning to the status quo is that restrictions on the reimbursement of telehealth visits to Medicare beneficiaries, such as when a patient presents to a medical professional from a rural area or at a clinical site, could be re-imposed.

Currently, AMG, our affiliated provider group, does not perform these kinds of consultations. As such, all patients who experienced a first-time visit with AMG during the pandemic would be able to continue using the platform. In light of that, we do not believe that the visit volume on our platform or visit revenue will materially decrease based on a return to the status quo from a regulatory perspective. In fact, we believe that such a return would benefit us as the renewed enforcement of HIPAA regulations may force many marginal telehealth platforms out of the marketplace, thereby lessening our competition.

Our Industry Opportunities

Healthcare today is inefficient, expensive, complicated and fragmented – resulting in substantial challenges for providers, health plans, and patients. We believe telehealth is central to overcoming these key structural challenges, which include:

 

   

Solving the access crisis driven by provider shortages and inefficient resource allocation;

 

   

Addressing increasing healthcare costs for all key stakeholders;

 

   

Promoting greater coordination of care; and

 

   

Optimizing patient experience to drive recruitment and retention.



 

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Our Solution

To capture these opportunities, we believe clients are seeking a comprehensive solution to support their connected care goals and consolidate unintegrated vendors and in-house designed solutions.

 

LOGO



 

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One Platform, Powering the Care Continuum

The Amwell Platform is a scalable, secure telehealth platform that supports a full range of telehealth functionality. The Amwell Platform consists of the Home line (provider-to-patient telehealth interactions, typically in the home) and the Hospital line (supporting provider-to-provider telehealth interactions, or provider-to-patient, typically in an inpatient or ambulatory setting). Our enterprise solution offers clients the ability to implement and quickly expand their telehealth offerings across many areas of clinical practice. Our platform is a highly configurable, white-labeled infrastructure that enables clients to deliver telehealth under their own brands and with their own providers. We offer a full range of management software, clinical workflows, Carepoint hardware and system integrations to deliver care across many modalities, including video, phone and secure messaging. Our platform is designed to support the continuum of care by offering the specific workflows and device solutions needed to deliver this care.

 

LOGO

Our open architecture allows the Amwell Platform to connect to existing systems, devices and access endpoints and to embed telehealth into our clients’ workflows. Our software development kits (“SDKs”) enable access to a broad set of application programming interfaces (“APIs”) to offer clients the ability to integrate, embed and customize telehealth across their digital domains, including:

 

   

Patient access points such as white-labeled web and mobile apps, 24-hour nurse and customer support lines and customer applications, such as patient or member “digital front doors”;

 

   

Provider access points, such as EHR systems, including Cerner, Epic and more. Clinicians can launch telehealth visits from within their EHRs, add records of new patients acquired via telehealth and share consult data through our bi-directional integrations; and

 

   

Administrative functions such as enrollment, clinical management, payment, eligibility and claims administration, e-prescribing, follow-up and data interchange.

The Amwell Platform is designed to quickly launch and remotely implement telehealth offerings for our clients and grow with them as they broaden their digital offerings through additional modules for a wide variety of use cases. Health systems typically begin with either urgent care or an acute use case and subsequently add modules. Health plans typically begin with an urgent care service and later add behavioral health or other services designed to support the needs of their employer clients. In emergency situations, such as natural



 

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disasters or the recent COVID-19 pandemic, our clients can start new practices and see patients using our telehealth solution in a matter of days.

We have designed the Amwell Platform to be intuitive and convenient for both patients and providers:

 

   

Patients – For patient-initiated on-demand visits, patients can either choose a specific provider or elect to see the next available physician. For scheduled visits, patients are guided through pre-visit readiness assessments, can enroll themselves and their dependents, enter their medical history, check insurance coverage and select video or phone visits. Post visit, patients can access their visit record or share it with other providers in their care team. The Amwell Platform is rated an average of 4.8 out of 5 stars by patients on all health system and health plan platforms, as well as our direct-to-consumer platform, and has achieved an average NPS score of 56 across our clients’ various branded services for the full-year period ending December 31, 2019.

 

   

Providers – The Amwell Platform is designed to deliver an easy-to-use provider experience via web or mobile application. Providers access familiar workflows for taking notes, prescribing, referencing clinical treatment guidelines and alerts for gaps in care or referral protocols. Importantly, many of our modules can be initiated directly from within a provider’s EHR system, creating a seamless experience.

Carepoints Enable a Variety of Clinical Settings

Patients and members access our platform through a wide variety of Carepoints. These Carepoints include not only patient and provider supplied devices for app-based access over web, mobile and phone, but also a full range of purpose-built devices for use in clinical settings. Our proprietary cart-based and kiosk Carepoints enable providers to deliver digital care into clinical care locations, such as the Emergency Department (the “ED”) and clinics, as well as into community settings such as retail stores, community centers, employer sites, skilled nursing facilities and schools. These devices are built to rigorous safety and clinical standards and have advanced features including far-end camera controls, fleet monitoring and connectivity to a variety of diagnostic scopes and examination tools. We are also developing home-based and hospital-based Carepoints that easily connect to existing TVs to deliver digital health services at home or in the hospital room. Our Carepoints support a range of modalities including multi-way video, phone connectivity and secure messaging to bring care teams to patients and members in the most efficient way possible.

Value-Added Services

We offer a full suite of paid, supporting services to our clients to enable their telehealth offerings. AMG is a 24/7/365 nationwide provider group with care capabilities that have been accredited with the National Committee for Quality Assurance (“NCQA”) and Utilization Review Accreditation Commission (“URAC”) Telehealth Accreditation Program. AMG employs more than 5,000 providers across primary and urgent care, behavioral health therapy, acute psychiatry, lactation counseling and nutrition to provide licensed, reimbursable medical staffing for digital care delivery to our clients. Clients can utilize AMG for staffing needs where they either do not employ full-time physicians, or as a bridge to facilitate the adoption of their telehealth programs among their own physicians over time. AMG can be used to augment provider capacity during nights, weekends or times of high demand, fill gaps in specialist coverage in acute hospital settings and enables expanded geographic coverage in cases where state-level licensing requirements restrict the ability of our clients’ own physicians to treat patients outside of their own geographic locations. Additionally, we provide professional services to facilitate telehealth implementation, workflow design, systems integration and service expansion. To help our clients promote adoption and utilization, we offer highly effective patient and provider engagement services through our internal digital engagement agency.



 

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Our Value Proposition

We provide differentiated value to our clients by enabling them to deepen their relationships with new and existing patients, members and employees through improved care access, cost and quality:

For Health Systems

We enable the telehealth services of 150 of the nation’s largest health systems, encompassing more than 2,000 hospitals. Health systems typically use their Amwell Platform to:

 

   

Attract and retain patients;

 

   

Improve care delivery;

 

   

Mobilize care in times of need;

 

   

Directly integrate and embed within the EHR and clinical workflows; and

 

   

Improve provider experience.

For Health Plans

We power the digital care programs of 55 health plans whose clients include over 36,000 employers and who represent more than 80 million covered lives. Health plans use their Amwell Platform to:

 

   

Attract and retain employers and members;

 

   

Deliver greater access, cost savings and improve health outcomes;

 

   

Utilize existing in-network providers more effectively;

 

   

Optimize provider network design; and

 

   

Enable innovative care delivery models.

Healthcare Innovators

Amwell partners with healthcare innovators to design, develop and deliver new services and products over our Amwell Platform. We work with remote monitoring device makers, such as Philips, to deliver targeted programs for chronic disease management and sleep therapy. Our partnership with TytoCare powers an affordable home kit for patient-driven medical exams as part of a primary or urgent care visit. We also supported the Apple Heart Study conducted by Stanford University and published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The Apple Heart Study was the largest clinical trial ever conducted, with over 400,000 consumers sharing Apple Watch heart rate data to detect atrial fibrillation which AMG physicians would follow up and then refer patients to emergency care as needed. We believe the flexibility of the Amwell Platform enables healthcare innovators to rethink healthcare and improve outcomes for patients. While innovators accounted for less than 10% of our revenue in 2019 and therefore are not material to our overall results, we intend to further develop our relationships with innovators over time as an important part of our strategy.

The Power of Our Connected Exchange Ecosystem

Our Amwell Platform enables our individual client platforms to interconnect across the platform and benefit from shared clinical services or programs offered by another client on the Amwell “Exchange”. A few of our clients have begun to use this capability. For example, Anthem distributes Cleveland Clinic services across several states, while Nemours offers its pediatric specialties nationwide. We also have health system clients developing digital programs to address diabetes and oncology needs. We believe that the value of the Amwell



 

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ecosystem grows for all clients as new clients join in, enabling healthcare’s leading brands to distribute these programs and services and leading to the creation of Centers of Excellence on the Amwell Platform.

Our Market Opportunity

Core U.S. Digital Care Market

We believe the annual total addressable market for our solutions is substantial and increasing. We estimate the current subscription revenue market opportunity for health plan and health system customers to be approximately $8.7 billion and $3.7 billion, respectively. There are over 290 million lives enrolled in insurance plans that we have identified as potential subscribers to our platform. We have also identified 802 health systems who would potentially benefit from the Amwell Platform. For AMG, we estimate the urgent care and telepsychiatry visit revenue market opportunity to be approximately $18.2 billion and $3.9 billion, respectively.

Additional Digital Care Market Opportunities

We intend to grow our addressable market through continued expansion into market adjacencies that we believe represent a significant opportunity to serve millions of additional potential patients and members.

 

   

Medicare and Medicaid – There are 60 million Medicare enrollees today. Recent legislation such as the Creating Opportunities Now for Necessary and Effective Care Technologies (“CONNECT”) Health Act of 2019 and the Mental Health Telemedicine Expansion, as well as recent regulatory developments related to the COVID-19 pandemic create the potential for much broader Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement for digital care.

 

   

Government – Government clients represent an addressable market that includes multiple state and federal agencies and departments including the Military Health System and the Defense Health Agency which provide care for over 9.4 million beneficiaries. Amwell has already deployed a program with the Defense Health Agency at Naval Hospital Jacksonville.

 

   

International – We have deployed our platform internationally and enabled some of our U.S.-based clients to expand their capabilities globally. Meuhedet, the third largest health maintenance organization (“HMO”) in Israel, leverages the Amwell Platform to transform healthcare delivery with its more than one million members. We believe there is significant international opportunity for telehealth and we intend to assess specific opportunities through our strategic investors, such as Fosun in China and Allianz in Europe.

 

   

Clinical Partnerships – Our partnership with Cleveland Clinic powers a first-of-its-kind initiative to drive clinical innovation and new care delivery options in close partnership with leading providers. This joint venture has launched with a Second Opinion service that connects patients and their local providers with Cleveland Clinic specialists; and could expand to other health systems, each contributing insight into new telehealth programs, capabilities and technology.

Our Competitive Strengths

Enabling Our Clients to Deliver the Continuum of Care

Our platform enables our clients to utilize their own provider networks to digitally distribute treatment to their patients and members across the continuum of care. This capability was demonstrated most clearly during the recent COVID-19 crisis, when our health system and health plan clients were able to deploy tens of thousands of their own providers onto their telehealth platforms. As of June 30, 2020, over 50,000 of our clients’ own providers address their patients’ needs, from primary care, the management of chronic care and specialist visits. We offer provider training, outreach and success services to drive increased patient acquisition and retention,



 

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appropriate utilization and better outcomes. We believe our ability to provide our clients with a platform that allows them to utilize their own trusted providers and networks differentiates us within our industry.

Flexible and Scalable Suite of Solutions

Our scalable platform allows us to grow with the digital care delivery needs of our clients. Most clients start by providing a single use case, such as urgent care, or start with a subset of their members or patients, such as employer administrative services. As our clients expand their digital care delivery solutions, they can add modules that support additional specialists or specific use cases across broader patient and/or member populations. Our products are currently available in more than 40 modules or programs that offer the necessary workflows to deliver care across over 100 individual use cases. In addition to clients increasing their telemedicine use cases over time, they tend to expand their use of Carepoints including our proprietary high-acuity carts and kiosks as well as consumer devices. As we expand our capabilities, our module, program and Carepoint-based approach allows us to partner with clients that are new to telehealth as well as with rapidly expanding telehealth market leaders.

Client-Branded, Embedded Digital Experiences

Our configurable Amwell Platform and its associated SDKs and APIs encourages our clients to white-label and deploy telehealth programs under their own brands, unlike other telehealth players who promote programs under their own names. Our differentiated approach empowers our clients to advance the look, feel and trust associated with their market-leading brands while we provide the core technology and clinical support to enable quality patient and member care. We are aligned with clients and partner to build tailored digital care distribution programs instead of competing with them for their patients.

Platform Integration That Provides for the Efficient Delivery of Digital Care

We enable digital care distribution to be integrated into existing care pathways and workflows rather than as a separate experience. Our proprietary SDKs, APIs and system integrations enable clients to embed telehealth into existing workflows utilized by providers and patients. Our platform is provided directly within or synchronized with our providers’ EHR systems, including Cerner and Epic, as well as through the mobile apps, 24-hour nurse and customer support lines and “digital front doors” that patients and members access. We also integrate with back end systems to streamline administrative functions such as enrollment, clinical management, payment, claims administration, e-prescribing, follow-up and data interchanges such as picture archiving and communication system (“PACS”). For our clients, this functionality eases administrative burdens and supports physician workflows. For patients and members, our embedded functionality simplifies digital care delivery directly into the portals and systems those individuals are already utilizing.

Connected Ecosystem of Health Systems, Health Plans and Innovators

We partner with many of the world’s largest and most trusted health systems, health plans and healthcare innovators. Our broad range of connected healthcare providers is attractive to health plans seeking to expand their care networks, while health systems are drawn to a network with a large number of health plans that allows for the possibility to extend their services through the digital distribution of their care. Our ecosystem benefits from scale in our client base across each stakeholder vertical. For example, we currently work with 30 of the 36 Blue plans nationally, who benefited as we added more of their cohort and allowed members with Blue cards to seamlessly access digitally distributed care outside the geography of their individual Blue plan. Our ecosystem is also strengthened by our partnerships with innovators that bring new services and capabilities to the Amwell Platform. Finally, the breadth of our ecosystem has enabled a deep understanding of health system and health plan workflows and reimbursement arrangements between our clients, allowing us to tailor our capabilities to their needs.



 

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Access to Scalable, On-Demand Medical Services to Help Support Our Clients’ Digital Care Solutions

As part of our mission to enable digital care distribution, we offer our clients a medical staffing solution for digital health services through AMG, representing over 5,000 multi-disciplinary providers with 24/7/365 coverage across 50 states, that integrates with and extends their existing care capabilities. Our recent acquisition of Aligned Telehealth Inc. (the “Aligned Acquisition”) bolstered our roster to now include over 600 behavioral health providers, strengthening the network we are able to offer our customers. For health plans, AMG provides essential nationwide clinical coverage for members across a broad range of specialties. For health systems, most require clinical support for their initial programs and then transition to weekend or evening coverage as their providers come onboard. During natural disasters or emergent health events such as the COVID-19 pandemic, our affiliated provider network can quickly augment staffing needs. By delivering access to on-demand medical staffing, we believe we bring trust and stability to our clients’ digital care delivery solutions.

Experienced Management

Our management team has extensive operational experience in healthcare, technology and services. Our co-founders are experienced entrepreneurs with a proven track record of successfully founding, growing and leading multiple companies. Our executive leadership team has an average of 20 years of experience, including several executives who have been innovators in telehealth over the past decade. We believe our management team’s extensive business experience, along with the backing of key strategic healthcare investors, sets Amwell apart in the industry.

Our Growth Strategies

Drive Greater Adoption with our Existing Clients

We intend to continue to drive greater adoption among existing clients in four ways:

 

   

Expanding the populations to which they offer services – Health plans may begin by offering telehealth to a subset of their total membership and over time expand to more members. Health systems may start with a single hospital or region and then expand system wide.

 

   

Increasing adoption within existing populations – We see significant increases in utilization among clients as providers and patients have become more aware of and comfortable with telehealth, and as clients have embedded digital care more fully into their operations. We use targeted patient and provider engagement campaigns, best practices training as well as operational support to further drive an increase in usage across our platform.

 

   

Adding new modules and programs – Most clients begin with one or two use cases for telehealth, but then expand into additional clinical areas. For health plans, additional programs are typically focused around the needs of employer clients and are increasingly driven by Medicare Advantage and Managed Medicaid business. For health systems, additional modules typically include a range of specialty care use cases across the care continuum.

 

   

Expanding their Carepoints – Clients typically increase the number of Carepoints over time, as they penetrate additional locations and expand their own network of digital care delivery. As the number of Carepoints rise, utilization goes up and our clients recognize additional value. We intend to continue to promote our proprietary Carepoints across our client base and believe that new Carepoint offerings such as our planned home and hospital TV solutions will further expand usage of our platform.

Increase Penetration by Adding New Clients within our Core Verticals

While we already partner with many of the largest health systems and health plans in the United States, there is still significant white space to add additional customer relationships. Additionally, Medicare and



 

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Medicaid programs provide a significant growth opportunity as they continue to expand telehealth as a reimbursable service across use cases. We expect to obtain an Authority to Operate within the Department of Defense’s health services which will provide additional entry points into government health services, where we believe there is a significant opportunity for growth. We continue to invest in our direct sales force and channel management capabilities to support growth and client support.

Invest in Platform to Continue to Expand Capabilities

We continue to invest in the Amwell Platform to develop new technologies, products, modules/programs and capabilities that meet the broadening needs of our clients. We also partner with our clients and other stakeholders to build new features, modules and programs. This includes the ongoing development of our digital tools program capabilities, which allow our clients to design new healthcare protocols by combining brick and mortar services with digital healthcare delivery in areas such as primary or cancer care. We plan to expand the reach of our digital platform into new areas by investing in new technologies. For example, our planned home and hospital TV Carepoint hardware solution will allow patients to access digital health services at home or in their hospital room via TVs. We are investing in AI technology that is designed to help expand patient engagement while improving efficiencies and reducing the cost of care. The first example of this AI deployment occurred during the COVID-19 crisis, when we launched “Ami,” an AI-based COVID-19 triage chatbot tool. Ami can be configured for use with other medical conditions and assessments. Continued investment in interoperability, including remote patient monitoring, advanced analytics and lab services as well as the home delivery of pharmaceuticals, is expected to allow us to expand use cases.

Increase Partnerships with Innovators to Better Enable the Digital Care Capabilities of our Clients

Our investments in interoperability with other technologies have allowed us to partner with innovative companies to develop unique products and services. Our current strategic partnership with Cerner, as well as relationships with Epic and other EHR providers, allows our services to be accessed directly through EHR interfaces. We recently developed a telehealth sleep program with Philips allowing for the remote diagnosis and treatment of various common sleep disorders. We have recently launched Second Opinion services through our Cleveland Clinic joint venture. We believe these partnerships will differentiate our offering and add new capabilities to drive demand and add value for our clients.

Expand into International Markets

As regulatory and reimbursement systems around the world evolve, we see a significant opportunity to expand internationally. We signed our first major international client in 2017 when Meuhedet Health Services, a leading Israeli Health Maintenance Organization with 1.2 million covered lives, joined our platform. Meuhedet’s telehealth program, launched in 2019, created Israel’s first “Hybrid HMO” using telehealth as the first line of contact for plan members for seamless care delivery and reduced facilities costs for Meuhedet. Our acquisition of Avizia, Inc. (“Avizia”) in 2018 also brought an international footprint in telehealth Carepoint carts that we continue to grow. We are also exploring joint international offerings with existing partners such as Philips and Cerner as well as with strategic investors such as Fosun and Allianz.

Selectively Pursue Acquisitions

Our comprehensive platform enables us to selectively pursue strategic and complementary assets to support our clients’ needs. We have a track record of successfully identifying and integrating acquisitions. The acquisition of Avizia in 2018 expanded our high-acuity care services and our hospital and Carepoint offerings. The Aligned Acquisition in 2019 expanded the number of behavioral health providers available in AMG and enhanced our ability to offer behavioral health resources and programs. We intend to continue to complement our strong organic growth opportunities by evaluating the acquisition of complementary products and services.



 

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Recent Developments—Google Investment and Commercial Relationship

On August 22, 2020, we entered into a stock purchase agreement with Google LLC, which we refer to as “Google”, pursuant to which we have agreed to issue to Google $100 million of our Class C common stock, with the price per share to be equal to the purchase price to the public in this offering. Based on the initial public offering price of $18.00 per share, we will issue 5,555,555 shares to Google. We refer to this transaction as the “Google Investment”. Upon consummation of this offering, Google’s equity interest in Amwell will be equal to approximately 2.46% of our common stock on a fully diluted basis. Closing of the Google Investment is contingent on the consummation of this offering.

Any shares of Class C common stock owned by Google will be subject to a 180-day lock-up in favor of the underwriters and Google has agreed with us not to transfer its Class C common stock for one year from the closing date of this offering, subject to certain exceptions and unless otherwise agreed to by us. In connection with this investment, Google will become a party to our investors rights agreement pursuant to which it will be entitled to certain registration rights. See “Description of Capital Stock—Registration Rights.”

We have also entered into an agreement with Google to enable telehealth video traffic of Amwell Home and Amwell Now, a version of Amwell Home that enables access to video visits and that does not require any app download, on the Google Cloud Platform by January 2021 and to enable and encourage our clients to redirect their Amwell telehealth video traffic to the Google Cloud Platform. This agreement contemplates that Amwell will be Google Cloud’s global telehealth solution platform partner and that the Google Cloud Platform will be our global cloud platform partner for telehealth visits. The partnership is strategic and contemplates differentiating elements of deep and comprehensive collaboration across technology, innovation and go-to-market commitments. While we believe that this partnership will help us expand and enhance our platform, we cannot guarantee that the partnership will be successful or result in increased client use of our applications or increased revenue.

Risks Related to Our Business

Investing in our Class A common stock involves substantial risk. You should carefully consider all of the information in this prospectus prior to investing in our Class A common stock. There are several risks related to our business and our ability to leverage our strengths described elsewhere in this prospectus that are described under “Risk Factors” elsewhere in this prospectus. Among these important risks are the following:

 

   

weak growth and increased volatility in the telehealth market;

 

   

our history of losses and the risk we may not achieve profitability;

 

   

inability to adapt to rapid technological changes;

 

   

our limited number of significant clients (including our largest customer by revenue, Anthem, which accounted for 21%, 23% and 22% of our revenue for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2019 and the six months ended June 30, 2020, respectively) and the risk that we may lose their business;

 

   

increased competition from existing and potential new participants in the healthcare industry;

 

   

changes in healthcare laws, regulations or trends as well as our ability to operate in the heavily regulated healthcare industry;

 

   

compliance with regulations concerning personally identifiable information and personal health industry;

 

   

slower than expected growth in patient adoption of telehealth and in platform usage by either clients or patients;

 

   

inability to grow our base of affiliated and non-affiliated providers sufficient to serve patient demand;



 

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the outbreak of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and its impact on business and economic conditions;

 

   

inability to remediate material weaknesses or maintain effective internal control over financial reporting;

 

   

holders of our Class A common stock will have limited or no ability to influence corporate matters due to the multiple class structure of our common stock and the ownership of Class B common stock by Ido Schoenberg and Roy Schoenberg (the “Founders”), which will have the effect of concentrating voting control with our founders for the foreseeable future; and

 

   

after this offering, our executive officers, directors and principal stockholders will continue to retain significant voting power.

Controlled Company

Upon the closing this offering, our common stock, including common stock issuable upon the automatic conversion of our convertible preferred stock, will all become Class A common stock except shares held by our Founders, which will become Class B common stock. In addition, based on the initial public offering price of $18.00 per share, Google will receive 5,555,555 shares of Class C common stock. Holders of Class B common stock will at all times hold 51% of our voting power so long as any shares of Class B common stock are outstanding. Accordingly, we will be a “controlled company” within the meaning of NYSE rules following completion of this offering.

Implications of Being an Emerging Growth Company

As a company with less than $1.07 billion in revenue during our last fiscal year, we qualify as an “emerging growth company” as defined in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012 (the “JOBS Act”), enacted in April 2012. An “emerging growth company” may take advantage of exemptions from some of the reporting requirements that are otherwise applicable to public companies that are not emerging growth companies. These exemptions include:

 

   

being permitted to present only two years of audited consolidated financial statements and only two years of related Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations in this prospectus;

 

   

not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as amended (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”), in the assessment of our internal control over financial reporting;

 

   

reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in our periodic reports, proxy statements and registration statements;

 

   

an exemption from compliance with the requirement of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board regarding the communication of critical audit matters in the auditor’s report on the financial statements; and

 

   

exemption from the requirements of holding a nonbinding advisory vote on executive compensation and obtaining stockholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved.

We may take advantage of these reporting exemptions until we are no longer an emerging growth company. We will remain an emerging growth company until the last day of our fiscal year following the fifth anniversary of the completion of this offering. However, if certain events occur prior to the end of such five-year period, including, but not limited to, if we have more than $700.0 million in market value of our Class A common stock held by non-affiliates (assessed as of the most recently completed second fiscal quarter), or if our annual gross



 

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revenue exceeds $1.07 billion or we issue more than $1.0 billion of non-convertible debt in any three-year period, we will cease to be an emerging growth company prior to the end of such five-year period.

We have elected to take advantage of certain of the reduced disclosure obligations in the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part and may elect to take advantage of some, but not all, of the reduced reporting requirements in future filings. As a result, the information that we provide to our stockholders may be different than you might receive from other public reporting companies in which you hold equity interests.

In addition, under the JOBS Act, emerging growth companies can delay adopting new or revised accounting standards issued subsequent to the enactment of the JOBS Act until such time as those standards apply to private companies. We have elected to use this extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards that have different effective dates for public and private companies until the earlier of the date that it is (i) no longer an emerging growth company or (ii) affirmatively and irrevocably opt out of the extended transition period provided in the JOBS Act.

Company Information

American Well Corporation was incorporated in the State of Delaware on June 1, 2006. Our principal executive offices are located at 75 State Street, 26th Floor, Boston, MA 02109, and our telephone number is (617) 204-3500. Our website address is www.americanwell.com. Information on, or accessible through, our website is not part of this prospectus, nor is such content incorporated by reference herein, and should not be relied upon in determining whether to make an investment in our Class A common stock.



 

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THE OFFERING

 

Class A common stock offered by us

41,222,222 shares.

 

Class A common stock outstanding after this offering

193,705,145 shares (or 198,164,422 if the underwriters exercise in full their option to purchase additional shares of Class A common stock from us and the selling stockholders).

 

Class B common stock outstanding after this offering

26,171,162 shares.

 

Class C common stock outstanding after this offering

5,555,555 shares.

 

Total Class A, Class B and Class C common stock to be outstanding after this offering

225,431,862 shares (or 229,891,139 if the underwriters exercise in full their option to purchase additional shares of Class A common stock from us and the selling stockholders).

 

Option to purchase additional shares

We and the selling stockholders have granted the underwriters an option for a period of 30 days to purchase up to 4,459,277 additional shares of Class A common stock from us and 1,724,056 shares of Class A common stock from certain selling stockholders.

 

Voting Rights

Upon completion of this offering, we will have three classes of voting common stock, Class A, Class B and Class C common stock. All of our outstanding common stock will be converted into Class A common stock, except shares held by our Founders, which will be converted into Class B common stock. Following this offering, all of our Class C common stock will be held by Google. Holders of Class A, Class B and Class C common stock will vote together as a single class on all matters other than the election of directors, in which case holders of Class C common stock will not have a vote, unless otherwise required by law or as specified in our amended and restated certificate of incorporation. Each share of Class A and Class C common stock will have one vote per share. The Class B common stock will collectively be entitled to a number of votes that equal 51% of the total voting power of all shares of common stock and preferred stock entitled to vote. Accordingly, our Founders, as holders of our Class B common stock, will at all times hold 51% of our voting power. As a result, our Founders, as the holders of the outstanding shares of Class B common stock, will have the ability to control the outcome of matters submitted to our stockholders for approval, including the election of our directors and the approval of any change in control transaction. See “Description of Capital Stock—Common Stock—Voting Rights.”

 

Use of proceeds

We estimate the proceeds to us from this offering will be approximately $692.5 million (or $767.9 million if the underwriters exercise in full



 

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their option to purchase additional shares of Class A common stock), based on the initial public offering price of $18.00 per share after deducting estimated underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us. We intend to use the net proceeds from this offering for working capital and general corporate purposes, including:

 

   

increasing engineering and development to expand the functionality and value of our core technology platform;

 

   

reducing operational and support costs through increased investment in automation, self-help and artificial intelligence;

 

   

expanding our sales force and account management team;

 

   

developing new verticals, including investment in market-specific functionality along with sales and operational support; and

 

   

potential acquisitions (both U.S. and international) to acquire new products, services, clients and member lives, although we have no commitments with respect to any such acquisitions at this time.

 

  We intend to use a portion of the net proceeds that we receive from this offering to repurchase 422,072 issued and outstanding shares of Class A and 918,284 shares of Class B common stock from certain of our executive officers and other employees at a purchase price per share equal to the initial public offering price per share of our Class A common stock to permit such executive officers and other employees to pay taxes owed or loans associated with taxes in connection with the vesting of equity awards (the “Net Share Settlement”). For further information, see “Use of Proceeds” and “Certain Relationships and Related Person Transactions—Transactions With Certain of Our Executive Officers and Other Employees”.

 

  We will not receive any proceeds from sales of our Class A common stock by the selling stockholders pursuant to the underwriters’ option to purchase additional shares from such selling stockholders in this offering.

 

Conversion and related rights

Our Class A common stock will not be convertible into any other class of shares. Shares of our Class B and Class C common stock will be convertible into shares of our Class A common stock on a one-for-one basis at the option of the holder, in the case of shares of our Class C common stock, upon determination that a filing under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act (“HSR”) is not necessary prior to the holder’s conversion of such shares or, if required, upon expiration or termination of the HSR waiting period. In addition, each share of Class B common stock will convert automatically into one share of Class A common stock (i) upon any transfer of such share, except for certain permitted transfers to entities



 

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controlled by our Founders, as described in our amended and restated certificate of incorporation, (ii) on the first business day after the date on which the outstanding shares of Class B common stock constitutes less than 5% of the aggregate number of shares of our common stock then outstanding, as determined by our board of directors, (iii) on the first business day after the date on which neither Founder is serving as an executive officer, (iv) following seven years after the date our amended and restated certificate of incorporation becomes effective, provided that such period may, to the extent permitted by law and applicable stock exchange rules, be extended for three years upon the affirmative vote of the holders of a majority of the voting power of the then-outstanding shares of Class A common stock entitled to vote thereon, voting separately as a class. See “Description of Capital Stock—Common Stock—Conversion, Exchange and Transferability” for more information.

 

Dividend policy

We do not currently pay and do not currently anticipate paying dividends on our Class A, Class B and Class C common stock following this offering. Any declaration and payment of future dividends to holders of our Class A, Class B and Class C common stock will be at the sole discretion of our board of directors. See “Dividend Policy.”

 

Proposed symbol

“AMWL”

 

Risk factors

See “Risk Factors” and other information included in this prospectus for a discussion of factors you should carefully consider before deciding to invest in our Class A common stock.

Unless we specifically state otherwise, throughout this prospectus the number of shares of our Class A, Class B and Class C common stock that will be outstanding after this offering is based on 179,994,441 shares of our common stock (including all shares issuable upon the automatic conversion of all shares of our preferred stock upon the closing of this offering) as of June 30, 2020, which will be automatically reclassified into 152,904,995 shares of Class A common stock and 27,089,446 shares of our Class B common stock immediately prior to this offering and 5,555,555 shares of Class C common stock being issued upon the closing of this offering to Google.

The number of shares of our Class A common stock to be outstanding after this offering excludes:

 

   

21,503,799 shares of Class A common stock issuable upon the exercise of options outstanding as of June 30, 2020 at a weighted average exercise price of $3.83 per share;

 

   

25,618,222 shares of Class A common stock reserved for future issuance under our 2020 Equity Incentive Plan, which became effective on August 17, 2020, including 3,589,159 shares of Class A common stock reserved for future issuance under our 2006 Employee, Director and Consultant Stock Plan, which shares, upon the effectiveness of our 2020 Equity Incentive Plan, became available for future issuance under such plan;

 

   

2,028,461 shares of Class A common stock issuable upon vesting and settlement of restricted stock unit (“RSU”) awards as of June 30, 2020 under our equity incentive plans;



 

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4,029,031 shares of Class A common stock issuable upon vesting and settlement of RSU awards to employees that were granted under our equity incentive plans in August 2020;

 

   

647,104 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options granted since June 30, 2020 at a weighted average exercise price of $9.89 per share; and

 

   

35,505,881 shares of Class A common stock reserved for issuance upon conversion of Class B and Class C common stock as of August 31, 2020.

The number of shares of our Class B common stock to be outstanding after this offering excludes:

 

   

3,529,766 shares of Class B common stock issuable upon the exercise of options outstanding as of June 30, 2020 at a weighted average exercise price of $5.56 per share; and

 

   

5,721,760 shares of Class B common stock issuable upon vesting and settlement of RSU awards as of June 30, 2020 under our equity incentive plans.

Unless we specifically state otherwise, all information in this prospectus assumes:

 

   

a 8.8-for-1 stock split in the form of a stock dividend of our common stock, which was effected on August 28, 2020;

 

   

the automatic conversion of all shares of our preferred stock outstanding as of June 30, 2020 into 136,625,900 shares of our common stock, which will occur immediately prior to the closing of this offering;

 

   

the reclassification of all shares of our common stock and preferred stock (on an as converted basis) outstanding as of June 30, 2020, other than 27,089,446 shares held by our Founders, into an equivalent number of shares of our Class A common stock, as well as the reclassification of 27,089,446 shares held by our Founders into an equivalent number of shares of our Class B common stock;

 

   

no exercise or cancellation of outstanding stock options subsequent to June 30, 2020;

 

   

our repurchase of 422,072 shares of Class A and 918,284 shares of Class B common stock at the price per share offered to the public in this offering with a portion of the proceeds of this offering as part of the Net Share Settlement;

 

   

no exercise by the underwriters of their option to purchase 4,459,277 additional shares of our Class A common stock and 1,724,056 shares of Class A common stock from certain selling stockholders in this offering;

 

   

the filing of our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and the adoption of our amended and restated bylaws immediately prior to the closing of this offering; and

 

   

completion of the Google Investment and issuance of 5,555,555 shares of Class C common stock.



 

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SUMMARY HISTORICAL FINANCIAL INFORMATION

The following table sets forth our summary historical financial information for the periods and as of the dates indicated. You should read the information contained in this table in conjunction with “Selected Historical Consolidated Financial Data,” “Capitalization,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and our audited consolidated financial statements and the related notes thereto included elsewhere in this prospectus. The statement of operations and comprehensive loss data for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2019 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. The balance sheet data as of June 30, 2020 and the statement of operations and comprehensive loss data for the six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2020 have been derived from our unaudited interim consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. The unaudited interim consolidated financial statements have been prepared on the same basis as the audited annual consolidated financial statements and reflect, in the opinion of management, adjustments of a normal, recurring nature that are necessary for a fair statement of the unaudited interim consolidated financial statements. On July 3, 2018, we acquired Avizia, Inc. and on November 14, 2019, we acquired Aligned Telehealth, Inc. (“Aligned”). Financial results for both acquired entities are reflected in our financials for the periods subsequent to the relevant acquisition date.

Historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected in the future.

 

    Year Ended
December 31,
    Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
(in thousands except share and per share data)   2018     2019     2019     2020  

Consolidated Statement of Operations and Comprehensive Loss Data:

       

Revenue

  $ 113,955     $ 148,857     $ 69,081     $ 122,282  

Costs and operating expenses:

       

Costs of revenue, excluding amortization of acquired intangible assets

    58,612       79,976       36,000       76,853  

Research and development

    36,273       53,941       25,567       32,573  

Sales and marketing

    31,629       47,672       22,642       26,220  

General and administrative

    37,217       54,211       25,535       95,424  

Depreciation and amortization expense

    5,330       7,761       3,800       4,795  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total costs and operating expenses

    169,061       243,561       113,544       235,865  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss from operations

    (55,106     (94,704     (44,463     (113,583

Interest income and other income (expense), net

    2,794       5,535       3,261       1,155  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss before benefit (expense) from income taxes and loss from equity method investment

    (52,312     (89,169     (41,202     (112,428

Benefit (expense) from income taxes

    —         803       (370     (252

Loss from equity method investment

    —         —         —         (764
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

  $ (52,312   $ (88,366   $ (41,572   $ (113,444
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income (loss) attributable to non-controlling interest

    362       (1,176     (828     (2,405
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss attributable to American Well Corporation

  $ (52,674   $ (87,190   $ (40,744   $ (111,039
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss per share attributable to common stockholders, basic and diluted

  $ (1.30   $ (2.12   $ (1.00   $ (2.66


 

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    Year Ended
December 31,
    Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
(in thousands except share and per share data)   2018     2019     2019     2020  

Weighted-average common shares outstanding, basic and diluted

    40,583,826       41,138,798       40,936,028       41,793,108  

Pro forma net loss per share attributable to common stockholders, basic and diluted(1)(2)

    $ (0.56     $ (0.65

Pro forma weighted-average common shares outstanding, basic and
diluted(1)(2)

      155,558,387         170,048,530  

 

(1)

See Note 24 to our consolidated financial statements appearing at the end of this prospectus for details on the calculation of basic and diluted net loss per share attributable to common stockholders and unaudited basic and diluted pro forma net loss per share attributable to common stockholders.

(2)

In June 2020, in anticipation of the IPO, the Company granted RSUs to the co-CEOs (the “IPO RSUs”). The IPO RSUs will be settled in Class A common stock once the awards are each vested (vesting occurs over a three-year period). For the purposes of pro forma net loss per share, the 2,984,894 Class A common shares underlying the IPO RSUs issuable at the IPO date, based on the public offering price of $18.00 per share, are included in the pro forma weighted-average common shares amount as if they were outstanding from the date of grant, as the requisite future service is not substantive for accounting purposes.

 

    As of June 30, 2020  
    Actual     Pro Forma(1)     Pro Forma
As Adjusted(2)
 

Consolidated Balance Sheet Data

     

(in thousands)

     

Cash, cash equivalents and short term investments

  $ 262,690     $ 262,690     $ 1,040,087  

Working capital(3)

    221,053       221,053       996,121  

Total assets(4)

    596,400       596,400       1,370,657  

Total liabilities(4)

    114,732       114,732       114,292  

Convertible preferred stock

    801,813       —         —    

Common stock

    434       1,800       2,255  

Total stockholders’ equity (deficit)

  $ (320,145   $ 481,668     $ 1,256,365  

 

(1)

The pro forma consolidated balance sheet data gives effect to the automatic conversion of all outstanding shares of our preferred stock into shares of our Class A common stock upon the closing of this offering, as well as giving effect to stock-based compensation expense of approximately $23.6 million associated with the IPO RSUs. This pro forma adjustment is reflected as an increase to additional paid-in capital and accumulated deficit.

(2)

The pro forma as adjusted balance sheet data gives further effect to our issuance and sale of 41,222,222 shares of Class A common stock in this offering and 5,555,555 shares of Class C common stock in the Google Investment, at an initial public offering price per share of Class A common stock and price per share of Class C common stock of $18.00 per share, after deducting estimated underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us and the use of a portion of the proceeds of this offering to repurchase 422,072 shares of Class A and 918,284 shares of Class B common stock (based on the initial public offering price of $18.00) at a price equal to the price per share offered to the public in this offering pursuant to the Net Share Settlement. The pro forma as adjusted balance sheet data does not reflect equity incentive grants after June 30, 2020, but does give effect to certain of the shares repurchased pursuant to the Net Share Settlement related thereto. See “Executive and Director Compensation—Other Compensation Plans—American Well Corporation 2006 Employee, Director and Consultant Stock Plan”.



 

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(3)

Working capital is defined as total current assets minus total current liabilities.

(4)

The Company adopted ASC 842 in the year ended December 31, 2019 on a modified retrospective basis.

Non-GAAP Financial Measures

In addition to our financial results determined in accordance with GAAP, we believe adjusted EBITDA, a non-GAAP measure, is useful in evaluating our operating performance. We use adjusted EBITDA to evaluate our ongoing operations and for internal planning and forecasting purposes. We believe that this non-GAAP financial measure, when taken together with the corresponding GAAP financial measures, provides meaningful supplemental information regarding our performance by excluding certain items that may not be indicative of our business, results of operations or outlook. In particular, we believe that the use of adjusted EBITDA is helpful to our investors as it is a metric used by management in assessing the health of our business and our operating performance. However, non-GAAP financial information is presented for supplemental informational purposes only, has limitations as an analytical tool and should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for financial information presented in accordance with GAAP. In addition, other companies, including companies in our industry, may calculate similarly-titled non-GAAP measures differently or may use other measures to evaluate their performance, all of which could reduce the usefulness of our non-GAAP financial measure as a tool for comparison. A reconciliation is provided below for our non-GAAP financial measure to the most directly comparable financial measure stated in accordance with GAAP. Investors are encouraged to review the related GAAP financial measure and the reconciliation of this non-GAAP financial measure to its most directly comparable GAAP financial measure, and not to rely on any single financial measure to evaluate our business.

Adjusted EBITDA

Adjusted EBITDA is a key performance measure that our management uses to assess our operating performance. Because adjusted EBITDA facilitates internal comparisons of our historical operating performance on a more consistent basis, we use this measure for business planning purposes and in evaluating acquisition opportunities.

We calculate adjusted EBITDA as net loss adjusted to exclude (i) interest income and other income, net, (ii) tax benefit and expense, (iii) depreciation and amortization, (iv) stock-based compensation expense, (v) initial public offering expenses, (vi) acquisition-related expenses and (vii) other items affecting our results that we do not view as representative of our ongoing operations, including direct and incremental expenses associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. We had no such other items during the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2019 or the six months ended June 30, 2019.



 

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The following table presents a reconciliation of adjusted EBITDA from the most comparable GAAP measure, net loss, for each of the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2019 and the six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2020:

 

     Year Ended
December 31,
     Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
(in thousands)    2018      2019      2019      2020  

Net loss

   $ (52,312    $ (88,366    $ (41,572    $ (113,444

Add:

           

Depreciation and amortization

     5,330        7,761        3,800        4,795  

Interest and other income, net

     (2,794      (5,535      (3,261      (1,155

(Benefit) expense from income taxes

     —          (803      370        252  

Stock-based compensation

     7,669        12,135        5,071        72,096  

Initial public offering expenses

     3,098        127        6        677  

Acquisition-related (income) expenses

     1,298        2,020        95        (48

COVID-19-related expenses(1)

     —          —          —          5,742  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA

   $ (37,711    $ (72,661    $ (35,491    $ (31,085
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1)

COVID-19-related expenses include non-recurring provider bonus payments, emergency hosting licensing fees and non-medical provider temporary labor costs related to on-boarding non-AMG providers incurred in response to the initial outbreak of the COVID-19 virus as Amwell attempted to scale quickly to meet unusually high patient and non-AMG provider demand.

Some of the limitations of adjusted EBITDA include (i) adjusted EBITDA does not properly reflect capital commitments to be paid in the future, and (ii) although depreciation and amortization are non-cash charges, the underlying assets may need to be replaced and adjusted EBITDA does not reflect these capital expenditures. Our IPO and acquisition-related expenses, including legal, accounting and other professional expenses, reflect cash expenditures and we expect such expenditures for acquisitions to recur from time to time. Our adjusted EBITDA may not be comparable to similarly titled measures of other companies because they may not calculate adjusted EBITDA in the same manner as we calculate the measure, limiting its usefulness as a comparative measure. In evaluating adjusted EBITDA, you should be aware that in the future we will incur expenses similar to the adjustments in this presentation. Our presentation of adjusted EBITDA should not be construed as an inference that our future results will be unaffected by these expenses or any unusual or non-recurring items. Adjusted EBITDA should not be considered as an alternative to loss before benefit from income taxes, net loss, earnings per share, or any other performance measures derived in accordance with U.S. GAAP. When evaluating our performance, you should consider adjusted EBITDA alongside other financial performance measures, including our net loss and other GAAP results.



 

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RISK FACTORS

An investment in our Class A common stock involves a high degree of risk. You should consider carefully the following risks, together with the other information contained in this prospectus before you decide whether to buy our Class A common stock. The risks and uncertainties described below are not the only ones we face. Additional risks and uncertainties that we are unaware of or that we do not currently deem material may also become important factors that adversely affect our business. If any of the events contemplated by the following discussion of risks should occur, our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows could suffer significantly. As a result, the market price of our Class A common stock could decline, and you may lose all or part of the money you paid to buy our Class A common stock. The following is a summary of all the material risks known to us.

Risks Related to Our Business and Industry

The telehealth market is immature and volatile, and if it does not develop, if it develops more slowly than we expect, if it encounters negative publicity or if our services are not competitive, the growth of our business will be harmed.

The telehealth market is relatively new and unproven, and it is uncertain whether it will achieve and sustain high levels of demand, consumer acceptance and market adoption. Our success will depend to a substantial extent on the willingness of our clients’ members or patients to use, and to increase the frequency and extent of their utilization of, our services, as well as on our ability to demonstrate the value of telehealth to employers, health plans, government agencies and other purchasers of healthcare for beneficiaries. Negative publicity concerning our services or the telehealth market as a whole could limit market acceptance of our services. If our clients, or their members or patients, do not perceive the benefits of our services, or if our services are not competitive, then our market may not develop at all, or it may develop more slowly than we expect. Similarly, individual and healthcare industry concerns or negative publicity regarding patient confidentiality and privacy in the context of telehealth could limit market acceptance of our healthcare services. If any of these events occurs, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

We have a history of losses, which we expect to continue, and we may never achieve or sustain profitability.

We have incurred significant losses in each period since our inception. We incurred net losses of $52.3 million and $88.4 million for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2019, respectively, and $41.6 million and $113.4 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2020, respectively. As of June 30, 2020, we had an accumulated deficit of $469.0 million. These losses and accumulated deficit reflect the substantial investments we made to acquire new clients and develop our technology platform. We intend to continue scaling our business to increase our client, patient, member and provider bases, broaden the scope of services we offer, invest in research and development and expand the applications of our technology through which consumers can access our services. Accordingly, we anticipate that cost of revenue and operating expenses will increase substantially in the foreseeable future. These efforts may prove more expensive than we currently anticipate and we may not succeed in increasing our revenue sufficiently to offset these higher expenses. We cannot assure you that we will achieve profitability in the future or that, if we do become profitable, we will be able to sustain or increase profitability. Our prior losses, combined with our expected future losses, have had and will continue to have an adverse effect on our stockholders’ equity and working capital. As a result of these factors, we may need to raise additional capital through debt or equity financings in order to fund our operations, and such capital may not be available on reasonable terms, if at all.

Rapid technological change in our industry presents us with significant risks and challenges.

The telehealth market is characterized by rapid technological change, changing consumer requirements, short product lifecycles and evolving industry standards. Our success will depend on our ability to enhance our

 

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solution with next-generation technologies and to develop or to acquire and market new services to access new consumer populations. There is no guarantee that we will possess the resources, either financial or personnel, for the research, design and development of new applications or services, or that we will be able to utilize these resources successfully and avoid technological or market obsolescence. Further, there can be no assurance that technological advances by one or more of our competitors or future competitors will not result in our present or future software-based products and services becoming uncompetitive or obsolete.

We operate in a competitive industry, and if we are not able to compete effectively, our business, financial condition and results of operations will be harmed.

While the telehealth market is in an early stage of development, it is competitive and we expect it to attract increased competition, which could make it difficult for us to succeed. We currently face competition in the telehealth industry from a range of companies, including specialized software and solution providers that offer similar solutions, often at substantially lower prices, and that are continuing to develop additional products and becoming more sophisticated and effective. These competitors include Doctor On Demand, MDLive and Teladoc. In addition, large, well-financed health systems have in some cases developed their own telehealth tools and may provide these solutions to their customers at discounted prices. EHR vendors, such as Cerner and Epic, could build telehealth functionality directly into their existing EHR systems instead of utilizing our services. The surge in interest in telehealth, and in particular the relaxation of HIPAA privacy and security requirements, has also attracted new competition from providers who utilize consumer-grade video conferencing platforms such as Zoom and Twilio. Competition from large software companies or other specialized solution providers, communication tools and other parties could result in continued pricing pressures, which is likely to lead to price declines in certain product segments, which could negatively impact our sales, profitability and market share.

Some of our competitors may have greater name recognition, longer operating histories and significantly greater resources than we do. Further, our current or potential competitors may be acquired by third parties with greater available resources. As a result, our competitors may be able to respond more quickly and effectively than we can to new or changing opportunities, technologies, standards or customer requirements and may have the ability to initiate or withstand substantial price competition. In addition, current and potential competitors have established, and may in the future establish, cooperative relationships with vendors of complementary products, technologies or services to increase the availability of their solutions in the marketplace. Accordingly, new competitors or alliances may emerge that have greater market share, a larger customer base, more widely adopted proprietary technologies, greater marketing expertise, greater financial resources and larger sales forces than we have, which could put us at a competitive disadvantage.

Our competitors could also be better positioned to serve certain segments of the telehealth market, which could create additional price pressure. In addition, many healthcare provider organizations are consolidating to create integrated healthcare delivery systems with greater market power. As provider networks and managed care organizations consolidate, thus decreasing the number of market participants, competition to provide products and services like ours could become more intense, and the importance of establishing and maintaining relationships with key industry participants could increase. These industry participants may try to use their market power to negotiate price reductions for our products and services. In light of these factors, even if our solution is more effective than those of our competitors, current or potential clients may accept competitive solutions in lieu of purchasing our solution. If we are unable to successfully compete in the telehealth market, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected.

The impact on us of recent healthcare legislation and other changes in the healthcare industry and in healthcare spending is currently unknown, but may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The impact on us of healthcare reform legislation and other changes in the healthcare industry and in healthcare spending is currently unknown, but may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results

 

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of operations. Our revenue is dependent on the healthcare industry and could be affected by changes in healthcare spending, reimbursement and policy. The healthcare industry is subject to changing political, regulatory and other influences. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act (the “Affordable Care Act” or the “ACA”) in 2010 made major changes in how healthcare is delivered and reimbursed, and increased access to health insurance benefits to the uninsured and underinsured population of the United States.

Since its enactment, there have been judicial and Congressional challenges to certain aspects of the ACA as well as recent efforts by the Trump administration to repeal or replace certain aspects of the ACA. For example, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 was enacted, which includes a provision repealing, effective January 1, 2019, the tax-based shared responsibility payment imposed by the ACA on certain individuals who fail to maintain qualifying health coverage for all or part of a year that is commonly referred to as the “individual mandate.” Since the enactment of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, there have been additional amendments to certain provisions of the ACA, and we expect the current Trump administration and Congress will likely continue to seek to modify all, or certain provisions of, the ACA. It is uncertain the extent to which any such changes may impact our business or financial condition. Congress may consider other legislation to repeal and replace elements of the ACA. In December 2019, a federal appeals court held that the individual mandate portion of the ACA was unconstitutional and left open the question whether the remaining provisions of the ACA would be valid without the individual mandate. On March 2, 2020, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the case during its term that begins in October 2020. We continue to evaluate the effect that the ACA and its possible modification or repeal and replacement has on our business. It is uncertain the extent to which any such changes may impact our business or financial condition.

Other legislative changes have been proposed and adopted since the ACA was enacted. These changes include aggregate reductions to Medicare payments to providers of up to 2% per fiscal year pursuant to the Budget Control Act of 2011 and subsequent laws, which began in 2013 and will remain in effect through 2029 unless additional Congressional action is taken. In January 2013, the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 was signed into law, which, among other things, further reduced Medicare payments to several types of providers, including hospitals, imaging centers and cancer treatment centers, and increased the statute of limitations period for the government to recover overpayments to providers from three to five years. New laws may result in additional reductions in Medicare and other healthcare funding, which may materially adversely affect customer demand and affordability for our products and, accordingly, the results of our financial operations. Additional changes that may affect our business include the expansion of new programs such as Medicare payment for performance initiatives for physicians under the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) which first affected physician payment in 2019. At this time, it is unclear how the introduction of the Medicare quality payment program will impact overall physician reimbursement.

Such changes in the regulatory environment may also result in changes to our payer mix that may affect our operations and revenue. In addition, certain provisions of the ACA authorize voluntary demonstration projects, which include the development of bundling payments for acute, inpatient hospital services, physician services and post-acute services for episodes of hospital care. Further, the ACA may adversely affect payers by increasing medical costs generally, which could have an effect on the industry and potentially impact our business and revenue as payers seek to offset these increases by reducing costs in other areas. Certain of these provisions are still being implemented and the full impact of these changes on us cannot be determined at this time.

Uncertainty regarding future amendments to the ACA as well as new legislative proposals to reform healthcare and government insurance programs, along with the trend toward managed healthcare in the United States, could result in reduced demand and prices for our services. We expect that additional state and federal healthcare reform measures will be adopted in the future, any of which could limit the amounts that federal and state governments and other third party payers will pay for healthcare products and services, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

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A significant portion of our revenue comes from a limited number of clients, the loss of which would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Historically, we have relied on a limited number of clients for a substantial portion of our total revenue. For the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2019, two clients and one client, respectively, represented 10% or more of our total revenue. For the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2019, our largest client, Anthem, accounted for 21% and 23% of our revenue, respectively. For the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2019, our top ten clients by revenue accounted for 48% and 44% of our total revenue, respectively. We also rely on our reputation and recommendations from key clients in order to promote our solution to potential new clients. The loss of any of our key clients, or a failure of some of them to renew or expand their subscriptions, could have a significant impact on our revenue, our reputation and our ability to obtain new clients. In addition, mergers and acquisitions involving our clients could lead to cancellation or non-renewal of our contracts with those clients or by the acquiring or combining companies, thereby reducing the number of our existing and potential clients, and their member and patient populations. As of June 30, 2020, Anthem owned 3.00% of our outstanding stock on a fully diluted basis. If Anthem decides to reduce their ownership stake in our company, doing so may also reduce the amount of their ongoing business with us.

If growth in the number of individuals covered by our health systems and health plans decreases, or the number of products or services that we are able to sell to our clients decreases due to legal, economic or business developments, our revenue will likely decrease.

We currently generate most of our revenues from customers who purchase access to our telehealth platform. These contracts generally have stated initial terms of three years. Most of our clients have no obligation to renew their subscriptions for our solution after the initial term expires. In addition, our clients may negotiate terms less advantageous to us upon renewal, which may reduce our revenue from these clients. Our future results of operations depend, in part, on our ability to expand into new clinical specialties and across care settings and use cases. If our clients fail to renew their contracts, renew their contracts upon less favorable terms or at lower fee levels or fail to purchase new products and services from us, our revenue may decline or our future revenue growth may be constrained.

Additional factors that could affect our ability to sell products and services include, but are not limited to:

 

   

failure of our clients to be successful offering our products;

 

   

changes in the nature or operations of our clients;

 

   

price, performance and functionality of our solution;

 

   

availability, price, performance and functionality of competing solutions;

 

   

our ability to develop and sell complementary products and services;

 

   

stability, performance and security of our hosting infrastructure and hosting services;

 

   

changes in healthcare laws, regulations or trends; and

 

   

the business environment of our clients and, in particular, headcount reductions by our clients.

In addition, our marketing efforts depend significantly on our ability to call upon our current clients to provide positive references to new, potential clients. Given our limited number of long-term clients, the loss or dissatisfaction of any client could substantially harm our brand and reputation, inhibit widespread adoption of our solution and impair our ability to attract new clients and maintain existing clients. Any of these consequences could lower retention rate and have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our growth depends in part on the success of our strategic relationships with third parties.

In order to grow our business, we anticipate that we will continue to depend on our relationships with third parties, including our partner organizations and technology and content providers. Identifying partners, and

 

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negotiating and documenting relationships with them, requires significant time and resources. Our competitors may be effective in providing incentives to third parties to favor their products or services or to prevent or reduce subscriptions to, or utilization of, our products and services. In addition, acquisitions of our partners by our competitors could result in a decrease in the number of our current and potential clients, as our partners may no longer facilitate the adoption of our applications by potential clients. If we are unsuccessful in establishing or maintaining our relationships with third parties, our ability to compete in the marketplace or to grow our revenue could be impaired and our results of operations may suffer. Even if we are successful, we cannot assure you that these relationships will result in increased client use of our applications or increased revenue.

Our telehealth strategy depends on the ability of our affiliated medical group to maintain and expand its network of skilled qualified providers. If it is unable to do so, our future growth would be limited and our business, financial condition and results of operations would be harmed.

Our success is dependent upon our affiliated medical group, AMG, and its continued ability to maintain a network of highly trained and qualified telehealth providers. If AMG is unable to recruit and retain board-certified physicians and other healthcare professionals, it would have a material adverse effect on our business and ability to grow and would adversely affect our results of operations. In any particular market, providers could demand higher payments or take other actions that could result in higher medical costs, less attractive service for our clients or difficulty meeting regulatory or accreditation requirements. The ability to develop and maintain satisfactory relationships with providers also may be negatively impacted by other factors not associated with us, such as changes in Medicare and/or Medicaid reimbursement levels, state physician licensing laws and standard of care requirements, and other pressures on healthcare providers and consolidation activity among hospitals, physician groups and healthcare providers. The failure of AMG to maintain or to secure new cost-effective provider contracts may result in a loss of or inability to grow our consumer base, higher costs, healthcare provider network disruptions, less attractive clinical services for our clients and/or difficulty in meeting regulatory or accreditation requirements, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The outbreak of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and its impact on business and economic conditions could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition, and the extent and duration of those effects will be uncertain.

In March 2020, the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. This contagious outbreak, which has continued to spread, and the related adverse public health developments, including orders to shelter-in-place, travel restrictions and mandated business closures, have adversely affected workforces, organizations, customers, economies and financial markets globally, leading to an economic downturn and increased market volatility. It has also disrupted the normal operations of many businesses, including ours.

This outbreak, as well as intensified measures undertaken to contain the spread of COVID-19, could cause disruptions and severely impact our business, including, but not limited to:

 

   

causing one or more of our health system or health plan clients to file for bankruptcy protection or shut down, including as a result of broader economic disruption;

 

   

reducing health system or health plan subscription agreement fees generated, as well as visit fees, by either client or AMG providers, as a result of funding constraints related to loss of revenue or employment;

 

   

negatively impacting collections of accounts receivable;

 

   

negatively impacting our ability to facilitate the provision of our services to health system, health plan or innovator clients due to unpredictable demand;

 

   

negatively impacting our ability to forecast our business’s financial outlook;

 

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creating regulatory uncertainty if certain restrictions on reimbursement or the practice of medicine across state lines are reintroduced at some point in the future; and

 

   

harming our business, results of operations and financial condition.

We cannot predict with any certainty whether and to what degree the disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and reactions thereto will continue, and expect to face difficulty accurately predicting our internal financial forecasts. The outbreak also presents challenges as our workforce is largely working remotely in helping new and existing health system, health plan and innovator clients, many of whose employees are also generally working remotely.

It is not possible for us to accurately predict the duration or magnitude of the adverse results of the outbreak and its effects on our business, results of operations or financial condition at this time, but such effects may be material. The COVID-19 pandemic may also have the effect of heightening many of the other risks identified elsewhere in this section.

We may not grow at the rates we historically have achieved or at all, even if our key metrics may indicate growth, which could have a material adverse effect on the market price of our Class A common stock.

We have experienced significant growth in the last five years. Future revenues may not grow at these same rates or may decline. Our future growth will depend, in part, on our ability to grow our revenue from existing clients, to complete sales to potential future clients, to expand our client, patient and member bases, to develop new products and services and to expand internationally. We can provide no assurances that we will be successful in executing on these growth strategies or that, even if our key metrics would indicate future growth, we will continue to grow our revenue or to generate net income. Our ability to execute on our existing sales pipeline, create additional sales pipelines, and expand our client base depends on, among other things, the attractiveness of our services relative to those offered by our competitors, our ability to demonstrate the value of our existing and future services, and our ability to attract and retain a sufficient number of qualified sales and marketing leadership and support personnel. In addition, our existing clients may be slower to adopt our services than we currently anticipate, which could adversely affect our results of operations and growth prospects.

Failure to adequately expand our direct sales force will impede our growth.

We believe that our future growth will depend on the continued development of our direct sales force and its ability to obtain new clients and to manage our existing client base. Identifying and recruiting qualified personnel and training them requires significant time, expense and attention. It can take six months or longer before a new sales representative is fully trained and productive. Our business may be adversely affected if our efforts to expand and train our direct sales force do not generate a corresponding increase in revenue. In particular, if we are unable to hire, develop and retain sufficient numbers of productive direct sales personnel or if new direct sales personnel are unable to achieve desired productivity levels in a reasonable period of time, sales of our services will suffer and our growth will be impeded.

We may be unable to successfully execute on our growth initiatives, business strategies or operating plans.

We are continually executing a number of growth initiatives, strategies and operating plans designed to enhance our business. The anticipated benefits from these efforts are based on several assumptions that may prove to be inaccurate. Moreover, we may not be able to successfully complete these growth initiatives, strategies and operating plans and realize all of the benefits, including growth targets and cost savings, that we expect to achieve or it may be more costly to do so than we anticipate. A variety of risks could cause us not to realize some or all of the expected benefits. These risks include, among others, delays in the anticipated timing of activities related to such growth initiatives, strategies and operating plans, increased difficulty and cost in

 

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implementing these efforts, including difficulties in complying with new regulatory requirements and the incurrence of other unexpected costs associated with operating the business. Moreover, our continued implementation of these programs may disrupt our operations and performance. As a result, we cannot assure you that we will realize these benefits. If, for any reason, the benefits we realize are less than our estimates or the implementation of these growth initiatives, strategies and operating plans adversely affect our operations or cost more or take longer to effectuate than we expect, or if our assumptions prove inaccurate, our business, financial condition and results of operations may be materially adversely affected.

We continue to research opportunities to expand our operations in markets outside of the United States. There can be no assurance that these efforts will be successful. We have limited experience in marketing, selling, implementing and supporting our products and services abroad. Expansion of our global sales and operations may require us to divert the efforts of our technical and management personnel and could result in significant expense to us, which could adversely affect our results of operations and growth prospects.

We may become subject to medical liability claims, which could cause us to incur significant expenses and may require us to pay significant damages if not covered by insurance.

Our business entails the risk of medical liability claims against AMG providers and us. Although we and AMG carry insurance covering medical malpractice claims in amounts that we believe are appropriate in light of the risks attendant to our business, successful medical liability claims could result in substantial damage awards that exceed the limits of our and AMG’s insurance coverage. AMG carries professional liability insurance for itself and each of its healthcare professionals, and we separately carry a professional liability insurance policy, which covers medical malpractice claims. In addition, professional liability insurance is expensive and insurance premiums may increase significantly in the future, particularly as we expand our services. As a result, adequate professional liability insurance may not be available to AMG providers or to us in the future at acceptable costs or at all.

Any claims made against us that are not fully covered by insurance could be costly to defend against, result in substantial damage awards against us and divert the attention of our management and our affiliated medical group from our operations, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, any claims may adversely affect our business or reputation.

A decline in the prevalence of employer-sponsored healthcare or the emergence of new technologies may render our telehealth solution obsolete or require us to expend significant resources in order to remain competitive.

The U.S. healthcare industry is massive, with a number of large market participants with conflicting agendas, and it is subject to significant government regulation and is currently undergoing significant change. Changes in our industry, for example, such as the emergence of new technologies as more competitors enter our market, could result in our telehealth solution being less desirable or relevant.

Some experts have predicted that future healthcare reform will encourage employer-sponsored health insurance to become significantly less prevalent as employees migrate to obtaining their own insurance over the state-sponsored insurance marketplaces. Were this to occur, there is no guarantee that we would be able to compensate for the loss in revenue from employers by increasing sales of our solution to health insurance companies or to individuals or government agencies. In such a case, our results of operations would be adversely affected.

If healthcare benefits trends shift or entirely new technologies are developed that replace existing solutions, our existing or future solutions could be rendered obsolete and our business could be adversely affected. In addition, we may experience difficulties with industry standards, design or marketing that could delay or prevent our development, introduction or implementation of new applications and enhancements.

 

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If our new telehealth offerings are not adopted by our clients, or if we fail to innovate and develop new software offerings that are adopted by our clients, our revenue and results of operations will be adversely affected.

To date, we have derived a substantial majority of our revenue from customers who pay for access to our telehealth platforms, and our longer-term results of operations and continued growth will depend on our ability to successfully develop and market new telehealth products and services that our clients want and are willing to purchase. In addition, we have invested, and will continue to invest, significant resources in research and development to enhance our existing solution and introduce new high-quality telehealth products and services. If existing clients are not willing to make additional payments for such new applications, or if new clients and their members and patients do not value such new applications, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. If we are unable to predict user preferences or if our industry changes, or if we are unable to modify our solution and services on a timely basis, we may lose clients. Our results of operations would also suffer if our innovations are not responsive to the needs of our clients, appropriately timed with market opportunity or effectively brought to market.

We rely on data center providers, Internet infrastructure, bandwidth providers, third-party computer hardware and software, other third parties and our own systems for providing services to our clients and consumers, and any failure or interruption in the services provided by these third parties or our own systems could expose us to litigation and negatively impact our relationships with clients, adversely affecting our brand and our business.

We serve all of our U.S. based clients and consumers from two geographically dispersed data centers. While we control and have access to our servers, we do not control the operation of these facilities. The owners of our data center facilities have no obligation to renew their agreements with us on commercially reasonable terms, or at all. If we are unable to renew these agreements on commercially reasonable terms, or if one of our data center operators is acquired, we may be required to transfer our servers and other infrastructure to new data center facilities, and we may incur significant costs and possible service interruption in connection with doing so. Problems faced by our third-party data center locations with the telecommunications network providers with whom we or they contract, or with the systems by which our telecommunications providers allocate capacity among their clients, including us, could adversely affect the experience of our clients and consumers. Our third-party data center operators could decide to close their facilities without adequate notice. In addition, any financial difficulties, such as bankruptcy faced by our third-party data centers operators or any of the service providers with whom we or they contract may have negative effects on our business, the nature and extent of which are difficult to predict.

Additionally, if our data centers are unable to keep up with our growing needs for capacity, this could have an adverse effect on our business. For example, a rapid expansion of our business could affect the service levels at our data centers or cause such data centers and systems to fail. Any changes in third-party service levels at our data centers or any disruptions or other performance problems with our solution could adversely affect our reputation and may damage our clients and consumers’ stored files or result in lengthy interruptions in our services. Interruptions in our services may reduce our revenue, cause us to issue refunds to clients for prepaid and unused subscriptions, as well as penalties related to service level credits and uptime, subject us to potential liability or adversely affect client renewal rates.

In addition, our ability to deliver our Internet-based services depends on the development and maintenance of the infrastructure of the Internet by third parties. This includes maintenance of a reliable network backbone with the necessary speed, data capacity, bandwidth capacity and security. Our services are designed to operate without interruption in accordance with our service level commitments. However, we have experienced, including during the period immediately following the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, and expect that we may experience in the future, interruptions and delays in services and availability from time to time. In the event of a catastrophic event with respect to one or more of our systems, we may experience an extended period of

 

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system unavailability, which could negatively impact our relationship with clients and consumers. To operate without interruption, both we and our service providers must guard against:

 

   

damage from fire, power loss, natural disasters and other force majeure events outside our control;

 

   

communications failures;

 

   

software and hardware errors, failures and crashes;

 

   

security breaches, computer viruses, hacking, denial-of-service attacks and similar disruptive problems; and

 

   

other potential interruptions.

We also rely on computer hardware purchased and software licensed from third parties in order to offer our services. These licenses are generally commercially available on varying terms. However, it is possible that this hardware and software may not continue to be available on commercially reasonable terms, or at all. Any loss of the right to use any of this hardware or software could result in delays in the provisioning of our services until equivalent technology is either developed by us, or, if available from third parties, is identified, obtained and integrated.

We exercise limited control over third-party vendors, which increases our vulnerability to problems with technology and information services they provide. Interruptions in our network access and services may in connection with third-party technology and information services reduce our revenue, cause us to issue refunds to clients, subject us to potential liability or adversely affect client renewal rates. Although we maintain a security and privacy damages insurance policy, the coverage under our policies may not be adequate to compensate us for all losses that may occur related to the services provided by our third-party vendors. In addition, we may not be able to continue to obtain adequate insurance coverage at an acceptable cost, if at all.

Our ability to rely on these services of third-party vendors could be impaired as a result of the failure of such providers to comply with applicable laws, regulations and contractual covenants, or as a result of events affecting such providers, such as power loss, telecommunication failures, software or hardware errors, computer viruses, cyber incidents and similar disruptive problems, fire, flood and natural disasters. Any such failure or event could adversely affect our relationships with our clients and damage our reputation. This could materially and adversely impact our business, financial condition and operating results.

If our or our vendors’ security measures fail or are breached and unauthorized access to a client’s data or information systems is obtained, our services may be perceived as insecure, we may incur significant liabilities, our reputation may be harmed, and we could lose sales and clients.

Our services involve the storage and transmission of clients’ and our consumers’ proprietary information, sensitive or confidential data, including valuable intellectual property and personal information of employees, clients, consumers and others, as well as the protected health information (“PHI”), of our consumers. We are subject to laws and regulations relating to the collection, use, retention, security and transfer of this information. Because of the extreme sensitivity of the information we store and transmit, the security features of our and our third-party vendors’ computer, network, and communications systems infrastructure are critical to the success of our business. A breach or failure of our or our third-party vendors’ network, hosted service providers or vendor systems could result from a variety of circumstances and events, including third-party action, employee negligence or error, malfeasance, computer viruses, cyber-attacks by computer hackers such as denial-of-service and phishing attacks, failures during the process of upgrading or replacing software and databases, power outages, hardware failures, telecommunication failures, user errors, or catastrophic events. Information security risks have generally increased in recent years because of the proliferation of new technologies and the increased sophistication and activities of perpetrators of cyber-attacks. Hackers and data thieves are increasingly sophisticated and operating large-scale and complex automated attacks, including on companies within the

 

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healthcare industry. As cyber threats continue to evolve, we may be required to expend additional resources to further enhance our information security measures and/or to investigate and remediate any information security vulnerabilities. If our or our third-party vendors’ security measures fail or are breached, it could result in unauthorized persons accessing sensitive patient or member data (including PHI), a loss of or damage to our data, an inability to access data sources, or process data or provide our services to our clients. Such failures or breaches of our or our third-party vendors’ security measures, or our or our third-party vendors’ inability to effectively resolve such failures or breaches in a timely manner, could severely damage our reputation, adversely affect client, patient, member or investor confidence in us, and reduce the demand for our services from existing and potential clients. In addition, we could face litigation, damages for contract breach, monetary penalties, or regulatory actions for violation of applicable laws or regulations, and incur significant costs for remedial measures to prevent future occurrences and mitigate past violations. Although we maintain insurance covering certain security and privacy damages and claim expenses, we may not carry insurance or maintain coverage sufficient to compensate for all liability and in any event, insurance coverage would not address the reputational damage that could result from a security incident.

Data privacy is also subject to frequently changing laws, rules and regulations in the various jurisdictions in which we operate. Such initiatives around the country could increase the cost of developing, implementing or securing our servers and require us to allocate more resources to improved technologies, adding to our IT and compliance costs. Our Board of Directors is briefed periodically on cybersecurity and risk management issues by our Chief Information Officer and General Counsel and we have implemented a number of processes to avoid cyber threats and to protect privacy. However, the processes we have implemented in connection with such initiatives may be insufficient to prevent or detect improper access to confidential, proprietary or sensitive data, including personal data. In addition, the competition for talent in the data privacy and cybersecurity space is intense, and we may be unable to hire, develop or retain suitable talent capable of adequately detecting, mitigating or remediating these risks. Our failure to adhere to, or successfully implement processes in response to, changing legal or regulatory requirements in this area could result in legal liability or damage to our reputation in the marketplace.

Should an attacker gain access to our network, including by way of example, using compromised credentials of an authorized user, we are at risk that the attacker might successfully leverage that access to compromise additional systems and data. Certain measures that could increase the security of our systems, such as data encryption (including data at rest encryption), heightened monitoring and logging, scanning for source code errors or deployment of multi-factor authentication, take significant time and resources to deploy broadly, and such measures may not be deployed in a timely manner or be effective against an attack. As cybersecurity threats continue to evolve, we may be required to expend significant additional resources to continue to modify or enhance our protective measures or to investigate and remediate any information security vulnerabilities. The inability to implement, maintain and upgrade adequate safeguards could have a material adverse effect on our business.

Our information systems must be continually updated, patched and upgraded to protect against known vulnerabilities. The volume of new vulnerabilities has increased markedly, as has the criticality of patches and other remedial measures. In addition to remediating newly identified vulnerabilities, previously identified vulnerabilities must also be continuously addressed. Accordingly, we are at risk that cyber-attackers exploit these known vulnerabilities before they have been addressed. Due to the large number of systems and platforms that we operate, the increased frequency at which vendors are issuing security patches to their products, the need to test patches and, in some cases coordinate with clients and vendors, before they can be deployed, we continuously face the substantial risk that we cannot deploy patches in a timely manner. We are also dependent on third-party vendors to keep their systems patched and secure in order to protect our information systems and data. Any failure related to these activities and any breach of our information systems could result in significant liability and/or have a material adverse effect on our business, reputation and financial condition.

 

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Any failure to protect, enforce or defend our intellectual property rights could impair our ability to protect our technology and our brand.

Our success depends in part on our ability to maintain, protect and enforce our intellectual property and other proprietary rights. We rely upon a combination of patent, trademark and trade secret laws, as well as license and access agreements and other contractual provisions, to protect our patent portfolio as well as other intellectual property rights. These laws, procedures and agreements provide only limited protection and any of our intellectual property rights may be challenged, invalidated, circumvented, infringed, diluted or misappropriated.

We attempt to protect our intellectual property and proprietary information by requiring our employees, consultants and certain of our contractors to execute confidentiality and assignment of inventions agreements. However, we may not obtain these agreements in all circumstances, and individuals with whom we have these agreements may not comply with their terms. The assignment of intellectual property rights under these agreements may not be self-executing or the assignment agreements may be breached, and we may be forced to bring claims against third parties, or defend claims that they may bring against us, to determine the ownership of what we regard as our intellectual property. In addition, we may not be able to prevent the unauthorized disclosure or use of our technical know-how or other trade secrets by the parties to these agreements despite the existence generally of confidentiality agreements and other contractual restrictions. Monitoring unauthorized uses and disclosures is difficult and we do not know whether the steps we have taken to protect our proprietary technologies will be effective. Additionally, if a competitor lawfully obtains or independently develops the technology we maintain as a trade secret, we would have no right to prevent such competitor from using that technology or information to compete with us, which could harm our competitive position.

Despite our efforts to protect our trade secrets and proprietary technologies, third parties may gain access to our proprietary information. They may also develop and market solutions similar to ours or use trademarks similar to ours, each of which could materially harm our business. Unauthorized parties may also attempt to copy or obtain and use our technology to develop applications with the same functionality as our solutions, and policing unauthorized use of our technology and intellectual property rights is difficult and may not be effective. The failure to adequately protect our intellectual property and other proprietary rights could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

In addition, we use open-source software in connection with our proprietary software and expect to continue to use open-source software in the future. Some open-source licenses require licensors to provide source code to licensees upon request, or prohibit licensors from charging a fee to licensees. While we try to insulate our proprietary code from the effects of such open-source license provisions, we cannot guarantee we will be successful. Accordingly, we may face claims from others claiming ownership of, or seeking to enforce the license terms applicable to such open-source software, including by demanding release of the open-source software, derivative works or our proprietary source code that was developed or distributed with such software. These claims could also result in litigation, require us to purchase a costly license or require us to devote additional research and development resources to change our software, any of which would have a negative effect on our business and results of operations. In addition, if the license terms for the open-source code change, we may be forced to re-engineer our software or incur additional costs. We cannot assure you that we have not incorporated open-source software into our proprietary software in a manner that may subject our proprietary software to an open-source license that requires disclosure, to customers or the public, of the source code to such proprietary software. Any such disclosure would have a negative effect on our business and the value of our proprietary software.

 

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Third parties may challenge the validity of our patents and trademarks, or oppose our patent and trademark applications. We may not be able to obtain and enforce additional patents to protect our proprietary rights from use by potential competitors. Companies with other patents could require us to stop using or pay to use required technology.

Our commercial success depends in large part on our ability to obtain and maintain intellectual property protection through patents, trademarks, trade secrets and contracts in the United States and other countries with respect to our software and technology. If we do not adequately protect our intellectual property rights, competitors may be able to erode, negate or preempt any competitive advantage we may have, which could harm our business.

We rely on our trademarks, trade name and brand names to distinguish our products and services from the products and services of our competitors, and have registered or applied to register many of these trademarks. We cannot assure you that our trademark applications will be approved. Third parties may also oppose our trademark applications, or otherwise challenge our use of the trademarks. In the event that our trademarks are successfully challenged, we could be forced to rebrand products or services, which could result in loss of brand recognition, and could require us to devote resources to advertising and marketing new brands.

We have applied for, and intend to continue to apply for, patents relating to our software and technology. Such applications may not result in the issuance of any patents, and any patents now held or that may be issued may not provide adequate protection from competition. Furthermore, because the issuance of a patent is not conclusive as to its inventorship, scope, validity or enforceability, patents issued to us have been found to be invalid in the past, and it is possible that patents issued or licensed to us may be challenged successfully and found to be invalid or unenforceable in the future. In that event, any competitive advantage that such patents might provide would be lost. If we are unable to secure or to continue to maintain patent coverage, our technology could become subject to competition from the sale of similar competing products.

Competitors may also be able to design around our patents. Changes in either the patent laws or interpretation of the patent laws in the United States and other countries may diminish the value of our patents or narrow the scope of our patent protection. If these developments were to occur, we could face increased competition. In addition, filing, prosecuting, maintaining, defending and enforcing patents on our software and technology in all countries throughout the world would be prohibitively expensive, and our intellectual property rights in some countries outside the United States can be less extensive than those in the United States.

From time to time, patents issued or licensed to us relating to our software and technology may be infringed by the products or processes of others. For example, we are aware of third parties that we believe are infringing certain of our owned patents related to our software and technology. The cost of enforcing patent rights against infringers, if such enforcement is required, could be significant and the time demands could interfere with our normal operations. Efforts to defend our intellectual property rights could incur significant costs and may or may not be resolved in our favor. If we fail to successfully enforce our intellectual property rights, our competitive position could suffer, which could harm our operating results. Regardless of the outcome, the cost and distraction associated with any such enforcement efforts could harm our business.

We could incur substantial costs as a result of any claim of infringement of another party’s intellectual property rights.

We have previously been involved in, and could become a party to, patent litigation and other infringement proceedings. The cost to us of any patent litigation or other infringement proceeding, even if resolved in our favor, could be substantial. Some of our would-be competitors may sustain the costs of such litigation more effectively than we can because of their greater financial resources.

In recent years, there has been significant litigation in the United States involving patents and other intellectual property rights. Companies in the Internet and technology industries are increasingly bringing and

 

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becoming subject to suits alleging infringement of proprietary rights, particularly patent rights, and our competitors and other third parties may hold patents or have pending patent applications, which could be related to our business. These risks have been amplified by the increase in third parties, which we refer to as non-practicing entities, whose sole or primary business is to assert such claims. Regardless of the merits of any intellectual property litigation, we may be required to expend significant management time and financial resources on the defense of such claims, and any adverse outcome of any such claim or the above referenced review could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations. We expect that we may receive in the future notices that claim we or our clients using our solution have misappropriated, misused or otherwise infringed other parties’ intellectual property rights, particularly as the number of competitors in our market grows and the functionality of applications amongst competitors overlaps. Our existing, or any future, litigation, whether or not successful, could be extremely costly to defend, divert our management’s time, attention and resources, damage our reputation and brand and substantially harm our business.

We employ individuals who were previously employed at other companies in our field, including our competitors or potential competitors. Although we try to ensure that our employees and consultants do not use the proprietary information or know-how of others in their work for us, we may be subject to claims that we or our employees, consultants or independent contractors have inadvertently or otherwise used or disclosed intellectual property, including trade secrets or other proprietary information, of a former employer or other third parties. Litigation may be necessary to defend against these claims. If we fail in defending any such claims, in addition to paying monetary damages, we may lose valuable intellectual property rights or personnel. Even if we are successful in defending against such claims, litigation could result in substantial costs and be a distraction to management and other employees.

In addition, in most instances, we have agreed to indemnify our clients against certain third-party claims, which may include claims that our solution infringes the intellectual property rights of such third parties. Our business could be adversely affected by any significant disputes between us and our clients as to the applicability or scope of our indemnification obligations to them. The results of any intellectual property litigation to which we may become a party, or for which we are required to provide indemnification, may require us to do one or more of the following:

 

   

cease offering or using technologies that incorporate the challenged intellectual property;

 

   

make substantial payments for legal fees, settlement payments or other costs or damages;

 

   

obtain a license, which may not be available on reasonable terms, to sell or use the relevant technology; or

 

   

redesign technology to avoid infringement.

If we are required to make substantial payments or undertake any of the other actions noted above as a result of any intellectual property infringement claims against us or any obligation to indemnify our clients for such claims, such payments or costs could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our proprietary software may not operate properly, which could damage our reputation, give rise to claims against us or divert application of our resources from other purposes, any of which could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The Amwell Platform provides our consumers and providers with the ability to, among other things, register for our services; complete, view and edit medical history; request a visit (either scheduled or on demand); and conduct a visit (via video or phone). Proprietary software development is time-consuming, expensive and complex, and may involve unforeseen difficulties. We encounter technical obstacles from time to time, and it is possible that we may discover additional problems that prevent our proprietary applications from operating

 

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properly. If our solution does not function reliably or fails to achieve client expectations in terms of performance, clients could assert liability claims against us or attempt to cancel their contracts with us. This could damage our reputation and impair our ability to attract or maintain clients.

Moreover, data services are complex and those we offer have in the past contained, and may in the future develop or contain, undetected defects or errors. Material performance problems, defects or errors in our existing or new software-based products and services may arise in the future and may result from interface of our solution with systems and data that we did not develop and the function of which is outside of our control or undetected in our testing. These defects and errors, and any failure by us to identify and address them, could result in loss of revenue or market share, diversion of development resources, harm to our reputation and increased service and maintenance costs. Defects or errors may discourage existing or potential clients from purchasing our solution from us. Correction of defects or errors could prove to be impossible or impracticable. The costs incurred in correcting any defects or errors may be substantial and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

If we cannot implement our solution for clients or resolve any technical issues in a timely manner, we may lose clients and our reputation may be harmed.

Our clients utilize a variety of data formats, applications and information systems and our solution must support our clients’ data formats and integrate with complex enterprise applications and information systems. If our telehealth platform does not currently support a client’s required data format or appropriately integrate with a client’s applications and information systems, then we must configure our platform to do so, which increases our expenses. Additionally, we do not control our clients’ implementation schedules. As a result, if our clients do not allocate the internal resources necessary to meet their implementation responsibilities or if we face unanticipated implementation difficulties, the implementation may be delayed. If the client implementation process is not executed successfully or if execution is delayed, we could incur significant costs, clients could become dissatisfied and decide not to increase utilization of our solution or not to implement our solution beyond an initial term commitment or, in some cases, revenue recognition could be delayed. In addition, competitors with more efficient operating models with lower implementation costs could jeopardize our client relationships.

Our clients depend on our support services to resolve any technical issues relating to our solution and services, and we may be unable to respond quickly enough to accommodate short-term increases in member demand for support services, particularly as we increase the size of our client, member and patient bases. We also may be unable to modify the format of our support services to compete with changes in support services provided by competitors. It is difficult to predict member demand for technical support services, and if member demand increases significantly, we may be unable to provide satisfactory support services to our consumers. Further, if we are unable to address consumers’ needs in a timely fashion or further develop and enhance our solution, or if a client or member is not satisfied with the quality of work performed by us or with the technical support services rendered, then we could incur additional costs to address the situation or be required to issue credits or refunds for amounts related to unused services, and our profitability may be impaired and clients’ dissatisfaction with our solution could damage our ability to expand the number of software-based products and services purchased by such clients. These clients may not renew their contracts, seek to terminate their relationship with us or renew on less favorable terms. Moreover, negative publicity related to our client relationships, regardless of its accuracy, may further damage our business by affecting our reputation or ability to compete for new business with current and prospective clients. If any of these were to occur, our revenue may decline and our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

We may be subject to claims for technology integration problems and warranties.

Our proprietary third party technology solutions, including integration with EHR providers, like Cerner and Epic, or mobile applications utilizing our SDK, are very complex and may contain design, coding or other errors, especially when first introduced. It is possible that providers may discover errors in our software after their

 

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introduction to the market. Our software is used not just for telehealth itself but also handling insurance eligibility, medical record access, payment and claims submission. Therefore, users of our software are less tolerant of errors than the market for other types of technologies generally. Our client agreements typically include warranties by the Company confirming the operation of our solution in accordance with specifications. If a software solution fails to meet these warranties or leads to faulty clinical decisions or injury to patients, it could constitute a material breach under the client agreement, allowing the client to terminate the agreement and possibly obtain a refund or damages or both; require us to incur additional expense in order to make the solution meet these criteria; or subject us to claims or litigation by our clients or clinicians or directly by the patient. Additionally, such failures could damage our reputation and could negatively affect future sales. Although we maintain liability insurance coverage, there can be no assurance that such coverage will cover any particular claim that has been brought or that may be brought in the future, that such coverage will prove to be adequate or that such coverage will continue to remain available on acceptable terms, if at all. A successful material claim or series of claims brought against us, if uninsured or under-insured, could materially harm our business, results of operations and financial condition.

We could experience losses or liability not covered by insurance.

Our business exposes us to risks that are inherent in the provision of telehealth and access to remote, virtual healthcare. If clients or individuals assert liability claims against us, any ensuing litigation, regardless of outcome, could result in a substantial cost to us, divert management’s attention from operations, and decrease market acceptance of our solution. We attempt to limit our liability to clients by contract; however, the limitations of liability set forth in the contracts may not be enforceable or may not otherwise protect us from liability for damages. Additionally, we may be subject to claims that are not explicitly covered by contract. We also maintain general liability coverage; however, this coverage may not continue to be available on acceptable terms, may not be available in sufficient amounts to cover one or more large claims against us, and may include larger self-insured retentions or exclusions for certain products. In addition, the insurer might disclaim coverage as to any future claim. A successful claim not fully covered by our insurance could have a material adverse impact on our liquidity, financial condition, and results of operations.

If AMG providers or experts or American Well Corporation experts are characterized as employees, AMG would be subject to employment and withholding liabilities.

AMG and American Well Corporation structure their relationships with the majority of their respective providers and experts in a manner that we believe results in an independent contractor relationship, not an employee relationship. An independent contractor is generally distinguished from an employee by his or her degree of autonomy and independence in providing services. A high degree of autonomy and independence is generally indicative of a contractor relationship, while a high degree of control is generally indicative of an employment relationship. Although we believe that AMG providers and experts and American Well Corporation experts are properly characterized as independent contractors, tax or other regulatory authorities may in the future challenge our characterization of these relationships. If such regulatory authorities or state, federal or foreign courts were to determine that AMG providers or experts or American Well Corporation experts are employees, and not independent contractors, AMG or American Well Corporation, as applicable, would be required to withhold income taxes, to withhold and pay social security, Medicare and similar taxes and to pay unemployment and other related payroll taxes. AMG or American Well Corporation, as applicable, would also be liable for unpaid past taxes and subject to penalties. As a result, any determination that AMG providers or experts and/or American Well experts are employees could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Any future litigation against us could be costly and time-consuming to defend.

We may become subject, from time to time, to legal proceedings, payer audits, investigations, and claims that arise in the ordinary course of business such as claims brought by our clients in connection with commercial

 

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disputes or employment claims made by our current or former associates. Litigation and audits may result in substantial costs and may divert management’s attention and resources, which may substantially harm our business, financial condition and results of operations. Insurance may not cover such claims, may not provide sufficient payments to cover all of the costs to resolve one or more such claims and may not continue to be available on terms acceptable to us. A claim brought against us that is uninsured or underinsured could result in unanticipated costs, thereby reducing our earnings and leading analysts or potential investors to reduce their expectations of our performance, which could reduce the market price of our stock.

We have identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting. If we are unable to remediate these material weaknesses, or if we identify additional material weaknesses in the future or otherwise fail to maintain an effective system of internal controls, we may not be able to accurately or timely report our financial condition or results of operations, which may adversely affect our business and stock price.

We have identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting. A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of our annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. If we are unable to remediate these material weaknesses, or if we identify additional material weaknesses in the future or otherwise fail to maintain an effective system of internal controls, we may not be able to accurately or timely report our financial condition or results of operations, which may adversely affect investor confidence in us and, as a result, our stock price.

As of December 31, 2019, we identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting. The material weaknesses we identified were as follows:

 

   

We did not maintain an effective control environment as we did not maintain a sufficient complement of accounting and financial reporting resources commensurate with our financial reporting requirements. This material weakness contributed to the following material weaknesses:

 

   

We did not have sufficient resources to appropriately record revenue transactions, nor did we did have controls in place to validate that the terms of the revenue transactions were appropriately entered into the revenue sub-ledger based on the terms of the arrangement with the customer.

 

   

We did not design or maintain the appropriate controls to review the work of the third party used to assist management in the accounting for taxes, including both income taxes and non-income based taxes.

 

   

We did not design or maintain effective controls over the period end financial reporting process and preparation of financial statements. Specifically, we did not design and implement a sufficient level of formal accounting policies and procedures that define how transactions across the business cycles should be initiated, recorded, processed and reported and appropriately authorized and approved.

These control deficiencies did not result in errors that were material to our annual financial statements. However, these control deficiencies could result in a misstatement in our accounts or disclosures that would result in a material misstatement to the annual financial statements that would not be prevented or detected. Accordingly, we determined that these control deficiencies constitute material weaknesses.

We are in the process of implementing measures designed to improve our internal control over financial reporting and remediate the control deficiencies that led to the material weaknesses. As of December 31, 2019, we have completed the following remedial actions:

 

   

hired additional full-time accounting resources with appropriate levels of accounting knowledge and experience, including a Chief Financial Officer in the second half of 2018, a Vice President of Accounting, Vice President of FP&A and Director of Revenue in the first half of 2019;

 

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reallocated responsibilities across the accounting organization to ensure that the appropriate level of knowledge and experience is applied based on risk and complexity of transactions and tasks under review;

 

   

migrated to a new accounting enterprise resource planning (“ERP”) system that better meets the needs of our business.

The process of implementing an effective financial reporting system is a continuous effort that requires us to anticipate and react to changes in our business and the economic and regulatory environments and to expend significant resources to maintain a financial reporting system that is adequate to satisfy our reporting obligations. We are working to remediate the material weaknesses as quickly and efficiently as possible. However, at this time, we cannot provide an estimate of costs expected to be incurred in connection with implementing this remediation plan or an estimate of expected timing for its completion. These remediation measures may be time consuming, costly, and may place significant demands on our financial and operational resources.

We have made significant progress towards remediating the material weaknesses by hiring qualified professionals for critical roles within our accounting department and migrating to a new ERP system. We are also enhancing and implementing new processes and controls to strengthen our internal control over financial reporting. After we operate the newly implemented controls for a sufficient time period, and management has concluded, through testing, that these controls are operating effectively, we expect that the remediation of the material weaknesses will be completed.

We cannot assure you that the measures we have taken to date, and actions we may take in the future, will be sufficient to remediate the control deficiencies that led to the material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting or that they will prevent or avoid potential future material weaknesses. In addition, neither our management nor an independent registered public accounting firm has performed an evaluation of our internal control over financial reporting in accordance with the provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act because no such evaluation has been required. Had we or our independent registered public accounting firm performed an evaluation of our internal control over financial reporting in accordance with the provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, additional material weaknesses may have been identified. If we are unable to successfully remediate our existing or any future material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting, or identify any additional material weaknesses, the accuracy and timing of our financial reporting may be adversely affected, we may be unable to maintain compliance with securities law requirements regarding timely filing of periodic reports in addition to applicable stock exchange listing requirements, investors may lose confidence in our financial reporting, and our share price may decline as a result. As a public company, we will be required to provide an annual management report on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting commencing with our second annual report on Form 10-K.

Any failure to implement and maintain effective internal control over financial reporting could also adversely affect the results of periodic management evaluations and annual independent registered public accounting firm audit reports regarding the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting that we will eventually be required to include in our periodic reports that will be filed with the SEC.

Our independent registered public accounting firm is not required to audit the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting until after we are no longer an “emerging growth company” as defined in the JOBS Act. At such time, our independent registered public accounting firm may issue an audit report that is adverse in the event one or more material weaknesses exist in our internal control over financial reporting. Any failure to maintain effective disclosure controls and internal control over financial reporting could have a material and adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition and could cause a decline in the trading price of our Class A common stock.

 

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Recent changes in U.S. tax laws could adversely affect our operating results and financial condition.

The United States recently enacted tax reform legislation (the “Tax Reform Legislation”) that, among other things, reduces the U.S. federal corporate income tax rate to 21%, imposes significant limitations on the deductibility of interest and executive compensation, allows for the expensing of capital expenditures, limits the deduction for net operating losses (“NOLs”) to 80% of current year taxable income in respect of losses arising in taxable years beginning after 2017, and modifies or repeals many business deductions and credits. The reduction in the U.S. federal corporate income tax rate is expected to be beneficial to us in future years in which we have net income subject to U.S. tax. The reduction in the U.S. federal corporate income tax rate also resulted in a remeasurement of our deferred tax assets and liabilities. There was no net impact as we maintain a full valuation allowance. On March 27, 2020, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the “CARES Act”) was enacted in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The CARES Act contains certain tax provisions, including provisions that retroactively and/or temporarily suspend or relax in certain respects the application of certain provisions, such as the limitations on the deduction of NOLs and interest, in the Tax Reform Legislation.

There are a number of uncertainties and ambiguities as to the interpretation and application of many of the provisions in the Tax Reform Legislation and the CARES Act. In the absence of guidance on these issues, we will use what we believe are reasonable interpretations and assumptions in interpreting and applying the Tax Reform Legislation and the CARES Act, which may change as we receive additional clarification and implementation guidance. It is also possible that the Internal Revenue Service could issue subsequent guidance or take positions on audit that differ from the interpretations and assumptions that we previously made, which could have a material adverse effect on our cash tax liabilities, results of operations and financial condition.

We may not be permitted to file as a consolidated group for U.S. federal income tax and certain state tax purposes.

Under Section 1504(a) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), we are generally permitted to elect to file a consolidated tax return for U.S. federal income tax purposes with any corporations in which we own at least 80%, by vote and value, of the corporation’s outstanding stock (other than preferred stock meeting certain requirements). Filing a consolidated tax return with our subsidiaries as a consolidated group has certain U.S. federal income tax advantages, including permitting the consolidated group to share certain tax attributes such as net operating losses realized by one or more members of the group, the nonrecognition of income on inter-group dividends, and the ability to defer the recognition of gains on certain intercompany transactions. In addition, similar rules apply in certain states, which permit a corporate groups which meet certain requirements to file state income tax returns on a unitary or similar basis. The ownership of a corporation’s stock for U.S. federal income tax purposes is generally based on the substance of a transaction, rather than the ownership of legal title, based on a determination as to which entity has the benefits and burdens of the ownership of a corporation’s stock.

Because we retain the economic ownership in and control over shares of the PCs, even though we have transferred legal title to the shares of the PCs to Dr. Peter Antall, with respect to the Online Care Group, and Dr. Nitin Nanda, with respect to Asana Medical Technologies, in order to comply with the laws of the various states in which the PCs were formed and operate, we believe that we are the beneficial owners of the stock of the PCs for U.S. federal and state income tax purposes and thus are entitled to include the PCs in our U.S. federal consolidated income tax return and file a unitary or similar basis in certain states. For further discussion of this structure, see “Business—Physicians and Healthcare Professionals.” However, there is no case law or other binding administrative guidance that directly addresses our facts, and it is possible that the Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) or a state taxing authority could take the position that we are not the beneficial owner of the stock of the PCs and thus are not entitled to include the PCs in our U.S. federal consolidated income tax return or state unitary or similar tax return, as applicable. There can be no assurance that the IRS or a state taxing authority will not take this position, or that such position would not be sustained if we were to challenge any such position in an administrative appeal or in a court.

 

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If we were not treated as the beneficial owner of the stock of the PCs, and were not entitled to include the PCs in our U.S. federal consolidated income tax return or a state unitary or similar tax return, this could have a material adverse effect on our cash tax liabilities, results of operations and financial condition.

Certain U.S. state and local tax authorities may assert that we have a nexus with such states or localities and may seek to impose state and local income taxes on our income allocated to such state and localities.

We file state and local income tax returns in 44 states and 2 cities. There is a risk that certain state tax authorities where we do not currently file a state income tax return could assert that we are liable for state and local income taxes based upon income or gross receipts allocable to such states or localities. States and localities are becoming increasingly aggressive in asserting nexus for state and local income tax purposes. We could be subject to additional state and local income taxation, including penalties and interest attributable to prior periods, if a state or local tax authority in a state or locality where we do not currently file an income tax return successfully asserts that our activities give rise to nexus for state income tax purposes. Such tax assessments, penalties and interest may adversely affect our cash tax liabilities, results of operations and financial condition.

Taxing authorities may successfully assert that we should have collected or in the future should collect sales and use or similar taxes for telehealth services which could adversely affect our results of operations.

Sales and use and similar tax laws and rates vary greatly from state to state. In 2019, we entered into voluntary disclosure agreements with 11 states and paid all amounts due under such agreements. Additionally, we are currently filing sales and use tax in 28 states, including 4 states in which we were required to register, collect and remit sales tax due to establishing “economic nexus” with such state under a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision. With respect to the remaining states in which we do not collect sales and use or similar taxes, although some of these states consider software-as-a-service to be exempt from sales and use tax or the state does not charge sales and use tax, one or more of the remaining states may assert that we had economic nexus with such state and were required to collect such taxes with respect to past or future services, which could result in tax assessments and penalties and interest. The assertion of such taxes against us for past services, or any requirement that we collect sales taxes on its provision of future services, could have a material adverse effect on our business, cash tax liabilities, results of operations, and financial condition.

Our ability to use our net operating losses to offset future taxable income may be subject to certain limitations.

In general, under Sections 382 and 383 of the Code, a corporation that undergoes an “ownership change” is subject to limitations on its ability to utilize its pre-change NOLs and certain credit and capital loss carryforwards to offset future taxable income. A Section 382 ownership change generally occurs if one or more stockholders or groups of stockholders who own at least 5% of our stock increase their ownership by more than 50 percentage points over their lowest ownership percentage within a rolling three-year period. Similar rules may apply under state tax laws. As of December 31, 2019, we had approximately $343.2 million of federal NOL carryforwards, $234.9 million of state NOL carryforwards, $1.6 million of federal research and development credit carryforwards, $0.9 million of state research and development credits and $0.4 million in foreign tax credits. The federal NOL carryforwards for years before 2018 begin to expire in 2026, the state NOL carryforwards began to expire in 2020 and federal research and development credit carryforwards begin to expire in 2027. For federal NOL carryforwards generated in 2018 ($21 million) and 2019 ($83 million), these amounts do not expire and can be carried forward indefinitely. Based on our analysis of changes in the ownership of our stock through June 1, 2020, we do not believe that any such changes prior to such date resulted in significant limitations under Section 382 of the Code on our ability to utilize NOL and credit carryforwards generated prior to that date. However, changes in the ownership of our stock after June 1, 2020, including as a result of this offering or future offerings, and some of which are outside of our control, could result in an ownership change under Section 382 of the Code after such date, which could significantly limit our ability to utilize our existing and future NOL and

 

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credit carryforwards arising at any time prior to such ownership change. In addition, certain of our NOLs for years before 2019 may be subject to a separate set of limitations applicable to losses from “separate return years,” which may limit our ability to use such losses against the income of our consolidated group. We have recorded a full valuation allowance against the deferred tax assets attributable to our NOL and our research and development credit carryforwards.

In order to support the growth of our business, we may need additional capital, which sources of additional capital may not be available to us on acceptable terms or at all.

Our operations have consumed substantial amounts of cash since inception and we intend to continue to make significant investments to support our business growth, respond to business challenges or opportunities, develop new software-based products and services, enhance our existing solution and services, enhance our operating infrastructure and potentially acquire complementary businesses and technologies. For the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2019, our net cash used in operating activities was $74.0 million and $81.9 million respectively, and $40.7 million and $57.8 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2020, respectively. As of December 31, 2019, we had $177.6 million of cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments, which are held for working capital purposes. As of June 30, 2020, we had $262.7 million of cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments, which are held for working capital purposes.

Our future capital requirements may be significantly different from our current estimates and will depend on many factors, including our growth rate, subscription renewal activity, the timing and extent of spending to support development efforts, the expansion of sales and marketing activities, the introduction of new or enhanced services and the continuing market acceptance of telehealth. Accordingly, we may need to engage in equity or debt financings or collaborative arrangements to secure additional funds. If we raise additional funds through further issuances of equity or convertible debt securities, our existing stockholders could suffer significant dilution, and any new equity securities we issue could have rights, preferences and privileges superior to those of holders of our Class A common stock. Any debt financing secured by us in the future could involve additional restrictive covenants relating to our capital-raising activities and other financial and operational matters, which may make it more difficult for us to obtain additional capital and to pursue business opportunities, including potential acquisitions. In addition, during times of economic instability, it has been difficult for many companies to obtain financing in the public markets or to obtain debt financing, and we may not be able to obtain additional financing on commercially reasonable terms, if at all. If we are unable to obtain adequate financing or financing on terms satisfactory to us, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our quarterly results may fluctuate significantly, which could adversely impact the value of our Class A common stock.

Our quarterly results of operations, including our revenue, net loss and cash flows, has varied and may vary significantly in the future, and period-to-period comparisons of our results of operations may not be meaningful. Accordingly, our quarterly results should not be relied upon as an indication of future performance. Our quarterly financial results may fluctuate as a result of a variety of factors, many of which are outside of our control, including, without limitation, the following:

 

   

the addition or loss of large clients, including through acquisitions or consolidations of such clients;

 

   

seasonal and other variations in the timing of the sales of our services, as a significantly higher proportion of our clients enter into new subscription contracts with us or renew their existing contracts in the third and fourth quarters of the year compared to the first and second quarters;

 

   

seasonal and other variations in the timing of the sales of our services, as a significantly higher proportion of our clients’ members and patients use our services during peak cold and flu season months;

 

   

the timing of recognition of revenue, including possible delays in the recognition of revenue due to sometimes unpredictable implementation timelines;

 

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the amount and timing of operating expenses related to the maintenance and expansion of our business, operations and infrastructure;

 

   

our ability to effectively manage the size and composition of our proprietary network of healthcare professionals relative to the level of demand for services from our clients’ members and patients;

 

   

the timing and success of introductions of new products and services by us or our competitors or any other change in the competitive dynamics of our industry, including consolidation among competitors, clients or strategic partners;

 

   

client renewal rates and the timing and terms of client renewals;

 

   

the mix of products and services sold during a period; and

 

   

the timing of expenses related to the development or acquisition of technologies or businesses and potential future charges for impairment of goodwill from acquired companies.

Most of our revenue in any given quarter is derived from contracts entered into with our clients during previous quarters. Consequently, a decline in new or renewed contracts in any one quarter may not be fully reflected in our revenue for that quarter. Such declines, however, would negatively affect our revenue in future periods and the effect of significant downturns in sales of and market demand for our solution, and potential changes in our rate of renewals or renewal terms, may not be fully reflected in our results of operations until future periods. Our subscription model also makes it difficult for us to rapidly increase our total revenue through additional sales in any period, as revenue from new clients must be recognized over the applicable term of the contract. Accordingly, the effect of changes in the industry impacting our business or changes we experience in our new sales may not be reflected in our short-term results of operations. Any fluctuation in our quarterly results may not accurately reflect the underlying performance of our business and could cause a decline in the trading price of our Class A common stock.

If we fail to manage our growth effectively, our expenses could increase more than expected, our revenue may not increase and we may be unable to implement our business strategy.

We have experienced significant growth in recent periods, which puts strain on our business, operations and employees. For example, we grew from 587 full-time employees at December 31, 2018 to 686 full-time employees at December 31, 2019. We have also increased our client and consumer bases significantly over the past five years. We anticipate that our operations will continue to rapidly expand. To manage our current and anticipated future growth effectively, we must continue to maintain and enhance our IT infrastructure, financial and accounting systems and controls. We must also attract, train and retain a significant number of qualified sales and marketing personnel, customer support personnel, professional services personnel, software engineers, technical personnel and management personnel, and the availability of such personnel, in particular software engineers, may be constrained.

A key aspect to managing our growth is our ability to scale our capabilities, including in response to unexpected shifts in demand for telehealth, such as during the COVID-19 pandemic, to implement our solution satisfactorily with respect to both large and demanding clients, who currently constitute the substantial majority of our client base. Large clients often require specific features or functions unique to their consumer base, which, at a time of significant growth or during periods of high demand, may strain our implementation capacity and hinder our ability to successfully implement our solution to our clients in a timely manner. We are in the process of hiring additional accounting personnel and, as a public company, may need to make further investments in our technology and automate portions of our solution or services to decrease our costs. If we are unable to address the needs of our clients or consumers, or our clients or consumers are unsatisfied with the quality of our solution or services, they may not renew their contracts, seek to cancel or terminate their relationship with us or renew on less favorable terms, any of which could cause our annual net dollar retention rate to decrease.

Failure to effectively manage our growth could also lead us to over-invest or under-invest in development and operations, result in weaknesses in our infrastructure, systems or controls, give rise to operational mistakes,

 

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financial losses, loss of productivity or business opportunities and result in loss of employees and reduced productivity of remaining employees. Our growth is expected to require significant capital expenditures and may divert financial resources from other projects such as the development of new software-based products and services. If our management is unable to effectively manage our growth, our expenses may increase more than expected, our revenue may not increase or may grow more slowly than expected and we may be unable to implement our business strategy. The quality of our services may also suffer, which could negatively affect our reputation and harm our ability to attract and retain clients.

We incur significant upfront costs in our client relationships, and if we are unable to maintain and grow these client relationships over time, we are likely to fail to recover these costs, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Historically we have derived the highest percentage of our revenue from software access fees. Accordingly, our business model depends heavily on achieving economies of scale because our initial upfront investment is costly and the associated revenue is recognized on a ratable basis. We devote significant resources to establish relationships with our clients and implement our solution and related services. This is particularly so in the case of large enterprises that, to date, have comprised a substantial majority of our client base. Accordingly, our results of operations will depend in substantial part on our ability to deliver a successful experience for clients, as well as their members and patients, and persuade our clients to maintain and grow their relationship with us over time. Additionally, as our business is growing significantly, our client acquisition costs could outpace our build-up of recurring revenue, and we may be unable to reduce our total operating costs enough to achieve profitability, or if achieved, to maintain it. If we fail to achieve appropriate economies of scale or if we fail to manage or anticipate the evolution and in future periods, demand, of the access fee model, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected.

Our sales cycle can be long and unpredictable and requires considerable time and expense, which may cause our results of operations to fluctuate.

The sales cycle for our solution from initial contact with a potential lead to contract execution and completion, varies widely by client, ranging from a few months to a year. Some of our clients undertake a significant and prolonged evaluation process, including to determine whether our services meet their unique healthcare needs, which frequently involves evaluation of not only our solution but also an evaluation of those of our competitors, which has in the past resulted in extended sales cycles. Our sales efforts involve educating our clients about the use, technical capabilities and potential benefits of our solution. Moreover, our large enterprise clients often begin to deploy our solution on a limited basis, which increases our upfront investment in the sales effort with no guarantee that these clients will deploy our solution widely enough across their organization to justify our substantial upfront investment. The implementation of large and complex contracts requires us to devote a sufficient amount of personnel, systems, equipment, technology and other resources as are necessary to ensure a timely and successful implementation. It is possible that in the future we may experience even longer sales cycles, more complex client needs, higher upfront sales costs and less predictability in completing some of our sales as we continue to expand our direct sales force, expand into new territories and market additional software-based products and services. If our sales cycle lengthens or our substantial upfront sales and implementation investments do not result in sufficient sales to justify our investments, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We depend on our senior management team, and the loss of one or more of our executive officers or key employees or an inability to attract and retain highly skilled employees could adversely affect our business.

Our success depends largely upon the continued services of our key members of senior management. These members of senior management are at-will employees and therefore they may terminate employment with us at any time with no advance notice. We also rely on our leadership team in the areas of research and development,

 

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marketing, services and general and administrative functions. From time to time, there may be changes in our management team resulting from the hiring or departure of executives, which could disrupt our business. The replacement of one or more of our executive officers or other key employees would likely involve significant time and costs and may significantly delay or prevent the achievement of our business objectives.

To continue to execute our growth strategy, we also must attract and retain highly skilled personnel. Competition is intense for qualified professionals. We may not be successful in continuing to attract and retain qualified personnel. We have from time to time in the past experienced, and we expect to continue to experience in the future, difficulty in hiring and retaining highly skilled personnel with appropriate qualifications. The pool of qualified personnel with experience working in the healthcare market is limited overall. In addition, many of the companies with which we compete for experienced personnel have greater resources than we have.

In addition, in making employment decisions, particularly in high-technology industries, job candidates often consider the value of the stock options or other equity instruments they are to receive in connection with their employment. Volatility in the price of our stock may, therefore, adversely affect our ability to attract or retain highly skilled personnel. Further, the requirement to expense stock options and other equity instruments may discourage us from granting the size or type of stock option or equity awards that job candidates require to join our company. Failure to attract new personnel or failure to retain and motivate our current personnel, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We are dependent on our ability to recruit, retain and develop a very large and diverse workforce.

Our products and services and our operations require a large number of skilled employees. A significant number of employees have joined us in recent years. Our success is dependent on our ability to align our talent with our business needs, engage our employees and inspire our employees to be open to change, to innovate and to maintain member- and client-focus when delivering our services. Our business would also be adversely affected if we fail to adequately plan for succession of our executives and senior management; or if we fail to effectively recruit, integrate, retain and develop key talent and/or align our talent with our business needs, in light of the current rapidly changing environment. While we have succession plans in place and we have employment arrangements with a limited number of key executives, these do not guarantee that the services of these or suitable successor executives will continue to be available to us. In addition, as we expand internationally, we face the challenge of recruiting, integrating, educating, managing, retaining and developing a more culturally diverse workforce.

If we fail to develop widespread brand awareness cost-effectively, our business may suffer.

We believe that developing and maintaining widespread awareness of our brand in a cost-effective manner is critical to achieving widespread adoption of our solution and attracting new clients. Our brand promotion activities may not generate client awareness or increase revenue, and even if they do, any increase in revenue may not offset the expenses we incur in building our brand. If we fail to successfully promote and maintain our brand, or incur substantial expenses in doing so, we may fail to attract or retain clients necessary to realize a sufficient return on our brand-building efforts or to achieve the widespread brand awareness that is critical for broad client adoption of our solution.

We may acquire other companies or technologies, which could divert our management’s attention, result in dilution to our stockholders and otherwise disrupt our operations and we may have difficulty integrating any such acquisitions successfully or realizing the anticipated benefits therefrom, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We intend to seek to acquire or invest in businesses, software-based products and services or technologies that we believe could complement or expand our solution, enhance our technical capabilities or otherwise offer growth opportunities. The pursuit of potential acquisitions may divert the attention of management and cause us

 

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to incur various expenses in identifying, investigating and pursuing suitable acquisitions, whether or not they are consummated.

If we acquire additional businesses, we may not be able to integrate the acquired personnel, operations and technologies successfully, or effectively manage the combined business following the acquisition. We also may not achieve the anticipated benefits from the acquired business due to a number of factors, including, but not limited to:

 

   

inability to integrate or benefit from acquired technologies or services in a profitable manner;

 

   

unanticipated costs or liabilities associated with the acquisition;

 

   

difficulty integrating the accounting systems, operations and personnel of the acquired business;

 

   

difficulties and additional expenses associated with supporting legacy products and hosting infrastructure of the acquired business;

 

   

difficulty converting the clients of the acquired business onto our platform and contract terms, including disparities in the revenue, licensing, support or professional services model of the acquired company;

 

   

diversion of management’s attention from other business concerns;

 

   

adverse effects to our existing business relationships with business partners and clients as a result of the acquisition;

 

   

the potential loss of key employees;

 

   

use of resources that are needed in other parts of our business; and

 

   

use of substantial portions of our available cash to consummate the acquisition.

In addition, a significant portion of the purchase price of companies we acquire may be allocated to acquired goodwill and other intangible assets, which generally must be assessed for impairment at least annually. In the future, if our acquisitions do not yield expected returns, we may be required to take charges to our results of operations based on this impairment assessment process, which could adversely affect our results of operations.

Acquisitions could also result in dilutive issuances of equity securities or the incurrence of debt, which could adversely affect our results of operations. In addition, if an acquired business fails to meet our expectations, our business, financial condition and results of operations may suffer.

We may fail to realize all of the anticipated benefits of the Aligned Acquisition, including expected synergies, and we will be subject to business uncertainties that could adversely affect our business.

The success of the Aligned Acquisition will depend, in part, on our ability to realize anticipated cost synergies by integrating Aligned’s customer relationships with our telehealth platform. Our success in realizing these benefits, and the timing of this realization, depends on the successful integration of our business and operations with Aligned’s business and may require significant internal and external investment. Even though we have integrated Aligned’s business, this integration may not result in the realization of the full benefits of the Aligned Acquisition that we currently expect within the anticipated time frame or at all. There is also the possibility that:

 

   

the Aligned Acquisition may result in our assuming unexpected liabilities;

 

   

we may experience difficulties integrating operations and systems, for example with respect to accounting and IT controls, IT systems as well as company policies and cultures;

 

   

we may fail to retain and assimilate employees of Aligned’s business; and

 

   

problems may arise in entering new markets in which we have little or no experience.

 

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Uncertainty about the effect of the Aligned Acquisition on employees, customers and suppliers may expose us to financial, executional and operational risks. These uncertainties may impair our ability to attract, retain and motivate key personnel and could cause our customers, suppliers and other business partners to delay or defer certain business decisions or to seek to change existing business relationships with us. The occurrence of any of these events could have a material adverse effect on our operating results.

We may pursue acquisitions and other strategic transactions to complement or expand our business that may not be successful, and we may lose up to the entire value of our investment in these acquisitions and transactions.

Our future success may depend on opportunities to buy other businesses or technologies that could complement, enhance or expand our current business or products or that might otherwise offer us growth opportunities. To pursue this strategy successfully, we must identify attractive acquisition or investment opportunities and successfully complete transactions, some of which may be large and complex. We may not be able to identify or complete attractive acquisition or investment opportunities due to, among other things, the intense competition for these transactions. If we are not able to identify and complete such acquisition or investment opportunities, our future results of operations and financial condition may be adversely affected.

We may be unable to obtain in the anticipated timeframe, or at all, any regulatory approvals required to complete proposed acquisitions and other strategic transactions. Furthermore, the conditions imposed for obtaining any necessary approvals could delay the completion of such transactions for a significant period of time or prevent them from occurring at all. We may not be able to complete such transactions and such transactions, if executed, pose significant risks and could have a negative effect on our operations. Any transactions that we are able to identify and complete may involve a number of risks, including:

 

   

the diversion of our management’s attention from our existing business to integrate the operations and personnel of the acquired or combined business or joint venture;

 

   

the possible adverse effects on our operating results during the integration process;

 

   

a high degree of risk inherent in these transactions, which could become substantial over time, and higher exposure to significant financial losses if the underlying ventures are not successful;

 

   

our possible inability to achieve the intended objectives of the transaction; and

 

   

the risks associated with complying with regulations applicable to the acquired business, which may cause us to incur substantial expenses.

In addition, we may not be able to successfully or profitably integrate, operate, maintain and manage our newly acquired operations or employees. We may not be able to maintain uniform standards, controls, procedures and policies, and this may lead to operational inefficiencies. In addition, the integration process may strain our financial and managerial controls and reporting systems and procedures.

New acquisitions, joint ventures and other transactions may require the commitment of significant capital that would otherwise be directed to investments in our existing business. To pursue acquisitions and other strategic transactions, we may need to raise additional capital in the future, which may not be available on acceptable terms or at all. In addition to committing capital to complete the acquisitions, substantial capital may be required to operate the acquired businesses following their acquisition. These acquisitions may result in significant financial losses if the intended objectives of the transactions are not achieved.

Economic uncertainties or downturns in the general economy or the industries in which our clients operate could disproportionately affect the demand for our solution and negatively impact our results of operations.

General worldwide economic conditions have experienced significant downturns during the last ten years, and market volatility and uncertainty remain widespread, making it potentially very difficult for our clients and

 

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us to accurately forecast and plan future business activities. During challenging economic times, our clients may have difficulty gaining timely access to sufficient credit or obtaining credit on reasonable terms, which could impair their ability to make timely payments to us and adversely affect our revenue. If that were to occur, our financial results could be harmed. Further, challenging economic conditions may impair the ability of our clients to pay for the software-based products and services they already have purchased from us and, as a result, our write-offs of accounts receivable could increase. We cannot predict the timing, strength or duration of any economic slowdown or recovery. If the condition of the general economy or markets in which we operate worsens, our business could be harmed.

We may enter into collaborations, in-licensing arrangements, joint ventures, strategic alliances or partnerships with third-parties that may not result in the development of commercially viable solutions or the generation of significant future revenues.

In the ordinary course of our business, we may enter into collaborations, in-licensing arrangements, joint ventures, strategic alliances, partnerships or other arrangements to develop products and to pursue new markets. Proposing, negotiating and implementing collaborations, in-licensing arrangements, joint ventures, strategic alliances or partnerships may be a lengthy and complex process. Other companies, including those with substantially greater financial, marketing, sales, technology or other business resources, may compete with us for these opportunities or arrangements. We may not identify, secure, or complete any such transactions or arrangements in a timely manner, on a cost-effective basis, on acceptable terms or at all. We have limited institutional knowledge and experience with respect to these business development activities, and we may also not realize the anticipated benefits of any such transaction or arrangement. In particular, these collaborations may not result in the development of products that achieve commercial success or result in significant revenues and could be terminated prior to developing any products. Additionally, we may not own, or may jointly own with a third party, the intellectual property rights in products and other works developed under our collaborations, joint ventures, strategic alliances or partnerships.

Additionally, we may not be in a position to exercise sole decision making authority regarding the transaction or arrangement, which could create the potential risk of creating impasses on decisions, and our future collaborators may have economic or business interests or goals that are, or that may become, inconsistent with our business interests or goals. It is possible that conflicts may arise with our collaborators, such as conflicts concerning the achievement of performance milestones, or the interpretation of significant terms under any agreement, such as those related to financial obligations or the ownership or control of intellectual property developed during the collaboration. If any conflicts arise with any future collaborators, they may act in their self-interest, which may be adverse to our best interest, and they may breach their obligations to us. In addition, we may have limited control over the amount and timing of resources that any future collaborators devote to our or their future products. Disputes between us and our collaborators may result in litigation or arbitration which would increase our expenses and divert the attention of our management. Further, these transactions and arrangements will be contractual in nature and will generally be terminable under the terms of the applicable agreements and, in such event, we may not continue to have rights to the products relating to such transaction or arrangement or may need to purchase such rights at a premium.

We are currently party to, and may enter into future, in-bound intellectual property license agreements. We may not be able to fully protect the intellectual property rights licensed to us or maintain those licenses. Our licensors may retain the right to prosecute and defend the intellectual property rights licensed to us, in which case we would depend on the ability of our licensors to obtain, maintain and enforce intellectual property protection for the licensed intellectual property. These licensors may determine not to pursue litigation against other companies or may pursue such litigation less aggressively than we would. In addition, such licenses may only provide us with non-exclusive rights, which could allow other third parties, including our competitors, to utilize the licensed intellectual property rights. Further, our in-bound license agreements may impose various diligence, commercialization, royalty or other obligations on us. Our licensors may allege that we have breached our license agreement with them, and accordingly seek to terminate our license, which could adversely affect our competitive business position and harm our business prospects.

 

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The estimates of market opportunity and forecasts of market growth included in this prospectus may prove to be inaccurate, and even if the market in which we compete achieves the forecasted growth, our business could fail to grow at similar rates, if at all.

Market opportunity estimates and growth forecasts are subject to significant uncertainty and are based on assumptions and estimates that may not prove to be accurate. The estimates and forecasts in this prospectus relating to the size and expected growth of the telehealth market may prove to be inaccurate. Even if the market in which we compete meets our size estimates and forecasted growth, our business could fail to grow at similar rates, if at all.

Natural or man-made disasters and other similar events may significantly disrupt our business and negatively impact our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our offices may be harmed or rendered inoperable by natural or man-made disasters, including earthquakes, power outages, fires, floods, nuclear disasters and acts of terrorism or other criminal activities, which may render it difficult or impossible for us to operate our business for some period of time. Although we have disaster recovery plans in place, such plans may not be adequate in a disaster situation. Any disruptions in our operations related to the repair or replacement of our offices, could negatively impact our business and results of operations and harm our reputation. Although we maintain an insurance policy covering damage to property we rent, such insurance may not be sufficient to compensate for losses that may occur. Any such losses or damages could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, our clients’ facilities may be harmed or rendered inoperable by such natural or man-made disasters, which may cause disruptions, difficulties or material adverse effects on our business.

With respect to our international operations, we face political, legal and compliance, operational, regulatory, economic and other risks that we do not face or that are more significant than in our domestic operations.

With respect to our international operations, we face political, legal and compliance, operational, regulatory, economic and other risks that we do not face or that are more significant than in our domestic operations. These risks vary widely by country and include varying regional and geopolitical business conditions and demands, government intervention and censorship, discriminatory regulation, nationalization or expropriation of assets and pricing constraints. Our international products need to meet country-specific client and member preferences as well as country-specific legal requirements, including those related to licensing, privacy, data storage, location, protection and security. We have offices in the United States and Israel and a client in Israel.

Our international operations require us to overcome logistical and other challenges based on differing languages, cultures, legal and regulatory schemes and time zones. Our international operations encounter labor laws, customs and employee relationships that can be difficult, less flexible than in our domestic operations and expensive to modify or terminate. In some countries we are required to, or choose to, operate with local business partners, which requires us to manage our partner relationships and may reduce our operational flexibility and ability to quickly respond to business challenges.

Our international operations are subject to particular risks in addition to those faced by our domestic operations, including:

 

   

the need to localize and adapt our solution for specific countries, including translation into foreign languages and associated expenses;

 

   

potential loss of proprietary information due to misappropriation or laws that may be less protective of our intellectual property rights than U.S. laws or that may not be adequately enforced;

 

   

requirements of foreign laws and other governmental controls, including cross-border compliance challenges related to the complexity of multiple, conflicting and changing governmental laws and regulations, including employment, healthcare, tax, privacy and data protection laws and regulations;

 

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data privacy laws that require that client data be stored and processed in a designated territory;

 

   

new and different sources of competition and laws and business practices favoring local competitors;

 

   

local business and cultural factors that differ from our normal standards and practices, including business practices that we are prohibited from engaging in by the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act of 1977 (“FCPA”) and other anti-corruption laws and regulations;

 

   

changes to economic sanctions laws and regulations;

 

   

central bank and other restrictions on our ability to repatriate cash from international subsidiaries;

 

   

adverse tax consequences;

 

   

fluctuations in currency exchange rates, economic instability and inflationary conditions, which could make our solution more expensive or increase our costs of doing business in certain countries;

 

   

limitations on future growth or inability to maintain current levels of revenues from international sales if we do not invest sufficiently in our international operations;

 

   

different pricing environments, longer sales cycles and longer accounts receivable payment cycles and collections issues;

 

   

difficulties in staffing, managing and operating our international operations, including difficulties related to administering our stock plans in some foreign countries and increased financial accounting and reporting requirements and complexities;

 

   

difficulties in coordinating the activities of our geographically dispersed and culturally diverse operations; and

 

   

political unrest, war, terrorism or regional natural disasters, particularly in areas in which we have facilities.

Our overall success in international markets depends, in part, on our ability to anticipate and effectively manage these risks and there can be no assurance that we will be able to do so without incurring unexpected costs. If we are not able to manage the risks related to our international operations, our business, financial condition and results of operations may be materially adversely affected.

Our failure to comply with the anti-corruption, trade compliance and economic sanctions laws and regulations of the United States and applicable international jurisdictions could materially adversely affect our reputation and results of operations.

We must comply with anti-corruption laws and regulations imposed by governments around the world with jurisdiction over our operations, which may include the FCPA in the United States, as well as the laws of the countries where we do business. These laws and regulations apply to companies, individual directors, officers, employees and agents, and may restrict our operations, trade practices, investment decisions and partnering activities. Where they apply, the FCPA and the U.K. Bribery Act of 2010 (the “UK Bribery Act”) prohibit us and our officers, directors, employees and business partners acting on our behalf, including joint venture partners and agents, from corruptly offering, promising, authorizing or providing anything of value to public officials for the purposes of influencing official decisions or obtaining or retaining business or otherwise obtaining favorable treatment. As part of our business, we may deal with governments and state-owned business enterprises, the employees and representatives of which may be considered public officials for purposes of the FCPA.

We also are subject to the jurisdiction of various governments and regulatory agencies around the world, which may bring our personnel and agents into contact with public officials responsible for issuing or renewing permits, licenses or approvals or for enforcing other governmental regulations. In addition, some of the international locations in which we will operate lack a developed legal system and have elevated levels of

 

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corruption. Our business also must be conducted in compliance with applicable export controls and trade and economic sanctions laws and regulations, including those of the U.S. government, the governments of other countries in which we will operate or conduct business and various multilateral organizations. Such laws and regulations include, without limitation, those administered and enforced by the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”), the U.S. Department of State, the U.S. Department of Commerce, the United Nations Security Council and other relevant sanctions authorities. Our provision of services to persons located outside the United States may be subject to certain regulatory prohibitions, restrictions or other requirements, including certain licensing or reporting requirements. Our provision of services outside of the United States exposes us to the risk of violating, or being accused of violating, anti-corruption, exports controls and trade compliance and economic sanctions laws and regulations. Our failure to successfully comply with these laws and regulations may expose us to reputational harm as well as significant sanctions, including criminal fines, imprisonment, civil penalties, disgorgement of profits, injunctions and suspension or debarment from government contracts, as well as other remedial measures. Investigations of alleged violations can be expensive and disruptive. Though we have implemented an anti-corruption policy as well as formal training and monitoring programs, we cannot assure compliance by our employees or representatives for which we may be held responsible, and any such violation could materially adversely affect our reputation, business, financial condition and results of operations.

Risks Related to Regulatory Environment

Our business could be adversely affected by legal challenges to our business model or by actions restricting our ability to provide the full range of our services in certain jurisdictions.

Our ability to conduct telehealth services in a particular jurisdiction is directly dependent upon the applicable laws governing remote care, the practice of medicine and healthcare delivery in general in such location, which are subject to changing political, regulatory and other influences. With respect to telehealth services, in the past, state medical boards have established new rules or interpreted existing rules in a manner that has limited or restricted our ability to conduct our business as it was conducted in other states. Some of these actions have resulted in the suspension or modification of our telehealth operations in certain states. However, the extent to which a jurisdiction considers particular actions or relationships to comply with the applicable standard of care is subject to change and to evolving interpretations by (in the case of U.S. states) medical boards and state attorneys general, among others, each with broad discretion. Accordingly, we must monitor our compliance with law in every jurisdiction in which we operate, on an ongoing basis, and we cannot provide assurance that our activities and arrangements, if challenged, will be found to be in compliance with the law. Although the COVID-19 pandemic has led to the relaxation of certain Medicare, Medicaid and state licensure restrictions on the delivery of telehealth services, it is uncertain how long the relaxed policies will remain in effect, and, there can be no guarantee that once the COVID-19 pandemic is over that such restrictions will not be reinstated or changed in a way that adversely affects our business.

Additionally, it is possible that the laws and rules governing the practice of medicine and the practice of pharmacy, including remote care, in one or more jurisdictions may change in a manner deleterious to our business. For instance, a few states have imposed different, and, in some cases, additional, standards regarding the provision of services via telehealth. Some states impose strict standards on using telehealth to prescribe certain classes of controlled substances that can be commonly used to treat behavioral health disorders. The unpredictability of this regulatory landscape means that sudden changes in policy regarding standards of care and reimbursement are possible. If a successful legal challenge or an adverse change in the relevant laws were to occur, and we or our affiliated medical group were unable to adapt our business model accordingly, our operations in the affected jurisdictions would be disrupted, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

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We are dependent on our relationships with affiliated professional entities, which we do not own, to provide physician services, and our business would be adversely affected if those relationships were disrupted.

There is a risk that authorities in some jurisdictions may find that our contractual relationships with AMG and AMG’s physicians providing telehealth violate laws prohibiting the corporate practice of medicine or fee-splitting. These laws generally prohibit the practice of medicine by or sharing of professional fees with lay persons or entities and are intended to prevent unlicensed persons or entities from interfering with or inappropriately influencing the physician’s professional judgment. Generally, we are prohibited from exercising control over the medical judgments or decisions of physicians or engaging in certain financial arrangements, such as splitting professional fees with physicians. The extent to which each state considers particular actions or contractual relationships to constitute improper influence of professional judgment varies across the states and is subject to change and to evolving interpretations by state boards of medicine and state attorneys general, among others. As such, we must monitor our compliance with laws in every jurisdiction in which we operate on an ongoing basis and we cannot guarantee that subsequent interpretation of the corporate practice of medicine laws will not circumscribe our business operations. The enforcement of state corporate practice of medicine doctrines may result in the imposition of penalties on physicians themselves for aiding the corporate practice of medicine, which could discourage physicians from participating in our network of providers.

The corporate practice of medicine prohibition exists in some form, by statute, regulation, board of medicine or attorney general guidance, or case law, in more than 40 states, all of which we operate in, though the broad variation between state application and enforcement of the doctrine makes an exact count difficult. Due to the prevalence of the corporate practice of medicine doctrine, including in the states where we predominantly conduct our business, we provide administrative and management services to entities associated with AMG pursuant to which those entities reserve exclusive control and responsibility for all aspects of the practice of medicine and the delivery of medical services. We do not own our AMG-affiliated entities. For example, Amwell Medical Group-affiliated entities are owned by Dr. Peter Antall, one of AMG’s medical providers, who also currently serves as our Chief Medical Officer, while Asana Medical Technologies is owned by Dr. Nitin Nanda, founder of Aligned Telehealth. We in turn contract with these entities through business support agreements and direct transfer agreements for the provision of health care services and the receipt of fees. For further discussion of this structure, see “Business—Physicians and Healthcare Professionals.” While we expect that these relationships will continue, we cannot guarantee that they will. A material change in our relationship with AMG, whether resulting from a dispute among the entities, a change in government regulation, or the loss of these affiliations, could impair our ability to provide services to our consumers and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

In addition, the arrangement in which we have entered to comply with state corporate practice of medicine doctrines could subject us to additional scrutiny by federal and state regulatory bodies regarding federal and state fraud and abuse laws. Any scrutiny, investigation, or litigation with regard to our arrangement with AMG could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations, particularly if we are unable to restructure our operations and arrangements to comply with applicable laws or we are required to restructure at a significant cost, or if we were subject to penalties or other adverse action.

Evolving government regulations may result in increased costs or adversely affect our results of operations.

In a regulatory climate that is uncertain, our operations may be subject to direct and indirect adoption, expansion or reinterpretation of various laws and regulations. Compliance with these future laws and regulations may require us to change our practices at an undeterminable and possibly significant initial monetary and recurring expense. These additional monetary expenditures may increase future overhead, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

 

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We have identified what we believe are the areas of government regulation that, if changed, would be costly to us. These include: rules governing the practice of medicine by physicians; laws relating to licensure requirements for physicians and other licensed health professionals; laws limiting the corporate practice of medicine and professional fee-splitting; laws governing the issuances of prescriptions in an online setting; cybersecurity and privacy laws; and laws and rules relating to the distinction between independent contractors and employees. There could be laws and regulations applicable to our business that we have not identified or that, if changed, may be costly to us, and we cannot predict all the ways in which implementation of such laws and regulations may affect us.

In the jurisdictions in which we operate, even where we believe we are in compliance with all applicable laws, due to the uncertain regulatory environment, certain jurisdictions may determine that we are in violation of their laws. In the event that we must remedy such violations, we may be required to modify our services and products in a manner that undermines our solution’s attractiveness to our clients, consumers or providers or experts, we may become subject to fines or other penalties or, if we determine that the requirements to operate in compliance in such jurisdictions are overly burdensome, we may elect to terminate our operations in such places. In each case, our revenue may decline and our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected.

Additionally, the introduction of new services may require us to comply with additional, yet undetermined, laws and regulations. Compliance may require obtaining appropriate licenses or certificates, increasing our security measures and expending additional resources to monitor developments in applicable rules and ensure compliance. The failure to adequately comply with these future laws and regulations may delay or possibly prevent some of our products or services from being offered to clients, or their members and patients, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We conduct business in a heavily regulated industry and if we fail to comply with these laws and government regulations, we could incur penalties or be required to make significant changes to our operations or experience adverse publicity, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

The U.S. healthcare industry is heavily regulated and closely scrutinized by federal and state governments. Comprehensive statutes and regulations govern the manner in which we provide and bill for services and collect reimbursement from governmental programs and private payers, our contractual relationships with AMG and its corresponding relationship with its providers, vendors and clients, our marketing activities and other aspects of our operations. Of particular importance are:

 

   

the federal physician self-referral law, commonly referred to as the Stark Law, that, unless one of the statutory or regulatory exceptions apply, prohibits physicians from referring Medicare or Medicaid patients to an entity for the provision of certain “designated health services” if the physician or a member of such physician’s immediate family has a direct or indirect financial relationship (including an ownership interest or a compensation arrangement) with the entity, and prohibit the entity from billing Medicare or Medicaid for such designated health services. Sanctions for violating the Stark Law include denial of payment, civil monetary penalties of up to $25,820 per claim submitted and exclusion from the federal health care programs. Failure to refund amounts received as a result of a prohibited referral on a timely basis may constitute a false or fraudulent claim and may result in civil penalties and additional penalties under the FCA. The statute also provides for a penalty of up to $172,137 for a circumvention scheme;

 

   

the federal Anti-Kickback Statute that prohibits the knowing and willful offer, payment, solicitation or receipt of any bribe, kickback, rebate or other remuneration for referring an individual, in return for ordering, leasing, purchasing or recommending or arranging for or to induce the referral of an individual or the ordering, purchasing or leasing of items or services covered, in whole or in part, by any federal healthcare program, such as Medicare and Medicaid. Remuneration has been interpreted broadly to be anything of value, and could include compensation, discounts, or free marketing services.

 

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A person or entity does not need to have actual knowledge of the statute or specific intent to violate it to have committed a violation. In addition, the government may assert that a claim including items or services resulting from a violation of the federal Anti-Kickback Statute constitutes a false or fraudulent claim for purposes of the False Claims Act. Violations of the federal Anti-Kickback Statute may result in civil monetary penalties up to $104,330 for each violation, plus up to three times the remuneration involved. Civil penalties for such conduct can further be assessed under the federal False Claims Act. Violations can also result in criminal penalties, including criminal fines of up to $100,000 and imprisonment of up to 10 years. Similarly, violations can result in exclusion from participation in government healthcare programs, including Medicare and Medicaid;

 

   

the criminal healthcare fraud provisions of the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, as amended by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (“HITECH”), and their implementing regulations, which we collectively refer to as HIPAA, and related rules that prohibit knowingly and willfully executing a scheme or artifice to defraud any healthcare benefit program or falsifying, concealing or covering up a material fact or making any material false, fictitious or fraudulent statement in connection with the delivery of or payment for healthcare benefits, items or services. Similar to the federal Anti-Kickback Statute, a person or entity does not need to have actual knowledge of the statute or specific intent to violate it to have committed a violation;

 

   

HIPAA, which also imposes certain regulatory and contractual requirements regarding the privacy, security and transmission of PHI;

 

   

the federal False Claims Act that imposes civil and criminal liability on individuals or entities that knowingly submit false or fraudulent claims for payment to the government or knowingly making, or causing to be made, a false statement in order to have a false claim paid, including qui tam or whistleblower suits;

 

   

the federal Civil Monetary Law prohibits, among other things, the offering or transfer of remuneration to a Medicare or state healthcare program beneficiary if the person knows or should know it is likely to influence the beneficiary’s selection of a particular provider, practitioner, or supplier of services reimbursable by Medicare or a state healthcare program, unless an exception applies;

 

   

reassignment of payment rules that prohibit certain types of billing and collection practices in connection with claims payable by the Medicare or Medicaid programs;

 

   

similar state law provisions pertaining to Anti-Kickback, self-referral and false claims issues, some of which may apply to items or services reimbursed by any third party payer, including commercial insurers or services paid out-of-pocket by patients;

 

   

state laws that prohibit general business corporations, such as us, from practicing medicine, controlling physicians’ medical decisions or engaging in some practices such as splitting fees with physicians;

 

   

the Federal Trade Commission Act and federal and state consumer protection, advertisement and unfair competition laws, which broadly regulate marketplace activities and activities that could potentially harm consumers;

 

   

laws that regulate debt collection practices as applied to our debt collection practices;

 

   

a provision of the Social Security Act that imposes criminal penalties on healthcare providers who fail to disclose or refund known overpayments;

 

   

federal and state laws that prohibit providers from billing and receiving payment from Medicare and Medicaid for services unless the services are medically necessary, adequately and accurately documented, and billed using codes that accurately reflect the type and level of services rendered; and

 

   

federal and state laws and policies that require healthcare providers to maintain licensure, certification or accreditation to provide physician and other professional services, to enroll and participate in the Medicare and Medicaid programs, to report certain changes in their operations to the agencies that administer these programs, as well as state insurance laws.

 

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Because of the breadth of these laws and the need to fit certain activities within one of the statutory exceptions and safe harbors available, it is possible that some of our business activities could be subject to challenge under one or more of such laws. Achieving and sustaining compliance with these laws may prove costly. Failure to comply with these laws and other laws can result in civil and criminal penalties such as fines, damages, overpayment recoupment, loss of enrollment status and exclusion from the Medicare and Medicaid programs. The risk of our being found in violation of these laws and regulations is increased by the fact that many of them have not been fully interpreted by the regulatory authorities or the courts, and their provisions are sometimes open to a variety of interpretations. Our failure to accurately anticipate the application of these laws and regulations to our business or any other failure to comply with regulatory requirements could create liability for us and negatively affect our business. Any action against us for violation of these laws or regulations, even if we successfully defend against it, could cause us to incur significant legal expenses, divert our management’s attention from the operation of our business and result in adverse publicity.

To enforce compliance with the federal laws, the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General (“OIG”), have continued their scrutiny of healthcare providers, which has led to a number of investigations, prosecutions, convictions and settlements in the healthcare industry. Dealing with investigations can be time- and resource-consuming and can divert management’s attention from the business. Any such investigation or settlement could increase our costs or otherwise have an adverse effect on our business. In addition, because of the potential for large monetary exposure under the federal False Claims Act, which provides for treble damages and mandatory minimum penalties of $11,665 to $23,331 per false claim or statement, healthcare providers often resolve allegations without admissions of liability for significant and material amounts to avoid the uncertainty of treble damages that may be awarded in litigation proceedings. Such settlements often contain additional compliance and reporting requirements as part of a consent decree, settlement agreement or corporate integrity agreement. Given the significant size of actual and potential settlements, it is expected that the government will continue to devote substantial resources to investigating healthcare providers’ compliance with the healthcare reimbursement rules and fraud and abuse laws.

Our ability to conduct telehealth services internationally is subject to the applicable laws governing remote care and the practice of medicine in such location, and the interpretation of these laws is evolving and varies significantly from country to county and are enforced by governmental, judicial and regulatory authorities with broad discretion. We cannot be certain that our interpretation of such laws and regulations are correct in how we structure our operations, our arrangements with physicians, services agreements and customer arrangements.

The laws, regulations and standards governing the provision of healthcare services may change significantly in the future. We cannot assure you that any new or changed healthcare laws, regulations or standards will not materially adversely affect our business. We cannot assure you that a review of our business by judicial, law enforcement, regulatory or accreditation authorities will not result in a determination that could adversely affect our operations.

Our use and disclosure of personally identifiable information, including PHI, personal data, and other health information, is subject to state, federal and foreign privacy and security regulations, and our failure to comply with those regulations or to adequately secure the information we hold could result in significant liability or reputational harm and, in turn, a material adverse effect on our client base, member and patient bases and revenue.

The privacy and security of personally identifiable information (“PII”) stored, maintained, received or transmitted electronically is a major issue in the United States and abroad. While we strive to comply with all applicable privacy and security laws and regulations, as well as our own posted privacy policies, legal standards for privacy, including but not limited to ‘‘unfairness’’ and ‘‘deception,’’ as enforced by the FTC and state attorneys general, continue to evolve and any failure or perceived failure to comply may result in proceedings or actions against us by government entities or others, or could cause us to lose customers, which could have a

 

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material adverse effect on our business. Recently, there has been an increase in public awareness of privacy issues in the wake of revelations about the activities of various government agencies and in the number of private privacy-related lawsuits filed against companies. Any allegations about our practices with regard to the collection, use, disclosure, or security of personally identifiable information or other privacy-related matters, even if unfounded and even if we are in compliance with applicable laws, could damage our reputation and harm our business.

For example, we send short message service, or SMS, text messages to potential end users who are eligible to use our service through certain customers and partners. While we obtain consent from or on behalf of these individuals to send text messages, federal or state regulatory authorities or private litigants may claim that the notices and disclosures we provide, form of consents we obtain or our SMS texting practices, are not adequate. These SMS texting campaigns are potential sources of risk for class action lawsuits and liability for our company. Numerous class-actions suits under federal and state laws have been filed in the past year against companies who conduct SMS texting programs, with many resulting in multi-million-dollar settlements to the plaintiffs. Any future such litigation against us could be costly and time-consuming to defend.

We also publish statements to our customers and clients that describe how we handle and protect personal information. If federal or state regulatory authorities or private litigants consider any portion of these statements to be untrue, we may be subject to claims of deceptive practices, which could lead to significant liabilities and consequences, including, without limitation, costs of responding to investigations, defending against litigation, settling claims and complying with regulatory or court orders

Numerous foreign, federal and state laws and regulations govern collection, dissemination, use and confidentiality of personally identifiable health information, including (i) state privacy and confidentiality laws (including state laws requiring disclosure of breaches); (ii) HIPAA; and (iii) European and other foreign data protection laws.

HIPAA establishes a set of basic national privacy and security standards for the protection of PHI, by health plans, healthcare clearinghouses and certain healthcare providers, referred to as covered entities, and the business associates with whom such covered entities contract for services, which includes us. We are considered a business associate under HIPAA; AMG is considered a covered entity.

HIPAA requires healthcare entities like us to develop and maintain policies and procedures with respect to PHI that is used or disclosed, including the adoption of administrative, physical and technical safeguards to protect such information. HIPAA also implemented the use of standard transaction code sets and standard identifiers that covered entities must use when submitting or receiving certain electronic healthcare transactions, including activities associated with the billing and collection of healthcare claims.

HIPAA imposes mandatory penalties for certain violations. Penalties for violations of HIPAA and its implementing regulations include civil monetary penalties of up to $59,522 per violation, not to exceed approximately $1.8 million for violations of the same standard in a single calendar year (as of 2020, and subject to periodic adjustments for inflation). However, a single breach incident can result in violations of multiple standards, which could result in significant fines. A person who knowingly obtains or discloses individually identifiable health information in violation of HIPAA may face a criminal penalty of up to $50,000 and up to one-year of imprisonment. The criminal penalties increase if the wrongful conduct involves false pretenses or the intent to sell, transfer, or use identifiable health information for commercial advantage, personal gain, or malicious harm. HIPAA also authorizes state attorneys general to file suit on behalf of their residents. While HIPAA does not create a private right of action allowing individuals to sue us in civil court for violations of HIPAA, its standards have been used as the basis for duty of care in state civil suits such as those for negligence or recklessness in the misuse or breach of PHI. Any such penalties or lawsuits could harm our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

 

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In addition, HIPAA mandates that the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) conduct periodic compliance audits of HIPAA covered entities or business associates for compliance with the HIPAA Privacy and Security Standards. It also tasks HHS with establishing a methodology whereby harmed individuals who were the victims of breaches of unsecured PHI may receive a percentage of the Civil Monetary Penalty fine paid by the violator.

HIPAA further requires that patients be notified of any unauthorized acquisition, access, use or disclosure of their unsecured PHI that compromises the privacy or security of such information, with certain exceptions related to unintentional or inadvertent use or disclosure by employees or authorized individuals. HIPAA specifies that such notifications must be made “without unreasonable delay and in no case later than 60 calendar days after discovery of the breach.” If a breach affects 500 patients or more, it must be reported to HHS without unreasonable delay, and HHS will post the name of the breaching entity on its public web site. Breaches affecting 500 patients or more in the same state or jurisdiction must also be reported to the local media. If a breach involves fewer than 500 people, the covered entity must record it in a log and notify HHS at least annually.

Further, the U.S. federal government and various states and governmental agencies have adopted or are considering adopting various laws, regulations and standards regarding the collection, use, retention, security, disclosure, transfer and other processing of sensitive and personal information. For example, California implemented the California Confidentiality of Medical Information Act, that imposes restrictive requirements regulating the use and disclosure of health information and other personally identifiable information. These laws and regulations are not necessarily preempted by HIPAA, particularly if a state affords greater protection to individuals than HIPAA. Where state laws are more protective, we have to comply with the stricter provisions. In addition to fines and penalties imposed upon violators, some of these state laws also afford private rights of action to individuals who believe their personal information has been misused. California has also implemented the California Consumer Privacy Act, or CCPA, which came into effect on January 1, 2020 and, which increases privacy rights for California residents and imposes obligations on companies that process their personal information. Among other things, the CCPA requires covered companies to provide new disclosures to California consumers and provide such consumers new data protection and privacy rights, including the ability to opt-out of certain sales of personal information. The CCPA provides for civil penalties for violations, as well as a private right of action for certain data breaches that result in the loss of personal information. This private right of action may increase the likelihood of, and risks associated with, data breach litigation. The CCPA has been amended from time to time, and it is possible that further amendments will be enacted, but even in its current format remains unclear how various provisions of the CCPA will be interpreted and enforced.

There are many other state-based data privacy and security laws and regulations that may impact our business. All of these evolving compliance and operational requirements impose significant costs that are likely to increase over time, may require us to modify our data processing practices and policies, divert resources from other initiatives and projects and could restrict the way services involving data are offered, all of which may adversely affect our results of operations. Certain state laws may be more stringent or broader in scope, or offer greater individual rights, with respect to sensitive and personal information than federal, international or other state laws, and such laws may differ from each other, which may complicate compliance efforts. State laws are changing rapidly and there is discussion in Congress of a new federal data protection and privacy law to which we may be subject.

The interplay of federal and state laws may be subject to varying interpretations by courts and government agencies, creating complex compliance issues for us and our clients and potentially exposing us to additional expense, adverse publicity and liability. Further, as regulatory focus on privacy issues continues to increase and laws and regulations concerning the protection of personal information expand and become more complex, these potential risks to our business could intensify. Changes in laws or regulations associated with the enhanced protection of certain types of sensitive data, such as PHI or PII, along with increased customer demands for enhanced data security infrastructure, could greatly increase our cost of providing our services, decrease demand for our services, reduce our revenue and/or subject us to additional liabilities.

 

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There are numerous foreign laws, regulations and directives regarding privacy and the collection, storage, transmission, use, processing, disclosure and protection of PII and other personal or customer data, the scope of which is continually evolving and subject to differing interpretations. If we provide telehealth services outside the United States, we must comply with such laws, regulations and directives and we may be subject to significant consequences, including penalties and fines, for our failure to comply. For example, the European Commission has enacted the General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”), that became effective in May 2018 for controllers and processors of personal data, which imposes more stringent data protection requirements and provides for severe penalties for breach, which could be imposed directly in connection with future European operations. Failure to comply with the requirements of GDPR and the applicable national data protection laws of the EU and European Economic Area (“EEA”) member states may result in fines of up to €20,000,000 or up to 4% of the total worldwide annual turnover of the preceding financial year, whichever is higher, and other administrative penalties. To comply with the GDPR we may be required to put in place additional mechanisms ensuring compliance. European data protection law also imposes strict rules on the transfer of personal data out of the EEA to the United States. These obligations may be interpreted and applied in a manner that is inconsistent from one jurisdiction to another and may conflict with other requirements or our practices. Moreover, following the United Kingdom’s (“UK”) withdrawal from the EU, we have to comply with the GDPR and separately the GDPR as implemented in the UK, each regime having the ability to fine up to the greater of €20 million (£17 million) or 4% of global turnover. The relationship between the UK and the EU in relation to certain aspects of data protection law remains unclear, e.g. how data transfers between EU member states and the UK will be treated. These changes may lead to additional compliance costs and could increase our overall risk. Furthermore, any failure, or perceived failure, by us to comply with or make effective modifications to our policies, or to comply with any federal, state, or international privacy, data-retention or data-protection-related laws, regulations, orders or industry self-regulatory principles could result in proceedings or actions against us by governmental entities or others, a loss of customer confidence, damage to our brand and reputation, and a loss of customers, any of which could have an adverse effect on our business.

Because of the breadth of these laws and the narrowness of their exceptions and safe harbors, it is possible that our business activities can be subject to challenge under one or more of such laws. The scope and enforcement of each of these laws is uncertain and subject to rapid change in the current environment of healthcare reform. Federal, state and foreign enforcement bodies have recently increased their scrutiny of interactions between healthcare companies and healthcare providers, which has led to a number of investigations, prosecutions, convictions and settlements in the healthcare industry. Any such investigations, prosecutions, convictions or settlements could result in significant financial penalties, damage to our brand and reputation, and a loss of customers, any of which could have an adverse effect on our business.

State, federal and foreign privacy and security laws and regulations are constantly evolving and our failure to comply with such changes could result in significant liability or reputational harm and, in turn, a material adverse effect on our client base, patient and members bases and revenue.

Various federal, state and foreign legislative or regulatory bodies may enact new or additional laws and regulations concerning privacy, data-retention and data-protection issues, including laws or regulations mandating disclosure to domestic or international law enforcement bodies, which could adversely impact our business, our brand or our reputation with customers. For example, some countries have adopted laws mandating that PII regarding customers in their country be maintained solely in their country. Having to maintain local data centers and redesign product, service and business operations to limit PII processing to within individual countries could increase our operating costs significantly.

In addition, any significant change to applicable laws, regulations or industry practices regarding the collection, use, retention, security or disclosure of our users’ content, or regarding the manner in which the express or implied consent of users for the collection, use, retention or disclosure of such content is obtained, could increase our costs and require us to modify our services and features, possibly in a material manner, which we may be unable to complete and may limit our ability to store and process user data or develop new services

 

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and features. Any of the foregoing could harm our competitive position, business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Security breaches, loss of data and other disruptions could compromise sensitive information related to our business or prevent us from accessing critical information and expose us to liability, which could adversely affect our business and our reputation.

Because of the extreme sensitivity of the PII and PHI we store and transmit, the security features of our technology platform are very important. If our security measures, some of which are managed by third parties, are breached or fail, unauthorized persons may be able to obtain access to sensitive client and member data, including PHI. As a result, our reputation could be severely damaged, adversely affecting client and member confidence. Consumers may curtail their use of or stop using our services or our client base could decrease, which would cause our business to suffer. In addition, we could face litigation, damages for contract breach, penalties and regulatory actions for violation of HIPAA and other applicable laws or regulations and significant costs for remediation, notification to individuals and for measures to prevent future occurrences. Any potential security breach could also result in increased costs associated with liability for stolen assets or information, repairing system damage that may have been caused by such breaches, incentives offered to clients or other business partners in an effort to maintain our business relationships after a breach and implementing measures to prevent future occurrences, including organizational changes, deploying additional personnel and protection technologies, training employees and engaging third-party experts and consultants. While we maintain insurance covering certain security and privacy damages and claim expenses, we may not carry insurance or maintain coverage sufficient to compensate for all liability and in any event, insurance coverage would not address the reputational damage that could result from a security incident.

We outsource important aspects of the storage and transmission of client and member information, and thus rely on third parties to manage functions that have material cyber-security risks. We attempt to address these risks by requiring outsourcing subcontractors who handle client and member information to sign agreements contractually requiring those subcontractors to adequately safeguard PII and PHI to the same extent that applies to us and in some cases by requiring such outsourcing subcontractors to undergo third-party security examinations. In addition, we periodically hire third-party security experts to assess and test our security posture. However, we cannot assure you that these contractual measures and other safeguards will adequately protect us from the risks associated with the storage and transmission of client and consumers’ proprietary and protected health information.

Due to applicable laws and regulations or contractual obligations, we may be held responsible for any information security failure or cyber-attack attributed to our vendors as they relate to the information we share with them. In addition, because we do not control our vendors and our ability to monitor their data security is limited, we cannot ensure the security measures they take will be sufficient to protect confidential, proprietary, or sensitive data, including personal data. We are at risk of a cyber-attack involving a vendor or other third party, which could result in a breakdown of such third party’s data protection processes or the cyber-attackers gaining access to our information systems or data through the third party. Regardless of whether an actual or perceived cyber-attack is attributable to us or our vendors, such an incident could, among other things, result in improper disclosure of information, harm our reputation and brand, reduce the demand for our products and services, lead to loss of client confidence in the effectiveness of our security measures, disrupt normal business operations or result in our systems or products and services being unavailable. In addition, it may require us to spend material resources to investigate or correct the breach and to prevent future security breaches and incidents, expose us to uninsured liability, increase our risk of regulatory scrutiny, expose us to legal liabilities, including litigation, regulatory enforcement, indemnity obligations or damages for contract breach, divert the attention of management from the operation of our business and cause us to incur significant costs, any of which could affect our financial condition, operating results and our reputation. Moreover, there could be public announcements regarding any such incidents and any steps we take to respond to or remediate such incidents, and if securities analysts or investors perceive these announcements to be negative, it could, among other things, have a

 

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substantial adverse effect on the price of our Class A common stock. In addition, our remediation efforts may not be successful and any failure related to these activities could result in significant liability and/or have a material adverse effect on our business, reputation and financial condition.

Risks Related to this Offering and Ownership of Our Class A Common Stock

The multiple class structure of our common stock and the ownership of Class B common stock by our Founders will have the effect of concentrating voting control with our Founders for the foreseeable future, which will limit or preclude your ability to influence corporate matters.

For so long as any shares of our Class B common stock remain outstanding, our Founders will at all times hold at least 51% of the voting power of the voting stock of the Company. As a result, our Founders, as the holders of Class B common stock, collectively will continue to control a majority of the total combined voting power of our outstanding common stock and therefore be able to control all matters submitted to our stockholders for approval, including elections for directors, mergers or acquisitions, asset sales and other significant transactions, so long as the Class B common stock remain outstanding. Even in the event that one of our Founders converts all or a portion of his shares of Class B common stock into shares of Class A common stock, the Class B common stock held by one or both or our Founders outstanding after such conversion would still be entitled to 51% of the voting power of the voting stock of the Company for so long as any Class B shares remain outstanding, subject to the conditions in our amended and restated certificate of incorporation, while the Founder who converted his shares into shares of Class A common stock, together with the Class C shares in the case of votes other than for directors, would dilute the relative voting power of existing holders of Class A common stock as his Class A common stock would be entitled to a pro rata portion of the 49% vote to which the Class A common shares, together with the Class C shares in the case of votes other than for directors, are entitled. In this circumstance, the Founders would be entitled to more than 51% of the voting power of our common stock. This concentrated control will limit your ability to influence corporate matters for the foreseeable future. For example, our Founders will be able to control the amendments of our amended and restated certificate of incorporation or by-laws, increases to the number of shares available for issuance under our equity incentive plans or adoption of new equity incentive plans and approval of any merger or sale of assets for the foreseeable future. This control may materially adversely affect the market price of our Class A common stock.

Additionally, the Founders, the holders of our Class B common stock may cause us to make strategic decisions or pursue acquisitions that could involve risks to you or which may not be aligned with your interests. The holders of our Class B common stock will also be entitled to a separate vote in the event we seek to amend our amended and restated certificate of incorporation in a manner that adversely affects the holders of our Class B common stock.

Finally, as noted above, any conversion of existing shares of Class B or Class C common stock would dilute the relative voting power of all holders of shares of Class A common stock. As of August 31, 2020, the Company had 35,505,881 shares of Class A common stock reserved for issuance upon conversion of Class B and Class C common stock. To the extent that the holders of Class B or Class C common stock convert their shares, your proportional vote out of the 49% vote to which the Class A shares (together with the Class C shares, in the case of votes other than for directors) are entitled while shares of Class B common stock remain outstanding will be diluted.

Our multiple class structure may depress the trading price or liquidity of our Class A common stock.

Our multiple class structure may result in a lower or more volatile market price of our Class A common stock or in adverse publicity or other adverse consequences. For example, certain index providers have announced restrictions on including companies with multiple class share structures in certain of their indexes. S&P Dow Jones and FTSE Russell have announced changes to their eligibility criteria for inclusion of shares of public companies on certain indices, including the S&P 500. These changes exclude companies with multiple classes of shares of common stock from being added to these indices. In addition, several stockholder advisory firms have announced their opposition to the use of dual or multiple class structures. As a result, the multiple class structure of our common stock may prevent the inclusion of our Class A common stock in these indices and may cause stockholder advisory firms to publish negative commentary about our corporate governance practices or otherwise seek to cause us to change our capital structure. Any such exclusion from indices could result in a less active trading market for our Class A common stock. Any actions or publications by stockholder advisory firms critical of our corporate governance practices or capital

 

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structure could also adversely affect the value of our Class A common stock. The difference in the voting rights of our Class A, Class B and Class C common stock could harm the value of our Class A common stock to the extent that any investor or potential future purchaser of our Class A common stock ascribes value to the right of holders of our Class B common stock to hold at all times 51% of our voting power. The existence of multiple classes of common stock could also result in less liquidity for our Class A common stock than if there were only one class of our common stock.

We will incur significantly increased costs and devote substantial management time as a result of operating as a public company.

As a public company, we will incur significant legal, accounting and other expenses that we do not incur as a private company. For example, we will be subject to the reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), and will be required to comply with the applicable requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, as well as rules and regulations of the SEC and NYSE, including the establishment and maintenance of effective disclosure and financial controls, changes in corporate governance practices and required filing of annual, quarterly and current reports with respect to our business and results of operations. We expect that compliance with these requirements will increase our legal and financial compliance costs and will make some activities more time-consuming and costly. In addition, we expect that our management and other personnel will need to divert attention from operational and other business matters to devote substantial time to these public company requirements. In particular, we expect to incur significant expenses and devote substantial management effort toward ensuring compliance with the requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, which will increase when we are no longer an emerging growth company. We are in the process of hiring additional accounting personnel and, as a public company, may need to hire additional accounting and financial staff with appropriate public company experience and technical accounting knowledge and may need to establish an internal audit function.

We also expect that operating as a public company will make it more expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance, and we may be required to accept reduced coverage or incur substantially higher costs to obtain coverage. This could also make it more difficult for us to attract and retain qualified people to serve on our board of directors, our board committees or as executive officers.

Provisions in our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and amended and restated by-laws and Delaware law could discourage, delay or prevent a change of control of our company and may affect the trading price of our Class A common stock.

Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and our amended and restated by-laws include a number of provisions that may discourage, delay or prevent a change in our management or control over us that stockholders may consider favorable. For example, prior to the consummation of this offering, our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and amended and restated by-laws will collectively:

 

   

authorize three classes of common stock with disparate voting power, the Class A common stock that will be offered and sold pursuant to this prospectus, the Class B common stock that will provide the holders thereof with the ability to control the outcome of matters requiring stockholder approval, even though such holders own significantly less than a majority of the shares of our outstanding Class A, Class B and Class C Common Stock, and the Class C common stock that will not have a vote on director elections;

 

   

authorize the issuance of “blank check” preferred stock that could be issued by our board of directors to prevent a takeover attempt;

 

   

authorize the classification of our Board of Directors into separate classes of directors to be elected on a staggered basis;

 

   

prohibit stockholders from calling special meetings of stockholders;

 

   

prohibit stockholder action by written consent, thereby requiring all actions to be taken at a duly called meeting of the stockholders;

 

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require the approval of holders of at least 75% of the total combined voting power of the outstanding shares of our common stock to amend our amended and restated by-laws and certain provisions of our amended and restated certificate of incorporation; and

 

   

provide for notice procedures that stockholders must comply with in order to nominate candidates to our board of directors or to propose matters to be acted upon at a stockholders’ meeting, which may discourage or deter a potential acquirer from conducting a solicitation of proxies to elect the acquirer’s own slate of directors or otherwise attempting to obtain control of us.

Moreover, because we are incorporated in Delaware, we are governed by the provisions of Section 203 of the General Corporation Law of the State of Delaware (the “DGCL”), which prohibits a person who owns in excess of 15% of our outstanding voting stock from merging or combining with us for a period of three years after the date of the transaction in which the person acquired in excess of 15% of our outstanding voting stock, unless the merger or combination is approved in a prescribed manner.

These provisions may prevent our stockholders from receiving the benefit from any premium to the market price of our Class A common stock offered by a bidder in a takeover context. Even in the absence of a takeover attempt, the existence of these provisions may adversely affect the prevailing market price of our Class A common stock if the provisions are viewed as discouraging takeover attempts in the future.

Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and amended and restated by-laws may also make it difficult for stockholders to replace or remove our management. Furthermore, the existence of the foregoing provisions, as well as the significant voting power that our Founders will hold following this offering, could limit the price that investors might be willing to pay in the future for shares of our Class A common stock. These provisions may facilitate management and board entrenchment that may delay, deter, render more difficult or prevent a change in our control, which may not be in the best interests of our stockholders.

We will be a “controlled company” within the meaning of NYSE rules and, as a result, we will qualify for, and intend to rely on, exemptions from certain corporate governance requirements. You will not have the same protections afforded to stockholders of companies that are subject to such requirements.

After the consummation of this offering, our Founders will hold 51% of the total combined voting power of our outstanding common stock. Accordingly, we will qualify as a “controlled company” within the meaning of NYSE corporate governance standards. Under NYSE rules, a company of which more than 50% of the voting power is held by an individual, group or another company is a “controlled company” and may elect not to comply with certain NYSE corporate governance standards, including:

 

   

the requirement that a majority of the members of our board of directors be independent directors; and

 

   

the requirement that our compensation committee and nominating and corporate governance committee be composed entirely of independent directors.

Following this offering, we intend to use these exemptions, although we expect that our compensation committee will be composed of independent directors. As a result, we will not have a majority of independent directors and our nominating and corporate governance committees will not consist entirely of independent directors. Consequently, you will not have the same protections afforded to stockholders of companies that are subject to all of NYSE corporate governance rules and requirements. Our status as a controlled company could make our Class A common stock less attractive to some investors or otherwise harm our stock price.

If you purchase shares of Class A common stock in this offering, you will suffer immediate dilution of your investment.

The initial public offering price of our Class A common stock will be substantially higher than the net tangible book value (deficit) per share of our common stock. Therefore, if you purchase shares of our Class A common stock in this offering, you will pay a price per share that substantially exceeds our net tangible book value per share after

 

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this offering. To the extent shares subsequently are issued under outstanding options, you will incur further dilution. Based on the initial public offering price of $18.00 per share, you will experience immediate dilution of $13.55 per share (or $13.31 per share if the underwriters exercise in full their option to purchase additional shares of common stock), representing the difference between our pro forma net tangible book value (deficit) per share as of June 30, 2020, after giving effect to this offering, and the initial public offering price.

An active trading market for our Class A common stock may not develop.

Prior to this offering, there has been no public market for our Class A common stock. The initial public offering price for our Class A common stock will be determined through negotiations with the underwriters. Although our Class A common stock has been approved for listing on NYSE, an active trading market for our Class A common stock may never develop or be sustained following this offering. If an active market for our Class A common stock does not develop, it may be difficult for you to sell the shares of our Class A common stock you purchase in this offering without depressing the market price for our Class A common stock or at all.

The provision of our amended and restated certificate of incorporation requiring exclusive forum in certain courts in the State of Delaware or the federal district courts of the United States for certain types of lawsuits may have the effect of discouraging lawsuits against our directors and officers.

Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation will require, to the fullest extent permitted by law, that (i) any derivative action or proceeding brought on our behalf, (ii) any action asserting a claim of breach of a fiduciary duty owed by any of our directors, officers or stockholders to us or our stockholders, (iii) any action asserting a claim against us arising pursuant to any provision of the DGCL or our amended and restated certificate of incorporation or our bylaws or (iv) any action asserting a claim against us governed by the internal affairs doctrine will have to be brought in a state court located within the state of Delaware (or if no state court of the State of Delaware has jurisdiction, the federal district court for the District of Delaware), in all cases subject to the court’s having personal jurisdiction over the indispensable parties named as defendants. The foregoing provision will not apply to claims arising under the Securities Act, the Exchange Act or other federal securities laws for which there is exclusive federal or concurrent federal and state jurisdiction

Additionally, unless we consent in writing to the selection of an alternative forum, the federal district courts of the United States of America shall be the exclusive forum for the resolution of any complaint asserting a cause of action arising under the Securities Act.

Although we believe these exclusive forum provisions benefit us by providing increased consistency in the application of Delaware law and federal securities laws in the types of lawsuits to which each applies, the exclusive forum provisions may limit a stockholder’s ability to bring a claim in a judicial forum that it finds favorable for disputes with us or any of our directors, officers or stockholders, which may discourage lawsuits with respect to such claims. Further, in the event a court finds either exclusive forum provision contained in our amended and restated certificate of incorporation to be unenforceable or inapplicable in an action, we may incur additional costs associated with resolving such action in other jurisdictions, which could harm our business, operating results and financial condition.

The price of our Class A common stock may be volatile and fluctuate substantially, which could result in substantial losses for purchasers of our Class A common stock in this offering.

Our stock price is likely to be volatile. The stock market has experienced extreme volatility that has often been unrelated to the operating performance of particular companies. As a result of this volatility, you may not be able to sell your Class A common stock at or above the initial public offering price. The market price for our Class A common stock may be influenced by many factors, including, but not limited to:

 

   

the success of competitive products or technologies;

 

   

developments related to our existing or any future collaborations;

 

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regulatory or legal developments in the United States and other countries;

 

   

developments or disputes concerning our intellectual property or other proprietary rights;

 

   

the recruitment or departure of key personnel;

 

   

actual or anticipated changes in estimates as to financial results, development timelines or recommendations by securities analysts;

 

   

variations in our financial results or those of companies that are perceived to be similar to us;

 

   

changes in the structure of healthcare payment systems;

 

   

general economic, industry and market conditions; and

 

   

the other factors described in this “Risk Factors” section.

We have broad discretion in the use of the net proceeds from this offering and may not use them effectively.

Our management and board of directors will have broad discretion in the application of the net proceeds from this offering and could spend the proceeds in ways that do not improve our results of operations or enhance the value of our Class A common stock. You may not agree with our decisions, and our use of the proceeds may not yield any return on your investment. We intend to use the net proceeds of this offering for working capital and general corporate purposes, including to expand our current business through acquisitions of, or investments in, other businesses, products or technologies. However, we have no commitments with respect to any such acquisitions or investments at this time, and our use of these proceeds may differ substantially from our current plans. The failure by our management to apply these funds effectively could result in financial losses that could have a material adverse effect on our business, cause the price of our Class A common stock to decline and delay the development of our new software-based products and services. Pending their use, we may invest the net proceeds from this offering in a manner that does not produce income or that loses value. You will not have the opportunity to influence our decision on how to use our net proceeds from this offering.

A significant portion of our total outstanding shares is eligible to be sold into the market in the near future, which could cause the market price of our Class A common stock to drop significantly, even if our business is doing well.

Sales of a substantial number of shares of our Class A common stock in the public market, or the perception in the market that the holders of a large number of shares intend to sell shares, could reduce the market price of our Class A common stock. After this offering and the Google Investment, we will have outstanding 193,705,145 shares of Class A common stock (or 198,164,422 shares of Class A common stock if the underwriters exercise in full their option to purchase additional shares of Class A common stock), 26,171,162 shares of Class B common stock which are convertible into 26,171,162 shares of Class A common stock and 5,555,555 shares of Class C common stock which are convertible into 5,555,555 shares of Class A common stock, based on the number of shares outstanding as of June 30, 2020. This includes the shares that we are selling in this offering, which may be resold in the public market immediately without restriction, unless purchased by our affiliates or existing stockholders. Substantially all of the remaining shares are currently restricted as a result of securities laws or lock-up agreements but will become eligible to be sold at various times beginning 180 days after this offering. Moreover, after this offering, holders of an aggregate of approximately 142,800,000 shares of our Class A common stock (or approximately 141,000,000 shares of Class A common stock if the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares of Class A common stock in full, in both cases including 5,555,555 shares issuable upon conversion of our Class C common stock) will have rights, subject to specified conditions, to require us to file registration statements covering their shares or to include their shares in registration statements that we may file for ourselves or other stockholders. We also intend to register all shares of Class A common stock that we may issue under our equity compensation plans. Once we register these shares, they can be freely sold in the public market upon issuance, subject to volume limitations applicable to affiliates and the lock-up agreements described in the “Underwriters” section of this prospectus.

 

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We are an “emerging growth company,” and the reduced disclosure requirements applicable to emerging growth companies may make our Class A common stock less attractive to investors.

We are an “emerging growth company,” as defined in the JOBS Act and may remain an emerging growth company for up to five years. For so long as we remain an emerging growth company, we are permitted and intend to rely on exemptions from certain disclosure requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies. These exemptions include:

 

   

being permitted to present only two years of audited financial statements and only two years of related Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations in this prospectus;

 

   

not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, in the assessment of our internal control over financial reporting;

 

   

reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in our periodic reports, proxy statements and registration statements;

 

   

an exemption from compliance with the requirement of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board regarding the communication of critical audit matters in the auditor’s report on the financial statements; and

 

   

exemption from the requirements of holding a nonbinding advisory vote on executive compensation and obtaining stockholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved.

We have taken advantage of reduced reporting requirements in this prospectus. In particular, in this prospectus, we have provided only two years of audited financial statements and have not included all of the executive compensation related information that would be required if we were not an emerging growth company. We cannot predict whether investors will find our Class A common stock less attractive if we rely on these exemptions. If some investors find our Class A common stock less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our Class A common stock and our stock price may be reduced or more volatile. In addition, the JOBS Act provides that an emerging growth company can take advantage of an extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards. This allows an emerging growth company to delay the adoption of these accounting standards until they would otherwise apply to private companies. We have elected to use this extended transition related to complying with new or revised accounting standards, which means that when a standard is issued or revised and it has different application dates for public and non-public companies, we can adopt the new or revised standard at the time non-public companies adopt the new or revised standard and can do so until such time that we either irrevocably elect to opt out of such extended transition period or no longer qualifies as an emerging growth company. We may choose to early adopt any new or revised accounting standards whenever such early adoption is permitted for non-public companies.

If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or reports about our business, or if they issue an adverse or misleading opinion regarding our stock, our stock price and trading volume could decline.

The trading market for our Class A common stock will be influenced by the research and reports that industry or securities analysts publish about us or our business. We do not currently have and may never obtain research coverage by securities and industry analysts. If no or few securities or industry analysts commence coverage of us, the trading price for our Class A common stock would be negatively impacted. In the event we obtain securities or industry analyst coverage, if any of the analysts who cover us issue an adverse or misleading opinion regarding us, our business model, our intellectual property or our stock performance, or if our results of operations fail to meet the expectations of analysts, our stock price would likely decline. If one or more of these analysts cease coverage of us or fail to publish reports on us regularly, we could lose visibility in the financial markets, which in turn could cause our stock price or trading volume to decline.

Because we do not anticipate paying any cash dividends on our capital stock in the foreseeable future, capital appreciation will be your sole source of gain, if any.

We have never declared or paid cash dividends on our capital stock. We currently intend to retain all of our future earnings, if any, to finance the growth and development of our business. Any future debt agreements may preclude us from paying dividends. As a result, capital appreciation, if any, of our Class A common stock will be your sole source of gain for the foreseeable future.

 

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SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This prospectus contains forward-looking statements that involve substantial risks and uncertainties. All statements made in this prospectus that are not statements of historical fact, including statements about our beliefs and expectations, are forward-looking statements and should be evaluated as such. Forward-looking statements include information concerning possible or assumed future results of operations, including descriptions of our business plan and strategies. These statements often include words such as “anticipate,” “expect,” “suggests,” “plan,” “believe,” “intend,” “estimates,” “targets,” “projects,” “should,” “could,” “would,” “may,” “will,” “forecast,” or the negative of these terms, and other similar expressions, although not all forward-looking statements contain these words. These forward-looking statements and projections are contained throughout this prospectus, including the sections entitled “Prospectus Summary,” “Risk Factors,” “Capitalization,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and “Business.” We base these forward-looking statements or projections on our current expectations, plans and assumptions that we have made in light of our experience in the industry, as well as our perceptions of historical trends, current conditions, expected future developments and other factors we believe are appropriate under the circumstances and at such time. As you read and consider this prospectus, you should understand that these statements are not guarantees of performance or results. The forward-looking statements and projections are subject to and involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions and you should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements or projections. Although we believe that these forward-looking statements and projections are based on reasonable assumptions at the time they are made, you should be aware that many factors could affect our actual financial results or results of operations and could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed in the forward-looking statements and projections.

Important factors that may materially affect such forward-looking statements and projections include the following:

 

   

weak growth and increased volatility in the telehealth market;

 

   

our history of losses and the risk we may not achieve profitability;

 

   

inability to adapt to rapid technological changes;

 

   

our limited number of significant clients and the risk that we may lose their business;

 

   

increased competition from existing and potential new participants in the healthcare industry;

 

   

changes in healthcare laws, regulations or trends and our ability to operate in the heavily regulated healthcare industry;

 

   

compliance with regulations concerning personally identifiable information and personal health industry;

 

   

slower than expected growth in patient adoption of telehealth and in platform usage by either clients or patients;

 

   

inability to grow our base of affiliated and non-affiliated providers sufficient to serve patient demand;

 

   

our ability to comply with federal and state privacy regulations and the significant liability that could result from a cybersecurity breach or our failure to comply with such regulations;

 

   

our ability to establish and maintain strategic relationships with third parties;

 

   

the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our business or on our ability to forecast our business’s financial outlook;

 

   

the risk that the insurance we maintain may not fully cover all potential exposures; and

 

   

inability to remediate material weaknesses or maintain effective internal control over financial reporting.

 

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You should refer to the “Risk Factors” section of this prospectus for a discussion of these and other important factors that may cause our actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by our forward-looking statements.

These cautionary statements should not be construed by you to be exhaustive and are made only as of the date of this prospectus. We undertake no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. You should evaluate all forward-looking statements made in this prospectus in the context of these risks and uncertainties.

 

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USE OF PROCEEDS

We estimate the proceeds to us from this offering will be approximately $692.5 million (or $767.9 million if the underwriters exercise in full their option to purchase additional shares of common stock), after deducting estimated underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us. We will not receive any proceeds from sales of our Class A common stock by the selling stockholders pursuant to the underwriters’ option to purchase additional shares from such selling stockholders in this offering.

The principal purposes of this offering are to obtain additional capital, create a public market for our Class A common stock, facilitate our future access to the public equity markets, increase awareness of our company among potential customers and improve our competitive position. We intend to use the net proceeds from this offering for working capital and other general corporate purposes, which may include:

 

   

increasing engineering and development to expand the functionality and value of our core technology platform;

 

   

reducing operational and support costs through increased investment in automation, self-help and artificial intelligence;

 

   

expanding our sales force and account management team;

 

   

developing new verticals, including investment in market-specific functionality along with sales and operational support; and

 

   

potential acquisitions (both U.S. and international) to acquire new products, services, clients and member lives, although we have no commitments with respect to any such acquisitions at this time.

We have not yet determined our anticipated expenditures and therefore cannot estimate the amounts to be used for each of the purposes discussed above. The amounts and timing of any expenditures will vary depending on the amount of cash generated by our operations, competitive and technological developments and the rate of growth, if any, of our business. Accordingly, our management will have significant discretion and flexibility in applying the net proceeds from this offering, and investors will be relying on the judgment of our management regarding the application of these net proceeds. Pending their use, we plan to invest our net proceeds from this offering in short-term, interest-bearing obligations, investment-grade instruments, certificates of deposit or direct or guaranteed obligations of the U.S. government.

We intend to use a portion of the net proceeds that we receive from this offering to repurchase 422,072 issued and outstanding shares of Class A and 918,284 shares of Class B common stock from certain of our executive officers and other employees at a purchase price per share equal to the initial public offering price per share of our Class A common stock to permit such executive officers and other employees to pay taxes owed in connection with the vesting of equity awards, including the repayment of loans outstanding on the date of this prospectus incurred to finance the payment of such taxes. See “Certain Relationships and Related Person Transactions—Transactions With Certain of Our Executive Officers and Other Employees” for additional information.

 

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DIVIDEND POLICY

We have never declared or paid dividends on our Class A and Class B common stock. We do not expect to pay dividends on our Class A, Class B and Class C common stock for the foreseeable future. Instead, we anticipate that all of our earnings, if any, will be used for the operation and growth of our business. Any future determination to declare cash dividends would be subject to the discretion of our board of directors and would depend upon various factors, including our results of operations, financial condition and liquidity requirements, restrictions that may be imposed by applicable law and our contracts and other factors deemed relevant by our board of directors.

 

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CAPITALIZATION

The following table sets forth our cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments and capitalization as of June 30, 2020, as follows:

 

   

on an actual basis;

 

   

on a pro forma basis to reflect the automatic conversion of all outstanding shares of our preferred stock into 136,625,900 shares of our Class A common stock upon the closing of this offering, as well as giving effect to stock-based compensation expense of approximately $23.6 million associated with the IPO RSUs. This pro forma adjustment is reflected as an increase to additional paid-in capital and accumulated deficit; and

 

   

on a pro forma as adjusted basis to give further effect to (i) our issuance and sale of 41,222,222 shares of our Class A common stock in this offering, based on the initial public offering price of $18.00 per share, after deducting estimated underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us; (ii) the repurchase of 422,072 shares of Class A and 918,284 shares of Class B common stock (at the initial public offering price of $18.00) at the same price with a portion of the proceeds pursuant to the Net Share Settlement and (iii) the issuance of 5,555,555 shares of Class C common stock pursuant to the Google Investment. The pro forma as adjusted balance sheet data does not reflect equity incentive grants after June 30, 2020, but does give effect to certain of the shares repurchased pursuant to the Net Share Settlement related thereto. See “Executive and Director Compensation—Other Compensation Plans—American Well Corporation 2006 Employee, Director and Consultant Stock Plan”.

You should read this information in conjunction with our audited consolidated financial statements and the related notes appearing at the end of this prospectus and the sections captioned “Selected Historical Financial Data” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and other financial information contained in this prospectus.

 

    As of June 30, 2020  
    Actual     Pro Forma     Pro Forma as
Adjusted
 
    (in thousands, except par value and share data)  

Cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments

  $ 262,690     $ 262,690   $ 1,040,087  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Series A convertible preferred stock, $0.01 par value per share: 3,200,000 shares authorized, 3,130,077 shares issued and outstanding, actual; no shares authorized, issued or outstanding, pro forma and pro forma as adjusted

  $ 28,889     $     $  

Series B convertible preferred stock, $0.01 par value per share: 833,334 shares authorized, 787,725 shares issued and outstanding, actual; no shares authorized, issued or outstanding, pro forma and pro forma as adjusted

    23,632              

Series C convertible preferred stock, $0.01 par value per share: 13,711,111 shares authorized, 11,607,883 shares issued and outstanding; no shares authorized, issued or outstanding, pro forma and pro forma as adjusted

    749,292              

Stockholders’ deficit:

     

Common stock, $0.01 par value per share: 220,000,000 shares authorized, 43,430,141 shares issued and 43,368,541 outstanding at June 30, 2020; no shares authorized, issued and outstanding, pro forma and pro forma as adjusted

    434              

 

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    As of June 30, 2020  
    Actual     Pro Forma     Pro Forma as
Adjusted
 
    (in thousands, except par value and share data)  

Class A common stock, $0.01 par value per share: no shares authorized, issued and outstanding at June 30, 2020; 1,000,000,000 shares authorized, pro forma and pro forma as adjusted; 152,966,595 shares issued and 152,904,995 outstanding, pro forma; 194,188,817 shares issued and 193,705,145 shares outstanding, pro forma as adjusted

    —         1,529       1,937  

Class B common stock, $0.01 par value per share: no shares authorized, issued and outstanding at June 30, 2020; 100,000,000 shares authorized, pro forma and pro forma as adjusted; 27,089,446 shares issued and outstanding, pro forma; 27,089,446 shares issued and 26,171,162 shares outstanding, pro forma as adjusted

 

 

—  

 

    271       262  

Class C common stock, $0.01 par value per share, no shares authorized, issued and outstanding at June 30, 2020; 200,000,000 shares authorized, pro forma and pro forma as adjusted; no shares issued and outstanding, pro forma; 5,555,555 shares issued and outstanding, pro forma as adjusted

 

 

—  

 

    —         56  

Treasury stock 61,600 shares at June 30, 2020 and pro forma; and 1,401,956 shares pro forma as adjusted

    (163     (163     (18,386

Additional paid in capital

    124,548       948,639       1,741,104  

Accumulated other comprehensive income

    148       148       148  

Accumulated deficit

    (468,966     (492,610     (492,610
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total American Well Corporation stockholders’ deficit

    (343,999     457,814       1,232,511  

Noncontrolling interest

    23,854       23,854       23,854  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total stockholders’ deficit

  $ (320,145   $ 481,668     $ 1,256,365  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total capitalization

  $ 481,668     $ 481,668     $ 1,256,365  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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DILUTION

If you invest in our Class A common stock, your interest will be diluted to the extent of the difference between the initial public offering price per share and the pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value per share after this offering and the use of proceeds therefrom.

Our pro forma net tangible book value (deficit) as of June 30, 2020 was $228 million, or $1.27 per share, based on shares of our Class A and Class B common stock outstanding as of June 30, 2020, after giving effect to the automatic conversion of all outstanding shares of our preferred stock into Class A common stock upon the closing of this offering. Our pro forma net tangible book value per share represents total tangible assets less total liabilities divided by the number of shares of our common stock outstanding assuming such conversion.

After giving further effect to (i) the sale of 41,222,222 shares of Class A common stock in this offering at an initial public offering price of $18.00 per share and after deducting estimated underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us; (ii) the repurchase of 422,072 shares of Class A and 918,284 shares of Class B common stock (based on the initial public offering price of $18.00) pursuant to the Net Share Settlement and (iii) the Google Investment, our pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value as of June 30, 2020 would have been approximately $1,003 million, or approximately $4.45 per share. This amount represents an immediate increase in pro forma net tangible book value of $3.18 per share to our existing stockholders and an immediate dilution of approximately $13.55 per share to new investors participating in this offering. We determine dilution by subtracting the pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value per share after this offering from the amount of cash that a new investor paid for a share of Class A common stock. The following table illustrates this dilution:

 

Initial public offering price per share

      $ 18.00

Pro forma net tangible book value (deficit) per share as of June 30, 2020

   $ 1.27     

Increase in pro forma net tangible book value (deficit) per share attributable to this offering

   $ 3.18     
  

 

 

    

Pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value per share after this offering

      $ 4.45  
     

 

 

 

Dilution per share to new investors participating in this offering

      $ 13.55  
     

 

 

 

 

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The following table summarizes on the pro forma as adjusted basis described above, as of June 30, 2020, the differences between the number of shares purchased from us, the total consideration paid to us in cash and the average price per share that existing stockholders and new investors paid. The calculation below is based on the initial public offering price of $18.00 per share before deducting estimated underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us.

 

     Shares Purchased     Total Consideration     Average
Price Per
Share
 
     Number      Percent     Amount      Percent  
     (000’s, except with respect to share figures)        

Existing stockholders

     178,654,085        79.2   $ 714,136      45.9   $ 4.00  

New investors (Class A)

     41,222,222        18.3     742,000        47.7     18.00  

Google (Class C)

     5,555,555        2.5     100,000        6.4     18.00  
          

 

 

   

Total

     225,431,862        100   $ 1,556,136        100  
     

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

The foregoing tables and calculations are based on the number of shares of our Class A common stock outstanding as of June 30, 2020, after giving effect to the automatic conversion of all outstanding shares of our preferred stock into Class A common stock upon the closing of this offering, as well as the reclassification of our common stock into separate classes of Class A common stock and Class B common stock immediately prior to the closing of this offering, and excludes:

 

   

21,503,799 shares of Class A common stock issuable upon the exercise of options outstanding as of June 30, 2020 at a weighted average exercise price of $3.83 per share; and

 

   

25,618,222 shares of Class A common stock reserved for future issuance under our 2020 Equity Incentive Plan, which became effective on August 17, 2020, including 3,589,159 shares of Class A common stock reserved for future issuance under our 2006 Employee, Director and Consultant Stock Plan, which shares, upon the effectiveness of our 2020 Equity Incentive Plan, became available for future issuance under our 2020 such plan Incentive Plan;

 

   

2,028,461 shares of Class A common stock issuable upon vesting and settlement of RSU awards as of June 30, 2020 under our equity incentive plans;

 

   

4,029,031 shares of Class A common stock issuable upon vesting and settlement of RSU awards to our employees that were granted under our equity incentive plans in August 2020;

 

   

3,529,766 shares of Class B common stock issuable upon the exercise of options outstanding as of June 30, 2020 at a weighted average exercise price of $5.56 per share;

 

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5,721,760 shares of Class B common stock issuable upon vesting and settlement of restricted stock unit awards as of June 30, 2020 under our equity incentive plans; and

 

   

5,555,555 shares of Class C common stock issuable upon closing of the Google Investment at the price to the public in this offering.

The table above assumes no exercise of the underwriters’ option to purchase additional shares in this offering. If the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares of our Class A common stock from us and certain selling stockholders in full:

 

   

the percentage of shares of common stock held by existing stockholders will decrease to approximately 79% of the total number of shares of our common stock outstanding after this offering; and

 

   

the number of shares held by new investors will increase to 47,405,555 or approximately 21% of the total number of shares of our common stock outstanding after this offering.

 

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SELECTED HISTORICAL CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL DATA

The following tables set forth the selected historical consolidated financial data for the periods and as of the dates indicated. We derived the following selected consolidated balance sheet and statements of operations data as of December 31, 2018 and 2019 and the years then ended from audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. We derived the selected consolidated balance sheet and statement of operations data as of June 30, 2020 and for the six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2020 from unaudited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. The unaudited interim consolidated financial statements have been prepared on the same basis as the audited annual consolidated financial statements and reflect, in the opinion of management, adjustments of a normal, recurring nature that are necessary for a fair statement of the unaudited interim consolidated financial statements. On July 3, 2018, we acquired Avizia, Inc. and on November 14, 2019, we acquired Aligned Telehealth, Inc. Financial results for both acquired entities are reflected in our financials for the periods subsequent to the acquisition date.

Historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected in the future. The selected financial data set forth below should be read together with the consolidated financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus, as well as the sections of this prospectus titled “Risk Factors,” “Capitalization” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.”

 

Consolidated Statement of Operations and
Comprehensive Loss:
  Year Ended
December 31,
    Six Months Ended
June 30
 
(in thousands except share and per share data)   2018     2019     2019     2020  

Revenue

  $ 113,955     $ 148,857     $ 69,081     $ 122,282  

Costs and operating expenses:

       

Costs of revenue, excluding amortization of acquired intangible assets

    58,612       79,976       36,000       76,853  

Research and development

    36,273       53,941       25,567       32,573  

Sales and marketing

    31,629       47,672       22,642       26,220  

General and administrative

    37,217       54,211       25,535       95,424  

Depreciation and amortization expense

    5,330       7,761       3,800       4,795  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total costs and operating expenses

    169,061       243,561       113,544       235,865  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss from operations

    (55,106     (94,704     (44,463     (113,583

Interest income and other income (expense), net

    2,794       5,535       3,261       1,155  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss before benefit (expense) from income taxes and loss from equity method investment

    (52,312     (89,169     (41,202     (112,428

Benefit (expense) from income taxes

    —         803       (370     (252

Loss from equity method investment

    —         —         —         (764
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

  $ (52,312   $ (88,366   $ (41,572   $ (113,444
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income (loss) attributable to non-controlling interest

    362       (1,176     (828     (2,405

Net loss attributable to American Well Corporation

  $ (52,674   $ (87,190   $ (40,744   $ (111,039
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Consolidated Statement of Operations and
Comprehensive Loss:
  Year Ended
December 31,
    Six Months Ended
June 30
 
(in thousands except share and per share data)   2018     2019     2019     2020  

Net loss per share attributable to common stockholders, basic and diluted

  $ (1.30   $ (2.12   $ (1.00   $ (2.66

Weighted-average common shares outstanding, basic and diluted

    40,583,826       41,138,798       40,936,028       41,793,108  

Pro forma net loss per share attributable to common stockholders, basic and diluted (1)

    $ (0.56     $ (0.65

Pro forma weighted-average common shares outstanding, basic and diluted (1)

      155,558,387         170,048,530  

 

(1)

See Note 24 to our consolidated financial statements appearing at the end of this prospectus for details on the calculation of basic and diluted net loss per share attributable to common stockholders and unaudited basic and diluted pro forma net loss per share attributable to common stockholders.

 

Selected Balance Sheet Data:    As of December 31,     As of June 30, 2020  
(in thousands)    2018     2019     Actual     Pro Forma(1)      Pro Forma as
Adjusted(2)
 

Cash, cash equivalents and short term investments

   $ 256,201     $ 177,626     $ 262,690     $ 262,690      $ 1,040,087  

Working capital(3)

     212,335       116,950       221,053       221,053        996,121  

Total assets(4)

     489,314       499,881       596,400       596,400        1,370,657  

Total liabilities(4)

     118,011       124,946       114,732       114,732        114,292  

Convertible preferred stock

     575,713       655,799       801,813       —          —    

Common stock

     414       423       434       1,800        2,255  

Total stockholders’ equity (deficit)

   $ (204,410   $ (280,864   $ (320,145   $ 481,668      $ 1,256,365  

 

(1)

The pro forma consolidated balance sheet data gives effect to the automatic conversion of all outstanding shares of our preferred stock into an aggregate of 136,625,900 shares of Class A common stock upon the closing of this offering, as well as giving effect to stock-based compensation expense of approximately $23.6 million associated with the IPO RSUs. This pro forma adjustment is reflected as an increase to additional paid-in capital and accumulated deficit.

(2)

The pro forma as adjusted balance sheet data gives further effect to our issuance and sale of 41,222,222 shares of Class A common stock in this offering and 5,555,555 shares of Class C common stock in the Google Investment, at an initial public offering price per share of Class A common stock and offering price per share of Class C common stock of $18.00 per share, after deducting estimated underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us and the use of a portion of the proceeds of this offering to repurchase 422,072 shares of Class A and 918,284 shares of Class B common stock at a price equal to the price per share offered to the public in this offering pursuant to the Net Share Settlement. The pro forma as adjusted balance sheet data does not reflect equity incentive grants after June 30, 2020, but does give effect to certain of the shares repurchased pursuant to the Net Share Settlement related thereto. See “Executive and Director Compensation—Other Compensation Plans—American Well Corporation 2006 Employee, Director and Consultant Stock Plan”.

(3)

Working capital is defined as total current assets minus total current liabilities.

(4)

The Company adopted ASC 842 in the year ended December 31, 2019 on a modified retrospective basis.

 

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Non-GAAP Financial Measures

In addition to our financial results determined in accordance with GAAP, we believe adjusted EBITDA, a non-GAAP measure, is useful in evaluating our operating performance. We use adjusted EBITDA to evaluate our ongoing operations and for internal planning and forecasting purposes. We believe that this non-GAAP financial measure, when taken together with the corresponding GAAP financial measures, provides meaningful supplemental information regarding our performance by excluding certain items that may not be indicative of our business, results of operations or outlook. In particular, we believe that the use of adjusted EBITDA is helpful to our investors as it is a metric used by management in assessing the health of our business and our operating performance. However, non-GAAP financial information is presented for supplemental informational purposes only, has limitations as an analytical tool and should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for financial information presented in accordance with GAAP. In addition, other companies, including companies in our industry, may calculate similarly-titled non-GAAP measures differently or may use other measures to evaluate their performance, all of which could reduce the usefulness of our non-GAAP financial measure as a tool for comparison. A reconciliation is provided below for our non-GAAP financial measure to the most directly comparable financial measure stated in accordance with GAAP. Investors are encouraged to review the related GAAP financial measure and the reconciliation of this non-GAAP financial measure to their most directly comparable GAAP financial measures, and not to rely on any single financial measure to evaluate our business.

Adjusted EBITDA

Adjusted EBITDA is a key performance measure that our management uses to assess our operating performance. Because adjusted EBITDA facilitates internal comparisons of our historical operating performance on a more consistent basis, we use this measure for business planning purposes and in evaluating acquisition opportunities.

We calculate adjusted EBITDA as net loss adjusted to exclude (i) interest income and other income, net, (ii) tax benefit and expense, (iii) depreciation and amortization, (iv) stock-based compensation expense, (v) initial public offering expenses, (vi) acquisition-related expenses and (vii) other items affecting our results that we do not view as representative of our ongoing operations, including direct and incremental expenses associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. We had no such other items during the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2019 or the six months ended June 30, 2019.

The following table presents a reconciliation of adjusted EBITDA from the most comparable GAAP measure, net loss, for each of the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2019 and the six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2020:

 

     Year Ended
December 31,
     Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
(in thousands)    2018      2019      2019      2020  

Net loss

   $ (52,312    $ (88,366    $ (41,572    $ (113,444

Add:

           

Depreciation and amortization

     5,330        7,761        3,800        4,795  

Interest and other income, net

     (2,794      (5,535      (3,261      (1,155

(Benefit) expense from income taxes

     —          (803      370        252  

Stock-based compensation

     7,669        12,135        5,071        72,096  

Initial public offering expenses

     3,098        127        6        677  

Acquisition-related (income) expenses

     1,298        2,020        95        (48

COVID-19-related expenses(1)

     —          —          —          5,742  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA

   $ (37,711    $ (72,661    $ (35,491    $ (31,085
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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(1)

COVID-19-related expenses include non-recurring provider bonus payments, emergency hosting licensing fees and non-medical provider temporary labor costs related to on-boarding non-AMG providers incurred in response to the initial outbreak of the COVID-19 virus as Amwell attempted to scale quickly to meet unusually high patient and non-AMG provider demand.

Some of the limitations of adjusted EBITDA include (i) adjusted EBITDA does not properly reflect capital commitments to be paid in the future, and (ii) although depreciation and amortization are non-cash charges, the underlying assets may need to be replaced and adjusted EBITDA does not reflect these capital expenditures. Our IPO and acquisition-related expenses, including legal, accounting and other professional expenses, reflect cash expenditures and we expect such expenditures for acquisitions to recur from time to time. Our adjusted EBITDA may not be comparable to similarly titled measures of other companies because they may not calculate adjusted EBITDA in the same manner as we calculate the measure, limiting its usefulness as a comparative measure. In evaluating adjusted EBITDA, you should be aware that in the future we will incur expenses similar to the adjustments in this presentation. Our presentation of adjusted EBITDA should not be construed as an inference that our future results will be unaffected by these expenses or any unusual or non-recurring items. Adjusted EBITDA should not be considered as an alternative to loss before benefit from income taxes, net loss, earnings per share, or any other performance measures derived in accordance with U.S. GAAP. When evaluating our performance, you should consider adjusted EBITDA alongside other financial performance measures, including our net loss and other GAAP results.

 

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MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with the section titled “Selected Historical Consolidated Financial Data” and our consolidated financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus. In addition to historical consolidated financial information, the following discussion and analysis and information contains forward-looking statements that involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions. Our actual results could differ materially from those anticipated by these forward-looking statements as a result of many factors. Factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include, but are not limited to, those identified below and those discussed in the sections titled “Risk Factors” and “Information Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” included elsewhere in this prospectus.

Overview

We are a leading telehealth company enabling digital delivery of care for healthcare’s key stakeholders. We empower our clients at the enterprise level with the core technology and services necessary to successfully develop and distribute telehealth programs that meet their strategic, operational, and social objectives under their own brands. The Amwell Platform is a complete digital care delivery solution that equips our health system, health plan and innovator, including government, clients with the tools to enable new models of care for their patients and members. Our scalable technology embeds with our clients’ existing offerings and clinical workflows, spanning the continuum of care and enabling care delivery across a wide variety of clinical, retail, school and home settings. Our client-focused approach drives our success as one of the largest telehealth companies. As of June 30, 2020, we powered the digital care programs of 55 health plans, which support over 36,000 employers and collectively represent more than 80 million covered lives, as well as 150 of the nation’s largest health systems, encompassing more than 2,000 hospitals. Since inception, we have powered over 5.6 million telehealth visits for our clients, including more than 2.9 million in the six months ended June 30, 2020.

Healthcare today faces many challenges. Choice and access can be limited, care delivery is fragmented and inefficient, and costs continue to rise and shift to consumers while health outcomes have not improved. The healthcare industry is evolving to meet these challenges with innovative care models and new regulatory frameworks to promote more effective outcomes. As healthcare’s key stakeholders demand innovative technology solutions that streamline care delivery, lower costs, expand access and improve outcomes, we believe there is significant opportunity for transformation.

We believe Amwell makes this digital care transformation possible for the healthcare ecosystem. The Amwell Platform enables care delivery across the full healthcare continuum – from primary and urgent care in the home to high acuity specialty consults, such as telestroke and telepsychiatry, in the hospital. We support both on-demand and scheduled consultations and offer 40 pre-packaged care modules and programs that power over 100 unique use cases today. Our platform can be fully embedded into our clients’ patient/member portals and provider workflows. Providers can launch telehealth directly from their native EHRs, with seamless integration to their payer eligibility and claims systems. Providers, patients and members can access this care through a full range of Carepoints, including via mobile, web, phone and our proprietary kiosks and carts that support multi-way video, phone or secure messaging interactions. As of June 30, 2020, over 50,000 of our clients’ providers use the Amwell Platform to serve their patients and members. When needed, we augment and extend our clients’ clinical capabilities with AMG, a nationwide clinical network of over 5,000 multi-disciplinary providers covering 50 states with 24/7/365 coverage.

Amwell exists to empower healthcare’s leading players, who have earned the deep trust of their patients and members over decades, and does not aim to compete with or replace them. We help our clients white-label and embed telehealth within their existing healthcare offerings for their patients and members. Thus we enable our provider customers to offer a seamless experience that blends online convenience when needed with in-person

 

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care by known, trusted providers as part of a complete care program that offers patients continuity of care. In this way, providers can use our telehealth platform as an effective augmentation and not a replacement of their traditional care delivery.

Our Business Model

The Amwell Platform is a complete digital care delivery solution that equips our health system, health plan and innovator partners with the tools to enable new models of care for their patients and members. We sell the Amwell Platform on a subscription basis, which with our modular platform architecture allows our clients to introduce innovative telehealth use cases over time, expanding our subscription revenue opportunity. To support the Amwell Platform, we offer professional services on a fee-for-service basis and a range of patient and provider access Carepoints that support hospital and home use cases and access to AMG, our affiliated medical group that provides clinical services on a fee-for-service basis. The combination of the platform, services and Carepoints allows our clients to deploy telehealth solutions across their full enterprise, deepening their relationships with existing and new patients and members through improved care access and coordination, cost, and quality. Our contracts are typically three years in length but may be longer for our largest strategic customer partners.

Health Systems

For our health system customers, the Amwell Platform’s primary function is to facilitate consultations between patients and providers affiliated with the health system. Our typical contracts with health systems are mainly the platform subscription, but also include services delivered by AMG to complement the health system provider resources, services for technology integration, marketing and Carepoints.

Subscription fees are recurring and are determined based on the initial forecasted number of overall consultations throughout the entire health system on the Amwell Platform and net patient revenue of the health system. Subscriptions include a maximum number of consultations that can be delivered on the platform and similar to a cellular phone plan, when consultations exceed the contractual maximum, overages result in higher subscription fees in the following annual period.

As the health system expands its use of the Amwell Platform through additional modules, there is a corresponding increase in subscription fees. Examples of modules include:

 

•  Acute Behavioral Health

 

•  School Health

  

•  Retail Health

•  Urgent Care

 

•  Telestroke

  

•  Triage in the ED

•  Specialty Consult

 

•  Behavioral Health Therapy

  

•  Dialysis

To supplement a health system’s own network of healthcare providers, health systems often choose to purchase clinical services from AMG to deliver care for certain specialties such as telepsychiatry, behavioral health therapy and general urgent care, or to simply operate as backup providers on nights and weekends. AMG services are provided on a fee-for-service basis. These clinical fees vary significantly from $59 to more than $800 per consultation or case based on the specialty and may require an additional module subscription, as in the case of telepsychiatry.

Subscriptions fees received from health system clients were $27.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2018 and $38.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, respectively, and $17.9 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019 and $23.6 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020, respectively.

Health Plans

For our health plan clients, the Amwell Platform functions to provide better access to care, better coordination of care and the ability to direct care referrals to providers owned or affiliated with the respective

 

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health plan. All of these functions lower the overall cost of care for health plan clients: improved population access to needed services reduces unneeded ED usage and better coordination of care can improve outcomes and lower the overall cost of care.

Currently, our typical health plan contract includes a recurring subscription fee based on the number of members who have access to our platform plus additional subscription fees associated with the various programs we offer the health plan. Clinical programs offered on the Amwell Platform include:

 

•  Urgent Care

  

•  Sleep Therapy

  

•  Women’s Health

•  Nutrition

  

•  Employee Assistance Program Therapy

  

•  Behavioral Health Therapy

Our health plan clients mainly purchase clinical services for their members through AMG. They may also maintain relationships with other in network provider organizations to deliver care on the Amwell Platform on their behalf. These visit consultations are charged on a fee-for-service basis and range in price based on the type of consultation and the specialty of the provider.

Subscription fees received from health plan clients were $23.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2018 and $30.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, respectively, and $14.9 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019 and $16.6 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020, respectively.

Innovators

Amwell has a number of unique customers that use our platform in various ways to support their products. For example, we support: (i) Philips’ sleep apnea products and programs, (ii) a joint-venture with Cleveland Clinic and Amwell, (iii) Meuhedet’s advanced, hybrid-virtual international health plan, and (iv) more recently, government contracts where we support 911 calls that can be addressed with virtual care.

Our contracts with our innovator customers vary from simple subscription fee-only contracts, where an innovator customer embeds our technology within their product, to broad subscription fee and services contracts that resemble a blend of our health system and health plan profile contracts.

Subscription fees received from innovator clients were $18.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2018 and $14.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, respectively, and $6.1 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019 and $6.0 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020, respectively.

Visits

Amwell’s partner AMG has built a network of over 5,000 providers who are registered and credentialed to deliver care on the Amwell Platform. This clinical network is designed and operated in a way that allows us to meet the aggregate visit demand requirements of our health plan and health system clients. As of June 30, 2020, there are 5,000 AMG providers that have delivered at least one visit on the platform in the last twelve months, spanning the following specialties:

 

•  Family Medicine

  

•  Internal Medicine

  

•  Emergency Medicine

•  Psychiatry

  

•  Psychology

  

•  Gastroenterology

•  Gynecology

  

•  Pulmonology

  

•  Nephrology

•  Anesthesiology

  

•  Urology

  

•  Pediatrician

•  Nutritionist

  

•  Health Coach

  

•  Lactation Consultant

•  Sleep Medicine

  

•  Orthopedic Surgery

  

•  Social Worker

•  Pain Management

  

•  Case Manager

  

•  Vascular Surgery

 

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AMG earns fee-for-service revenue for each episode of care delivered on the Amwell Platform by its providers with fees varying by physician specialty or clinical program.

Fees received from AMG-related visits were $26.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2018 and $40.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, respectively, and $18.5 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019 and $62.5 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020, respectively.

Services & Carepoints

We offer a full suite of paid, supporting services to our clients to enable their telehealth offerings, including professional services to facilitate telehealth implementation, workflow design, systems integration and service expansion. To help our clients promote adoption and utilization, we offer patient and provider engagement services through our internal digital engagement agency.

Our customers often deploy telemedicine through a variety of our proprietary Carepoints, which are medical carts and kiosks designed for various clinical and community settings. These Carepoints enable providers to deliver digital care into clinical care locations, such as the ED and clinics, as well as into community settings such as retail stores, community centers, employer sites, skilled nursing facilities and schools. Carepoints consist of hardware integrated into our Platform but can also be deployed independent of our software solution. Our Carepoints are designed by our product development teams and manufactured through partner and contract relationships.

Fees received from the provision of services and Carepoints were $18.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2018 and $24.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, respectively, and $11.7 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019 and $13.6 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020, respectively.

Factors Affecting Our Performance

We believe our future growth, success and performance are dependent on many factors, including those set forth below. While these factors present significant opportunities for us, they also represent the challenges that we must successfully address in order to grow our business and improve our results of operations.

Telehealth Utilization

Telehealth utilization is a key driver of our business. A client’s overall utilization of its telehealth platform provides an important measure of the value they derive. Telehealth utilization drives our business in three important ways. First, to the extent a client succeeds with its telehealth program and sees good usage, they are more likely to renew and potentially expand their contract with us. Second, our health systems agreements typically include a certain number of visits conducted by their own providers annually and provide that as certain volume thresholds are exceeded, its annual license fees will rise to reflect this growing value. Third, to the extent that clients utilize provider services from AMG, Amwell derives revenue from clinical fees. We expect that our future revenues will be driven by the growing adoption of telehealth and our ability to maintain and grow market share within that market.

In the full year 2019, clients completed a total of 1.1 million visits on the Amwell Platform, while in the six months ended June 30, 2020, clients significantly expanded their use of the Amwell Platform with 2.9 million completed visits. During the COVID-19 crisis, utilization of the platform achieved levels not seen before, evident by a larger number of clients’ own providers using the Amwell Platform. AMG providers accounted for 23% of total visits performed versus 65% of total visits performed on the Amwell Platform during the three months ended June 30, 2020 and June 30, 2019, respectively.

COVID-19-related visit growth reflects several factors. Many patients need assessment for respiratory or other COVID-19-like symptoms and have sought to be assessed for possible referral to hospital or testing

 

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facilities. In addition, many patients, especially those with health vulnerabilities, have sought to avoid going into brick and mortar facilities – and indeed our health systems’ clients have preferred wherever possible to treat patients remotely at home for non-COVID-19 related ongoing healthcare needs. Finally, we have seen significant expansion of reimbursement for telehealth during the COVID-19 crisis, which has made telehealth more affordable for many people.

New Use Patterns and Functionality

Looking past COVID-19, we can see that some effects of the current period may be felt beyond the immediate crisis. In particular, we are seeing the growing awareness among consumers of the availability and efficacy of telehealth for many healthcare needs and we are seeing more widespread hands-on experience among providers in delivering care via telehealth. It remains unclear the extent to which the currently more relaxed regulatory environment, favorable reimbursement policies, and leniency with respect to cross-state provider licensure will become normative. However, we believe that the current experience is more likely to be favorable to telehealth and Amwell’s business than otherwise over the longer term.

The surge in interest in telehealth, and in particular the relaxation of HIPAA privacy and security requirements, has also attracted new competition from providers who utilize consumer-grade video conferencing platforms such as Zoom and Twilio. Compared to those new entrants, Amwell offers simpler video capabilities to meet the new interest in easy, fast video connections. While it is not yet clear how this competitive dynamic will play out, Amwell remains confident that healthcare is a highly specialized application, and that both health plans and health systems will require a secure, HIPAA-compliant, end-to-end platform capable of handling the full care continuum and connecting to appropriate physical Carepoints in the future.

New Client Acquisition

We believe our ability to add net new health system and health plan clients is a key indicator of our increasing market adoption and future revenue potential. We maintain dedicated direct sales teams for both health systems and health plans focused on selling solutions that meet each of their respective needs. Our direct sales teams sell our full suite of technology, services and Carepoints.

Channel partners also play an important role in marketing and selling our products to our customer base, primarily focusing on the Amwell Platform and Carepoints. Channel partners reduce our sales cycle and lower customer acquisition costs. For example, through our EHR channel partners we are able to natively embed our technology into existing health system technology infrastructure which, as a competitive differentiator, may lead to a higher win rate. In addition, because of the technology integration, an EHR partner sale may accelerate our ability to launch the technology and ultimately recognize revenue. Carepoint channel partners primarily consist of value-added resellers that have established relationships with health systems and health plans. We typically generate lower revenues in connection with sales obtained through these channel partner agreements.

Health System Client Expansion and Retention

Health system contracts are initially priced based on the size of the system and their projected visit activity. The contract value is typically expected to grow as the health system increases the number of providers on the platform and the number of consultations performed through the platform or adds the ability to deliver new use cases across their enterprise whether by the health system’s own providers or through AMG. When a client chooses to adopt a new use case, Amwell configures a module for its Amwell Platform instance. A module represents a unique patient or provider workflow, documentation requirement, or technology integration and associated services. Our most commonly deployed modules include urgent care, behavioral health, telestroke, telepsychiatry, and specialty consultations. Our platform modules currently support over 100 active use cases with new modules continually being developed as virtual care continues to expand into new areas.

 

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We believe we are well-positioned to expand our modular Amwell Platform across a health system enterprise. Once a client has established itself on the Amwell Platform with at least one module, our Customer Success and Account Director teams focus on achieving our clients’ short- and long-term telehealth objectives. We provide case studies, webinars, ROI analysis and best practices to demonstrate how other clients have successfully deployed new modules to achieve their objective of improving access, cost and quality. Health systems pay Amwell incremental subscription fees for each module that is deployed, which over time increases the annual contract value per health system, a key indicator of the growth of our business. We believe our ability to grow subscription revenue in our existing health system client base is an indicator of the long-term value of our customer relationships.

 

LOGO

Expanding software modules also provide opportunities for Amwell to earn revenue through the sale of services and Carepoints. In some cases, new modules require integration into an EHR or other operations systems for which Amwell is paid a fee to provide professional services. Amwell also offers engagement and marketing services to health systems to drive adoption and utilization of the telehealth offering. Engagement, marketing and other professional services are typically fee-for-service arrangements. Many telehealth use cases are supported by our proprietary Carepoints, such as telestroke and telepsychiatry. Typically, we sell our Carepoints under fee-for-goods arrangements, although we have begun to offer Carepoints in a hardware-as-a-service model. To date, hardware-as-a-service accounts for an immaterial portion of total revenue for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2019.

Through AMG, we are also able to support certain modules with clinical services, such as behavioral health, to supplement the clinical services provided through the Amwell Platform by our clients. Our AMG service offerings have expanded to include multiple medical specialties such as psychiatry, psychology, nutrition, and women’s health providers such as lactation specialists. AMG earns fees for each consultation or case episode of care it delivers. As the number of modules for which AMG provides services increase, the opportunity for AMG to deliver additional services also increases.

We believe increasing the number of modules for each of our health system clients will increase the likelihood we will retain our clients over time. Our cost to maintain and retain an existing client is generally less than the cost to initially acquire a new health system client. Our health system client retention rate was 100% in 2018 and 87% in 2019. As part of the combination with Avizia, a number of smaller-sized Avizia customers did not fit our platform strategy and were not targeted by Amwell for renewal. Health system client retention is calculated by taking the number of clients who were with us at the beginning of each measurement period and subtracting the number of those clients that cancelled during the measurement period and dividing that number by the starting number for that period.

 

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Health Plan Client Expansion and Retention

An important component of our revenue growth strategy is to retain and expand business with our existing health plan clients. We expand business with health plans when they expand the number of members who have access to our Amwell Platform and AMG services or through offering new clinical programs to eligible plan members as follows:

Expanding Eligible Members

Health plans offer Amwell’s telehealth offering to their commercial and government customers. These consist of either large self-insured employers, for which the plan acts as an Administrative Service Organization (ASO), or a pool of individual, large local, or small business customers under a fully insured business model. In addition, some health plans offer government funded programs such as Medicare Advantage plans to individuals over 65 years old or are administrators for State-based Medicaid programs. The total membership of both ASO, fully insured, and government-based business lines represent the total potential membership that could become eligible for our telehealth services through a health plan client. When we sign a new health plan client, typically some but not all, of their members are eligible. Particularly in the ASO business line, health plans operate under the direction of their customer which may or may not select telehealth as part of their benefit design. Furthermore, telehealth may or may not be included in the benefit design of an ASO, Medicare Advantage, Medicaid, or fully insured plan. Members not currently eligible to access our Amwell Platform represent an opportunity for Amwell to expand each health plan client’s plan membership. As of June 30, 2020, more than 80 million members have access to our platform as a covered benefit, while our health plan clients serve approximately 150 million overall members.

Offering New Clinical Programs

Our most common clinical program for health plans is episodic urgent care. We also offer a variety of other programs including behavioral therapy, psychiatry, nutrition/weight management, lactation consulting, sleep specialists, risk adjustment and smoking cessation, among others. Clinical programs may include a combination of technology and services that are made available either broadly or to a specific set of members in a given membership group. In total we currently offer 40 clinical programs to our health plan clients and intend to expand these to meet the population health management objectives of our health plan clients.

We believe we are well positioned to expand business with our existing health plan clients. The incremental cost to Amwell to add plan members to the existing base is minor. For a health plan it takes less time to operationalize and is less costly to implement with an existing vendor that is already embedded into systems and infrastructure. Further our Customer Success and Account Director teams focus on achieving our clients’ short- and long-term telehealth objectives. We provide case studies, webinars, ROI analysis, and best practices to demonstrate how other health plans have successfully deployed various clinical programs to achieve their objective of improving access and lowering the overall cost of care. In many cases health plans pay Amwell incremental subscription fees for adding new members to the Amwell Platform, and for each clinical program that is deployed, which over time increases the annual contract value per health plan, a key indicator of the growth of our business. We believe our ability to grow subscription revenue in our existing health plan client base is an indicator of the long-term value of our customer relationships.

 

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LOGO

Expanding members and clinical programs also provides opportunities for Amwell to earn revenue through the sale of services. Amwell’s engagement and marketing services drive adoption and utilization of the clinical programs. Marketing and other professional services are typically fee-for-service arrangements.

Through AMG, we are also able to support the delivery of clinical programs. AMG earns fees for each consultation or case episode of care it delivers. As the number of members who are eligible for the Amwell Platform and utilization increases, the opportunity for AMG to deliver additional services also increases.

We believe increasing the number of members and clinical programs for each of our health plan clients will increase the likelihood we will retain our clients over time. Our costs to maintain and retain an existing client are less than the cost to initially acquire a new health plan client. Our health plan client retention rate was 100% and 94% as of December 31, 2018 and 2019, respectively. Health plan client retention is calculated by taking the number of clients who were with us at the beginning of each measurement period and subtracting the number of those clients that cancelled during the measurement period and dividing that number by the starting number for that period.

Active Providers

An important indicator of the value of our Amwell Platform to our clients is the number of non-AMG providers that are active on the Amwell Platform. We define “Active Providers” as providers that have delivered a visit on the Amwell Platform at least once in the last 12 months. Active Providers demonstrate the prevalence of telehealth within our clients in both home and hospital environments. We believe Active Providers is a measure of our success in delivering on our mission of enabling access to care. We expect that the number of Active Providers will increase over time as a result of several factors:

 

   

the number of modules and use cases deployed within health systems

 

   

the adoption of telehealth by providers across the spectrum of care

 

   

the number of programs offered through health plans

 

   

the continued improvement in the regulatory environment for telehealth, including reimbursement for telehealth services

 

   

the ongoing consumerization of healthcare

 

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LOGO

Carepoint Growth

We have designed our product offerings so our Carepoints can support use cases with or without the Amwell Platform. We have both dedicated internal teams and channel partners focused exclusively on selling our Carepoints to a broad range of users, from health systems and health plans to schools, employers, and government entities. Carepoint-only clients represent an opportunity for us to expand our penetration in our core health system and health plan business and beyond. As of June 30, 2020, we had 300 CarePoint-only health system clients.

Invest in Growth

We expect to continue to focus on long-term revenue growth through investments in technology development and sales and marketing efforts. In addition, we believe additional investments in platform modules and clinical programs will allow us to continue to penetrate our products and services further in to our existing client relationships. Accordingly, in the short term we expect these activities to increase our net losses, but in the long term we anticipate that these investments will positively impact our results of operations.

Regulatory Environment

Our operations are subject to comprehensive United States federal, state and local and international regulation in the jurisdictions in which we do business. Our ability to operate profitably will depend in part upon our ability, and that of our affiliated providers, to maintain all necessary licenses and to operate in compliance with applicable laws and rules. The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in a reduction of regulatory and reimbursement barriers for telehealth, including removing the originating site restrictions for fee for service Medicare; the expansion of Medicare and commercial reimbursement for telehealth and an easing of state licensure policies for providers. Although the COVID-19 pandemic has led to the relaxation of certain Medicare, Medicaid and state licensure restrictions on the delivery of telehealth services, it is uncertain how long the

 

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relaxed policies will remain in effect, and there can be no guarantee that once the COVID-19 pandemic is over that such restrictions will not be reinstated or changed in a way that adversely affects our business. For additional discussion of this factor, see “Risk Factors—Risks Related to Regulatory Environment.”

Business Combinations

In July 2018, we acquired all of the outstanding stock of Avizia. This acquisition brought a comprehensive acute care capability, including a hospital-based cart lineup and custom software workflows for more than forty clinical specialties, including telestroke and tele-behavioral health. This acquisition enhanced options available to clients across Amwell’s diverse telehealth ecosystem, including health systems, health plans and innovators, enabling clients to choose one comprehensive single platform solution. The aggregate consideration for this transaction was $137.8 million, and included $65.3 million paid in cash and $72.5 million in equity comprised of 1,115,934 shares of Series C preferred stock at a price of $65.00 per share. The acquisition was a stock purchase and the goodwill resulting from this acquisition is not deductible for tax purposes. The results of operations of Avizia have been included within our operations from the date of acquisition.

In November 2019, we acquired all of the outstanding stock of Aligned Telehealth. This acquisition combines Aligned’s ability to access an affiliated network of psychiatrists and advanced practice psychiatric nurses, with the Company’s health system and health plan client relationships to address the mounting challenges of psychiatric clinician shortages, fragmented care and societal stigmas impeding adequate behavioral health access and treatment. The aggregate consideration for this transaction was $82.9 million, and included $48.7 million paid in cash and $34.3 million in equity comprised of 456,667 shares of Series C preferred stock at a price of $75.00 per share. The agreement also included a component of contingent earnout consideration to be earned if certain financial performance is achieved. The total potential contingent earnout consideration is capped at $70.0 million. The acquisition was a stock purchase and the goodwill resulting from this acquisition is not deductible for tax purposes. The results of operations of Aligned have been included within our operations from the date of acquisition.

Seasonality

Visit volumes typically follow the annual flu season, rising during quarter four and quarter one and falling in the summer months. While we sell to and implement our solutions to clients year-round, we experience some seasonality in terms of when we enter into agreements with our clients and when we launch our solutions to members. We typically enter into a higher percentage of agreements with new clients, as well as renewal agreements with existing clients, in the first and fourth quarters. Regardless of when the agreement is entered into, we can typically complete client implementation in an average of approximately three months. Any downturn in sales, however, may negatively affect our revenue in future periods. Accordingly, the effect of downturns in sales and potential changes in our rate of renewals may not be fully reflected in our results of operations until future periods.

Key Metrics

We monitor the following key metrics to help us evaluate our business, identify trends affecting our business, formulate business plans and make strategic decisions. We believe the following metrics are useful in evaluating our business:

Health Systems:

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
     2018      2019  

Average Number of Health System Clients

     92        138  

Total Health System Subscription Revenue

   $ 27.3 million      $ 38.8 million  

Average Annual Contract Value

   $ 296 thousand      $ 282 thousand  

 

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Health System: A health system is an Amwell Platform client whose primary business case is the delivery of care by its providers. A typical health system client has many hospitals within its system. The average number of health system clients is calculated by averaging the number of such clients under contract at the beginning and end of each fiscal year.

Health System Subscription Revenue: Health System subscription revenue consists of all platform-related fees for a health system, including subscription licenses, fees related to software modules, and overage charges, and primarily represents the fee to access our platform over the contractual period. Subscription revenue may include immaterial amounts from non-health system clients whose business model acts similarly to those clients.

Average Annual Contract Value: Average annual contract value is defined as total health system subscription revenue for the fiscal period divided by average number of health system clients.

Health Plans:

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
     2018      2019  

Average Number of Health Plan Clients

     52        56  

Total Health Plan Subscription Revenue

   $ 23.6 million      $ 30.6 million  

Average Annual Contract Value

   $ 453 thousand      $ 546 thousand  

Health Plan: A health plan is an Amwell Platform client whose primary business case is managing the healthcare financial risk of its membership. The average number of health plan clients is calculated by averaging the number of such clients under contract at the beginning and end of each fiscal year.

Health Plan Subscription Revenue: Health Plan subscription revenue consists of all platform-related fees for a health plan, including subscription licenses, per member/per month charges and fees related to clinical programs, and primarily represents the fee to access our platform over the contractual period. Subscription revenue may include immaterial amounts from non-health plan clients whose business model acts similarly to those clients.

Average Annual Contract Value: Annual contract value is defined as total health plan subscription revenue for the fiscal period divided by average number of health plan clients.

Visits:

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
     2018      2019  

AMG Paid Visits (thousands)

     551        759  

Total Visit Revenue

   $ 26.5 million      $ 40.7 million  

Revenue per Visit

   $ 48      $ 54  

AMG Paid Visit: An AMG paid visit is a case completed by our AMG affiliate providers and visit revenue reflects fee-for-service revenue to AMG for the visit.

Non-GAAP Financial Measures

In addition to our financial results determined in accordance with GAAP, we believe adjusted EBITDA, a non-GAAP measure, is useful in evaluating our operating performance. We use adjusted EBITDA to evaluate our ongoing operations and for internal planning and forecasting purposes. We believe that this non-GAAP financial measure, when taken together with the corresponding GAAP financial measures, provides meaningful

 

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supplemental information regarding our performance by excluding certain items that may not be indicative of our business, results of operations or outlook. In particular, we believe that the use of adjusted EBITDA is helpful to our investors as it is a metric used by management in assessing the health of our business and our operating performance. However, non-GAAP financial information is presented for supplemental informational purposes only, has limitations as an analytical tool and should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for financial information presented in accordance with GAAP. In addition, other companies, including companies in our industry, may calculate similarly-titled non-GAAP measures differently or may use other measures to evaluate their performance, all of which could reduce the usefulness of our non-GAAP financial measure as a tool for comparison. A reconciliation is provided below for our non-GAAP financial measure to the most directly comparable financial measure stated in accordance with GAAP. Investors are encouraged to review the related GAAP financial measure and the reconciliation of this non-GAAP financial measure to their most directly comparable GAAP financial measures, and not to rely on any single financial measure to evaluate our business.

Adjusted EBITDA

Adjusted EBITDA is a key performance measure that our management uses to assess our operating performance. Because adjusted EBITDA facilitates internal comparisons of our historical operating performance on a more consistent basis, we use this measure for business planning purposes and in evaluating acquisition opportunities.

We calculate adjusted EBITDA as net loss adjusted to exclude (i) interest income and other income, net, (ii) tax benefit and expense, (iii) depreciation and amortization, (iv) stock-based compensation expense, (v) initial public offering expenses, (vi) acquisition-related expenses and (vii) other items affecting our results that we do not view as representative of our ongoing operations, including direct and incremental expenses associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. We had no such other items during the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2019 or the six months ended June 30, 2019.

The following table presents a reconciliation of adjusted EBITDA from the most comparable GAAP measure, net loss, for each of the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2019 and the six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2020:

 

     Year Ended
December 31,
     Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
(in thousands)    2018      2019      2019      2020  

Net loss

   $ (52,312    $ (88,366    $ (41,572    $ (113,444

Add:

           

Depreciation and amortization

     5,330        7,761        3,800        4,795  

Interest and other income, net

     (2,794      (5,535      (3,261      (1,155

(Benefit) expense from income taxes

     —          (803      370        252  

Stock-based compensation

     7,669        12,135        5,071        72,096  

Initial public offering expenses

     3,098        127        6        677  

Acquisition-related (income) expenses

     1,298        2,020        95        (48

COVID-19-related expenses(1)

     —          —          —          5,742  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA

   $ (37,711    $ (72,661    $ (35,491    $ (31,085
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1)

COVID-19-related expenses include non-recurring provider bonus payments, emergency hosting licensing fees and non-medical provider temporary labor costs related to on-boarding non-AMG providers incurred in response to the initial outbreak of the COVID-19 virus as Amwell attempted to scale quickly to meet unusually high patient and non-AMG provider demand.

Some of the limitations of adjusted EBITDA include (i) adjusted EBITDA does not properly reflect capital commitments to be paid in the future, and (ii) although depreciation and amortization are non-cash charges, the

 

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underlying assets may need to be replaced and adjusted EBITDA does not reflect these capital expenditures. Our IPO and acquisition-related expenses, including legal, accounting and other professional expenses, reflect cash expenditures and we expect such expenditures for acquisitions to recur from time to time. Our adjusted EBITDA may not be comparable to similarly titled measures of other companies because they may not calculate adjusted EBITDA in the same manner as we calculate the measure, limiting its usefulness as a comparative measure. In evaluating adjusted EBITDA, you should be aware that in the future we will incur expenses similar to the adjustments in this presentation. Our presentation of adjusted EBITDA should not be construed as an inference that our future results will be unaffected by these expenses or any unusual or non-recurring items. Adjusted EBITDA should not be considered as an alternative to loss before benefit from income taxes, net loss, earnings per share, or any other performance measures derived in accordance with U.S. GAAP. When evaluating our performance, you should consider adjusted EBITDA alongside other financial performance measures, including our net loss and other GAAP results.

Components of Results of Operations

Revenue

The Company has demonstrated continued revenue growth during 2018 and 2019 as a direct result of the acceptance of telehealth, our penetration of the market, and the successful integration of recent acquisitions. The combination of the successful acquisitions of Avizia and Aligned along with our organic growth of customer base and provider base have resulted in revenue growth of 31% in the year ended December 31, 2019. In 2019, 84.0% of our revenue was on a recurring basis.

Revenue performance is reflective of the strong foundation that has been built, focused around health plans, health systems, our provider network and a consistently increasing visit base. As of June 30, 2020, the Company has 55 health plan clients (covering over 80 million lives) and 150 health system Amwell Platform clients (comprised of more than 2,000 hospitals). AMG’s active provider network grew by 145% from June 30, 2019 to June 30, 2020, to a total of over 3,800 active providers. Active Providers grew by over 1,100% from June 30, 2019 to June 30, 2020, to a total of over 50,000 Active Providers. We have similarly experienced growth on the visit front with the Company surpassing 5.6 million visits since inception, greater than 1 million visits in 2019, and over 2.9 million visits from January through June 2020.

We generate revenues from the use of the Amwell Platform in the form of recurring subscription fees for use of our platform, and related services and Carepoint sales. We also generate revenue from the performance of AMG patient visits.

Cost of Revenues, Excluding Amortization of Acquired Intangible Assets

Cost of revenue primarily consists of hosting fees paid to our hosting providers, costs incurred in connection with our professional services, technical and hosting support, and costs for running our affiliated provider network operations team. These costs primarily include employee-related expenses (including salaries, bonuses, benefits, stock-based compensation and travel).

Cost of revenues are primarily driven by the size of our provider network and the hosting and technical support required to service our platform customers. Our business models are designed to be scalable and to leverage fixed costs to generate higher revenues. While we currently expect increased investments to support accelerated growth, we also expect increased efficiencies and economies of scale. Our quarterly cost of revenues as a percentage of revenues is expected to fluctuate from period to period depending on the interplay of these aforementioned factors.

Operating Expenses

Operating expenses consist of research and development, sales and marketing, and general and administrative expenses.

 

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Research and Development Expenses

Research and development expenses include personnel and related expenses for software and hardware engineering, information technology infrastructure, security and compliance and product development (inclusive of stock-based compensation for our research and development employees). Research and development expenses also include the periodic outsourcing of similar functions to third party specialists.

Due to the quarantine and isolation strategies employed by governmental authorities, health systems and health plans to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic, a significant portion of healthcare was forced to be delivered virtually. Our health plan and health system customers believe that overall utilization of telemedicine and care delivered virtually will continue to increase during and after the COVID-19 crisis. By partnering with our customers during the crisis, we understand the increased volume and additional types of care they intend to deliver virtually on our platform. We originally expected this increase in volume, evolution and advancement of telemedicine usage to occur over the next few years but we have now adjusted our research and development strategies to match the views of our customer partners, thus accelerating the expansion of our platform volume capacity and the development of additional functionality through new programs and modules. While an increase in the research and development expense is expected in the near-term future periods, the corresponding future revenue growth is expected to result in lower expenses as a percentage of revenue.

Our research and development expenses may also fluctuate as a percentage of our total revenue from period to period due to the seasonality of our total revenue and the timing and extent of our research and development expenses.

Sales and Marketing Expenses

Sales expenses consist primarily of employee-related expenses, including salaries, benefits, commissions, travel and stock-based compensation costs for our employees engaged in sales.

We expect our sales expenses to increase as we continue to invest in the expansion of our business. We expect to hire additional sales personnel and related account management and sales support personnel to properly service our growing client base and to identify and capitalize on new strategic market opportunities.

Marketing expenses consist primarily of personnel and related expenses (inclusive of stock-based compensation) for our marketing staff, including costs of communications materials that are produced to generate greater awareness and utilization of our platform among our clients and their users. Marketing costs also include third-party independent research, participation in trade shows, brand messaging, and public relations costs.

Our sales and marketing expenses will fluctuate as a percentage of our total revenue from period to period due to the seasonality of our total revenue and the timing and extent of our advertising and marketing expenses.

General and Administrative Expenses

General and administrative expenses include personnel and related expenses, and professional fees incurred by finance, legal, human resources, information technology, our executives, and executive administration staff. They also include stock-based compensation for employees in these departments and expenses related to auditing, consulting, legal, and corporate insurance.

We expect our general and administrative expenses to increase for the foreseeable future due to costs that we incur as a new public company, as well as other costs associated with continuing to grow our business. However, we expect our general and administrative expenses to decrease as a percentage of our total revenue over the next several years. Our general and administrative expenses may fluctuate as a percentage of our total

 

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revenue from period to period due to the seasonality of our total revenue and the timing and extent of our general and administrative expenses.

Depreciation and Amortization Expense

Depreciation and amortization expense includes the amortization of intangible assets and depreciation related to our fixed assets. Amortization of acquired intangible assets consists of the amortization of acquisition-related intangible assets, which are customer relationships, contractor relationships, technology and trade names.

Interest Income and Other Income (Expense), Net

The balance of interest income and other income (expense), net, consists predominantly of interest income on our money-market and short-term investments. We did not incur material interest expenses in the period as there were no outstanding debts or notes payables.

Discussion of Consolidated Results of Operations

The following table sets forth our summarized consolidated statement of operations data for the six months ended June 30, 2020, and 2019 and the dollar and percentage change between the respective periods:

 

     Six Months Ended June 30,  
     2019      2020                
     $      $      Variance      % Change  

Revenue

   $ 69,081      $ 122,282      $ 53,201        77.0

Costs and operating expenses:

           

Costs of revenue, excluding amortization of acquired intangible assets

     36,000        76,853        40,853        113.5

Research and development

     25,567        32,573        7,006        27.4

Sales and marketing

     22,642        26,220        3,578        15.8

General and administrative

     25,535        95,424        69,889        273.7

Depreciation and amortization expense

     3,800        4,795        995        26.2
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Total costs and operating expenses

     113,544        235,865        122,321        107.7

Loss from operations

     (44,463      (113,583      (69,120      155.5

Interest income and other income (expense), net

     3,261        1,155        (2,106      (64.6 )% 
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Loss before benefit (expense) from income taxes and loss from equity method investment

     (41,202      (112,428      (71,226      172.9
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Benefit (expense) from income taxes

     (370      (252      118        (31.9 )% 

Loss from equity method investment

     —          (764      (764      N/A  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Net loss

   $ (41,572    $ (113,444      (71,872      172.9
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Net loss attributable to noncontrolling interest

     (828      (2,405      (1,577      190.5

Net loss attributable to American Well Corporation

   $ (40,744    $ (111,039    $ (70,295      172.5
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

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The following table sets forth our summarized consolidated statement of operations data for the years ended December 31, 2019, and 2018 and the dollar and percentage change between the respective periods:

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
     2018      2019                
     $      $      Variance      % Change  

Revenue

   $ 113,955      $ 148,857      $ 34,902        30.6

Costs and operating expenses:

           

Costs of revenue, excluding amortization of acquired intangible assets

     58,612        79,976        21,364        36.4

Research and development

     36,273        53,941        17,688        48.7

Sales and marketing

     31,629        47,672        16,043        50.7

General and administrative

     37,217        54,211        16,994        45.7

Depreciation and amortization expense

     5,330        7,761        2,431        45.6
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Total costs and operating expenses

     169,061        243,561        74,500        44.1

Loss from operations

     (55,106      (94,704      (39,598      71.9

Interest income and other income (expense), net

     2,794        5,535        2,741        98.1
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Loss before benefit from income taxes

     (52,312      (89,169      (36,857      70.5
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Benefit from income taxes

     —          803        803        N/A  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Net loss

   $ (52,312    $ (88,366      (36,054      68.9
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interest

     362        (1,176      (1,538      (424.9 %) 

Net loss attributable to American Well Corporation

   $ (52,674    $ (87,190    $ (34,516      65.5
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Six months ended June 30, 2020, vs. six months ended June 30, 2019

Revenue

Total revenue was $122.3 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020, compared to $69.1 million during the six months ended June 30, 2019, an increase of $53.2 million, or 77.0%. This increase was substantially driven by an increase in visit revenue volume ($44.0 million increase). Visit revenue has increased due to the impact of the COVID-19 crisis as well as the contribution of the Aligned Acquisition (which closed in the fourth quarter of 2019). Revenue increase was also attributable to new clients using our platform and existing clients adding additional modules to their platform subscriptions, such as our COVID-19 module. We believe that the strength of our technology platform will continue to serve as the foundation for our revenue growth.

Subscription revenue was $46.2 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020, compared to $38.9 million during the six months ended June 30, 2019, an increase of $7.3 million, or 18.8%. Revenue earned from AMG patient visits increased by $44.0 million, or 237.7%, from $18.5 million in the six months ended June 30, 2019 to $62.5 million in the six months ended June 30, 2020. This increase was primarily driven by increased utilization across our health system and health plan clients primarily from the COVID-19 pandemic. AMG paid visits constituted 30% of the total visits for the six months ended June 30, 2020, compared to 68% for the six months ended June 30, 2019. Revenue earned from services and Carepoints were $13.6 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020, compared to $11.7 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019, an increase of $1.9 million, or 16.3%. The increase in services and Carepoints revenue was largely the result of timing with respect to the performance of such obligations.

Costs of Revenue, Excluding Amortization of Acquired Intangible Assets

Cost of revenue was $76.9 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020, compared to $36.0 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019, an increase of $40.9 million, or 113.5%. The increase was primarily due to

 

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an increase of $32.5 million in provider related costs, with some portion of these provider costs due both to increased visit volumes as well as the Aligned Acquisition. Some portion of these provider costs were above typical levels due to the COVID-19 emergency rapid expansion of active providers. The increase in visit volume also resulted in the need to utilize a significantly higher level of contractor resources to properly service visit demand. The Company experienced a $3.5 million increase in employee-related expense (primarily in the form of variable compensation and stock compensation expense) and a $4.5 million increase in other costs, primarily implementation and hosting related expenses. As a percentage of revenue, cost of revenues has increased as a result of the shift in revenue mix. The impact of COVID-19 has increased our visit revenue, which generates a lower gross margin contribution.

Research and Development Expenses

Research and development expenses were $32.6 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020, compared to $25.6 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019, an increase of $7.0 million, or 27.4%. This increase is primarily driven by an increase of $3.4 million from employee-related costs (inclusive of stock compensation expense). The increase in research and development expense was further driven by a $0.5 million increase in annual service agreement expenses for certain services used by the research and development group.

Sales and Marketing Expenses

Sales and marketing expenses were $26.2 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020, compared to $22.6 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019, an increase of $3.6 million, or 15.8%. This increase in sales and marketing primarily consisted of a $3.3 million increase in employee-related costs (inclusive of commissions and stock compensation expense) and, to a lesser extent, an increase of $0.8 million in annual service agreement expense for certain services used by the sales and marketing group.

General and Administrative Expenses

General and administrative expenses were $95.4 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020, compared to $25.5 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019, an increase of $69.9 million, or 273.7%. This increase was driven by stock-based compensation expense of $65.7 million (predominantly related to restricted stock units granted to the co-CEOs). Additionally, the increase consisted of employee-related costs (excluding compensation and stock compensation expense) of approximately $4.7 million. Each of these expenses were partially offset by savings in non-compensation related administrative expenses.

General and administrative expenses, excluding the increase in stock-based compensation, are expected to continue to increase (in absolute dollars) in future periods as we continue to grow in size and complexity while at the same time recognizing the full year impact of the regulatory and compliance costs associated with being a publicly traded company.

Depreciation and Amortization Expense

Depreciation and amortization expenses were $4.8 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020, compared to $3.8 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019, an increase of $1.0 million, or 26.2%. For the six months ended June 30, 2020, depreciation expense was $0.9 million and amortization expense was $3.9 million. For the six months ended June 30, 2019, depreciation expense was $0.9 million and amortization expense was $2.9 million.

Interest Income and Other Income (Expense), net

Interest income and other expenses were $1.2 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020, compared to $3.3 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019, a decrease of $2.1 million, or 64.6%. This amount consists entirely of interest income from our cash equivalents and short-term investments.

 

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Benefit (Expense) from Income Taxes

Income tax expense was $0.3 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020, compared to $0.4 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019, a decrease of $0.1 million, or 31.9%.

Loss from Equity Method Investment

The Company and Cleveland Clinic partnered to form a joint venture, under the name CCAW, JV LLC, to provide broad access to comprehensive and high acuity care services via telehealth. The Company does not have a controlling financial interest in CCAW, JV LLC, but it does have the ability to exercise significant influence over the operating and financial policies of CCAW, JV LLC. Therefore, the Company accounts for its investments in CCAW, JV LLC using the equity method of accounting.

During the six months ended June 30, 2020, the Company recognized a loss of $0.8 million as its proportionate share of the joint venture results of operations.

Year ended December 31, 2019, vs. year ended December 31, 2018

Revenue

Total revenue was $148.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, compared to $114.0 million during the year ended December 31, 2018, an increase of $34.9 million, or 30.6%. The increase was predominately the result of new clients using the platform as the average number of health system and health plan clients on our platform increased by 50, to 194 at December 31, 2019 from 144 at December 31, 2018, a 35.0% increase. We believe that the strength of our technology platform will continue to serve as the foundation for our revenue growth.

Subscription revenue from health system clients was $38.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, compared to $27.3 million during the year ended December 31, 2018, an increase of $11.5 million, or 42.3%. This increase was substantially driven by a 50% increase in the average number of subscription clients increasing from 92 to 138. Subscription revenue from health plan clients was $30.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, compared to $23.6 million during the year ended December 31, 2018, an increase of $7.0 million, or 29.8%. This increase was driven by an 8% increase in the average number of subscription clients, increasing from 52 to 56, and increases in the health plan client average contract value increasing 20.5%. The total number of paid AMG patient visits increased 38%, by 208,000, from 551,000 in the year ended December 31, 2018 to 759,000 in the year ended December 31, 2019. This increase was primarily driven by increased utilization across our health system and health plan clients. AMG paid visits constituted 66% of the total visits for the year ended December 31, 2019, compared to 73% for the year ended December 31, 2018.

Costs of Revenue, Excluding Amortization of Acquired Intangible Assets

Cost of revenue was $80.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, compared to $58.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, an increase of $21.4 million, or 36.4%. The increase was primarily due to an increase of $4.6 million in employee-related expense (inclusive of stock compensation expense) and a $16.8 million increase in other costs, primarily provider related costs, combined with implementation and hosting related expenses. With respect to employee-related expense, our total administrative employee headcount dedicated to servicing AMG increased to 158 on December 31, 2019, as compared to 145 on December 31, 2018. As a percentage of revenue, cost of revenues have remained relatively consistent year over year.

Research and Development Expenses

Research and development expenses were $53.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, compared to $36.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, an increase of $17.7 million, or 48.7%. This increase is

 

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primarily driven by an increase of $11.6 million from employee-related costs (inclusive of stock compensation expense). The increase in research and development expense was further driven by a $5.8 million increase in third party consulting related spend.

In 2019, the Company has initiated a focused effort to invest in the area of research and development. This increased investment focused primarily on the hiring of highly technically skilled resources to execute on our growth strategy. This increase in the research and development employee base is expected to result in increased research and development expense in future periods. However, the corresponding growth and revenue is expected to result in a lower expense as a percentage of revenue.

Total research and development employee headcount increased to 223 on December 31, 2019, as compared to 209 on December 31, 2018.

Sales and Marketing Expenses

Sales and marketing expenses were $47.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, compared to $31.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, an increase of $16.0 million, or 50.7%. This increase in sales and marketing primarily consisted of direct marketing spend, a $9.0 million increase in employee-related costs including commissions (inclusive of stock compensation expense) and, to a lesser extent, an increase $1.3 million in trade show and sponsorship expenses.

Total sales and marketing employee headcount increased to 149 on December 31, 2019, as compared to 121 on December 31, 2018.

General and Administrative Expenses

General and administrative expenses were $54.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, compared to $37.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, an increase of $17.0 million, or 45.7%. This increase was driven in part by increases in employee-related costs (including bonuses and stock compensation expense) of approximately $12.2 million, consulting of $3.3 million, service support agreements of $1.5 million and acquisition and integration costs of $0.7 million. Each of these expenses were partially offset by savings in non-compensation related administrative expenses.

General and administrative expenses are expected to continue to increase (in absolute dollars) in future periods as we continue to grow in size and complexity while at the same time recognizing the full year impact of the regulatory and compliance costs associated with being a publicly traded company.

Total general and administrative employee headcount increased to 156 on December 31, 2019, as compared to 112 on December 31, 2018.

Depreciation and Amortization Expense

Depreciation and amortization expenses were $7.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, compared to $5.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, an increase of $2.4 million, or 45.6%. The increase in depreciation and amortization was primarily driven by a $2.3 million increase in amortization as a result of the amortization of acquired intangible assets related to the Avizia Acquisition in July 2018.

Interest Income and Other Income (Expense), net

Interest income and other income (expense), net, was $5.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, compared to $2.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, an increase of $2.7 million, or 98.1%. This balance consists entirely of interest income from our cash equivalents and short-term investments.

 

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Quarterly Results of Operations and Other Data

The following table sets forth our unaudited quarterly statements of operations data for each of the quarters indicated. The unaudited quarterly statements of operations data set forth below have been prepared on the same basis as our audited consolidated financial statements and, in the opinion of management, reflect all adjustments, consisting only of normal recurring adjustments, that are necessary for the fair statement of such data. Our historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected in the future, and the results for any quarter are not necessarily indicative of results to be expected for a full year or any other period. The following quarterly financial data should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus.

 

     Three Months Ended  
     March 31,
2019
(unaudited
    June 30,
2019
(unaudited)
    September 30,
2019
(unaudited)
    December 31,
2019
(unaudited)
    March 31,
2020
(unaudited)
    June 30,
2020
(unaudited)
 

Revenue

   $ 33,667     $ 35,414     $ 34,744     $ 45,032     $ 53,714     $ 68,568  

Costs and operating expenses:

            

Costs of revenue, excluding amortization of acquired intangible assets

     18,605       17,395       19,060       24,916       33,027       43,826  

Research and development

     13,253       12,314       13,602       14,772       14,936       17,637  

Sales and marketing

     11,189       11,453       11,309       13,721       13,874       12,346  

General and administrative

     11,825       13,710       14,654       14,022       15,342       80,082  

Depreciation and amortization expense

     1,894       1,906       1,868       2,093       2,286       2,509  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total costs and operating expenses

     56,766       56,778       60,493       69,524       79,465       156,400  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss from operations

     (23,099     (21,364     (25,749     (24,492     (25,751     (87,832

Interest income and other income (expense), net

     1,584       1,677       1,286       988       847       308  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss before benefit (expense) from income taxes and loss from equity method investment

     (21,515     (19,687     (24,463     (23,504     (24,904     (87,524

Benefit (expense) from income taxes

     —         (370     392       781       —         (252

Loss from equity method investment

     —         —         —         —         (320     (444
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

     (21,515     (20,057     (24,071     (22,723     (25,224     (88,220
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net (loss) income attributable to non-controlling interest

     (384     (444     (56     (292     (843     (1,562
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss attributable to American Well Corporation

   $ (21,131   $ (19,613   $ (24,015   $ (22,431   $ (24,381   $ (86,658
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Liquidity and Capital Resources

The following table presents a summary of our cash flow activity for the periods set forth below:

 

     Year Ended      Six months Ended  
     December 31,      June 30,  
     2018      2019      2019      2020  

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows Data:

           

Net cash used in operating activities

   $ (74,006    $ (81,892    $ (40,739    $ (57,822

Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities

     (245,933      119,999        146,852        4,334  

Net cash provided by financing activities

     278,181        46,639        379        148,462  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ (41,758    $ 84,746      $ 106,492      $ 94,974  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Sources of Financing

Our principal sources of liquidity were cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments totaling $177.6 million and $262.7 million as of December 31, 2019 and June 30, 2020, respectively, which were held for a variety of growth initiatives and investments as well as working capital purposes. Our cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments are comprised of money market funds and marketable securities including U.S. Treasury bills. These funds have been primarily generated through the periodic offering of preferred stock.

In July 2018, we acquired Avizia for $65.3 million in cash (plus Series C preferred stock consideration) and in November 2019, we acquired Aligned for $48.7 million in cash (plus Series C preferred stock consideration and the potential for contingent earnout consideration).

In the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company completed a Series C fund raise with net proceeds of $280.4 million (after issuance costs of $6.3 million). In the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company completed a Series C fund raise with net proceeds of $45.8 million (after issuance costs of $1.3 million). In the six month period ended June 30, 2020, the Company completed a Series C fund raise with net proceeds of $146.0 million (after issuance costs of $1.0 million which are included in accrued expenses as of June 30, 2020).

We typically invoice our customers annually in advance for their annual software access fee. Therefore, a substantial source of our cash is from such invoices, which are included on our consolidated balance sheets as accounts receivable prior to collection and contract liabilities over the contractual service commitment period. Accordingly, collections from our customers have a material impact on our cash flows from operating activities.

As shown in the accompanying consolidated financial statements, the Company incurred a loss from operations of $94.7 million and a net loss of $88.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2019 and had an accumulated deficit of $357.9 million as of December 31, 2019. The Company incurred a loss from operations of $113.6 million and a net loss of $113.4 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020 and had an accumulated deficit of $469.0 million as of June 30, 2020. To date, the Company has funded its operations primarily through private placements of its convertible preferred stock as well as through sales of software access related services. The Company has no debt as of December 31, 2019 or June 30, 2020 and expects to generate operating losses in future years.

We believe that our existing cash and cash equivalents will be sufficient to meet our working capital and capital expenditure needs for at least the 12 months from the issuance date of the financial statements. Our future capital requirements will depend on many factors including our growth rate, contract renewal activity, number of consultations on our platform, the timing and extent of spending to support product development efforts, our expansion of sales and marketing activities, the introduction of new and enhanced services offerings, and the continuing market acceptance of telehealth services. We may in the future enter into arrangements to acquire or invest in complementary businesses, services and technologies and intellectual property rights. We may be

 

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required to seek additional equity or debt financing. In the event that additional financing is required from outside sources, we may not be able to raise it on terms acceptable to us or at all. If we are unable to raise additional capital when desired, our business, financial condition and results of operations would be adversely affected.

Indebtedness & Lines of Credit

In January 2011, the Company entered into a credit agreement (the “Line of Credit”) with a financial institution that provides for maximum borrowings in one or more advances of an amount up to $5.0 million. Borrowings under the Line of Credit accrue interest at the London Interbank Offered Rate plus 1.25%. Borrowings are repayable immediately upon demand by the financial institution. In November 2017, the Line of Credit was amended to increase the maximum borrowings to $7.0 million. As of December 31, 2018, 2019, and June 30, 2020, the Company had no outstanding borrowings under the Line of Credit.

During any period that the Line of Credit is in effect, the Company can request the financial institution issue a letter of credit with a maximum maturity not to exceed twelve months. Any letters of credit issued by the financial instrument reduce the maximum borrowings available under the Line of Credit. As of December 31, 2019 and June 30, 2020, the maximum borrowing available to the Company is $5.9 million based on the outstanding letters of credit of $1.1 million that have been issued by the financial institution.

Six months ended June 30, 2020, vs. six months ended June 30, 2019

Cash Used in Operating Activities

For the six months ended June 30, 2020, cash used in operating activities was $(57.8) million. The primary driver of this use of cash was our net loss of $113.4 million. The net loss for the year was reflective of the expenses incurred with our response to COVID-19 and our continued investments made back into the Company’s infrastructure, partially offset by the revenue growth discussed above. The net loss was partially offset by non-cash expenses of $79.4 million (primarily stock-based compensation of $72.1 million and depreciation and amortization of $4.8 million).

For the six months ended June 30, 2019, cash used in operating activities was $(40.7) million. The primary driver of this use of cash was our net loss of $(41.6) million. The cash used for operating activities was primarily driven by investment in corporate infrastructure as the Company integrated the Avizia Acquisition and prepared for public company requirements. The net loss was partially offset by non-cash charges totaling $10.1 million (primarily comprised of stock-based compensation of $5.1 million and depreciation and amortization expense of $3.8 million.)

Cash Provided by Investing Activities

Cash provided by investing activities was $4.3 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020. Cash provided by investing activities consisted of $39.4 million in proceeds from the maturities of investments, offset by $29.8 million in purchases of investments. Further, cash used in investing activities included a $2.9 million investment in the CCAW, JV LLC joint venture with Cleveland Clinic and $2.3 million in the purchases of property and equipment.

Cash provided by investing activities was $146.9 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019. Cash provided by investing activities consisted of $206.8 million in proceeds from the maturities of investments, which were partially offset by the purchase of $59.1 million in investments. Further, the Company used $1.0 million for purchases of property and equipment.

 

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Cash Provided by Financing Activities

Cash provided by financing activities for the six months ended June 30, 2020, was $148.5 million. Cash provided by financing activities consisted of $146.8 million of cash proceeds from our issuance of Series C Convertible Preferred Stock, net of issuance costs.

Cash provided by financing activities for the six months ended June 30, 2019, was $0.4 million. Cash provided by financing activities consisted of proceeds received from the exercise of options of common stock.

Year ended December 31, 2019, vs. year ended December 31, 2018

Cash Used in Operating Activities

For the year ended December 31, 2019, cash used in operating activities was $(81.9) million. The primary driver of this use of cash was our net loss of $(88.4) million. The net loss for the year was reflective of the investments made back into the Company (from both a personnel and technology perspective), partially offset by the overall growth of our business including an increase in new clients and expansion of business with existing clients. The net loss was partially offset by non-cash expenses of $21.0 million (primarily stock-based compensation of $12.1 million and depreciation and amortization of $7.8 million).

For the year ended December 31, 2018, cash used in operating activities was $(74.0) million. The primary driver of this use of cash was our net loss of $(52.3) million. The cash used for operating activities was primarily driven by the overall growth of our business including an increase in new clients (through organic growth and the Avizia Acquisition) and expansion of business by existing clients. The net loss was partially offset by non-cash charges totaling $15.1 million, which was primarily comprised of stock-based compensation of $7.7 million and depreciation and amortization expense of $5.3 million.

Cash Provided by Investing Activities

Cash provided by investing activities was $120.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2019. Cash provided by investing activities consisted of $246.0 million in proceeds from maturities of investments, partially offset by $78.9 million in purchases of investments. The Company used $45.8 million in connection with the acquisition of Aligned (in addition to Series C stock consideration). Further, cash used in investing activities included $1.3 million in the purchases of property and equipment.

Cash used in investing activities was $(245.9) million for the year ended December 31, 2018. Cash used in investing activities consisted of $355.2 million in purchases of investments and $175.6 million in proceeds from the sale of securities. Further, the Company used $64.4 million (in addition to Series C stock consideration) in connection with the acquisition of Avizia and $1.9 million for the purchases of property and equipment.

We invest a portion of our available cash in investments that are not accounted for as cash equivalents under GAAP. Instead, when we invest such amounts, it is recorded as a use of cash for investing activities and when we liquidate such investments to finance cash needs, it is recorded as cash provided by investing activities. On a net basis, activities related to these investments represented $167.1 million of cash provided by investing activities in 2019, representing our use of these investments to fund cash needs. In 2018, purchases of these investments represented $179.6 million of cash used in investing activities, reflecting our receipt of funds from a financing round that we invested. Excluding such activities, cash used for investing activities was $47.1 million in 2019 and $66.3 million in 2018, primarily related to acquisitions of Aligned and Avizia.

Cash Provided by Financing Activities

Cash provided by financing activities for the year ended December 31, 2019, was $46.6 million. Cash provided by financing activities consisted of $45.8 million of cash proceeds from our issuance of Series C Convertible Preferred Stock, net of issuance costs, and $1.0 million of proceeds from the exercise of employee stock options.

 

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Cash provided by financing activities for the year ended December 31, 2018, was $278.2 million. Cash provided by financing activities consisted of $280.4 million of cash proceeds from our issuance of Series C Convertible Preferred Stock, net of issuance costs, and $0.6 million of proceeds from the exercise of employee stock options. Cash provided by financing activities was partially offset by $2.9 million used to repurchases Series A Convertible Preferred Stock.

Contractual Obligations and Commitments

The following summarizes our contractual obligations as of December 31, 2019:

 

     Payment Due by Period  
     Total      Less than
1 Year
     1 to 3
Years
     4 to 5
Years
     More than
5 Years
 

Operating Leases

   $ 13,840      $ 6,925      $ 6,685      $ 230      $ —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 13,840      $ 6,925      $ 6,685      $ 230      $ —    
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Our existing office and hosting facilities lease agreements provide us with the option to renew and generally provide for rental payments on a graduated basis. Our future operating lease obligations would change if we entered into additional operating lease agreements as we expand our operations and if we exercised the office and hosting facilities lease options. The contractual commitment amounts in the table above are associated with agreements that are enforceable and legally binding and that specify all significant terms, including fixed or minimum services to be used, fixed, minimum or variable price provisions and the approximate timing of the transaction. Obligations under contracts that we can cancel without a significant penalty are not included in the table above.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

During the periods presented, we did not have, nor do we currently have, any relationships with unconsolidated entities or financial partnerships, such as entities often referred to as structured finance or special purpose entities, which would have been established for the purpose of facilitating off-balance sheet arrangements or other contractually narrow or limited purposes. We are therefore not exposed to the financing, liquidity, market or credit risk that could arise if we had engaged in those types of relationships.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

Interest Rate Risk

We had cash and cash equivalents totaling $232.7 million, $137.7 million, and $48.0 million as of June 30, 2020, December 31, 2019, and 2018, respectively. The Company also held investments totaling $30.0 million, $40.0 million and $208.2 million as of June 30, 2020, December 31, 2019, and 2018, respectively. These amounts were primarily invested in money markets and U.S. Treasury bills. The cash and cash equivalents are held for a variety of growth and investments as well as working capital purposes. Our investments are made for capital preservation purposes. We do not enter into investments for trading or speculative purposes. All our investments are denominated in U.S. dollars.

We do not believe that an increase or decrease of 100 basis points in interest rates would have a material effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations. However, our cash equivalents are subject to market risk due to changes in interest rates. Fixed rate securities may have their market value adversely affected due to a rise in interest rates. Due in part to these factors, our future investment income may fall short of expectation due to changes in interest rates or we may suffer losses in principal if we are forced to sell securities that decline in market value due to changes in interest rates.

 

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Fluctuations in the value of our money market funds caused by a change in interest rates (gains or losses on the carrying value) are recorded in other income and are realized only if we sell the underlying securities.

Foreign Currency Exchange Risk

To date, a substantial majority of our revenue from customer arrangements has been denominated in U.S. dollars. We have limited operations outside the United States. As of June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, we had one foreign subsidiary. The functional currency of our foreign subsidiary is the U.S. dollar. The Company also has a branch with a functional currency of the New Israeli Shekel, however activity in the New Israeli Shekel is not considered significant. Accordingly, we believe we do not have a material exposure to foreign currency risk. We may choose to focus on international expansion, which may increase our exposure to foreign currency exchange risk in the future.

Inflation Risk

We do not believe that inflation had a material effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations in the last two years. If our costs were to become subject to significant inflationary pressures, we may not be able to fully offset such higher costs through price increases. Our inability or failure to do so could harm our business, financial condition or results of operations.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

Our management’s discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations is based on our financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with GAAP. The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. The Company bases its estimates on historical experience, current business factors, and various other assumptions that the Company believes are necessary to consider to form a basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities, the recorded amounts of revenue and expenses, and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. The Company is subject to uncertainties such as the impact of future events, economic and political factors, and changes in the Company’s business environment; therefore, actual results could differ from these estimates. Accordingly, the accounting estimates used in the preparation of the Company’s consolidated financial statements will change as new events occur, as more experience is acquired, as additional information is obtained, and as the Company’s operating environment evolves.

Changes in estimates are made when circumstances warrant. Such changes in estimates are reflected in the reported results of operations; if material, the effects of changes in estimates are disclosed in the notes to the consolidated financial statements. Significant estimates and assumptions reflected in these consolidated financial statements include, but are not limited to, revenue recognition, business combinations, goodwill and intangible assets and stock-based compensation.

We believe that the accounting policies discussed below are critical to understanding our historical and future performance, as these policies relate to the more significant areas involving management’s judgments and estimates. See Note 2 to our consolidated financial statements appearing at the end of this prospectus for a description of our other significant accounting policies.

Revenue Recognition

The Company generates revenue from contracts with customers who purchase access to the Company’s hosted telehealth platform which includes access to the Company’s network of medical professionals. The Company also provides implementation and post go-live professional services for its telehealth platform.

 

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Access to the platform, includes the ability for customers to access the AMG network of medical professionals, as well as, in certain cases, support and maintenance and other professional services. The typical contract term is three years. Most of the Company’s contracts are non-cancelable over the contractual term. Customers typically have the right to terminate their contracts for cause if the Company fails to perform in accordance with the contractual terms.

For customers who purchase access to the Amwell Platform, the Company hosts a dedicated instance of the telehealth platform, white-labeled under the customer’s own name, branding, and with customized workflows and operating choices. Certain implementation services are required in order for the customer to drive its intended benefit. These implementation services generally span several months and are not performed by another entity.

We recognize revenue from contracts with customers using the five-step method described in Note 2 in our consolidated financial statements. At contract inception, we evaluate whether two or more contracts should be combined and accounted for as a single contract and whether the combined or single contract includes more than one performance obligation. We combine contracts entered into at or near the same time with the same customer if we determine that the contracts are negotiated as a package with a single commercial objective; the amount of consideration to be paid in one contract depends on the price or performance of the other contract; or the services promised in the contracts are a single performance obligation.

In general, we satisfy the majority of our performance obligations over time as we transfer the promised services to our customers. We review the contract terms and conditions to evaluate the timing and amount of revenue recognition; the related contract balances; and our remaining performance obligations. These evaluations require significant judgment that could affect the timing and amount of revenue recognized.

Deferred revenues consist of the unearned portion of billed fees for our enterprise software access fees and related services, which is subsequently recognized as revenue in accordance with our revenue recognition policy. The Company estimates the amount of revenue it expects to recognize during the twelve-month period following the financial statement date which is recorded as current deferred revenue and the remaining portion is recorded as noncurrent. As of June 30, 2020, we had current deferred revenues of $62.0 million and $9.9 million of noncurrent deferred revenue. As of December 31, 2019, we had current deferred revenues of $66.5 million and $10.9 million of noncurrent as compared to $64.1 million current deferred revenue and $29.2 million of noncurrent as of December 31, 2018. This timing of the actual revenue may differ from the estimate as additional information becomes available including but not limited when the hosting arrangements are provided to the customer and when professional service hours are incurred.

Business Combinations

The Company accounts for business combinations using the acquisition method of accounting. Application of this method of accounting requires that (i) identifiable assets acquired (including identifiable intangible assets) and liabilities assumed generally be measured and recognized at fair value as of the acquisition date and (ii) the excess of the purchase price over the net fair value of identifiable assets acquired and liabilities assumed be recognized as goodwill. Transaction costs related to business combinations are expensed as incurred.

Determining the fair value of assets acquired and liabilities assumed and the allocation of the purchase price requires management to use significant judgment and estimates, especially with respect to intangible assets. Critical estimates in valuing certain identifiable assets include, but are not limited to, the selection of valuation methodologies, estimates of future revenue and cash flows, expected long-term market growth, future expected operating expenses, costs of capital and appropriate discount rates. Management’s estimates of fair value are based upon assumptions believed to be reasonable, but which are inherently uncertain and unpredictable and, as a result, actual results may differ from estimates. During the measurement period, the Company may record certain adjustments to the carrying value of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed with the corresponding offset to

 

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goodwill. After the measurement period, which could last up to one year after the transaction date, all adjustments are recorded in the consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss.

Goodwill and Intangible Assets

Amortization of acquired intangible assets is the result of the consolidation of NTN which occurred in 2016, the acquisition of Avizia which occurred in 2018 and the acquisition of Aligned which occurred in 2019. As a result of these transactions, contractor and customer relationships, acquired technology, and trade name were identified as intangible assets, and are amortized over their estimated useful lives.

We recognize the excess of the purchase price over the fair value of identifiable net assets acquired as goodwill. Goodwill is not amortized but is tested for impairment annually on November 30 or more frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the goodwill may not be recoverable. Our goodwill impairment tests are performed at the enterprise level given our single reporting unit.

Our goodwill impairment analysis first assesses qualitative factors to determine whether events or circumstances existed that would lead us to conclude it is more likely than not that the fair value of the reporting unit is below its carrying amount. If we determine that it is more likely than not that the fair value of the reporting unit is below the carrying amount, a quantitative goodwill assessment is required. In the quantitative evaluation, the fair value of the reporting unit is determined and compared to the carrying value. If the fair value estimate is less than the carrying value, goodwill is considered impaired for the amount by which the carrying amount exceeds the reporting unit’s fair value with the maximum impairment being equal to the carrying value of goodwill. A charge is reported as impairment of goodwill in the consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss.

Stock-Based Compensation

We measure all stock-based awards granted to employees and directors based on the fair value on the date of the grant and recognize the corresponding compensation expense of those awards over the requisite service period, which is generally the vesting period of the respective award. We issue stock option awards and restricted stock units with only service-based vesting conditions and record the expense for these awards using the straight-line method.

We estimate the fair value of each stock option grant using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model, which uses as inputs the fair value of our common stock and assumptions we make for the volatility of our common stock, the expected term of our stock options, the risk-free interest rate for a period that approximates the expected term of our stock options and our expected dividend yield. The assumptions and estimates are as follows:

 

   

Fair Value of Class A Common Stock—The absence of an active market for our common stock requires us to estimate the fair value of our common stock. See “—Common Stock Valuations” below.

 

   

Expected Term—The expected term represents the period that the stock-based awards are expected to be outstanding. We determine the expected term using the simplified method. The simplified method deems the term to be the average of the time-to-vesting and the contractual life of the options. For stock options granted to non-employees, the expected term equals the remaining contractual term of the option from the vesting date.

 

   

Expected Volatility—As we have no trading history for our common stock, the expected volatility was estimated by taking the average historic price volatility for industry peers, consisting of several public companies in our industry that are either similar in size, stage, or financial leverage, over a period equivalent to the expected term of the awards.

 

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Risk-Free Interest Rate—The risk-free interest rate is calculated using the average of the published interest rates of U.S. Treasury zero-coupon issues with maturities that are commensurate with the expected term.

 

   

Dividend Yield—The dividend yield assumption is zero, as we have no history of, or plans to make, dividend payments.

The weighted average of assumptions that the Company used to determine the fair value of the common stock options granted to employees and directors were as follows:

 

     Years Ended December 31,     Six months Ended  
     2018     2019     June 30, 2020  

Risk-free interest rate

     2.96     2.17     1.32

Expected term (in years)

     6.0       6.0       6.1  

Expected volatility

     47     50     51

Expected dividend yield

     0     0     0

Common Stock Valuations

Prior to the completion of our IPO, the fair value of the common stock underlying our stock awards was determined by our board of directors. The valuations of our common stock prior to the completion of our IPO were determined in accordance with the guidelines outlined in the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants Practice Aid, Valuation of Privately-Held-Company Equity Securities Issued as Compensation. In the absence of a public trading market, our board of directors, with input from management, exercised significant judgment and considered numerous objective and subjective factors to determine the fair value of our common stock as of the date of each option grant, including the following factors:

 

   

contemporaneous valuations performed by third-party valuation firms;

 

   

the prices, rights, preferences, and privileges of our convertible preferred stock relative to those of our common stock;

 

   

the prices of convertible preferred stock sold by us to third-party investors in arms-length transactions;

 

   

the lack of marketability of our common stock;

 

   

our actual operating and financial performance;

 

   

current business conditions and projections;

 

   

our stage of development;

 

   

the likelihood of achieving a liquidity event, such as an initial public offering or a merger or acquisition of our business given prevailing market conditions;

 

   

recent secondary stock transactions;

 

   

the market performance of comparable publicly-traded companies; and

 

   

U.S. market conditions.

Following our IPO, we rely on the closing price of our Class A common stock as reported on the date of grant to determine the fair value of our Class A common stock, as shares of our Class A common stock are traded in the public market.

Recently Issued and Adopted Accounting Pronouncements

Refer to Note 2 of our consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus for recently adopted accounting pronouncements and recently issued accounting pronouncements not yet adopted as of the date of this prospectus.

 

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Emerging Growth Company Status

We are an emerging growth company, as defined in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012 (the “JOBS Act”). Under the JOBS Act, emerging growth companies can delay adopting new or revised accounting standards issued subsequent to the enactment of the JOBS Act until such time as those standards apply to private companies. We have elected to use this extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards that have different effective dates for public and private companies until the earlier of the date that it is (i) no longer an emerging growth company or (ii) affirmatively and irrevocably opt out of the extended transition period provided in the JOBS Act. As a result, our financial statements may not be comparable to companies that comply with the new or revised accounting pronouncements as of public company effective dates.

 

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BUSINESS

Our Mission

Amwell connects and enables providers, insurers, patients and innovators to deliver greater access to more affordable, higher quality care.

Overview

We are a leading telehealth company enabling digital delivery of care for healthcare’s key stakeholders. We empower our clients at the enterprise level with the core technology and services necessary to successfully develop and distribute telehealth programs that meet their strategic, operational, and social objectives under their own brands. The Amwell Platform is a complete digital care delivery solution that equips our health system, health plan and innovator, including government, clients with the tools to enable new models of care for their patients and members. Our scalable technology embeds with our clients’ existing offerings and clinical workflows, spanning the continuum of care and enabling care delivery across a wide variety of clinical, retail, school and home settings. Our client-focused approach drives our success as one of the largest telehealth companies. As of June 30, 2020, we powered the digital care programs of 55 health plans, which support over 36,000 employers and collectively represent more than 80 million covered lives, as well as 150 of the nation’s largest health systems, encompassing more than 2,000 hospitals. Since inception, we have powered over 5.6 million telehealth visits for our clients, including more than 2.9 million in the six months ended June 30, 2020.

Healthcare today faces many challenges. Choice and access can be limited, care delivery is fragmented and inefficient, and costs continue to rise and shift to consumers while health outcomes have not improved. The healthcare industry is evolving to meet these challenges with innovative care models and new regulatory frameworks to promote more effective outcomes. As healthcare’s key stakeholders demand innovative technology solutions that streamline care delivery, lower costs, expand access and improve outcomes, we believe there is significant opportunity for transformation.

We believe Amwell makes this digital care transformation possible for the healthcare ecosystem. The Amwell Platform enables care delivery across the full healthcare continuum – from primary and urgent care in the home to high acuity specialty consults, such as telestroke and telepsychiatry, in the hospital. We support both on-demand and scheduled consultations and offer 40 pre-packaged care modules and programs that power over 100 unique use cases today. Our platform can be fully embedded into our clients’ patient/member portals and provider workflows. Providers can launch telehealth directly from their native EHRs, with seamless integration to their payer eligibility and claims systems. Providers, patients and members can access this care through a full range of Carepoints, including via mobile, web, phone and our proprietary kiosks and carts that support multi-way video, phone or secure messaging interactions. As of June 30, 2020, over 50,000 of our clients’ providers use the Amwell Platform to serve their patients and members. When needed, we augment and extend our clients’ clinical capabilities with AMG, a nationwide clinical network of over 5,000 multi-disciplinary providers covering 50 states with 24/7/365 coverage.

Amwell exists to empower healthcare’s leading players, who have earned the deep trust of their patients and members over decades, and does not aim to compete with or replace them. We help our clients white-label and embed telehealth within their existing healthcare offerings for their patients and members. Thus we enable our provider customers to offer a seamless experience that blends online convenience when needed with in-person care by known, trusted providers as part of a complete care program that offers patients continuity of care. In this way, providers can use our telehealth platform as an effective augmentation and not a replacement of their traditional care delivery.

 

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Our digital care solution delivers value across the healthcare ecosystem, including, for example:

 

   

Patients needing treatment for minor conditions can be seen same day and save an average of 2.5 hours compared to office visits, while those with acute or chronic conditions can be treated in clinics or in their homes while their physicians receive expert care guidance from specialists.

 

   

Physicians can practice medicine from home offices as well as from clinical locations, enabling them to work on flexible schedules. In more rural locations, providers can avoid significant “windshield time” spent driving among clinical outpost locations to treat patients.

 

   

We believe health systems are able to improve clinical pathways, more effectively manage resources across their network and improve provider quality of life by allowing remote treatments. Telehealth can offer significant protection to healthcare workers through online triage and efficient patient transfers, as well as help mitigate the impact of infectious disease. Health systems are better equipped to acquire and retain customers in an increasingly competitive marketplace that demands convenient care.

 

   

Health plans and their employer clients utilize our platform to manage healthcare costs and deliver better health outcomes by expanding their care networks to fill gaps in care, shifting care to lower-cost settings and coordinating care more effectively across underutilized resources.

 

   

Healthcare innovator companies such as Philips, Apple, and Cerner, have used our platform to develop and deliver novel telehealth services and products. Our platform allows this ecosystem of companies to create differentiated healthcare offerings by forming unique partnerships together, further increasing the reach and integration of their products and services.

We have experienced significant growth since our inception. We derive our revenue from multiple stakeholders, including health systems, health plans, government clients and healthcare innovators. We monetize the value of our platform and services in the form of recurring platform subscription fees, usage-based clinical fees and related hardware and services fees. In 2019, 84.0% of our revenue was on a recurring basis.

Our revenue was $114.0 million and $148.9 million for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2019, respectively, representing a year-over-year growth rate of 30.6%. We incurred net losses of $52.3 million and $88.4 million for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2019, respectively.

Our revenue was $69.1 million and $122.3 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2020, respectively, representing a year-over-year growth rate of 77%. We incurred net losses of $41.6 million and $113.4 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019 and 2020, respectively.

 

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LOGO

Recent Developments

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a massive impact on our clients and, as a result, created significant needs and opportunities for Amwell to partner with them to help solve their most critical challenges. Key among these developments have been:

 

   

Significant reduction of regulatory and reimbursement barriers for telehealth, including:

 

   

removing the originating site restrictions for fee for service Medicare that kept telehealth confined to rural clinical facilities rather than patient homes;

 

   

expansion of Medicare and commercial reimbursement for telehealth often at parity with brick and mortar services, often with $0 co-pay, and;

 

   

easing of state licensure policies for providers, enabling more providers to serve patients in more states.

 

   

Rapid demand increase for on-demand remote access to providers for COVID-19 symptom assessment and referral as needed to hospital or testing facilities.

 

   

A surge in scheduled visit volume, especially among health systems, as administrators seek to protect healthcare workers from patients who may be infected with coronavirus, and to enable patients, especially the elderly and vulnerable, to receive ongoing care for conditions not related to COVID-19, while adhering to “stay at home” orders.

As a result of these developments, for the three months ended June 30, 2020, Amwell has seen average monthly visit volumes and average monthly active providers delivering healthcare on our platform increase over 300% and 400%, respectively, versus the averages for these metrics only three months earlier for the same period ended March 31, 2020.

Moreover, utilization of our platform to deliver care during the COVID-19 crisis increased dramatically, evident by our clients’ own providers accounting for 77% of the 2.2 million total visits performed on the Amwell Platform during the three months ended June 30, 2020, versus 50% of the over 700 thousand visits for the three month period ended March 31, 2020. We view this rapid embrace of healthcare delivery by a patient’s own doctor as evidence that doctors are increasingly using telemedicine to reach their patient population, patients are

 

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amenable to receiving care by their doctor virtually, and overall, providers and patients within the Amwell ecosystem are increasingly receiving care virtually on the Amwell Platform. While the COVID-19 crisis is a unique event, we believe that utilization of the Amwell Platform will remain at higher levels after the crisis versus levels previously forecasted before the crisis.

Visits in April 2020 were as high as over 40,000 per day, versus approximately 2,900 visits per day in April 2019 and the highest daily levels only two months earlier of 5,500 in January and February 2020. In spite of average daily visits in April 2020 at 10x the volume and the number of active providers delivering care at 9x, in both cases versus April 2019, average wait times remained under 10 minutes. For additional information, see “Business—Case Studies.”

Due to the quarantine and isolation strategies employed by governmental authorities, health systems and health plans to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic, a significant portion of healthcare was forced to be delivered virtually. Our health plan and health system customers believe that overall utilization of telemedicine and care delivered virtually will continue to increase during and after the COVID-19 crisis. By partnering with our customers during the crisis, we understand the increased volume and additional types of care they intend to deliver virtually on our platform. We originally expected this increase in volume, evolution and advancement of telemedicine usage to occur over the next few years but we have now adjusted our research and development strategies to match the views of our customer partners, thus accelerating the expansion of our platform volume capacity and the development of additional functionality through new programs and modules.

 

LOGO

 

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LOGO

Although the COVID-19 pandemic has led to the relaxation of certain regulatory and reimbursement barriers, it is uncertain how long the relaxed policies will remain in effect, and there can be no guarantee that once the COVID-19 pandemic is over that such restrictions will not be reinstated or changed in a way that adversely affects our business. For many health care companies engaging in telehealth, the most significant potential concern about returning to the status quo is that restrictions on the reimbursement of telehealth visits to Medicare beneficiaries, such as when a patient presents to a medical professional from a rural area or at a clinical site, could be re-imposed.

Currently, AMG, our affiliated provider group, does not perform these kinds of consultations. As such, all patients who experienced a first-time visit with AMG during the pandemic would be able to continue using the platform. In light of that, we do not believe that the visit volume on our platform or visit revenue will materially decrease based on a return to the status quo from a regulatory perspective. In fact, we believe that such a return would benefit us as the renewed enforcement of HIPAA regulations may force many marginal telehealth platforms out of the marketplace, thereby lessening our competition.

Our Industry Opportunities

Healthcare today is inefficient, expensive, complicated and fragmented – resulting in substantial challenges for providers, health plans, and patients. We believe telehealth is central to overcoming these key structural challenges, which include:

Solving the Access Crisis Driven by Provider Shortages and Inefficient Resource Allocation

Access to appropriate care is one of the most significant issues facing America’s healthcare system today, with shortages in primary and specialist care impacting both urban and rural communities alike. More than 80 million Americans live in primary care shortage areas and the average wait time for new patient primary care provider appointments reached 29 days in 2017 according to a Merritt Hawkins report. These extended wait times can result in adverse outcomes such as rapid declines in condition, patients foregoing necessary care or a lost opportunity for effective treatment altogether.

The access shortage is a significant issue in the case of specialty care as well. For example, there are not enough neurologists in the U.S. to meet demand, and this shortage is projected to worsen over the next several years. Transferring a patient from a local hospital to a neurologist-staffed medical facility drives up costs and often consumes the therapeutic window for effective treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke to minimize

 

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long-term disability or avert death. In addition, according to the Merritt Hawkins report, 77% of U.S. counties reported a severe psychiatrist shortage in 2017, and the average wait time for an initial psychiatric visit in 2015 was 25 days according to a National Center for Biotechnology Information study.

This access crisis extends to both urban and rural areas, with rural communities particularly affected. The North Carolina Rural Health Research Program reports that from 2010 to 2020 more than 125 rural hospitals in 33 states have closed, with 55% of the U.S. population living designated health professional shortage areas.

These access issues are particularly exacerbated during natural disasters and adverse health events, such as the recent emergence of COVID-19. This recent pandemic illustrates how quickly local clinical resources can be overwhelmed without access to broader support across a state or nationwide basis.

Telehealth can address many of these issues. It enables the efficient allocation of primary, urgent and acute care by overcoming barriers to access. Patients are able to conveniently access care at a time that suits them without the burden of potentially long travel times. Hospitals are empowered to connect in real-time with specialists at major medical centers to help diagnose and optimize a course of treatment. For example, a remote specialist can conduct a rapid clinical assessment and make treatment recommendations to a local provider team during the critical treatment window for stroke, or a pool of behavioral health specialists can cover critical ED needs across an entire state.

Addressing Increasing Healthcare Costs for All Key Stakeholders

Healthcare expenditures in the United States more than doubled from $1.3 trillion to $3.6 trillion from 2000 to 2018 according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (“CMS”), with increasing costs impacting individuals, employers and health systems. In 2019, the average family premium for employer health insurance was $20,576, representing a 54% increase over the last decade, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. During the same time period, the average employee premium contribution has risen by 71% to approximately $6,015. Health systems have also faced their own challenges. According to a Navigant study, health system operating margins declined by 39% between 2015 and 2017 as margins were impacted by reimbursement pressures coupled with increases in their cost structure.

To mitigate these rising costs, telehealth can play a central role in helping the healthcare industry adapt. Telehealth visits can address the demand from health plans, health systems and consumers for cost-efficient solutions for care, in particular for low acuity episodes. For example, an Amwell urgent care telehealth visit typically costs $79 before insurance compared to the cost of an in-person Urgent Care visit of $100-$150 and an ED visit of $1,389. As a result, health plans typically offer urgent care telehealth as a covered benefit at the same or lower co-pay as office visits, while some plans may feature $0 co-pay telehealth visits. Meanwhile, health systems can also deploy telehealth to deliver operational efficiencies including better utilization of resources such as improved load balancing and distribution of care, as well as the reduction or even elimination of travel times for care providers.

In 2017, the Congressional Budget Office concluded that expanding telehealth coverage for Medicare recipients would be budget neutral for the federal government. During the COVID-19 crisis and ensuing Public Health Emergency, Congress and CMS rapidly removed regulatory barriers to delivering telehealth to Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries, including but not limited to requirements that beneficiaries be at a medical facility located in a rural area at the time of the telehealth appointment. Although the COVID-19 pandemic has led to the relaxation of certain regulatory and reimbursement barriers, it is uncertain how long the relaxed policies will remain in effect, and there can be no guarantee that once the COVID-19 pandemic is over that such restrictions will not be reinstated or changed in a way that adversely affects our business.

Promoting Greater Coordination of Care

Over 60% of hospital revenue will come from value-based care models by 2021, according to an L.E.K. Consulting report. Value-based care reimbursement models require managing patient populations to optimize site

 

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of care, organize transitions, alleviate inappropriate utilization and minimize readmissions. Many low-cost options for patients may fail to establish the required long-term healthcare connections to enable these models. Fragmented provider ecosystems that utilize multiple third-party or in-house solutions lack integration across clinical, operational and financial workflows, which can obstruct the necessary care coordination to meet these requirements. Disorganized and confusing treatment plans combined with conflicting guidance resulting from siloed information can lead to consumer frustration and sub-optimal outcomes.

To adapt to these new innovative models of care delivery, health systems and health plans seek enterprise-wide telehealth platforms to scale across their organizations. By improving how care is coordinated both within and beyond the four walls of the traditional healthcare practice, health systems and health plans are better able to identify and close gaps in care, resulting in better outcomes. In addition, care teams who treat complex patient cases can use scheduling, multi-way video, secure messaging and warm transfer capabilities to coordinate across numerous specialties while eliminating travel for both patients and providers.

Optimizing Patient Experience to Drive Recruitment and Retention

The structural limitations of the healthcare system have not evolved to keep pace with consumer preferences for effective, convenient and transparent healthcare options. At the same time, as value-based care reimbursement models become more prevalent, the value of attracting and retaining patients is increasing. A patient’s current lifetime value to a health system is approximately $1.4 million, according to NRC Health. As a result, health systems and health plans are focused on employing technology-enabled solutions to attract patients and close gaps in clinical offerings that may result in low patient satisfaction, negative brand perception or patient leakage. Telehealth drives initial patient recruitment and converts them to longer term customers, including higher acuity healthcare services. For example, health systems use telehealth to deliver primary care online to target the 25% of adults that according to one study are without a primary care physician relationship in the United States as of 2015. We believe that access to telehealth has become an expected health plan benefit in the job market. By extending a health system or health plan’s brand beyond their traditional settings, telehealth can offer convenient and timely access through a broad range of access points, improving the ability of these stakeholders to recruit and retain their patients or members.

Our Solution

To capture these opportunities, we believe clients are seeking a comprehensive solution to support their connected care goals and consolidate unintegrated vendors and in-house designed solutions.

 

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LOGO

One Platform, Powering the Care Continuum

The Amwell Platform is a scalable, secure telehealth platform that supports a full range of telehealth functionality. The Amwell Platform consists of the Home line (provider-to-patient telehealth interactions, typically in the home) and the Hospital line (supporting provider-to-provider telehealth interactions, or provider-to-patient, typically in an inpatient or ambulatory setting). Our enterprise solution offers clients the ability to implement and quickly expand their telehealth offerings across many areas of clinical practice. Our platform is a highly configurable, white-labeled infrastructure that enables clients to deliver telehealth under their own brands and with their own providers. We offer a full range of management software, clinical workflows, CarepointTM hardware and system integrations to deliver care across many modalities, including video, phone and secure messaging. Our platform is designed to support the continuum of care by offering the specific workflows and device solutions needed to deliver this care.

 

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LOGO

Our open architecture allows the Amwell Platform to connect to existing systems, devices and access endpoints and to embed telehealth into our clients’ workflows. Our SDKs enable access to a broad set of APIs to offer clients the ability to integrate, embed and customize telehealth across their digital domains, including:

 

   

Patient access points such as white-labeled web and mobile apps, 24-hour nurse and customer support lines and customer applications, such as patient or member “digital front doors”;

 

   

Provider access points, such as EHR systems, including Cerner, Epic and more. Clinicians can launch telehealth visits from within their EHRs, add records of new patients acquired via telehealth and share consult data through our bidirectional integrations; and

 

   

Administrative functions such as enrollment, clinical management, payment, eligibility and claims administration, e-prescribing, follow-up and data interchange.

 

LOGO

The Amwell Platform is designed to quickly launch and remotely implement telehealth offerings for our clients and grow with them as they broaden their digital offerings through additional modules for a wide variety of use cases. Health systems typically begin with either urgent care or an acute use case, such as telestroke or telepsychiatry, and subsequently add modules for areas such as scheduled specialty follow-up visits, virtual rounding, school-based services and more. Health plans typically begin with an urgent care service and later add behavioral health or other services designed to support the needs of their employer clients, such as breastfeeding support, EAP therapy or nutrition services. In emergency situations, such as natural disasters or the recent

 

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COVID-19 pandemic, our clients can start new practices and see patients using our telehealth solution in a matter of days.

We have designed the Amwell Platform to be intuitive and convenient for both patients and providers:

 

   

Patients—For patient-initiated on-demand visits, patients can either choose a specific provider or elect to see the next available physician. For scheduled visits, patients are guided through pre-visit readiness assessments and reminded to log in at the time of the visit. In addition, patients can enroll themselves and their dependents, enter their medical history, check insurance coverage and select video or phone visits. Post visit, patients can access their visit record or share it with other providers in their care team. The Amwell Platform is rated an average of 4.8 out of 5 stars by patients on all health system and health plan platforms, as well as our direct-to-consumer platform, and has achieved an average NPS score of 56 across our clients’ various branded services for the full-year period ended December 31, 2019.

 

   

Providers—The Amwell Platform is designed to deliver an easy-to-use provider experience via web or mobile application. Providers access familiar workflows for taking notes, prescribing, referencing clinical treatment guidelines and alerts for gaps in care or referral protocols. Importantly, many of our modules can be initiated directly from within a provider’s EHR system, creating a seamless experience and reducing redundant data entry.

Carepoints Enable a Variety of Clinical Settings

Patients and members access our platform through a wide variety of Carepoints. These Carepoints include not only patient and provider supplied devices for app-based access over web, mobile and phone, but also a full range of purpose-built devices for use in clinical settings. Our proprietary cart-based and kiosk Carepoints enable providers to deliver digital care into clinical care locations, such as the ED and clinics, as well as into community settings such as retail stores, community centers, employer sites, skilled nursing facilities and schools. These devices are built to rigorous safety and clinical standards and have advanced features including far-end camera controls, fleet monitoring and connectivity to a variety of diagnostic scopes and examination tools. We are also developing home-based and hospital-based Carepoints that easily connect to existing TVs to deliver digital health services at home or in the hospital room. Our Carepoints support a range of modalities including multi-way video, phone connectivity and secure messaging to bring care teams to patients and members in the most efficient way possible.

In addition to our 150 health system clients who have purchased the Amwell Platform, we have sold our Carepoints to 300 additional health systems independent of the platform. We believe there is an opportunity to upsell the Amwell Platform into our Carepoint-only customers.

 

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LOGO

Value-Added Services

We offer a full suite of paid, supporting services to our clients to enable their telehealth offerings. AMG is a 24/7/365 nationwide provider group with care capabilities that have been accredited with NCQA and URAC Telehealth Accreditation Program. AMG employs more than 5,000 providers across primary and urgent care, behavioral health therapy, acute psychiatry, lactation counseling and nutrition to provide licensed, reimbursable medical staffing for digital care delivery to our clients. Clients can utilize AMG for staffing needs where they either do not employ full-time physicians, or as a bridge to facilitate the adoption of their telehealth programs among their own physicians over time. AMG can be used to augment provider capacity during nights, weekends or times of high demand, fill gaps in specialist coverage in acute hospital settings and enables expanded geographic coverage in cases where state-level licensing requirements restrict the ability of our clients’ own physicians to treat patients outside of their own geographic locations. Additionally, we provide professional services to facilitate telehealth implementation, workflow design, systems integration and service expansion. To help our clients promote adoption and utilization, we offer highly effective patient and provider engagement services through our internal digital engagement agency.

Our Value Proposition

We provide differentiated value to our clients by enabling them to deepen their relationships with new and existing patients, members and employees through improved care access, cost and quality:

For Health Systems

We enable the telehealth services of 150 of the nation’s largest health systems, encompassing more than 2,000 hospitals. In addition, we support nurse and onsite clinic providers, skilled nursing facilities, schools and post-acute care centers. Health systems typically use their Amwell Platform to:

 

   

Attract and retain patients—Competition for new patients is increasing. The Amwell Platform empowers our health system clients to deliver convenient, mobile, digital access for their patients to high quality care in the right place at the right time, improving their ability to attract patients. Health

 

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systems must also retain patients to maximize revenue and demonstrate value to health plan partners. Our hospital-branded telehealth programs improve the ability of a health system to engage with patients with specialty care across a wider geographic area than their brick and mortar footprint, thereby avoiding them leaking to alternate sites of care, such as retail or urgent care.

 

   

Improve care delivery—Amwell enables our provider clients to offer more timely and appropriate access to care by balancing provider supply with demand and maintaining engagement with patients across their entire system. Our clients are able to treat patients in a low-cost, most clinically appropriate setting. For example, a pool of telehealth-enabled neurologists can intervene in critical cases across a network instead of one facility. These rapid interventions can significantly improve care outcomes in clinical services such as telestroke by bringing this care directly into EDs via our Carepoints. AMG can also complement our providers’ existing telehealth offerings with flexible staffing solutions, after hours availability, inter-state reach and access to needed specialists.

 

   

Mobilize care in times of need—Our digital care distribution platform offers important benefits to health system clients during periods of increased demand, such as natural disasters or disease epidemics. During the recent COVID-19 pandemic, the Amwell Platform allowed our clients’ physicians to treat patients remotely, triaging cases and helping to curb the spread of infection by reducing the need for unnecessary physical interactions. As health systems needed more providers, AMG was rapidly deployed in our clients’ existing telehealth programs to expand nationwide capacity and reach.

 

   

Directly integrate and embed within the EHR and clinical workflows—Amwell may be embedded directly into the EHR and clinical workflows, improving the overall provider and patient experience. During such a visit, the patient’s full medical history is available to the provider via the EHR, improving the provider’s ability to diagnose and treat the patient. Video consults can be launched directly from the EHR and telehealth consultation records are automatically synched with the EHR. Patients can also launch visits directly from “digital front door” care portals for a consistent experience. These integrations support clinical quality, care continuity and accountability and reduce administrative burdens.

 

   

Improve provider experience—Over 50,000 of our clients’ own providers are active on the Amwell Platform. We deliver user-friendly technology to improve telehealth adoption. We believe health systems use our tools to attract and retain provider talent by enabling them to practice at the top of their license and by improving the work/life balance of their care providers.

 

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LOGO

For Health Plans

We power the digital care programs of 55 health plans whose clients include over 36,000 employers and who represent more than 80 million covered lives. Health plans use their Amwell Platform to:

 

   

Attract and retain employers and members—Our white-labeled telehealth infrastructure allows health plan clients to offer embedded telehealth solutions into their existing member-facing programs for a differentiated customer experience. Health plans choose programs specific to the needs of their individual populations at implementation and add new programs over time. By offering an integrated, customized telehealth offering, we believe health plans are better able to attract and retain employers and members. 

 

   

Deliver greater access, cost savings and improve health outcomes—Health plan members have access to timely and effective care when and where they need it. Health plan clients can offer targeted programs such as sleep management, smoking cessation or counseling to specific populations to efficiently manage healthcare costs. By integrating with health plan claims and gaps in care data, we can also help health plans more accurately assess patient risk, prompt providers at the time of care and address care gaps with patients.

 

   

Utilize existing in-network providers more effectively—We help health plans bring existing in-network providers and member-facing services on to their telehealth programs to improve care access. Our tools enable automated provider enrollment for rapid provider background checks and credentialing. These integrated provider networks extend the reach of care and help health plans achieve better outcomes at reduced costs for their members.

 

   

Optimize provider network design—Health plan clients can leverage telehealth to meet adequacy requirements for government programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid, while also supporting other health plan models, such as narrow network programs that have smaller pools of affiliated providers. When needed we supplement health plan provider networks with additional services via AMG as well as the ability to create unique partnerships across the existing provider ecosystem on our platform.

 

   

Enable innovative care delivery models—Our technology platform enables health plan clients to deliver innovative care models focused on effective care coordination. Amwell is developing a digital

 

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tools program to deliver specific care workflow solutions in areas such as digital primary care, providing health plans with the ability to serve sub-segments of their member populations. This digital tools program supports AI-enabled patient triage and tools to create Centers of Excellence within health plans, allowing them to present their best performing providers as a channel for referrals.

Healthcare Innovators

Amwell partners with healthcare innovators to design, develop and deliver new services and products over our Amwell Platform. We work with remote monitoring device makers, such as Philips, to deliver targeted programs for chronic disease management and sleep therapy. Our partnership with TytoCare powers an affordable home kit for patient-driven medical exams as part of a primary or urgent care visit. We also supported the Apple Heart Study conducted by Stanford University and published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The Apple Heart Study was the largest clinical trial ever conducted, with over 400,000 consumers sharing Apple Watch heart rate data to detect atrial fibrillation which AMG physicians would follow up and then refer patients to emergency care as needed. We believe the flexibility of the Amwell Platform enables healthcare innovators to rethink healthcare and improve outcomes for patients. While innovators accounted for less than 10% of our revenue in 2019 and therefore are not material to our overall results, we intend to further develop our relationships with innovators over time as an important part of our strategy.

The Power of Our Connected Exchange Ecosystem

Our Amwell Platform enables our individual client platforms to interconnect across the platform and benefit from shared clinical services or programs offered by another client on the Amwell “Exchange”. A few of our clients have begun to use this capability. For example, Anthem distributes Cleveland Clinic services across several states, while Nemours offers its pediatric specialties nationwide. We also have health system clients developing digital programs to address diabetes and oncology needs. We believe that the value of the Amwell ecosystem grows for all clients as new clients join in, enabling healthcare’s leading brands to distribute these programs and services and leading to the creation of Centers of Excellence on the Amwell Platform.

Our Market Opportunity

Core U.S. Digital Care Market

We believe the annual total addressable market for our solutions is substantial and increasing. We estimate the current subscription revenue market opportunity for health plan and health system customers to be approximately $8.7 billion and $3.7 billion, respectively. Subscription revenue consists of all platform-related fees for a health plan or health system including subscription licenses, per member per month (“PMPM”) charges, fees related to software modules or clinical programs, and overage charges. There are over 290 million lives enrolled in insurance plans that we have identified as potential subscribers to our platform. We have also identified 802 health systems who would potentially benefit from the Amwell Platform. For AMG, we estimate the urgent care visit revenue market opportunity to be approximately $18.2 billion. According to a 2016 report from the Centers for Disease Control, there are approximately 883 million ambulatory care visits in the United States per year. We believe that 35% of these visits could be treated through telehealth, representing over 309 million telehealth visits annually. We estimate the telepsychiatry visit revenue market opportunity for AMG to be approximately $3.9 billion. The CDC reports annual ED visits of 139 million in the United States, of which, according to a study by USC in 2019, 10% relate to psychiatric and mental health complaints that we believe could be addressed through telehealth visits.

Additional Digital Care Market Opportunities

We intend to grow our addressable market through continued expansion into market adjacencies that we believe represent a significant opportunity to serve millions of additional potential patients and members.

 

   

Medicare and Medicaid—There are 60 million Medicare enrollees today. Recent legislation such as the CONNECT Health Act of 2019 and the Mental Health Telemedicine Expansion, as well as recent

 

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regulatory developments related to the COVID-19 pandemic, such as (i) reimbursement at parity; (ii) removal of “originating site” restrictions for telehealth patients, and (iii) easing of geographic licensing restrictions for clinicians; create the potential for much broader Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement for digital care. Home dialysis, stroke-related digital care, mental health and telehealth as a basic benefit for Medicare Advantage patients all represent areas of potential reimbursement expansion.

 

   

Government—Government clients represent an addressable market that includes multiple state and federal agencies and departments. We believe significant growth opportunities exist across the Military Health System and the Defense Health Agency which provide care for over 9.4 million beneficiaries. Amwell has already deployed a program with the Defense Health Agency at Naval Hospital Jacksonville.

 

   

International—We have deployed our platform internationally and enabled some of our U.S.-based clients to expand their capabilities globally. Meuhedet, the third largest HMO in Israel, leverages the Amwell Platform to transform healthcare delivery with its more than one million members. Meuhedet offers a hybrid plan: many Meuhedet providers are available via telehealth and patients start with our digital tools program – dramatically lowering facilities costs and improving patient convenience. We believe there is significant international opportunity for telehealth and we intend to assess specific opportunities through our strategic investors, such as Fosun in China and Allianz in Europe.

 

   

Clinical Partnerships—Our partnership with Cleveland Clinic powers a first-of-its-kind initiative to drive clinical innovation and new care delivery options in close partnership with leading providers. This joint venture has launched with a Second Opinion service that connects patients and their local providers with Cleveland Clinic specialists; and could expand to other health systems, each contributing insight into new telehealth programs, capabilities and technology. We believe these partnerships enable Amwell to lead telehealth innovation.

Our Competitive Strengths

Enabling Our Clients to Deliver the Continuum of Care

Our platform enables our clients to utilize their own provider networks to digitally distribute treatment to their patients and members across the continuum of care. This capability was demonstrated most clearly during the recent COVID-19 crisis, when our health system and health plan clients were able to deploy tens of thousands of their own providers onto their telehealth platforms. As of June 30, 2020, over 50,000 of our clients’ own providers address their patients’ needs, from primary care, the management of chronic care and specialist visits. We offer provider training, outreach and success services to drive increased patient acquisition and retention, appropriate utilization and better outcomes. We believe our ability to provide our clients with a platform that allows them to utilize their own trusted providers and networks differentiates us within our industry.

Flexible and Scalable Suite of Solutions

Our scalable platform allows us to grow with the digital care delivery needs of our clients. Most clients start by providing a single use case, such as urgent care, or start with a subset of their members or patients, such as employer administrative services. As our clients expand their digital care delivery solutions, they can add modules that support additional specialists or specific use cases across broader patient and/or member populations. Our products are currently available in more than 40 modules or programs that offer the necessary workflows to deliver care across over 100 individual use cases with a consistent look and feel for each client. In addition to clients increasing their telemedicine use cases over time, they tend to expand their use of Carepoints including our proprietary high-acuity carts and kiosks as well as consumer devices. As we expand our capabilities, our module, program and Carepoint-based approach allows us to partner with clients that are new to telehealth as well as with rapidly expanding telehealth market leaders.

 

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Client-Branded, Embedded Digital Experiences

Our configurable Amwell Platform and its associated SDKs and APIs encourages our clients to white-label and deploy telehealth programs under their own brands, unlike other telehealth players who promote programs under their own names. Our differentiated approach empowers our clients to advance the look, feel and trust associated with their market-leading brands while we provide the core technology and clinical support to enable quality patient and member care. We are aligned with clients and partner to build tailored digital care distribution programs instead of competing with them for their patients.

 

LOGO

Platform Integration That Provides for the Efficient Delivery of Digital Care

We enable digital care distribution to be integrated into existing care pathways and workflows rather than as a separate experience. Our proprietary SDKs, APIs and system integrations enable clients to embed telehealth into existing workflows utilized by providers and patients, while minimizing the administrative needs of our health system and health plan clients. Our platform is provided directly within or synchronized with our providers’ EHR systems, including Cerner and Epic, as well as through the mobile apps, 24-hour nurse and customer support lines and “digital front doors” that patients and members access. We also integrate with back end systems to streamline administrative functions such as enrollment, clinical management, payment, claims administration, e-prescribing, follow-up and data interchanges such as PACS systems. For our clients, this functionality eases administrative burdens and supports physician workflows. For patients and members, our embedded functionality simplifies digital care delivery directly into the portals and systems those individuals are already utilizing. Through our integration capabilit